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Volume 1 | Issue 8 | Middle East

NEW LOOK! m

ore artic more tips, mles, inspirationsore

Depth Of Focus

Celia Peterson Standing Witness to the Frame of Time Sean Armenta

Seeing Culture through Today’s Lifestyle Emirates Photography

Lifestyle Photography: The Story of Existence Jay Alonzo

Capturing Emotions as a Way of Life Paul Aiken

Fujifilm X-F1 Fujifilm has launched the latest addition to its highly acclaimed X series.

GODOX QT 600 A View from a Professional Photographer


Dubai Office & Showroom: No.905, Riqqa Al Buteen Plaza, Opposite To Concord Hotel, Al Maktoum Road, Deira, Dubai, U.A.E. Mobile: +97 15 5554 6811 Tel: (+971) 42980059 Fax: (+971) 42980058 P.O.BOX: 80556 E-mail: dubai@altontrading.com


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Issue 1 | November 2011 | Middle East

Photography Magazine

Photography Magazine

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Volume 1 | Issue 4 | Middle East

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Cover Story

Meiji Sangalang

Why Men Are Into Fashion Photography?!

Behind the Lens PJ Tiongson

A Desert Surprise Do’s & Don’ts Discover Obscura

“Role Reversal”

Engr. Milo Torres

15 Quick Tips To Better Photos After Dark

Work Flow Exposed

The Challenge

Questions From The Readers

Man with Simple Dreams

Jay Morales

Donnell Gumiran

Behind The Lens

The Challenge

Jophel Botero Ybiosa

Beyond Passion Edwin Loyola

Small Things Big Result

Richard Schneider

Edwin Allan Riguer

Rocky Gathercole

Mike Malate

Eugene Santos / Michael Cruz

Off Camera Lighting

Depth Of Focus

Toy Photography

Jay Calaguian / Noel Garcia

Find out how

Portrait Photography Tips And Methods

Yuri Arcurs

Osama Al Zubaidi

of Photography in UAE

Jhoel Valenzo

World’s Top Selling Stock Photographer

Depth of Focus

9 Ways To Beat The High Cost Of Photography

Depth Of Focus

Jay Alonzo

A Manny Librodo Exclusive

Chris Calumberan

What’s Inside

Gadget Review

Post Processing Tutorials

Do It Yourself

Workshop Schedules

Group Profile

Issue 1 “Pilot”

What’s Inside

Camera Guide

Extreme Post Processing Tutorials

Tips & Tricks

Get the Most Out of your Point and Shoot Camera

Issue 2 “Point & shoot”

What’s Inside

Gadgets Review

Basic Tutorials

Workshops

Issue 3 “Outdoor” issue 3 final cover.indd 1

Photography Magazine

Photo Gallery

Group Profile

What’s Inside

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Camera Review

Basic Tutorials

Workshops

Issue 4 “Fashion”

Photography Magazine

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Volume 1 | Issue 6 | Middle East

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Guidelines for Travel Photography

Black and White Photography; The World Without Color

10 Travel Photography Tips

Camera Review

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Tutorials

Issue 5 “Travel”

Workshops

Photo Gallery

Group Profile 5/22/12 12:19 AM

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Ethics of a Photographer

Camera Review

Tips Tutorials

Workshops

Issue 6 “Black & White”

Photo Gallery

Group Profile 9/3/12 11:42 AM

Post Production Essential Skills

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Alex Jeffries

FULLFRAME MAGAZINE

Progressive Tips on Black & White Imagery

FULLFRAME MAGAZINE

Mosh Lafuente What’s Inside

Mario Cardenas AED15

Jay Alonzo

Why Do You Need to Convert Your photo from RGB to CMYK?

fullframe

Depth of Focus

The Art of Black and White Photography

Depth of Focus

o Fo F

Focal Points

photography magazine

Tips on How to Shoot on Low Light

Gear Up

Janine Khouri Elias

The Changing Picture of Photography

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Feature, Performance & User Experience

issue 7 cover.indd 1

NIKON D600 Exclusive launch event held at The Armani Hotel

11/25/12 12:54 PM

Issue 7 “Wedding”

FullFrame is a Photography magazine not just for photo enthusiasts but for those who have taste for art, beauty and creativity. It is designed to take a deeper look into photography’s history, influence and modern agenda. With undying passion, the team behind this publication is taking photography in a different ground and hoping one day to rest the art and craft into its rightful place among the pedestal. Indeed, an impact is what we seek that would also encourage society to look unto the glamorous and not so superficial side of photography – an irony that lures the curious mind. This editorial is intended to demystify the use of modern equipment in photography by emphasizing practical use of the camera in the field, highlighting the method rather than the technical. It has been conceptualized to stimulate the photo enthusiasts to enhance their recreational enjoyment through photography and to satisfy their needs as amateur and professional photographers.

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Volume 01 | Issue 08 | 2013

Photo Gallery

Group Profile


Editor

Volume 1 | Issue 8 | Middle East

Paz Calaguian

NEW LOO

K! more article more tips, mos, inspirations re

Art Director: Chris Lleses

Depth Of Focus

Writer / Researcher:

Celia Peterson

Gericult Paulo Cosuco

Standing Witness to the Frame of Time

Writer

Sean Armenta

Arnold Pasillas II

Seeing Culture through Today’s Lifestyle

I.T. Manager:

Lifestyle Photography: The Story of Existence

Emirates Photography

Derick Venzon

Jay Alonzo

Capturing Emotions as a Way of Life

Graphic Design Jeff Inocencio

Paul Aiken

PR & Events: Deo Macaraig Photographer: Dennis Ong

Writer Contributors: Jay Alonzo | Janine Khouri Elias | Michael Cruz | Alex Jeffries | