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Summer 2014

Incubator Jon Goulder at JamFactory Trade Fairs Cologne / Paris / Stockholm Talking Business TAIT Scrapbook Sixhands

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editors’ letter A

the essential ingredients for success in a tough market – ideas, risk, adaptability and perseverance.

t Furnishing International our commitment is to the furnishing industry in Australia. We are here to examine what is and isn’t working for Australian brands, yet we also look outwards to the global marketplace that defines the breadth and depth of the sector we represent. Compiling this issue, it has been interesting to reflect on the many layers of activity that must positively align for business to evolve and for designers and manufacturers to chart a successful course through the changing currents that often redefine the landscape around us. Looking internationally we’ve created a new section selecting the best products launching globally at key trade fairs. The level of output and sheer scale of these events defines them as the engine rooms of this transnational industry, and a vital consideration for local brands seeking new market channels. Our new section on materials reveals that leading designers are searching for a simple, honest, textural and ethical palette. Shunning gloss for a design language composed on considered elements. For our cover story we visit Jon Goulder, celebrated designer and maker as he takes over the reins of the furniture studio at Adelaide’s JamFactory. Goulder pulls no punches as he reflects on the role of education and the value of incubating young talent in preparing the sector for the future. Goulder’s opinions, based on tough lessons and personal trial and error provide a great segue to our interviews with two of Australia’s most innovative and successful furnishing brands – Street & Garden Furniture Co. and TAIT. Both interviews emphasise the critical role that design can play in creating a competitive market advantage, whilst highlighting the essential ingredients for success in a tough market – ideas, risk, adaptability and perseverance. Looking through it all, it is hard not to feel that Australia’s market is at once mature and dynamic. We must all work hard to make the most of what we have.

Ewan McEoin and Linda Cheng


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Interiors


Contents 14

Show Season

Summer 2014

38

Capacity

We head to Paris, Cologne and Stockholm for trade show season, exploring new trends,

The Patriarch

innovations and inspirations from European powerhouses of furnishing design.

David Shaw, director of Street & Garden, is the godfather of one of the most successful design-led brands in Australia. He is setting his sights on an even bigger market.

32

46

Talking Business With TAIT Outdoor and BSeated Global.

Incubator

58

Scrapbook Sydney-based textile design studio

Designer-maker Jon Goulder talks to Furnishing International about his new

Sixhands share their inspirations,

role as creative director of the furniture studio at Adelaide’s JamFactory and

influences and most idolised possessions.

his plans for shaking up the industry.

64

69 New Products

78 News and Events

Materials We take a peek inside two design studio’s materials sample library for an inside guide on the materials they can’t wait to use on that special project.

Cover image: Jon Goulder in his furniture making studio. (Photo: Bo Wong)


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Founder/Publisher Peter Zapris peter@furnishinginternational.com Editor-in-Chief Ewan McEoin editor@furnishinginternational.com Deputy Editor Linda Cheng editor@furnishinginternational.com Graphic Design Change Creative (Phillips Hentri) mail@changecreative.com.au Printing Ellikon – Print • People • Planet ellikon.com.au Contributing Writer Katie O’Brien Contributing Photographers Scottie Cameron, Mark Chew, Florian Groehn, Stephanie McCleod, Michael Wee, Bo Wong General Manager George Iliadis george@furnishinginternational.com Subscriptions Manager Natalie Tshaikiwksy subscriptions@furnishinginternational.com Advertising Enquiries George Iliadis Phone: (+61 3) 9417 9399 Fax: (+61 3) 9417 3981
 Mobile: (+61) 400 519 218 george@furnishinginternational.com Ellikon Publishing 384 George Street
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Furnishing International accepts freelance contributions; however there is no guarantee that unsolicited manuscripts, artwork or photographs will be used or returned. The entire contents of Furnishing International are copyright and may not be reproduced in any form, either in whole or in part, without written permission from the publisher. While the publisher makes every effort to be accurate regarding the publication of advertisements, it should be noted that Furnishing International does not endorse any advertised product or service. Viewpoints and opinions expressed in Furnishing International are those of the authors. The publisher accepts no responsibility for the information supplied or changes subsequent to the date of publication. Furnishing International is printed at a ISO 9001 Quality Accredited and ISO 14001 Certified green print facility and on paper sourced from sustainable forests. The Publisher of Furnishing International promotes environmentally responsible, socially equitable and economically sustainable practices.


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Inspiration — CECILIA NYBERG, STOCKHOLM FURNITURE & LIGHT FAIR


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TRADE FAIRS: IMM COLOGNE

Show Season THE FIRST FEW MONTHS OF THE YEAR ARE TOUGH. THERE’S THE POST CHRISTMAS AND NEW YEARS RECOVERY AND WE START HEADING BACK TO WORK, SETTLING INTO THE OLD FAMILIAR ROUTINE. BUT FOR THE INTERNATIONAL TRADE FAIR CALENDAR, THE FIRST TWO MONTHS OF THE YEAR ARE ABSOLUTELY MANIC. IF YOU’RE BASED IN EUROPE DURING THIS TIME YOU CAN HAVE YOUR PICK OF THE CROP, GETTING ACCESS TO THE MOST RECENT PRODUCTS AND TRENDS, DIVING DEEP INTO THE BUSINESS AND NETWORKING OF IT ALL. BUT FOR MOST OF US IT’S A LONG WAY TO TRAVEL. TO HELP YOU OUT WE’VE LOOKED AT THREE RECENT TRADE FAIRS – PROVING THAT EACH IS A DESIGN PILGRIMAGE WELL WORTH THE TREK. Reports by Katie O’Brien

Imm Cologne

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he 65th imm Cologne launched the 2014 trade fair circuit presenting the latest international furniture and interior trends with a strong business focus underpinning the weekly events. Delighting over 120,000 patrons from the 13–19 January and partnering with the Living Interiors event, “the increased number of visitors from abroad underlines the importance of the export industry for our exhibitors,” said Katharina C. Hamma, CEO of event organiser, Koelnmesse. A multifaceted program complemented the comprehensive range of exhibitors with an extensive lineup of business-focused events, including a Global Networking Lounge and

Summer Issue 2014

Furniture Club to the inaugural E-Commerce Congress which discussed challenges and opportunities in the online world. Despite a business-centric program, the imm organisers created a spectacle with almost every hall housing a special exhibition, theme-based lounge or large-scale attraction. Among these was the magnificent ‘Das Haus’ living interiors program where this year, Danish furniture designer Louise Campbell was asked to conceive a domestic housing typology. Campbell’s life-size houses were positioned as if one was pushing into the other, offering it’s inhabitants a sprawling interior with the installation.

Above: Das Haus by Louise Campbell. Campbell’s vision for Das Haus annual living interiors program brings forth a space that creates harmony between its inhabitants offering an open, sprawling interior. louisecampbell.com


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TRADE FAIRS: IMM COLOGNE

imm trends this year suggested a global mix of aesthetics with a hint of Romanticism. Harmonious shapes and warm colours were prominent with personalised home accessories an emerging theme. The growing demand for wall units focused less on storage and more on the ability to integrate electrical technology whilst bright colours made a bold return, married this time around with a spectrum of natural tones that dominated wooden furniture ranges. The next 
imm Cologne will be held from
19–25 January 2015
and will see the business program grow in size and the return of popular platforms such as The D3 Contest, an international event for young creatives which in 2014 was taken out by Swiss designer Christoph Goechnahts for his ‘ordnungshalber’ (for the sake of order) shaker inspired peg rail. imm-cologne.com

Above: Ordnungshalber (for the sake of order) Peg rail by Christoph Goechnahts. A hanging storage unit adorned with wedge hooks, small shelves or boxes. christophgoe.ch

Above: Copenhagen pendant by Space Copenhagen. Danish lighting brand &Tradition has collaborated with design studio Space Copenhagen to develop ‘The Copenhagen pendant’ fusing a mix of classic and modern, maritime and industrial. spacecph.dk

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TRADE FAIRS: IMM COLOGNE

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Above: Stacked Objects by Emiel Remmelts. Objects on the shelves are used to form a dynamic composition, which defines the overall aesthetic of the furniture. emielremmelts.nl

