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Photography Magazine

Volume 1 | Issue 4 | Middle East

15 AED

Why Men Are Into Fashion Photography?! Jhoel Valenzo

Portrait Photography Tips And Methods Richard Schneider

“Role Reversal” Rocky Gathercole

Questions From The Readers

Depth of Focus

Jay Alonzo What’s Inside issue 3 final cover.indd 1

Camera Review

Basic Tutorials

Workshops

Photo Gallery

Group Profile 3/8/12 7:28 PM


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ADS

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Photography Magazine

Photography Magazine

Issue 1 | November 2011 | Middle East

Photography Magazine

Issue 2 | December 2011 | Middle East

Volume 1 | Issue 3 | Middle East

15 AED

Cover Story Meiji Sangalang

Behind the Lens PJ Tiongson

A Desert Surprise

World’s Top Selling Stock Photographer

Toy Photography

Behind The Lens

The Challenge

15 Quick Tips To Better Photos After Dark

Yuri Arcurs

Osama Al Zubaidi

Do’s & Don’ts Discover Obscura

Engr. Milo Torres

Work Flow Exposed

The Challenge

Man with Simple Dreams

9 Ways To Beat The High Cost Of Photography

Find out how

Jay Morales

Donnell Gumiran

Jophel Botero Ybiosa

Beyond Passion Chris Calumberan

Gadget Review

Post Processing Tutorials

Do It Yourself

Workshop Schedules

Group Profile

Depth Of Focus

A Manny Librodo Exclusive

Edwin Loyola

Small Things Big Result What’s Inside

Mike Malate

Eugene Santos / Michael Cruz

Off Camera Lighting

Depth Of Focus

Edwin Allan Riguer

Jay Calaguian / Noel Garcia

of Photography in UAE

What’s Inside

Camera Guide

Extreme Post Processing Tutorials

Tips & Tricks

Get the Most Out of your Point and Shoot Camera

What’s Inside

Gadgets Review

Basic Tutorials

Workshops

Photo Gallery

Group Profile

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Photography Magazine FullFrame, is a Photography magazine being published monthly not just for photo enthusiasts but for those who have tastes for art, beauty and creativity. It is designed to look into photography’s modern photographic world, the team behind it is taking photography in a different ground. Indeed, an impact that also encourages society in looking unto the glamorous and not so famous side of photography – an irony that lure the curious mind. Editorial is intended to demystify the use of modern equipment by emphasizing practical use of the camera in the field, highlighting the technique rather than the technical. It has been conceptualized to stimulate the photo enthusiasts to enhance their recreational enjoyment through photography and to satisfy the needs of amateur and professional photographers.

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Editor in Chief: Suzette Delos Santos Operations Manager: Paz Calaguian Creative Director: Pat Lasala Art Director / Graphic Designer: Chris Lleses Photographer / Graphic Designer: Dennis Ong I.T. Manager: Derick Venzon In-House Writer / Photographer: Michael Zu単iga Logistic: Jhubert Cruz Writer Contributors: Gladys Alog / Hanna Torcuator / Jhoel Valenzo / Richard Schneider Photographer Contributors: Sam Coran / Mike Malate / Arian Marcos / Mark Anthony Guittap Managing Partners: Chris Lleses / Pat Lasala / Paz Calaguian / Suzette Delos Santos Printer: Printex Printing Press

Koncepto Publishing

Unit P12 Rimal, The Walk Jumeirah Beach Residence P.O. Box 53485 Dubai, UAE

For Advertising:

ads@fullframemag.com Mob: +971 50 9028161 Fax: +971 4 4486405 info@fullframemag.com www.fullframemag.com

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Photography Magazine

Volume 1 | Issue 4 | Middle East

15 AED

Why Men Are Into Fashion Photography?! Jhoel Valenzo

Portrait Photography Tips And Methods Richard Schneider

“Role Reversal” Rocky Gathercole

Questions From The Readers

Depth of Focus

Jay Alonzo What’s Inside

Camera Review

Basic Tutorials

Workshops

Photo Gallery

Group Profile

FROM THE FULLFRAME TEAM

Fashion, no matter how chic, is incomplete until you make it your own. This issue of FFM’s Fashion Photography has truly been a labour of love - of art, photography, good writing and publishing - by the team at FFM and all the contributors who supported the magazine . We can not say “thank you” enough for everyone’s encouragement and enthusiasm. In this issue we feature Jay Alonzo – the creative genius behind our cover story, while also interviewing Will Dy– a budding fashion photographer who is making a name for himself in the industry. We also chat with the renowned and much beloved Chris Calumberan and talented Sam Coran. Rocky Gathercole was once again the epicentre of independent designers across the region, his art production was filled with creativity, beauty and uniqueness. Like always, we promise to keep getting better and better. This magazine is made especially for you. We are confident this issue will provide inspiration for everyone. Enjoy!

FullFrame Team

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www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

PHOTOGRAPHERS PROFILE

COVER STORY

For the fashion and beauty themed issue, FFM decided to tread a road less travelled. We gambled on choosing a dark skinned model and to make the big pay off, FFM chose a lucky charm in the person of Jay Alonzo. With his concepts accepted by FFM, we finally gave the go signal to do the shoot. To support Jay A, we provided him with the best help we can find. For hair and makeup, we chose Joseph Tayco and assisting him is Michael Zuniga. Photographer – Jay Alonzo Assistant Photographer – Michael Zuniga Hair and Make Up – Joseph Tayco Model – Khadija Swaleh Art Director/ FFM – Chris Lleses

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56 Depth Of Focus Jay Alonzo

Content Volume 1 Issue 4

07 Cover Story

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10 Portrait Photography

The crusader Chris Calumberan

Tips and Methods

Review 14 Camera Nikon J1 Crusader 16 The Chris Calumberan Focus 22 On Photogaphers Profile

26 Questions From The Readers Michael Zuniga

Lange 27 Dorothea Photographer of the People

28 Ahmed Ginawi Photography 30 The Come Back Kid Wilfredo Dy

The Lens 36 Behind Rocky Gathercole

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Master Class Xander Angeles Workshop

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46 Shutter

Shootercada

Class 48 Master Xander Angeles Workshop

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On Focus

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The Come back Kid Wilfredo Dy

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54 Shutter Spectrum

Review

of Focus 56 Depth Jay Alonzo

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Role Reversal Rocky Gathercole

64 Workshop “I DO” Raymond Fortun Coran 66 Sam On the Spot

68 Creators of Beauty Clicks 74 Random Photographers Gallery Of View 77 Point Jhoel Valenzona

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Portrait Photography Tips and Methods

78 Classifieds

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Yuri Arcurs

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Questions From The Readers

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Point Of View

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HIGHLIGHTS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

RICHARD SCHNEIDER | http://www.picturecorrect.com/

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Portrait Photography Tips and Methods About The Author Richard Schneider is a digital photography enthusiast and founder of http://www.picturecorrect.com/ which offers tips and news about digital photography, digital camera reviews, photoshop tutorials and computer wallpaper.