Above: Cha teapot by Naoto Fukasawa. Cha (tea) project has transformed the ancient traditional Japanese teapot into a sophisticated modern object with multiple uses. Made from 18/10 stainless steel with a black thermoplastic handle and knob with removable internal filters. naotofukasawa.com

furnishinginternational.com


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TRADE FAIRS: MAISON&OBJET PARIS

MAISON&OBJET Paris

M

AISON&OBJET Paris brought together the world’s top professionals of home fashion, continuing the 2014 trade fair circuit 24–28 January. And in a show spanning 250,000m2 over 3000 artists, craftspeople, brands, manufacturers, importers and designers presented their collections to 80,000 visitors and a global audience of buyers and specifiers. Encompassing every facet of lifestyle and interior design, MAISON&OBJET Paris provides a business platform and networking interface, which also conveniently satisfies our everyday desire to create a ‘home sweet home’. With the 2014 show delivering a variety of highly fashionable sectors including haute couture textiles, designer lifestyles

Summer Issue 2014

and ethnic chic to name a few, the iconic fair offered everything from the everyday and ordinary to the opulent and exceptional. In an attempt to keep the event fresh, 2014 MAISON&OBJET organisers launched the cook+design studio, spotlighting the booming food sector. Resembling a contemporary brasserie, the venue played host to a packed program of revered speakers, innovative presentations and tastings, all directly related to the latest developments in luxury fashion food culture. In the biggest news of the Fair, British designer Tom Dixon claimed the highly coveted title of Designer for 2014. The award comes after the studio’s third year of exhibiting at the event and the decision was

Above: Heigh Ho by Piero Lissoni for Glasitalia. A series of aerial hanging display cases available in straight and oblique with options of a mirrored back or illuminated LED system. glasitalia.com


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TRADE FAIRS: MAISON&OBJET PARIS

applauded in design circles internationally, proving just how influential Dixon has been throughout his career. The accolade serendipitously coincided with the launch of Dixons 2014 accessories range. Heavily influenced by “steampunk” science fiction, the collection included utensils cast in solid brass referencing natural forms and engineering components. The Tom Dixon design studio reported proudly that they “will be marking the award with a special installation at the September edition of the fair in 2014”, which is sure to increase attendance to the already popular event. With so much hype and success surrounding MAISON&OBJET Paris, it comes as no surprise that the fair has expanded to two other continents. In addition to the event being hosted in the French capital once again in 2014 (5–9 September), the immediate future will see the unveiling of MAISON&OBJET Asia in Singapore (10–13 March 2014) and MAISON&OBJET Americas in Miami Beach (12–15 May 2015). maison-objet.com

Left: Paradiset Collection by Gubi. Originally designed by Swedish female modernist designer Kerstin Horlin-Holmquist in 1956 Gubi acquired the rights to re-introduce the iconic collection at imm Cologne. gubi.com

Above: T-Table by Jaime Hayon for Bosa Ceramiche. A distinctive shaped table using contrasting metallic lacquer finishes. hayonstudio.com

Summer Issue 2014

Above: New release of Matégot Trolley from original Mathieu Matégot designs by Gubi. A double-decker tea trolley with a newspaper holder fitted to the lower tray. gubi.com

Above: Tip of the Tongue Light by Michael Anastassipdes. A dedestal table light made from mouth-blown milk glass polished brass. michaelanastassiades.com


TRADE FAIRS: MAISON&OBJET PARIS

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Above: Nordic Spruce Box by Labt. This Belgian design collective creates small edition pieces of furniture and accessories. Made from stained and painted timber. labt.be Top Right: Voltaire table lamp by Gio Tirotto and Stefano Rigolli for Exnovo. Table or freestanding lamp in five variations of design and size. Made from white laser sintered polyamide. exnovo-italia.com Middle Right: Tom Dixon’s 2014 Accessories range. Two collections designed for the home. The Cog collection references industrial machine parts and tools whilst the Arc collection is science fictioninspired futuristic simplicity. Made from sand casted solid brass. tomdixon.net Below: Reversed Volumes by Mischer Traxler for PCM. These quirky vessels bear the negative impressions of the fruits and vegetables they can be used to serve. Made from food-safe, waterproof resin. pcmdesign.es

furnishinginternational.com


Home influences

10-13 MARCH 2014 SINGAPORE

MARINA BAY SANDS EXPO AND CONVENTION CENTER www.maison-objet-asia.com Visitors: Promosalons AUSTRALIA PTY LTD Tel. +61 (0) 2 9261 3322 - australia@promosalons.com

preview, © Cyril Lagel, GraphicObsession. SAFI organisation, a subsidiary of Ateliers d’Art de France and Reed Expositions France

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TRADE FAIRS: STOCKHOLM FURNITURE FAIR

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Stockholm Furniture Fair

A

ttracting architects, designers, specifiers and journalists to the Swedish capital for over 60 years, Stockholm Furniture Fair tempts design enthusiasts with a program of over 100 dynamic day- and night-time events. The year was no different, held over five days from 7–11 February.

Since it’s launch in 1951, the fair has evolved into one of the most esteemed events on the international trade fair calendar and this year’s 70,000m2 venue was visited by 35,000 people from 90 different countries. “The mood at the Fair was very good… positive signals that the industry is seeing better times and reported good business,”

said Cecilia Nyberg, Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair event manager. And with one tweet being posted every two minutes throughout the fairs duration and over 5800 photos posted on Instagram the weeklong event provided invaluable exposure for the 750 companies exhibiting their furniture, lighting and textile products.

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TRADE FAIRS: STOCKHOLM FURNITURE FAIR

Above: Ginkgo acoustic panel by Stone Designs for Bla Station Sound-absorbing wall mounted modules, which bring amazing landscapes to your indoor environment. Made from hot-pressed polyester form felt. stone-dsgns.es blastation.com Right: Rope trick lamp by Wrong for Hay A floor lamp that utilises LED technology in a design based on a simple rope mechanism. wrongforhay.com Below: Sound panels Luca Nichettos for Offecct. A series of roomadapting sound panels and space dividers. Made using recyclable felt made out of scraps from upholstery production. offecct.se

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With its rich history and refined aesthetic, 2014 sees the Scandinavian design revival continuing to build in strength with the fair’s emerging trends circulating rapidly on an international scale. The somewhat detached, impersonal aesthetic that once dominated design directions has been firmly replaced with warmth, familiarity and individuality. A mixing of old and new aesthetics referencing eras gone by, but with heavy and intentional nods to contemporary influences through materiality and technology. Natural materials, such as stone, wood and glass represented contemporary forms with an eclectic mix of timber, metal and leather continuing to appear but in innovative exciting ways. Whilst the presence of plants and green spaces continue to inspire next season’s colour map, Stockholm 2014 saw the birth of a whole new genre of furniture pieces dedicated solely to the display of greenery, foliage and flowers. The next Stockholm Furniture & Light Fair will be held on the 3–7 February, 2015 at Stockholmsmässan and it will see the return of inaugural events from this years calendar such as the successful Stockholm Design Talks seminar series and the new ‘Twelve’ platform which saw 12 established Nordic designers display their products, style and personal philosophy to an eager and willing crowd. stockholmfurniturefair.se

Top Right: Yeh wall by Kenyon Yeh for Menu. A flat pack assemblage of components with its surface and leg separated by the circular tabletop folding at a right angle to cling to the wall. kenyonyeh.com Bottom Right: Winkel w127 table lamp by BASF + Dirk Winkel for Wästberg. Adjustable table lamp with built in dimmer and timer Made with over 60% renewable material derived from castor oil and is also recyclable. wastberg.com

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TRADE FAIRS: STOCKHOLM FURNITURE FAIR


Feature Wall : flyme2themoon, Byron Bay 2013


Ideation Design Innovation It’s important for Australia to have a facility where it teaches all aspects of design, making, manufacturing, and product development. It’s important because it creates a new breed of designer-maker.

— JON GOULDER, JAMFACTORY


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Incubator.

Summer Issue 2014


FEATURE: JON GOULDER

FURNITURE MAKER, ARTIST AND PRODUCT DESIGNER, JON GOULDER HAS HAD A LONG AND CELEBRATED CAREER IN AUSTRALIA’S FURNITURE SECTOR. HE HAS TRIED HIS HAND AT MOST THINGS, INCLUDING OFFSHORE PRODUCTION; DESIGN FOR INDUSTRY; AND BESPOKE COMMISSIONS. RECENTLY, GOULDER MOVED FROM PERTH TO ADELAIDE TO LEAD AN AMBITIOUS NEW TRAJECTORY FOR THE FURNITURE STUDIO AT THE JAMFACTORY, SOUTH AUSTRALIA’S CREATIVE ARTS EDUCATION AND EXHIBITION CENTRE. WE CAUGHT UP WITH THIS MAN OF MANY TALENTS TO HEAR HIS UNIQUE INSIGHTS INTO SOLUTIONS AND STRATEGY FOR THE FUTURE OF THE SECTOR. Interview Ewan McEoin & Linda Cheng Portrait Bo Wong

Left: Jon Goulder in his furniture studio.

What is the current role of the Furniture Studio at JamFactory? I’m the Creative Director of the Furniture Studio and I also run my own practice through the JamFactory. Theses are complementary activities, so I see them as being one thing, with each informing the other in a ‘virtuous cycle’. By working in this way, I’m practising what I teach and reinforming my own practice through the pedagogical process. In the studio I work alongside six Associates, who are first year and second year. They’re from all around Australia. I also have an international intern from France. My role is to mentor the Associates toward a strong and competitive professional creative practice relevant to the furniture sector. There are a few focuses they can choose, designer-making, design as an industrial designer, or art craft. What they select to work on depends on which way they want to go out in the industry. I have to be careful not to breed clones. The Furniture Studio derives considerable value by being setup as both a teaching environment and a commercially oriented studio. My responsibilities as Creative Director include winning large-scale commissions for bespoke furniture or architectural elements, which we usually receive through architecture firms. Bringing in work is a core part of what I do. I’m also responsible for managing the workshop and the finances. Developing product is a huge responsibility, and the part of the role, which really gets me inspired. We strive to always be working on new products that can be manufactured either at the JamFactory or in local industry. How will your new role leading the Studio transform the facility and its outlook? My role here reflects the role that I play out in industry, and the mindset that I strongly advocate for other furniture manufacturers as they operate in a competitive environment. I want to bring a far stronger focus on design rather than relying on craftsmanship alone.

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Design sets products apart from one another. When coupled with exceptional craftsmanship there is significant opportunity to excel. The JamFactory already has a strong focus in design, however I will be working to expand and accelerate this. Given my experience in the industry I’m looking forward to linking up the studio with national and international opportunities for manufacturing and distribution. The Studio has traditionally been a product manufacturing and commission manufacturing based workshop. So in many ways the activity within the space (and the minds of the team) is reliant on orders or commission briefs. This is a typical Aussie mindset, to wait for someone to ask you to make something before you lift the tools. I believe we need a radical shift in mindset so that prototyping and speculative new product development is given a prominent place within the facility. In this rapidly evolving marketplace it is critical to hone skills, test ideas and learn how to conduct ourselves as professionals in a global industry as creative practitioners, not just makers. How does the studio assist emerging designers to develop specialist skills? They learn by doing. They build experience through first-hand application of skills as they respond to briefs that I write. They basically work beside me on those briefs. There is a lot of talent in South Australia and not just in making furniture. A lot of the people I am working with simply haven’t had a broad path of opportunity opened for them; I see that as my role. For example Takeshi Iue who works with Khai Liew, and John Quan. If I get my way, JamFactory will become the place to go in Australia to learn exceptional design and making skills for the furniture sector. It will also be a testing ground, accessible to manufacturers to prototype ideas and conduct product research with exceptionally talented specialists. We have a ceramics studio

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FEATURE: JON GOULDER

Above left: Limited edition Oh La La dining chair. Above right: Splay side table designed for One/Third, manufactured by Designs in Timber, distributed through Stylecraft.

upstairs capable of industrial production, we have a glass studio downstairs who are producing almost on an industrial level. Combine this skill set with furniture and metal manufacturing, all in one building with our Director Brian Parkes at the helm. It’s pretty exciting. Why is this important? It’s important for Australia to have a facility where it teaches all aspects of design, making, manufacturing, and product development. It’s important because it creates a new breed of designer-maker. Someone who can look internationally, understand materiality and innovation, a person who can collaborate effectively with industry and stimulate growth within the furniture sector by designing, prototyping and resolving products with the capacity to be produced in saleable quantities on an international market. How does the studio intersect with the broader furniture industry? It doesn’t at this point, or it hasn’t traditionally. My plan is to develop a

Summer Issue 2014

collection from the JamFactory and have it manufactured in the industry locally – the South Australian industry and distribute nationally and internationally through wellknown distribution links that I have already established. We also have an ‘open door’ policy to industry. We are very keen to work with manufacturers who are thinking about the future, how they remain competitive and grow, how they innovate. I want us to provide an R&D facility that is valuable across the whole sector. Our trajectory is to grow the people, products and projects that form the spine of a new generation approach for Australian furniture industry. Does the studio research or look at emerging technologies or materials including rare timbers or new composites? Yes we will. We’ll embrace anything that can help stimulate growth in the industry and in this sector. I’d like to look into the materials and technologies that are unique to South Australia and utilise them. But I would never restrict us to South Australia for the sake of it. At the end of the day, we have to design good product that goes to the market and sells,

which creates opportunity for the chain of people involved in that happening. What are the key forces that you see shaping the Australian furnishing industry? I think for the first time ever, we’re seeing architects and designers (A+D) specify Australian products as a preference over international imports. There is confidence coming from specifiers in the level of innovation and quality embedded in Australian designed products. This confidence has honestly taken 20 years of hard work to build. European products or replica classic chairs are not so attractive to specify anymore because they have just become far to ubiquitous and it doesn’t really contribute anything aesthetically or socially to the design process. The financial crisis also rationalised the untamed specification of European products imported from companies in Milan, London etc. Italian and international brands have become conservative, are expensive, are slow to ship and are not such an attractive proposition anymore. Australians are starting to look around at what they can specify from our own country.


FEATURE: JON GOULDER

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Above: Calypso lounge, distributed by Anibou.

Some key players in the A+D industry have been doing that and have sparked a bit of trend to specify Australian design, which has resulted in huge growth for us. This has been an informal but combined effort by many of Australia’s leading architects, small brands, designers and the design media. An incremental push, the slow but steady erosion of parochialism. This is a massive and positive tectonic shift for the furnishing sector. What business or innovation models do you think have the greatest capacity to help Australian furniture designers and manufacturers succeed and grow? The JamFactory will become the only place in Australia that teaches real-life experience as a furniture designer-maker. The universities certainly aren’t teaching that so that’s the gap we’re trying to fill. Our innovation model is to teach reality and gear designers towards industry with a total appreciation for design across the business. As with other countries, our government really needs to support industry to transition to a place where they can utilise designers

more strategically to inject new growth in the furniture-manufacturing sector. A lot of industry is unfortunately caught up in an old paradigm, an outdated way of working where they don’t embrace design (from branding, to the web, to communications and the product) and are looking inwards not outwards. Today everything needs to be designed as a total experience or you just get left behind. To enable this manufacturers need to be prepared to look and listen and to invest in their own future. A good example of this methodology is the new brand One/Third that was seed funded by Enterprise Connect with Tasmanian family company Designs in Timber (FI Winter 2013). Led by Queensland designer Alexander Loterstzain the company went through a full innovation process – new branding, new products, new communications, new distribution. The success of this project shows what can happen when you’ve got a few experienced designers with distribution links working with manufacturers. Honestly it isn’t rocket science but I am amazed by how rarely it happens here. If we look out towards out region with Asia on our doorstep the market is huge. Australian

companies need to plan to either go offshore or develop the industry here. I’m not sure if the government is actually interested in enabling this. So perhaps the industry just needs to get on with it. That is what the Italians did in the 50’s and they created 50 years of growth. Our current government seems hesitant to subsidise uncompetitive industries. What are some things manufacturing businesses can do to help themselves to become more competitive? The reality is that manufacturers have to start to work with designers (or integrate design) or they will inevitably fade away. We live in and age where everything is now designed and the market demands this. For this to happen designers also need to better understand how to communicate and work with industry. Traditionally, manufacturers don’t like to work with designers because they see it as a cost or a dubious value. I don’t think designers have given industry the respect they deserve. A lot of designers approach industry in the wrong way. They come out of university with CAD drawings and they think industry is there to serve them. This is a short-term mindset.