Photo by: Sam Coran

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ortrait is defined as, “A likeness of a person, especially one showing the face, that is created by a painter or photographer, for example.” In the area of portrait photography there are some guidelines that you should consider when you go to take photos of people. The different types of portraits are: close-ups, facial shots, upper body shots or environmental portraits. Environmental portraits are where you focus on the subject and on their surroundings that provide more character to the subject. When people have a camera in their face it usually makes them nervous and they will try to put on a face that does not portray who they really are. The real skill to portrait photography is trying to capture photos when the subjects are comfortable and not worried about a camera.

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Many professional photographers try to capture their subject’s true essence by using tricks. One example of this is counting to three so the subject prepares and then while they are relaxing after taking a planned photo the photographer will snap a few more unplanned photos. In most cases the subject won’t even know that more than one photo was taken but it’s usually the photos that the subject wasn’t expecting that capture their true essence. Another more common strategy professionals use is to tell funny jokes that make their subjects genuinely laugh or smile. I’m sure that you have probably experienced something like this yourself.

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Photo by: Mike Malate

ENVIRONMENTAL PORTRAITS T

hese are the portraits that let you into the life of a subject. They might include the whole subject in a scenario or the subject participating in some hobby that they enjoy. These are best for telling a story to the viewer about the subject. They are almost always used by photojournalists to look into the lives of interesting people. They also make great Black and White pictures.

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HIGHLIGHTS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

ROCKY GATHERCOLE RICHARD SCHNEIDER| |www.allanriguer.com http://www.picturecorrect.com/

Photo by: Marc Anthony Guittap

CLOSE-UP PORTRAITS

T

hese usually have the subject’s shoulders and head or less. They are framed around the face. These are the most common and best at capturing expressions and glamour shots. For these it is very important to have the light coming from a good angle. To accent wrinkles or small details you should have the light coming from the side or from the top. To create flattering pictures you should choose a cloudy day or try to create diffused light so there are hardly any shadows. Also make sure the subject is brighter than the background to reduce distraction. For close-up portraits you should use a wide aperture (low f/stop) to make the background out of focus and therefore less of a distraction. Professionals commonly use a fixed telephoto lens that’s 90 mm or higher for portraits in order to de-emphasize the subject’s nose or any other unflattering feature. It works because at that distance the nose or any other feature does not seem closer to the camera than the rest of the face.

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Photo by: Arian Marcos

UPPER BODY OR MIDRANGE PORTRAITS

T

hese are easier to capture because the subject is probably more relaxed because it’s less personal. These include a little more of the background than close-ups. These are commonly used for both single subjects and multiple subjects. This is the kind of portrait used to mark occasions such as graduation, yearbook, birthdays and other parties. The ideal lens would be about a 90 mm fixed telephoto or more wide angle depending on how many subjects there are. Use this information to develop what kind of portrait style you would like to take, and then practice it before dealing with any serious clients.

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W

hen the mirrorless camera market was introduced by Olympus and Panasonic, Nikon reluctantly joined into the fray. Since the mirrorless camera sports an APS-C sized sensor, They thought that this may eat into their strong DSLR market share should they introduce one. They studied the rise of the market and had watched closely how it evolved. For a while there, the market hit a doldrum until Sony and Fujifilm introduced monster cameras rivaling that of the entry level DSLR quality wise. Now Nikon felt that the time is right to introduce the 1 System to battle with the Sony and Fujifilm entrees.

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Sensor So as not to compete with Nikon’s DSLR line, they introduced a new size sensor to power the 1 Series called the CX. It is smaller than the APS-C sensor and the micro four thirds but don’t let the size fool you. Remember this is a Nikon, and they unleashed their imaging might on this small camera. Images come crisp and clear using Nikon’s strength in software, hardware and optics design. Only the best of Nikon on this 1 Series.

Performance This is where the 1 Series or the J1 excels in. The image engine on this baby is truly exceptional. With the VR (vibration reduction) system borrowed from its lens technologies built in, you can be assured of steady and clear pictures. Focusing is so fast you would surely grab that photo with ease. On its Continuous Electronic mode, this baby can fire 60 frames per second. You will never miss a moment with this camera. For those who love sports, shutter speed can be set to a whopping 1/16000 to capture high speed action. I could go on and on with its performance and we are still espousing it’s still photo functions. Going over the movie functions, this is no push over either. You can shoot at 30, 60, and heaven to goodness 400fps. Due to time constraints, we were not able to test fully the movie side of this camera.

Adaptability Currently, the 1 series offers four lenses in total. You might think is limiting your creativity, but don’t be mislead with this fact. Nikon introduced the FT1, an accessory to hook up your Nikkor F-mount lenses, with the 1 mount system. Just to inform you, auto focus only works with AF- S lenses. AF-D or screw drive lenses wont autofocus on the 1 Series. You can do it manually with the help of a manual focus indicator on the LCD screen. Older F mount Nikkor lenses with no electronics can be used however only in stop down mode using aperture priority or manual mode. Auto focus though is out of the question and no manual focus indicator to help you either. In summary of its adaptability, although its cool that you can do this, however I still can’t imagine why would you need to attach your Nikkor F-mount lenses. The 1 Series choices of lenses are already great at what it was meant for.

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J1

Handling Sporting 5 different colors, and encased in smooth Aluminum Alloy body, this thing looks gorgeous whichever angle you look at it. No matter how beautiful it may be, sadly handling is where it need improvements as per our tests. First up is the smooth finish of the body, they are very difficult to take hold of. The LCD screen at the back adds to the slippery feel of the camera. After researching for a solution for this, Nikon has announced an accessory, a camera grip worth US$69 in Amazon. I wondered why Nikon has to offer this as an accessory when most of its competitor cameras have included this in their design. Secondly the buttons at the back of the camera needs being accustomed to. In manual mode, shutter speed is not clearly marked and it took time for us to finally find it. ISO change would mean fiddling with the menu system as there is no dedicated button for it at the back. For what was mentioned herein as we find at fault, it compensates for performance.