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FEATURE: JON GOULDER

There have been thousands of design hopefuls who have gone to industry in the past with an idea or prototype and expected industry to develop the work without paying or on a promise it’s going to be a huge seller. It obviously never happens because most designers don’t have the marketing and distribution locked down. That’s what has given designers a really bad name in the industry. So there’s a divide between designers and industry, which needs to be bridged. Both factions need to learn to work together and a design and manufacturing sector. I guess my role here is to make the connections between the designer and industry so we can work together and support each other. Why do you think there’s been a failure of university to teach students the skills to engage with industry? A lot of the design courses in Australia are more about bums on seats, because the university is a business. They’re over populated and they don’t get the specialised one-on-one experience from their lecturers. It depends who you have as a lecturer and how much experience they have. I think many lecturers in universities are hiding in the university system. Many lack practical experience, they’ve never actually had a

Summer Issue 2014

Top: Leda seat, produced by Woodmark. Above: LD Desk.


FEATURE: JON GOULDER

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Above: Reception furniture for Wesfarmers offices in Perth. Commissioned by Woodsbagot and acquired for Wesfarmers Private Art Collection. Right: The multi-purpose Stak stool, side table and shelf.

practice of their own and so they are basing their teaching on conceptual interpretations of how the industry might work. I wonder how these people can teach effectively when they haven’t practiced. I also worry that many lecturers don’t know how to communicate with industry. This is a self-perpetuating system. The reality is that an apprentice working with a smart and progressive manufacturer will probably have a better education than someone doing a full degree, That said, I think the university system definitely has its place. COFA, RMIT, Canberra School of Arts, UTS, these universities produce quality designers every year. People need to realise you can’t just do four years at university, you need to re-educate again and again. The JamFactory, for example, doesn’t take someone who hasn’t done an industrial design degree, or a furniture-making course. So then they come to us and do another two years of study and they might go somewhere else and do another two years again. Does the level of industry and government support you receive accurately reflect the value the Studio embeds within the sector? To be honest I don’t think we put enough value into in the industry at the moment to command any significant respect. That

connection isn’t there yet. But that’s what I plan to do. However, government needs to look at countries like The Netherlands and other European countries where industry is encouraged to transform for the future, to work with designers and develop ideas for programs and production thinking which stimulated the growth of an industry. What advice do you have for someone who is a furniture manufacturer trying to grow in a competitive market? I have the ultimate respect for manufacturers because I come from a manufacturing family. I’m the fourth generation maker and I grew up at a bench making furniture. I feel that any manufacturer who doesn’t embrace design in everything they do will find it increasingly hard to continue making money. The generations coming through have been raised with iPhones and iPads. They are design savvy. They are internationally linked through the internet. They watch, see and think differently. That is the nature of the market now. The future is to embrace design. If a company doesn’t have in-house designers then they have to seek out and work with designers to develop new collections and ranges that use the same production

techniques as they have now. The things they are producing, now and into the future, must be searching for design excellence. What advice do you have for emerging furniture designers? Well, not to chase fame. To understand that you’re not going to be successful after a four year degree. You need to do more. The establishment of any business takes at least five years. To have a long-term vision. They need to be passionate and love what they do, otherwise they won’t last. What project are you most excited about right now? Maggie Beer and I are working on some ideas on homewares for an exhibition. Hanging out with Maggie in Seppeltsfield and talking about what would be cool to design and make for the fun of it at this point is really cool. I’m really excited about that. At this point it’s not a commercial collection, we’re just having fun. It’s for an exhibition at the JamFactory but obviously we’re thinking a lot bigger than that. It’s a real privilege to work with Maggie. jongoulder.com jamfactory.com.au

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Summer Issue 2014

CAPACITY: STREET & GARDEN FURNITURE CO.


CAPACITY: STREET & GARDEN FURNITURE CO.

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The

Patriarch DAVID SHAW IS AUSTRALIAN STREET FURNITURE ROYALTY. AND AFTER TWO DECADES GUIDING BRISBANE BASED STREET & GARDEN FURNITURE CO. TO BECOME ONE OF AUSTRALIA’S MOST ESTEEMED AND SUCCESSFUL FURNITURE COMPANIES ONE WOULD THINK HE’D BE SLOWING DOWN. BUT WITH HIS EYES FIRMLY FOCUSED ON THE U.S, THIS CLEARLY ISN’T THE CASE. WE CAUGHT UP WITH HIM AT HIS (VERY HIP) BRISBANE WAREHOUSE STUDIO. Text Katie O’Brien Photography Florian Groehn

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ueensland’s furniture industry is like any modern day Australian family. You’ve got the young talent ready to take on the world. Prodigal sons and daughters like Alexander Lotersztain, who’ve travelled far but are lured back to the Sunshine State. There are the industry aunties and uncles like Jason Bird of Luxxbox, wise and well respected. And then you have the patriarch of the family, the one who started it all. He’s been here since the beginning and, if he gets his way, he’s going to be there till the end. When we met at his Brisbane warehouse showroom, Shaw recounts how after studying fine art in Tasmania with a focus on industrial design and street furniture, he found himself lecturing at the Tasmanian School of Arts. When he realised students weren’t being taught the useful knowledge they should in order to get a job as designers after graduating, he took the proactive step of leaving Tasmania to try a few jobs in Queensland. “My intention was to go back home and teach something that would students to job opportunities… I sort of stayed up here instead!” chuckles Shaw.

After working in various architectural and design firms, in 1991 he weighed his options for the future. Although street furniture wasn’t particularly glamorous, “I thought it might be something that I could do successfully and if I proved myself as a designer and entrepreneur… people might offer me a real job – but they never did!” And thankfully twenty-three years later, Street & Garden Furniture Co. is one of the few furniture companies still manufacturing all of their products in Queensland today. Operating out of a new studio in Brisbane’s dynamic West End, Shaw employs five permanent full time staff and with one employee celebrating seventeen years with the company, they are indeed very much like a family. This geniality extends well beyond office banter, with full design acknowledgement given to the creator of each Street & Garden product. “Unlike a lot of companies… I nominate the predominant designer on each product,” Shaw declares almost nonchalantly, “because within the industry, it’s important to be seen to be developing careers”. According to those

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in-the-know, it is this lack of design ego that keeps the projects coming in. With clients ranging from Virgin to Novotel and Lend Lease, Shaw claims “it’s been harder to get the City Council contracts over the past few years, simply because were running out of CBD’s to do!” And that’s when you realise just how paramount Street & Garden are to manufacturing in Queensland. Pick any council along the coast of the Sunshine State and you can safely assume that Street & Garden Furniture Co. have been involved: Brisbane, Surfers Paradise, Bundaberg – Street & Garden are everywhere and this is reassuring for local manufacturers. The company sub-contracts its manufacturing work to Queensland-based manufacturers, with Brisbane-based Rockpress one of their primary sheet metal fabricators. With this hub-and-spoke manufacturing model comes great flexibility. “Technology has changed so significantly in

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CAPACITY: STREET & GARDEN FURNITURE CO.

recent years that it is now possible for what we see on the computer screen to get made perfectly,” says Shaw. Street & Garden embraces collaboration and technology so that they can get to the point where their manufacturing can be less hands on, purely to be more cost effective. Although they haven’t done it to date, discussions surrounding offshore manufacturing are presently on the table. Shaw is however quick to attest “We’re obviously not trying to diminish using local manufacturing. But local manufacturing is being challenged very heavily, and we can’t compete in certain areas without going offshore, which is sad.” Shaw constantly re-assesses the way the company works and who they work with in order to keep production local and maintain control over the design and price of products. “Recently we looked at doing a product with a company that produces motorised mowers.

Previous spread: The godfather of Queensland’s furniture industry, David Shaw. Top: Custom table at Virgin’s Headquarters in Newstead, Brisbane. Right: The former Street & Garden studio reception. Showcasing custom designed folded steel joinery.


CAPACITY: STREET & GARDEN FURNITURE CO.

Technology has changed so significantly in recent years that it is now possible for what we see on the computer screen to get made perfectly.

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CAPACITY: STREET & GARDEN FURNITURE CO.


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Previous page (top and bottom): Rockpress factory This page (clockwise from top left): The True Laser 5040 is the machine used on materials 5mm thick and above - about 75% of S&G products; Rockpress factory workers; The 5400 is dedicated to heavy steels; Paint preparation; Loading the sheet metal; Electrostatic powder coating (applying powder); Welding; Laser cutting stainless steel.

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CAPACITY: STREET & GARDEN FURNITURE CO.

Above: The former Street & Garden studio in Brisbane’s West End, home to David and the team for 8 years. Top right: Custom folded steel table and bend seats for Virgin Airlines. Middle right: Detail of table for Caloundra Bulcock Beach, in collaboration with PLACE Design Group.

Normally we would dictate how we want to design a product, but in this case we said: ‘This is the design intent, you tell us how to build it in the most cost effective way.’ ” By remaining open to opportunities to reassess how things can be made using new and emerging technologies the company is forging new manufacturing relationships in unexpected places, even working closely with motorbike hot rod companies for specific pieces. “We are doing a lot of bespoke furniture, and if we weren’t we’d be in a lot of trouble,” says Shaw, who acknowledges that with the majority of their competitors selling imported off the shelf products, Street & Garden Furniture Co. would be one of the few companies who are still producing totally original designs today. Previously shunning direct marketing in favour of word of mouth, Shaw is now realising the potential of being visible, seeking more

Summer Issue 2014

face-to-face time with clients and building meaningful relationships. “We almost lost a project with a client we have a good relationship with. But by speaking with them and by being flexible to change the design, materials and cost process they gave us the opportunity, we ended up winning the job,” he says. Ensuring those relationships are actively maintained, so that those difficult conversations can occur at critical times is an item high on the agenda for Shaw’s team in this coming year. So as customer loyalty begins to wane in a competitive international market and contracts are won or loss purely based on price, what will Street & Garden be doing differently in 2014 to cope with in such a price driven market? “I’m going to go see a lot of people this year, where we missed out on jobs, and ask them what we could do next time… so we can figure out where we need to go to make it work,” answers Shaw. This flexibility and

eagerness to adapt has seen Street & Garden Furniture Co. position themselves strongly in a design and manufacturing capacity not only in Queensland, but Australia at large. With plans firmly in place to head back to America in 2014, attending the NYC Wanted Design event as part of QLD based design collective Quench, and pursuing potential collaborations and alliances with US based companies, Shaw concedes that, “Breaking into a conservative American market is difficult”. You need to have the big three; the product, the personality and the promotion...“It’s as much about the sizzle as it is about the sausage”. From what we’ve seen of Shaw over the past two decades, we know that Street & Garden Furniture Co. will no doubt provide both, and then some. streetandgarden.com


INTRODUCING

ONE OF LIFE’S LUXURIES Exclusively developed and made only in Australia, Sealy Posturepedic Exquisite™ features the unique ReST™ coil – truly responsive support technology designed to perfectly cradle and support every part of the body.

Australia’s Number 1 Bedding Brand* *Source: Quantum Research Bedding Tracking Report, October 2013


TALKING BUSINESS: TAIT.

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Talking Business:

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TALKING BUSINESS: TAIT.

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SOME CALL IT ACUMEN; OTHERS WILL SAY IT IS STREET SMARTS. THE BOTTOM LINE IS THAT SOMETIMES GUT INSTINCT IS THE BEST INGREDIENT FOR A RECIPE TO SUCCESSFULLY CHANGE THE TRAJECTORY OF A BUSINESS. Text Linda Cheng

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The only real valuable thing is intuition. — ALBERT EINSTEIN

ordon and Susan Tait’s intuition has served the business well. In its 21-year history, Tait has grown from a one-man workshop in Nunawading, Victoria, to a manufacturer of outdoor furniture employing 16 people with a showroom in both Melbourne and Sydney. Tait is represented in Perth through an agent and most recently, it formed a partnership with Stylecraft to retail in their Singapore outlet. The Taits have nurtured their business from infancy. Gordon, who apprenticed in sheet-metal work, was making one-off commissions in his downtime while he was employed at a printing company building machines for drying ink. “I wasn’t interested in production [back then],” says Gordon. “It was an artisan-based business where I made one thing for one client and then moved on to the next thing.” When a few large, high profile clients such as Country Road, Witchery and Mecca Cosmetica came knocking on the door with high volume orders for display props, production at Tait’s now two-man factory dramatically increased. In the early 1990s Tait’s first furniture pieces, largely interior, were picked up by the Georges department store in Melbourne. The clean, minimalist lines were a hit with the yuppies of the rapidly gentrifying inner suburbs. But it was their outdoor Fat Sunlounge that gave them their greatest success so far and was even named sunlounge of the year by Elle Décor.

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“We realised then that there was a really big hole in the market and there wasn’t really a lot of [out door furniture] that was made here and withstood the Australian climate,” says Susan. “So we started developing that and we became really well known for it. We realised we had stumbled on a niche.” “We’re really good at it,” adds Gordon with his trademark cheeky smile. “There’s no one doing outdoor like Tait do outdoor.” This ability to evolve and adapt quickly is one of the many traits that have allowed this dynamic and agile business to seamlessly shift with the market. When the influx of replica products started to hit the Australian market, Tait knew they had to once again evolve their product range to stay ahead of the pack. “We decided to think about making more sophisticated furniture,” says Susan. In 2002, industrial designer Justin Hutchinson had just graduated from university and walked into Tait’s showroom and Factory in Easey

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TALKING BUSINESS: TAIT.

Street, Collingwood and presented his folio. He was offered a job that afternoon and started working on the factory floor part time. Together with Gordon the pair designed, developed and prototyped the Huski range. “That was a step up for us,” says Susan. “Our products became more resolved and they’ve continued to improve. We’ve also continued the pattern of working with industrial designers because we can see the result.” “I remember discussing the idea of engaging designers, but we couldn’t afford to employ one full time,” says Gordon. This limitation has turned into an advantage. Instead of employing designers, Tait now has five successful collaborations with designers under its belt, all of whom are Australian. In addition, they also have New Zealand designer whose product is manufactured under license. “It’s a really good way of getting the product without the overhead,” continues Gordon.

Previous spread: Susan and Gordon Tait in their Johnston Street showroom, Fitzroy. Above: The factory is just downstairs from Tait’s head office which allows Gordon and Susan to communicate and collaborate easily with the workmen. (Photo: Scottie Cameron) Right: A workmen in Tait’s factory. (Photo: Scottie Cameron)


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It’s really attractive to be able to work with different people. It’s nice that we can have a contract with a designer for a specific product and maybe next year it can be someone else. That constantly brings in fresh ideas.

TALKING BUSINESS: TAIT.

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“We wanted to bring fresh ideas into the company,” says Susan. “It’s really attractive to be able to work with different people. It’s nice that we can have a contract with a designer for a specific product and maybe next year it can be someone else. That constantly brings in fresh ideas.” This model is quite unique in the Australian context and has contributed to Tait’s success. Tait has continued to manufacture in Melbourne despite the mounting pressures in the industry. It’s a familiar story that when government and commercial projects cease or put on hold in the aftermath of the global financial crisis, many manufacturers were drawn under as a consequence. Tait, however, were able to protect the manufacturing operations by embracing the consumer retail market and opening a showroom in Fitzroy. “We were focussed only on commercial [before the GFC]. We had a few people who retailed the odd product,” says Susan. “But we were really frustrated that we had this whole range that you couldn’t see anywhere unless you came upstairs to our old factory. And people were coming to find the furniture.” “So it ended up being great because it brought Tait to the end user market and it’s given us a beautiful showroom for architects and designers to look at as well,” Susan continues. “It’s definitely given us much better brand presence which has been really good.” Tait opened their second showroom in 2011 in Redfern, Sydney. The brand has now spread across the nation and even

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CAPACITY: MEET THE MAKERS

internationally via their agents Designfarm in Perth and Stylecraft in Singapore. But in the outdoor furniture, seasonality is a significant disadvantage. “We’re trying to move into warmer climates such as Queensland, Northern Territory. Seasonality really affects the cashflow in this business in the cooler months and we’re trying to smooth it out,” says Gordon. After 21 years, Gordon and Susan are now starting to take a step back of their business and have employed a General Manager to look after the everyday operations. This has allowed them the much-needed time to think strategically about how to grow the business further and continue to lead the market.