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Final words In finality, set aside its handling, you have a great camera at your fingertips. Just remember what this camera is for and it will serve you well. Nikon engineers thought well of this camera and it was never meant to replace your DSLR. This camera fills in the void when you don’t have your DSLR at your side and wish that you have a similar capability camera on hand. Camera at this level is meant for fun, meaning less thinking on the technicalities, and focus more on life as it happens.

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PHOTO SESSION

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

CHRIS CALUMBERAN | www.chriscalumberan.com

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The Crusader

hris Calumberan, a Dubai based Freelance Professional Photographer, has been around shooting much about everything. Every photographer passes through all types of assignments, and currently his images to date are featured in fashion and beauty magazines. He has worked with various production agencies such as Bareface, Creative Management to name a few, and now working together with Phototechnics. As a veteran from the advertising industry, he knows the inner workings of a conceptual shoot thus he is sought after for his services. For a period of time, the advertising industry has not been easy for a photographer with asian descent, although this was true, he surged forward with own brand of photography. His style of lighting has won him admiration not only from the advertising industry but from the Filipino community as well. Budding photographers can’t help admire the man as he has become the crusader for Filipino pride and of how he has remained humble in the midst of these accolades.

For this issue, he has decided to use the images from Donatella Novello’s bridal beauty shoot. An Italian with a flair for the arts, Donatella is a seasoned make up artist and has been around the fashion industry in Europe and Mid-east. It is in his delight that he finally got the chance to work with Donatella together with Appolina as the Hair Stylist. His model for this shoot is Andreea Zoia, Romanian Beauty whom he had worked many times before. And for the dress, it was designed by no less than Sohad Acouri, a Lebanese fashion designer. To top off the team, Jed Causapin was brought in as an assistant and videographer for the “behind the scenes” coverage. His images from the shoot is shown herein and we would thank Chris Calumberan for allowing us to showcase his talent in our magazine. Thank you also for bearing the Filipino pride and more power to your craft.

For more information of Chris Calumberan’s work, you may visit his portfolio at www.chriscalumberan.com.

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PHOTO SESSION CHRIS CALUMBERAN | www.chriscalumberan.com

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012


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PHOTO SESSION CHRIS CALUMBERAN | www.chriscalumberan.com

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012


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ON FOCUS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

PHOTOGRAPHERS PROFILE

Samer Al Nahhal (NIKON D3) He started his Photography with Sony R1 in 2006 then jumped to DSLR Camera Nikon D300 in 2010. Upon owning the latter, he got fascinated with the flexibilities of its features thus continued to upgrade until getting Nikon D3. Took Photography alone at his early stage but after meeting Mr. Henry Solih and was introduced to Camera Club of Dubai, his Photography went into a different sense. Though still a work in progress in Photography, he eventually wants to learn more about Portrait, Fashion and Events Photography.

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www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

PHOTOGRAPHERS PROFILE

ON FOCUS

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Royce Aldrich G. Centeno (NIKON D7000) From downloading and watching Photography and Photoshop tutorials, this new breed of photographer have been around prints and received tremendous commendations from the Photography’s world itself. Like his inspirations, Nigel Barker and Nikos Papadopoulos, he also would like to do high fashion Photography and earn some income over this hobby. He also longs to be featured in international magazines thus he kept on shooting at his best.

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ON FOCUS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

PHOTOGRAPHERS PROFILE

Myk Reyes (NIKON D300s) A photography buff since high school, he would take his sister’s camera just to take photos of people and places in Cavite. It was only in 2011 when he bought a used Nikon D3000 that he considered he started in photography. Since then he improved his style of photography and so does his gear. He now sports a Nikon D300s and he is slowly being known to be a classical photographer. He continually hones his passion through shoots and he hopes one day would win admiration among his fellow photographers.

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Call for Contributors

Call for Contributors Be part of FFM family! If you are a journalist, photo hobbyist, graphic designer or a writer with burning passions in technology and “photography� join us and make a history! email us at info@fullframemag.com

CREATIVE PEOPLE + YOU

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QUESTIONS FROM THE READER

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

MIKE ZUNIGA

Could I use a zoom lens in shooting small subjects instead of a macro lens? -Jasmine, Nikon D3000 Yes you may use it. However, you will be opening yourself up to other issues like subject magnification imbalances and lens aberrations. Subject magnification is measured in terms of 1:1, this means that subject on film or image is the same as in real life. A subject which is actually 1 inch will appear 1 inch in the image. A subject magnification of 2:1 means the subject in the image appears to be 2 inch whereas in real life its only 1 inch. Macro lenses can produce these kinds of details because of their lens construction and though Zoom lenses can shoot objects at near distances and may appear to be similar to that taken by a macro lens, still it could only produce subject magnification starting with 1:2 ratio. This means that for an inch of actual length of a subject, they may appear to be 2 inches in our images. Second factor is the lens aberrations in terms of optics, this also come into play. Modern macro lenses are designed with “floating” designs so they may focus closer, much like the use of extension tubes and optics are curved in such a way that it corrects the optical distortions as a result of using these zoom lenses for macro photography work.

I’d like to capture faces but with limited focal points on my camera how could I make sharp pictures? -Franco, Canon 450D Think not of your limited focal or focus points but concentrate more as to how to use them properly. To address this, try choosing single point focus on your camera. You will notice that whenever you half press your shutter button you will see only one focus point lighting up in your viewfinder. This is the area by which your camera is focusing on as a sharp image. Simply align your subject’s face on the lighted focus point and do a half press, when you hear a beep or the subject’s face is focused correctly, press the AE-L button (for Nikon) or press the * button (for Canon) to lock on the exposure. Then without releasing this button as of yet, simply re-compose the shot (rule of thirds of example) and press the shutter button to take your shot.

What harm can it do to a picture if I use 1200 ISO? -Andrew , Canon 7D We all know that the higher the ISO we use, the noisier the picture gets. It’s the snowy effect that we see in our photos should we use ISO 1200 and you will lose some of the image’s details. This is why most instructors tell you to shoot at ISO 100-200 as much as possible so you can get crisp and sharp images.

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How could I change the color mode of my pictures from RGB to CMYK? -Marlon, Canon 450D With an opened photo, simply go to Image then click on Mode, then choose CMYK. Commercial printers require this because our photos are recorded in RGB for which their machines› colour space doesn›t match. CMYK colour is not as rich as RGB thus creates dull colored photos when they do try printing it.

How many times do you have to clean a camera? -Kurt, Nikon D90 Cleaning of camera should be done whenever you get a chance. Some do it after every shoot, others do it before. If you are referring to the sensor, you should only clean it if it is necessary. Necessary means there are annoying spots showing up in your pictures and it’s bugging you already.

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www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

ON FOCUS

Dorothea Lange: Photographer of the People

PHOTOGRAPHERS PROFILE

By: Hanna Torcuator

“The camera is an instrument that teaches people how to see without a camera.” Migrant Mother 1936

I

f Dorothea Lange were alive today, she would probably be out in United Nations Plaza, talking with and photographing the homeless. Shy as she was, Dorothea Lange was always interested in people: either her rich clients who sat for their portraits in her early career, or the migrant workers from Oklahoma she spent time with in later years. Ask most people who know her work where and what she photographed and they will reply: bread lines, strikers, tenant farmers, the Central Valley and the Great Plains. Born of second-generation German immigrants on May 26, 1895, in Hoboken, New Jersey, Dorothea Lange was named Dorothea Margaretta Nutzhorn at birth. When she was seven years old, she contracted polio, which left her with an obvious limp. The neighborhood children made fun of her and even her mother, Joan, acted ashamed of her crippled daughter. When she was 12 years old, She dropped her middle name and assumed her mother’s maiden name after her father abandoned them. These two painful events left indelible marks on her life.

when the government hired her to document the effects of the depression, it deepened her compassion for the destitution and despair that she saw all around her. She would walk into camps, where homeless pea-pickers and refugees of the Oklahoma dust bowl were scraping by, sometimes starving to death, and talk to them until they felt comfortable enough to have their pictures taken. Her limp, she thought, created an instant rapport between herself and her subjects. She said that people trusted her more because she didn’t appear “whole and secure” in the face of their poverty and insecurity. Although she got her start and made most of her money taking portraits of wealthy people, Lange preferred the deeper challenge of photographing the real human condition. Wherever there was social upheaval, or quiet suffering, Lange was there with a compassionate eye to record and report. During the depression, the government created work for writers, scholars and artists through various documentary assignments, and Lange was fortunate to get such a position. She took pictures of the labor strikes in San Francisco. She traveled to the Deep South with her partner and husband, Paul Taylor, photographing out-of-work sharecroppers and their families. She went to Oklahoma to take pictures of dust-bowl emigrants, and went up and down California, meeting and photographing the homeless families who had come in search of work. During this time she took “Migrant Mother” which was to become her most famous picture.

When her father walked out on the family. They neither saw nor heard from him again. They moved into the home of Sophie Lange, the children’s maternal grandmother, and great-aunt Caroline. Her mother took a job as a librarian in Manhattan. It was during those long walks through downtown Manhattan to meet her mother after school that Dorothea discovered a wealth of visual imagery and decided that she wanted to take photographs. Following the attack on Pearl Harbor, she took heart-rending pictures of the Japanese families as they were evacuated from their homes and sent Dorothea was fiercely independent. Instead of becoming a teacher as to prison camps. her mother wanted, she went uptown to the studio of a famous portrait photographer, Arnold Genthe, and asked him for a job. She was hired, By the 1960s, Lange was a nationally known photographer who was and her life’s work began. She learned how to set up a camera and surrounded by an extensive network of family and friends. She was also studio lights, met many rich and famous people, and studied the artistry famous (on a smaller scale) for her Thanksgiving dinners, which she with which Genthe portrayed people: he didn’t just snap their picture; he spent weeks planning for and preparing, and which culminated in huge seemed to make the camera understand the people. This sense that an gatherings where the ritual would begin with a reading of the proclamation understanding of a subject was essential in making a portrait was truly of Thanksgiving. the artistic part of photography, and something that Dorothea would take In 1965, the last year of her life, Dorothea Lange was honored by a with her for the rest of her career. retrospective of her work at the Museum of Modern Art in New York City. Although she was never able to get rid of the vestiges of polio, Dorothea Elizabeth Partridge, daughter of photographer Rondal Partridge who dropped the memory of her father almost completely. She took her worked as Lange’s assistant for many years and whose family Lange took mother’s maiden name, Lange, as her own last name, and refused to into her own, has written about this remarkable artist in the biography speak of her father, even to her own children. The pain of her childhood, Restless Spirit: the Life and Work of Dorothea Lange. Dorothea Lange died however, gave her a fuller sense of what suffering meant, and later on, October 11, 1965.

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EXCLUSIVE

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

AHMED GINAWI |

Ahmed A. Ginawi

Sudanese Telecommunication Engineer, Photography Enthusiast

How did you end up with Photography? I started photography when one of my neighbors gave a camera as a gift before heading back to his country. Who inspired you or helped you appreciate the art of Photography? I got inspired by some of my friends works, and it was my friend Moawia who encouraged me to switch to digital (DSLR)

however for composition and artistic version I still keep on learning every time I shoot, so I still consider myself a student. What is the most challenging Photography experience you had to date? A photography trip to Ethiopia

Describe to us how you did your very first shot (with DSLR or point-and-shoot camera)? I started shooting family members and events with a a Yashica camera SLR using film.

What are the best and worst things about Photography? The worst in photography it takes some precious time away from your family. The best is expressing self vision through the lens and brings the photographer closer to the subject.

Did you have formal studies in photography? I don’t have a formal studies in photography but attended some worskhops.

How long have you been doing Photography? I started more than 15 years back, and but has taken it seriously for about 4 years now.

What are your Photography achievements to date? My works have been featured in “Professions By Artisans Eyes” (Ajman Culture & Media Department), also in environment competition of Abu Dhabi Heritage Club and Environmental Research Unit titled “Desert Blooms with Life”, and in some news letters and small exhibition about Sudan in a school in Dubai.

If long enough, can you describe the difference of Photography from then to now? It was hard when using film, number of shots are limited, no on-the-spot review, and tough post processing, so the shot has to be the right one at the first time. It is much easier nowadays and provides a room for creativity which is an advantage.