Top: Tait’s new factory facility in Thornbury, Victoria. (Photo: Scottie Cameron) Above: The original factory in Easey Street, Collingwood. (Photo: Mark Chew)

As Susan says, “The creativity of Tait is really important and keeping that freshness is a real challenge.” madebytait.com.au


Shoppers are looking for Australian furniture and bedding

The Australian Made logo will help them find yours

We are proudly supported by our Campaign Partners in the furniture and bedding industry.

6027AM

To find out how the logo can help your business, or to register to use the logo, visit www.australianmade.com.au or phone 1800 350 520


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TALKING BUSINESS: BSEATED GLOBAL

Talking Business:

BSeated Global

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Seated Global was founded in 2005 by Jack Klein, a 35-year veteran of the furniture business. The company imports furniture from all over the world as well as running a custom manufacturing operation, and a showroom in Revesby, NSW. In nine years of business, it has grown its range to over 3000 products. “We started in the event and rental market, specifically function furniture,” says director Daniella Klein Menachemson. “We supplied to companies that hired out furniture to the event market and that has evolved into the broader hospitality market for us.” Today, the company supplies directly to the hospitality industry, servicing cafés, pubs, bars, restaurants, hotels and even airport lounges. They specialise in franchises and RSL clubs, which provides them with volume sales and national distribution networks. Amongst their clients are nationally restaurant and café chains such as Michel’s Patisserie and Nandos. The company has a network of factories both locally and offshore who manufacturer to order. This means almost all of their range is customisable by material, colour and finish. “We also work closely with the architecture and design community,” says Klein Memachemson. “We focus on custom design for a multitude of commercial projects.” They recently completed the interior renovation of Sydney’s Bull and Bear pub with Edge Design Studio. Designed as a contemporary interpretation of a gentlemen’s club, all of the furniture was custom designed and manufactured with BSeated Global. “They allowed me to design all the furniture from scratch,” says Mandy

Summer Issue 2014

Edge, designer of Bull and Bear. “Prototypes were made and materials sourced to my exact requirements.” “We really like becoming involved in the project and getting personally attached,” Klein Menachemson cites this as the reason that sets them apart from the competitors. “We can meet everyone’s budgets. Our strategy is to provide custom design at an affordable price point. It doesn’t have to be absurdly expensive for someone to have furniture that is unique and exclusive.”

Above: Sydney’s new Bull and Bear with furniture supplied by BSeated Global.

Looking into the future, the company is keen to expand their range of upholstered products as well as exporting to the US. “We’re continuously looking for new ways of growing our business and new markets to target,” says Klein Menachemson. bseatedglobal.com.au


RECOPOL – GREENING INDUSTRY FROM THE INSIDE ™

PLUS

FOR THE INTERNAL FRAMING OF SUSTAINABLE FURNITURE FOR GREEN BUILDINGS Recopol™ recycled engineering-grade ABS mouldings are a sophisticated eco-design medium for designers and manufacturers of sustainable commercial furniture. Select from a range of standard shells or custom design. Recopol™ shells have Ecospecifier GreenTag™ Gold Plus Level A accreditation. Using Recopol™ shells in your furniture can reduce production times, the volume of materials required, reduce VOCs to meet GBCA IEQ requirements and are able to be re-used, refurbished and returned whole or as off-cuts to Wharington for recycling at end of life. AutoCAD drawings available on the website.

DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED IN AUSTRALIA

Recopol™ is a registered trademark of Wharington International Pty Ltd

Wharington International Pty Ltd 48 – 50 Hargreaves Street Huntingdale Victoria 3166 Australia

T +61 3 9544 5533 F +61 3 9543 1907 E sales@wharington.com.au

DRILL SAW ROUT SCREW NAIL CUT GLUE BOLT T-NUT METAL INSERT RE-SHAPE PAINT LAMINATE UPHOLSTER DRILL SAW ROUT SCREW NAIL CUT GLUE BOLT T-NUT METAL INSERT RE-SHAPE PAINT LAMINATE UPHOLSTER DRILL SAW ROUT SCREW NAIL CUT GLUE BOLT T-NUT METAL INSERT RE-SHAPE PAINT LAMINATE UPHOLSTER DRILL

7 Environment ISO 14001

www.recopol.com.au


SCRAPBOOK BY SIXHANDS

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Scrapbook

THE PLACE FOR DESIGNERS TO SHARE THEIR THOUGHTS

by Sixhands

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ixhands was formed in 2006 by textile designers Brianna Pike, Anna Harves and Alecia Jensen. The three met while studying fashion and textiles at University of Technology, Sydney. After graduation, they each was hesitant to start a fashion label because of the saturation in the market, some research made it obvious that there was opportunity in textile design, where their creative juices could flow freely. Now after 8 years in

Summer Issue 2014

business, their wildly expressive designs have attracted the attention of the fashion industry (for which they had been trained) as well as interior designers and furniture makers. Today, the studio is down to two (Alecia Jensen left a few years ago) but this hasn’t stopped them from expanding their operations to produce a range of wallpaper, rugs, cushions, lampshades and accessories as well as continuing to develop their rich and inspiring textiles.


SCRAPBOOK BY SIXHANDS

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Left: Sixhands’ Lorikeet Tequila Sunrise fabric. Right (clockwise from top): Palour Paradiso Denim wallpaper and various cushions; Chevy Chase Candy Store fabric and Maple Ink art canvas; Mo Peach cushion; Felicity Silkroad Wallpaper.

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Design can intercept during the process of developing a product... whereby products are conceived, produced, packaged, distributed and retired with their long-term environmental impacts in mind.

“

“

This page (clockwise from top left): Damask Ochre rug; Jane Doe vintage art canvas; Paperflock lounge and Haiti Treehouse cushion; Safari Ash woven fabric. Left: Crossbones tropical wall print.

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what we make... furnishinginternational.com


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SCRAPBOOK BY SIXHANDS

Clockwise from top left: Wood grain tiles from Palace of Versailles; Paper daisy collage; An Armadillo guitar; Parquetry table from a bar in London; Graffitti wall in New York City; Smudged chalk drawing in Washington DC; Sonar Barcelona, the annual festival of music and multimedia arts; Water reflection during Vivid light festival in Sydney.

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our inspirations... Clockwise from top left: A textile bazaar; Lattice security gate in Vietnam; Stone steps in Barcelona, Spain; Diagonal stripe painting with a resin texture; A Peruvian blanket; Ripples on the surface of water in a pool; Lime bouquet in a party punch.

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Questions with Sixhands

Brianna Pike (left) and Anna Harves (right). Photo: Michael Wee.

What’s your favourite time of day? Anna: Our morning coffee date where Bri and I debrief, catch up on life outside of work and then it’s back to the studio. Over the years it’s become a bit of a joint ritual, I only started drinking coffee in recent years and prior to that I would just go along for the socialising and outdoor time. What’s on your desk right now? Brianna: We are working on artwork for Sixhands new collection and are also doing some custom artworks for fashion and interior clients. So there’s mountains of books, paper, pens and inks, which also means there are piles of sketches and painted elements. What do you see when you look out at the world from where you sit? Anna: A world of colour and opportunity. What motivates you? Brianna: The excitement of creating something out of nothing. What are you most passionate about? Anna: Life and Love.

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Brianna: Good music, studying French, handmaking shoes, cooking, new ideas, learning new things and bike riding adventures. Who/what are your key influences? Anna: Influences come from everywhere; we get inspiration from our day-to-day life, travel, documentaries, music, history, nature. We translate and record our experiences into artworks and textiles, we feel our collection of designs are like our diary, they tell our story. Whilst we look at trends and cycles of fashion we prefer to focus on original design and Sixhands distinctive way of expressing youthful, colourful, Australian life. In your mind, what is the most critical problem facing us in the future? How can design intercept with that? Brianna: The generation of waste and disposability. Design can intercept during the process of developing a product, businesses need to take responsibility for the entire life cycle of the product, whereby products are conceived, produced, packaged, distributed and retired with their long-term environmental impacts in mind.