How advanced are you in terms of Photography know-how? Technically, I have a very good knowledge of camera setting and terminologies,

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What is the importance of Photography in the society? There’s a lot of important aspects of photography in the society, examples are: spread the culture in the world, maintain historical record for future generations, family memories, assist journalists to convey the news, express emotional, political, beauty, nature, architectural. The camera lens captures and represent the beautiful and the ugly. Which lens you cannot live without? 70-200 If you will be leaving Photography, what other things you’d like to do? Post processing. How would you like to be remembered as a photographer? This is a difficult question, I want to be remembered for any good works I have done whether it is related to photography or not.

Which famous photographer would you like to meet and why that person?I love to meet any photographer to learn their ways, techniques and vision.

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ON THE SPOT

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

WILLFREDO DY | www.pbase.com/willfreddy

The Photography Come Back Kid By Michael Zuniga

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fashion designer by trade, a photographer by heart. This epitomizes the person, Will Dy. Started designing dresses as a teenager and reaching to the level wherein his designs are being photographed by a master no less than Wig Tysman himself. It is during these shooting sessions with Wig that he was bitten by the photography bug. He shot first using film for sometime then he stopped when the digital cameras came out. He felt that going digital was not an outlet for his creative juncture so he stopped momentarily. It was another master photographer that brought him back to digital photography. Will, as he is known to his friends, saw an image made by Manny Librodo and he liked how digital cameras have evolved and could be adapted to suit this shooting style. He bought a used Nikon D2H to start off his digital photography journey and kept on moving forward. A true believer of improvement, everyday for him is a continuous challenge towards excellence. His photos in facebook would certify to this fact. Each photo would garner the nod of his friends in a way that the number of likes would attest to his creative prowess. His photographic style have hints of Annie Liebovitz in them, attitude that of Richard Avedon, and follows simplistic rules of Ansel Adams. Even with these influences and the quality of his photos, he still believes he hasn’t found his masterpiece. This is why he is continually shooting and trying out different concepts and themes and collaborations. What future awaits for this designer photographer holds, we will have to see. We see now the quality of his work, and at the rate it’s improving, we can say that his future is bright in the photography world.

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ON THE SPOT

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WILLFREDO DY | www.pbase.com/willfreddy

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WILLFREDO DY | www.pbase.com/willfreddy

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ON THE SPOT

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BEHIND THE LENS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

ROCKY GATHERCOLE COLLECTION |

“Role Reversal ” I

t was a quiet Friday morning in Sharjah and there was something stirring in the neighborhood. It was Rocky Gathercole whipping up another artistic storm with FFM. He noticed that during fashion editorial shoots, it was always the men who were the shooting and the females were the models. When his turn came up to be feature in FFM, he wanted to do something else. He wanted this time female photographers shooting male models. He chose the 4 females he needed to pull off his artistic concepts into a reality. He really pushed himself to the limit this time and FFM was happy he did pull this one off pretty well.

The first concept he created was called Human Anatomy. He wants to paint a human skeleton on the upper half of the model and let the bottom part remain as it is. He was challenged by this since he can draw, being a fashion designer, however he never did body paint. So he pushed his abilities to the limit with this one. He was glad he chose Pauline San Jose Agrabio to shoot this one. The second concept is the Male Adonis. This was a simple concept however a tedious one, since the male model will be painted in gold all over. He chose Belle Foronda for this shoot and he is confident that she can pull this one off, for which she did. The male model was very photogenic even with the gold paint and all, and the shoot was over in a matter of 15mins. What a feat for Belle.

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The third one, Rocky simply called it Color Blocking. He painted the model with color green and asked beforehand the photographer, Czarro Ann Infante-de Guzman to shoot it then change the background to orange. Rocky wanted the contrast between the green paint and green apples to contradict with the color orange. The last shoot but not the least, he chose Mae Calimquim to finish off the day’s shoot. He called this Glow-in-the-dark concept. What a way to end the shoot with a model bathed in black paint and we used flourscent colors on the guy. Not only that, Mae even bought ultraviolet lighting to punch out the colors on the male model’s body. The effect was simply stunning that Rocky was truly happy how things work out. Overall he was happy with what the photographers he had chosen and offered this to the rest. A photographer must also be an artist and be original. They should push their creative art to the fullest and what they think is good or beautiful. Yes he believes one must attend workshops as well, but he suggests emulating the teacher, not copying which is different. By doing what you think is right, you can let loose the artist in you and prosper.

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Photo by: Bernard Gonzalez

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BEHIND THE LENS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

ROCKY GATHERCOLE COLLECTION | Title: Male Anatomy

Pauline San Jose Agrabio Photographer

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BEHIND THE LENS

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ROCKY GATHERCOLE COLLECTION | Title: Statue of Adonis

Belle Foronda Photographer

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BEHIND THE LENS

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ROCKY GATHERCOLE COLLECTION | Title: Color Blocking

Czarro Ann Infante-de Guzman Photographer

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BEHIND THE LENS

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ROCKY GATHERCOLE COLLECTION | Title: Glow in the dark

Mae Calimquim Photographer

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SHUTTER

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GROUP PROFILE | Shootercada

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Shootercada Photographers Circle S

hootercada Photographers Circle, also known as “SPC” within the Filipino photography community of UAE, is a non-profit association of Filipino Photographers – professional and amateur – based in Abu Dhabi, it was formed by four enthusiasts banding together since February 2009 for the love of photography. The group’s number swelled to 42 over the period of two years and has developed undeniable camaraderie amongst its members. The group values quality over quantity, which is why membership is by invitation and hopefuls are carefully evaluated by the assigned committee before getting accepted. Although membership is essentially free, a minimal amount of 150 dirhams is required upon sign-up and annual renewal to cover administrative costs incurred by the group. Month after month, the group’s advisors and senior members deliver workshops on different aspects of photography, occasionally; these activities might involve models that would allow members practice their acquired knowledge during the training. Moreover, junior members are consistently encouraged to attend highly specialized seminars by industry bigwig instructors like Manny Librodo, Jay Alonzo, Dustein Sibug, Jay Jallorina and Lito Sy among others. Members also frequent Dubai and Abu Dhabi photography themed event like the GPP foto-weekends and Saadiyat Al Manarat Photography exhibition. Aside from monthly activities such as mini-workshops tailor-made for the members, photo walks and fun-shoots, the group actively participates with community driven activities at the Philippine

Embassy. In fact, they are the photographers of choice for the Philippine Independence Day Celebrations in the past 2 years. In between monthly happenings inside the group, they make it a point to get involved in various charitable community projects in and around Abu Dhabi and their involvement is not limited to Filipino communities only, they engage in various activities photographing events such as charity walks, fun runs, Earth Hour, fund raising campaigns and many others. The group’s annual plan which is spread out monthly includes attending charitable events, conducting basic and advance workshops for members and non-members, out of town photo trips and family fun days. At the end of this term, members are gearing up to stage an exhibition of some of their best works. The group’s ambition is for its members to achieve full potential in their chosen field of photography by helping them develop their photographic skills, both technically and creatively. It aims to provide a well-connected peer network, promote experimentation and generally socialize with fellow photographers. As per their assertion, “We may be serious in our passion, but most are wacky in nature. Having fun is one of our priorities along with education and community service.” SPC is the first Filipino photography group accredited by the Embassy of the Philippines in Abu Dhabi.

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WORKSHOP

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XANDER ANGELES | FullFrame Magazine

Organizers: FullFrame Photography Magazine & Work Flow Exposed Designer: Angel De Jesus Head MUA: Bobby Caparas Asst. MUA and Hair Stylist: Joseph Tayco Models: Megan Lambert, Aleysa, Inessa, Inna, Omid, Abdulla and Abdulla

X ANDER ANGELES

MASTER CLASS W O R K S H O P new template FFM.indd 48

Sponsors: Grandstores UAE/Nikon, Paparazzi Shoes Greenbelt Lounge, Dream Cam Shop, Gulf Color Film Lab, Al Qadi Travel Atendees: Harry Cruz Arian Marcos Donnell Gumiran Roy Francis Manalang Gabriel John Rimaldo Merchel Peter Caguan Noel Reyes Adelle Lumalang

Shelly Idea Catherine Surla Brian Cotaoco Antoniette David Joshua Langurayan Sappho Rodriguez Eric Baluya Jeffrey Delatado Ali Nawaz

Ric Meily Rozen Antonio John Soriano Myk Reyes Karlo Joan Gadian Ronnie Diez Jon De Guzman Jr. Mabelle Ramos Koi Reyes

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WORKSHOP

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XANDER ANGELES | FullFrame Magazine

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WORKSHOP

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XANDER ANGELES | FullFrame Magazine

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X ANDER ANGELES

WINNERS

MASTER CLASS W O R K S H O P

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2nd Price

3rd Price

Photo by: Brian Haw Cotaoco

Photo by: Myk Reyes

1st

Price

Photo by: Merchel Peter Caguan

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SHUTTER

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GROUP PROFILE | Spectrum

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Photography Group Jeddah K.S.A When, where and how did you form the group? It is officially Spectrum – The Filipino Photographers’ Realm on June 10, 2011 during the founding assembly of the group at La Parilla Restaurant in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The group emerged when students at a series of basic photography workshops unite to continue the quest for learning, friendship and camaraderie, as well as to have an identity as a group. What made you thought that you have to create your own group? To create an organization that will help each member hone their skills in photography while enjoying friendship and camaraderie. 3. How did you decide on the name of the group? We collected suggestions from members. The members cast their votes by “liking” the suggested name. Spectrum eventually came out a winner

6. Having said that, our activities are not aimed to make a profit, but to really help the members become better at photography. We are also involved in projects that involves the community, like environmental clean-up drives and outreach programs. Is your group well-equipped in terms of photography gadgets and accessories? Not everybody is equipped with gadgets and accessories, but we are sharing gadgets among members. Are you hosting workshops and seminars? If so, what are those? When and where did it happen? So far, we had Back to Basics: Basic Photography and Basic Lighting Workshop last October 14, 2012 as the Batch 1, and on November 4, 2011, Batch 3 will be on March 2012, and it is usually exclusive for our members. Occasionally, we have Photoshop and Lightroom sessions.

What is the main objective or mission of this group? As per Constitution and By Laws, the group’s objectives are as follows: 1. To unite all Filipinos based in the Western Region of Saudi Arabia who are interested in Photography. 2. To create a strong bond in sharing and creating work that is beneficial to everyone. 3. To promote advancement in the field of photography, through interactions with advance practitioners. 4. To facilitate the exchange of information, knowledge, ideas and experience.

Photo by: Jasper Desamito

5. To foster a high sense of professionalism, fellowship, brotherhood, and camaraderie among Spectrum members.

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How many members do you have so far? Are you planning to expand? So far, we have around 80 members and we welcome those who want to be part of the group.

Do you think this group has helped its members to excel in Photography? In one way or another, it has. Teaching them the basics has led them to discover the possibilities that photography brings.

How can a photographer join your group? A photographer can join our group by expressing their intent, signing up membership form and paying a minimal amount of membership fee. Having signed as a member they are expected to be part of the group’s different activities and projects based on their availability.

Who composes the group? Like what kind of individuals? OFWs working in Western Region of KSA - Nurses, IT Professionals, Engineers,Etc. and some members are photographers by profession.

Our group acknowledges that photography is our passion, yet it cannot go above our priorities like work and family. What are the things your group did that you don’t want to to do again? None. We treat not-so-good experiences as lessons for the betterment of our group. What are the challenges/complications your group encountered since it was created? Interpersonal conflicts that almost lead to dissolution of the group, but a few fought for the group to remain. There is even a time that we need to decide if we will retain or replace Spectrum as the name of our group, and start anew, but whatever conflicts we had, it made us what we are now. Common challenges are of course on the leadership i.e., officers on resignation and vacant posts, as to members, conflicts of schedules that leads to absence during group’s activities.

Of course, that includes family men and women, singles and from different backgrounds yet united by one common passion – photography. Who is your group’s inspiration or a photographer/group of photographers your group look up to? Inspiration varies from individual stand point but we are fond of Filipino photographers who have great achievements in the field of photography – Manny Librodo, Parc Cruz, Maricirs Fabe Carlos, Yeng Baet, George Tapan and Edwin Loyola. We are watching out for the next Filipino to make it in the international scene. How do you want your group to be remembered? We want the group to be remembered as a group of photographers who are down-toearth and willing to lend a helping hand. A group which promotes a sense of family and professionalism.