What’s your most essential piece of equipment? Brianna: Artline pens and Adobe Creative Suite, they are absolute essentials! What are you most proud of? Anna: We have received recognition for achievements in textile design, including: Voted 2013 Style Awards ‘Most Noteworthy Soft Furnishings’ by House & Garden magazine; ‘2013 Top 25 Australian Homeware Designers’ by Design Local, voted ‘The Next Big Thing’ by GQ magazine, voted ‘Wallpaper of the Year’ by House and Garden, featured in the Sydney episode of TV series ‘Designer Travel’ which has aired throughout South Korea, Canada, Spain, United Kingdom, Italy and France. Sixhands spoke at the Habitus Conversation Series at Sydney Design week and had artworks published by Spanish Patterns In Fashion book. What now? How do you see the road ahead? Anna: We will eventually cover textiles for all aspects of your lifestyle, it’s always exciting to see what products we develop next! sixhands.com.au


880,000m2 EXHIBITION AREA 4,500 GLOBAL EXHIBITORS 190,000 GLOBAL BUYER S

CHINA INTERNATIONAL FURNITURE FAIR(GUANGZHOU)

The 33rd China International Furniture Fair (Guangzhou) Office Show


REPRESENTING AUSTRALIA... Furnishing International is the Exclusive Australian Member of The International Alliance of Furnishing Publications

China China Furniture Brazil Mobile Lojista

England Cabinet Maker France Le Courrier du Meuble

United States Furniture|Today Germany Mobelmarkt

Summer 2014

Incubator Jon Goulder at JamFactory Trade Fairs Cologne / Paris / Stockholm Talking Business TAIT Scrapbook Sixhands

Mexico Moblaje

India IFJ

Romania Mobila

INSPIRATION / IDEATION / DESIGN / INNOVATION / INDUSTRY

Italy Rima Editrice Gd’A

Australia Furnishing International Singapore Furniture & Furnishing Export, International Japan The Home Living South Korea GaGu United Emirates Gulf Interiors Spain El Mobiliario

Taiwan China Economic News

Turkey Furniturk

IAFP membership is by invitation only. Through our affiliation with the IAFP, Furnishing International is proud to offer its readers and advertisers the additional benefits of global content and distribution through the world’s leading furniture publications. With 18 members, the IAFP is recognized as an authoritative organization which supports the interests of the home furnishings industry by providing an open forum for members to meet and strengthen our industry. Our current goal is to promote the Green movement internationally. Visit our website at www.iafpalliance.com

For more information, please contact Peter Zapris, Publisher - Furnishing International on +61 3 9417 9399 or email peter@furnishinginternational.com


Industry By remaining open to opportunities to reassess how things can be made using new and emerging technologies [Street & Garden] is forging new manufacturing relationships in unexpected places.

— KATIE O’BRIEN


MATERIALITY: JUSTIN HUTCHISON

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Materiality EVERY DESIGNER WORTH THEIR SALT HAS A PALETTE OF COLOURS, FABRICS, COMPOSITES AND FINISHES ON STANDBY WAITING FOR A PROJECT WHICH ALLOWS THEM TO PUSH THE BOUNDARIES OF MATERIALITY. THESE MATERIALS ARE OFTEN KEPT ASIDE IN A SAMPLE LIBRARY, OR REST IN PRIDE OF PLACE ON THE DESIGNERS STUDIO DESK. THEY ARE SEPARATED FROM THE CROWD BY THEIR TECHNICAL PROPERTIES, ACOUSTIC PERFORMANCE, SUSTAINABILITY CREDENTIALS OR FOR PURELY AESTHETIC REASONS. WE’VE INVITED TWO DYNAMIC MELBOURNE PRACTICES, INTERIOR DESIGN STUDIO DESIGNOFFICE AND INDUSTRIAL DESIGNER JUSTIN HUTCHINSON TO UNLOCK THEIR SAMPLE CUPBOARDS TO SHOW US SOME OF THE MATERIALS THEY HAVE SET ASIDE FOR THAT SPECIAL PROJECT. Photography and Art Direction Stephanie McLeod

Profile 09 expanded rolled mesh from Locker Group A material that spands large areas with a very small amount of material due to its manufacturing process. locker.com.au

Copper sheet and tube from George Weston & Sons Copper is essential to all living organisms as a trace dietary mineral because it is a key constituent of the respiratory enzyme complex cytochrome coxidase. georgeweston.com.au

Perforated leather from Leffler Perforated leather has great breathability and is free from heavy metals in the tanning process. leffler.com.au

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MATERIALITY: JUSTIN HUTCHINSON

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Justin Hutchinson

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ustin Hutchinson is a Melbourne based industrial designer, lecturer and urban innovator. He is a firm believer in the positive value of design. Hutchinson’s experience with outdoor products and environmental design sparked his research into the duality between the manufactured and the natural environment – designing for longevity, and ultimately trying to forge a way for the man-made to co-exist with the natural

environment. Justin is also Design Director of Urban Commons, a cross-disciplinary design consultancy committed to reviving the spirit of the commons in our urban spaces and producer of urban food growing solution, FoodscapeTM. He strives for considered urban solutions to high density living through technological and social innovation. justinhutchinson.com

Comcork tactile First recycled flooring product from recycled wine cork to remove PVC as a bonding agent, available in a wide variety of surface finishes, colours and is weather resistant. comcork.com.au

Weathertex Compressed by-product eucalyptus fibre, formaldehyde free, no glues and a twenty year warranty outdoors. weathertex.com.au

Rubberwood from Thailand latex plantations industries A byproduct of the latex industry, rubber wood or parrawood has incredible properties that are akin to a hardwood.

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MATERIALITY: DESIGNOFFICE

Airstep gold carpet underlay

DesignOffice

Made from natural rubber, the unique waffle design helps to circulate the air between the underlay and the subfloor which prevents dampness.

D

irectors Mark Simpson and Damien Mulvihill worked as part of the core design team at Universal Design Studio in London between 2003 and 2007, realizing projects for clients including Liberty of London and Canteen. The Melbourne office of Universal (now rebranded as DesignOffice) opened in 2008 and has undertaken work for clients including Bendigo Art Gallery, Mud Australia, Molonglo Group, Bendon and James Cameron. The team of eight is located in Melbourne’s creative capital of Collingwood. designoffice.com.au

We just visually like the texture, which is inherent to the material. That’s quite important to us. airstep.com.au

Rib cladding from CedarSales The profile of this panel has a lovely soft curve. When you curve the form of a building with it, it almost becomes a double curve. It’s quite cost effective as well. cedarsales.com.au

Architecture VISION from Sefar Black precision fabric which can be coated with aluminium, chromium, titanium, gold. The metalised fabric side can be copper, gold, bronze or printed in special designs. This is interlayered glass which is quite beautiful in two directions. It’s a black mesh on one side and bronze on the other. I just love what it does to light. It’s so soft at a distance but close up. There’s loads of different metals that can go in between it. sefar.com.au

Woca Neutral Oil A professional flooring finish, made from natural vegetable oils, that protects the surface and the natural raw timber look.

We had it pleated for a project. We just like what happens to it when you pleat it.

We found the perfect timber finish. It basically trying to get the timber to look like raw timber. The timber is completely finished and sealed for commercial grade application but it doesn’t change its appearance. The problem normally when you finish timber is it goes glossy and yellow and it changes its appearance.

kvadratmaharam.com

woca.dk

Plot by Kvadrat in a custom pleat by DesignOffice. Dual-layer, plain weave upholstery fabric in flame retardant Trevira CS.