Photo by: Romy Israel

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DEPTH OF FOCUS

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JAY ALONZO | www.jayalonzo.com

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The New Kid in the

Block

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few years ago, a soft spoken photographer from Manila breezed through town and did a one day workshop. I personally was there to witness that event and I thought he was just another lecturer passing through. Never did I realize that person would be smitten by a beautiful OFW and in just few years time, would finally settle down here in Abu Dhabi. Recently he opened his studio and he had the Philippine Ambassador to the UAE to be his special guest of honor. He is now the new kid in the block, hoping to carve a niche in the UAE photography market. Now that he has entrenched himself in Abu Dhabi, his mornings would be changed forever. Previously, he starts his day in Manila with hot coffee to perk himself up. Now he has added Chai Tea to his habit as an alternative choice, a cultural adaptation on his part. Jay A as fondly called by his students, started his career as a marketing student. Never did he envision himself to be an accomplished photographer he is today. If it was his choice, he’d rather be a commercial pilot or another employee working for a big corporation. He was already on track to his “dream” when he was sidetracked to do some photography work. It started out with taking his own images for his college reports. His classmates took notice of this that even after college, he was commissioned to do some images for magazines and newspapers. He then became a commercial photographer. To further enhance his skills, he enrolled in course provided by a government institution offering livelihood projects. Imagine photography offered side by side with Mud Crab Fattening, Baking and Flower Arrangements. After finishing this photography course, he became a true believer of workshops, he believed this so much that he eventually became a lecturer himself. He is teaching his own brand of photography and workflow to his students. Stick to the basics, he always tell his class, he is like a Mr. Miyagi in the Karate Kid movie (not the Jacky Chan remake), wherein he teaches the young Daniel (Ralph Macchio in real life) to stick to the basics. No matter how Daniel clamors for advanced teachings, like his counterparts were getting, Mr. Miyagi still taught him the basics. The Crane Technique might be out moded by the standards then, but the basics build foundation. Much like in photography, with a solid foundation in basic skills, the student will go forward with his own style or technique in the future. He further mentioned that a photographer should shoot according to his perception and senses. He must be steadfast not to be influenced by other sources and shoot what he feels is right for his taste. Should he continue doing what is in his heart, his images will show consistency. This consistency will be noticed by his peers, thus becoming his style and is recognized as his own. Jay A’s style is very much noticeable in his works, clean, clear, and almost straight out of the Camera shots. He is meticulous as he is attentive to details in his shoots, and this what makes Jay A a heavy favorite in the commercial photography arena. For his clients, he would like them to feel that for once in their life, their image was captured at the best of their prime. For his students, he would like to be an influential force in the former’s photography and in a way changed his life for the better through photography. In summary, Sir Jay A, even with the accolades he has gotten, has continued to be a shy, soft spoken and unselfish person as he is now. These traits what makes Jay A, a crowd favorite in workshops, a trusted deliverer of great images in the commercial photography world. What was marketing’s loss was photography’s gain in the end.

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DEPTH OF FOCUS

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JAY ALONZO | www.jayalonzo.com

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DEPTH OF FOCUS

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JAY ALONZO | www.jayalonzo.com

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DEPTH OF FOCUS

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JAY ALONZO | www.jayalonzo.com

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WORKSHOP

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“I DO”

RAYMOND FORTUN | Lightcathers

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EXCLUSIVE

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

SAM CORAN |

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ong before, Sam always wanted to keep photos of people he meets. Seeing those smiles on their faces makes his heart leap. With this reason he shifted to DSLR and embraced the kaleidoscope world of Modern Photography. Soon after that, he enrolled in New York Institute of Photography and since then he never stop engaging himself to improve his craft through continuous studies and training. Because of his perseverance, hard work and passion – it is without doubt that his award winning photographs have ended up 1st Place in Dubai in Your Eyes Photography Competition by Gulf Photo Plus, Nikon Middle East and 7 Days Newspaper. Sam also finds sense of achievement whenever he’s being hired by a client or effectively executes an external flash. But the most important accomplishment for him is when his photographs create a feeling of wanting to look back on how young, fun and beautiful his subjects/clients were once in this journey called life. “Each and every individual I meet has fascinated me and documenting it in the form of Photography seems to be the best way to relive memories of the past”. As for this awardwinning photographer, his inspirations is not just a question of “who” but, “what”. His inspirations are the collective consciousness of shared traits and circumstances between him and the people he spend time shooting. The every result of his Photography lies from the wonderful experiences of working together and understanding each other. With all of these tucked into his long-loved craft, Sam admits the costly requirements of his passion. A hundred dollars would not be enough to get the satisfaction he craves in his Photography.

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CREATORS OF BEAUTY

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FASHION DESIGNER | MAKEUP ARTIST | Paz Calaguian

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Angel De Jesus Fashion Designer

A B.S Psychology under graduate of Centro Escolar University he decided to study instead Business Opportunity Fashion under the wings of Sir Yuki of Cora Doloroso. Angel’s Houte Couture 1001 which he opened last year caters mostly to local Arab ladies and his unique creations combined with flair and imagination that is so feminine is very much love by his clienteles. Angel’s designs are inspired from the works of Suhair Murad, Dolce & Gabbana and Galliano.

Photo by: Donnell Gumiran

Photo by: Donnell Gumiran

Photo by: Donnell Gumiran

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Paz Calaguian | FASHION DESIGNER | MAKEUP ARTIST

CREATORS OF BEAUTY

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Photo by: Donnell Gumiran

Bobby Victa Caparas Photo by: Donnell Gumiran

Makeup artist & Hair Stylist Bobby Caparas, one of the most famous make up artists in the industry of UAE Photography started playing with make-up when he was a teenager. He used to hang around in his friend’s salon, Ding Sambile who he also considers his mentor to watch him apply make-up on his clients. Over the years Bobby was able to honed his skills in make-up and hair styling and with his talent he was able to gain the trust and confidence of most his clients, models and photographers alike. He uses MAC as his make-up brand and loves to do Avant Garde and Fantasy style of make-up. Some of the known artists he have worked with are Charice Pempenco, Sarah Geronimo, Lani Misalucha, Ai Ai Delas Alas, Mark Bautista, Willie Revillame and a lot more.

Photo by: Donnell Gumiran

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CREATORS OF BEAUTY

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FASHION DESIGNER | MAKEUP ARTIST | Paz Calaguian

Joseph Tayco

Makeup artist & Hair Stylist Diosa as he is known to his close friends, never thought that he will become a make- up artist and a good one! With friends influences he finally decided to test the water in make up and hair styling and with his creative mind and confidence he was able to achieve a name for himself in the challenging world of fashion industry. He drew his inspiration from his mother, who have supported him ever since he started in 1994. Like most make-up artists he loves to use Mac Brand of make-up because of it’s quality. From simple hairstyling to avant garde, Joseph does it with perfection!

Photo by: Royce Aldrich Centino

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Paz Calaguian | FASHION DESIGNER | MAKEUP ARTIST

CREATORS OF BEAUTY

Ivy Peralta

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Makeup artist & Hair Stylist Born in Dagupan City and grew up in the province of La Union, San Fernando City, drawing and painting has always been part of Ivy’s life. He started his career as a Make-up Artist at the age of 21 after pursuing his studies in Business Advertising at Union Christian College in La Union. At the same time he started to design evening and wedding gowns for his friend’s clients. After graduating in college, he decided to train with Bobby Borja a multi and international champion for Hair and Make –up Artist base in their town. Just like any typical person from the province, he decided to move to Manila to find a greener pasture. There he enrolled at Academy Salon of Arts where he met Edwin Aguilar a famous celebrity make up artist in the Philippine Cinema and Fashion industry. It was not an easy ride for him with lack of guidance but from working hard, he worked harder to reach his goal. Finally he started garnering awards for best bridal and commercial make up and fantasy make up which gave him the opportunity to worked with celebrated fashion and make up artist in the Philippines. With his ambitious streak it was not enough for him, he decided to try again his luck in Dubai which landed him a job in the salon as a manicurist. But opportunity always finds it’s way to Ivy, he met some people who helped him finally find his calling as a make-up artist in Dubai. Now Ivy Kep Peralta is a household name amongst the designers and photographers.

Photo by: Radi Morada

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CREATORS OF BEAUTY

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FASHION DESIGNER | MAKEUP ARTIST | Paz Calaguian

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Joey Baluyot

Fashion Designer Joey Baluyot’s life and Philosophy is “Always evolve, don’t just adapt to whatever is in fashion. Be not stagnant, nothing in the world remains the same, change is inevitable. Fashion should not only speak your mind but also tell people WHO you are.” Hails from Lubao, Pampanga, Kuya Joey as he is fondly called love for fashion is rooted in his early years, but it was in his young adulthood when his talent became truly apparent. His innate eyes for fashion was enhance through his training from Don Honorio Ventura College of Arts and Trade. His humble beginning did not discourage him from pursuing his dreams, rather it drove him to learn more and reach greater heights. From being a simple employee in a well-known couture shop in Jeddah Saudi Arabia catering a glamorous gown for a member of a Royal Family, he established his own business. From one happy and satisfied client to another, his unique genius propelled him upward in the fashion arena. Today, he is considered as one of the most sought-after highly respected and well-loved couturier. Joey Baluyot has been in the business for 20 years and still very active in the fashion industry by continuously innovating and revolutionizing the status quo in the business. He is known for his enigmatic, gothic and most of all unorthodox approach. He say’s he doesn’t want to limit himself. He just lets his imagination run wild and free. He believes that creativity is a state of mind.

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Photo by: Royce Aldrich Centino

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‘wag mong itago sa baul! Kung ikaw ay may natatabing litrato sa baul na pwedeng ipagmalaki, maaari mo itong ipadala sa info@fullframemag.com at mapabilang sa hanay ng mga naggagandahang larawan.

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RANDOM CLICKS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

PHOTOGRAPHERS GALLERY |

Photo by: Mark Tomboc

Photo by: Darryl Espiritu

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Photo by: Christopher Edralin

Photo by: Guiller Velasco

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RANDOM CLICKS

www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

PHOTOGRAPHERS GALLERY |

Photo by: Darryl Espiritu

Photo by: Gabriel John Rimando

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www.fullframemag.com | Issue 4 | 2012

JHOEL VALENZONA

POINT OF VIEW

Why Men are into Fashion Photography?!

A

s a male photographer, I believe that most men in this field like to express their imaginations, interpretations, ideas and creativity. Like the painters, artists and sculptors during early days, they have their own style and vision on how they will be acknowledge as an artist. We, on the other hand, interpret and visualize our arts through Fashion Photography. Personally, I have this huge interest on this type of Photography because I always like to be a model when I was young. With this dream, I created a persona that will showcase my skills in Photography should I become a model. I also like to take photos of female models as a subject in Fashion Photography because with them I can create and visualize a large number of ideas and concepts. From Vintage look up to Futuristic concept, they can easily give justice on numerous ideas and looks that i want to have in my Photography. Theoretically, men are born thinker and creative! Through our passion in creating new ideas, concepts and interpretations we use Photography as our tools in expressing our own individual arts.

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CLASSIFIEDS

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COMMUNITY SERVICE |

Services Gabriel John Rimando

Brian Haw Cotaoco

Meiji Sangalang

Alvin Mark Buen

Wedding / Portraits / Fashion Contacts: 0561130989 gabby.juan@gmail.com Portrait Photographer Contact: 055-1855847 meijsangalang@gmail.com

Sport / Event Photographer Cantact: 0555570345 brian.h.cotaoco@gmail.com Wedding Photographer Cantact: 0509057408 alvinmarkbuen@yahoo.com

Eugene “Soy� Caasi

Myk Reyes

Eugene Santos

Royce Aldrich G. Centeno

Jay Morales

Sam Coran

Photographer Contact: 050-8647584 abzmed@yahoo.com

Event Photographer Contacts: 050-6529931 eugenesantos3@gmail.com

Portrait, Portfolio, Wedding, Product, Interior, and Event Cantact: 0555703641 jjmorales1978@gmail.com

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Portrait Photographer Cantact: 0503986165 myk_0312@yahoo.com

FREE

Line Ads fo r your pho tography related bus iness or se rvice. Sim email your ply yout AD de tails to info@fullfr amemag.c om

Portrait Photographer Cantact: 0552819329 mr_stageactor24@yahoo.com

Portraits and Lifestyle Photographer Cantact: 0555813001 scoran@gmail.com www.samcoran.com

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Workshop Fee : 350 AED Proceeds will be donated to Mission Save Kids with Cancer

For Inquiries : Shelly Idea : 0556338598 Allan Polina : 0502652426 Wallei Trinidad : 0556272644

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FullFrame Photography Magazine Issue 4  

Fashion Photography

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