Summer Issue 2014


MATERIALITY: DESIGNOFFICE

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ValCromat by Investwood in light grey Where as MDF is coloured on the surface, ValCromat uses wood fibres which have been impregnated with organic coloured dyes then bonded together with a special resin to form panels. It’s colour is inherent to its material. You can use it for joinery and for linings. We’ve used a wax finish but the finish doesn’t change its appearance. valchromat.pt

Silentsound from Beaufloors An acoustic black rubber underlay with gold foil backing This is actually reasonably industrial material but with the intensity of the gold, the texture and the pattern in terms of the grid and it’s metallic-ness, it could be quite a beautiful wall lining because of the way it reflects light. beaufloors.com.au

Dulux Electro powder coat range in Subtle Blue Powder coating is traditionally restricted to aluminium applications. The Electro powder coat range can be applied to steel and galvanised metal as well. It’s low VOC and has a lowsheen, silky anodised look. It’s a lovely combination a matte finish but it has a lustre to it. dulux.com.au

Danpalon polycarbonate in gold Danpalon is an architectural glazing system that can be used for exterior cladding, roofing and partitions. We love the almost gold-ness of it. It’s such a soft metallic that’s not beige, it’s got a bit of sheen but it’s not gold. It has an ethereal quality when you see the light through it. danpalon.com.au

DecorSatin mirror from Viridian Frosted glass with a mirror backing. It provides diffused light reflection without being spectrally reflective. It’s not mirror and it’s not frosted glass, it’s got a different depth to it. It can make a space feel bigger. viridianglass.com

furnishinginternational.com


www.interiorsonline.com.au


NEW PRODUCTS

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New Products

TIME DINING TABLE AND STORYTELLER CHAIRS designed by Tomek Archer Solid oak with choice of solid oak or compact laminate top. Chairs are solid oak. nomi.com.au

furnishinginternational.com


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NEW PRODUCTS

3000 COLLECTION by Schamburg & Alvisse American Oak Timber leg and selected upholstery zenithinteriors.com.au

NOMOS EXECUTIVE MEETING TABLE designed by Foster and Partners for Tecno. Available in solid compact laminate, glass or MDF lacquered board tops. schiavello.com

TUFF STOOL designed by Korban Flaubert 100% rotationally moulded polyethylene korbanflaubert.com.au

VANS THE OMEGA COFFEE TABLE designed by East Editions East coast Blackbutt with custom acrylic and aerosol paints. easteditions.com

Summer Issue 2014


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ZIG RANGE designed by Ben Wahrlich Fluted American Oak Panels & Bespoke Axolotl shell anomaly.com.au

SOL CHAIR by LK Hjelle Metal Backrest, upholstered in canvas or leather. hjelle.no

RISE SOFA by Fogia Timber legs and upholstery. fogia.se

Summer Issue 2014

NEW PRODUCTS

TETRIS FOR HORREDS by Design Front Available in felt, copper, leather, brass, steel, and timber. designfront.org


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NEW PRODUCTS

MARC NEWSON for Caroma A family of bathroom products including tap ware, toilets and baths. caromamarcnewson.com

CROSS BACK CAFÉ CHAIR Resin backrest. Stackable up to 7 chairs high. bseatedglobal.com.au

BUILT-IN MULTIFUNCTION PYRO OVEN Stainless Steel with pyrolytic self-cleaning function. beko.com.au

D900 SH CURVE SURFACE MOUNTED DOWNLIGHT Aluminium body. Recessed LED lens with 900 luments of Tru-Colour light. 70,000 hours lifespan. brightgreen.com

Summer Issue 2014


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NEW PRODUCTS CAPACITY: MEET THE MAKERS

CHANEL Upholstery fabric. Available in four colourways. charlesparsons.com.au

POP CLUSTER 7 light cluster with black cloth suspension cord. Available in yellow, orange, white and black. lightslightslights.com.au

Summer Issue 2014

RITA CHAIR designed by aAssociati for MIDJ Stainless steel base with epoxy vanish in grey or white ash. classique.net.au

MANTIS PENDANT Available in black, red or white with chrome. telbix.com


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INDUSTRY NEWS

News and Events China International Furniture Fair 18 – 22 MARCH, 28 MARCH – 1 APRIL

T

he largest furniture exhibition in the world is now even bigger lasting five days instead of four. Held in the furniture capital of China, Guangzhou, CIFF is an important business platform for the furniture industry worldwide. Stage 1 (18-22 March) is for home, outdoor and leisure furniture while stage 2 (28 March – 1 April) is for office, commercial and hotel furniture. This year’s fair expects to attract more than 200,000 professional operators including well-know international brands such as Robert Cavalli and Natuzzi. ciff-gz.com

DesignBUILD 2 – 4 APRIL

D

esignBUILD is a trade fair of building products, services and technologies. Held at the Melbourne Convention and Exhibition Centre this year, the trade only event will host over 200 local and international exhibitors. Highlights at this year’s fair include Project Next by Cameron Rosen of Australian Living, a sustainability consultancy for the building industry and a showcase of 16 innovative products in Innovation Alley. designbuildexpo.com.au

Peter Watt retires from Bekaert

Milan Furniture Fair

A

A

fter 41 years of service, National Sales Manager of Bekaert Australia, Peter Watt, has retired. Peter started working for Bekaert in 1973 when the Australian manufacturing plant was the only offshore operation outside of the company’s headquarters in Belgium. Whilst in the early years of his employment, the industry was heavily protected through trade tariffs and bounties, the environment has evolved to one where local industry must compete with the strength of a high local currency. Peter faced this challenge through his commitment to service and innovation. Peter will be replaced by Bart Dehaerne, who has a wealth of knowledge in the industry. (Text by Luc Deleu, Managing Director, Bekaert Australia)

Summer Issue 2014

8 – 13 APRIL rguably the world’s foremost furniture fair returns again this year with over 2,500 exhibitors showcasing their new releases and collections. As always, the world will watch with close attention at the new wave of emerging furniture design hopefuls who will be unveiling their prototypes at the many satellite exhibitions including SaloneSatellite and Ventura Lambrate. This year, the fair is co-located with nternational lighting exhibition, Euroluce. cosmit.it


ONE LAST WORD

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One last word ICONIC AUSTRALIAN HOUSES Presented in partnership with Australian Architecture Foundation, Iconic Australia Houses delves into the life and times of 29 important Australian houses over the past halfcentury. The exhibition is curated by Karen McCartney based on her series of books of the same title. 3D models, archival photography (such as the Gottlieb House by Wood/Marsh pictured) and filmed interviews provide a fly-on-the-wall view into the architects’ studios to tell the story of how good design enriches lives. Iconic Australian Houses is on show at the Museum of Sydney from 12 April to 17 August. (Photo: Michael Wee) sydneylivingmuseums.com.au

Advertiser Index IFC–01

Arma Shutter armashutter.com.au

22

MAISON&OBJET maison-objet.com

62

IAFP iafpalliance.com

02–03

Bambi bambi.com.au

25

Jinhan Fair jinhanfair.com

68

Interiors Online interiorsonline.com.au

04–05

Bekaert Textiles bekaerttextiles.com

27

International Dragon Furniture Fair qianjin.com

71

Mayfield mayfieldlamps.com.au

Lifestyle lifestyle-au.com

73

Export Furniture Exhibition efe.my

07

Charles Parsons charlesparsonsinteriors.com

09

Enjoy Lighting enjoylighting.com.au

30

Antique Mirror Glass antiquemirrorglass.com.au

75

Indian Furnishings, Floorings, & Textiles Expo epch.in

11

LIGHTS & TRACKS l-t.com.au

45

Sealy sealy.com.au

77

Indonesia International Furniture Expo ifexindonesia.com

12

Reed Gift Fairs reedgiftfairs.com.au

51

Australian Made australianmade.com.au

78

Anji ZOY Furniture CO.,Ltd

15

Malaysian International Furniture Fair 2014.miff.com.my

53

Wharington International wharington.com.au

19

Furniture China furniture-china.cn

61

China International Furniture Fair ciff-gz.com

Summer Issue 2014

28–29

IBC

Proposte propostefair.it

OBC

designEX designex.info


The original design and architecture event returns to Sydney in an exciting new location Join over 10,000 industry professionals, installations by local designers, including Nest14 and international speakers, headlined by world renowned trend forecaster, Lidewij Edelkoort. Discover a host of onsite collaborations including: Corporate Culture with George Livissianis, St ALi, Mount Langi Ghiran wine bar, Moleskine, SPARC Design, futurespace designed Workplace feature and more.

Register FREE online at www.designex.info/register Using Promo Code: MFIM2

designex.info

Furnishing International Summer 2014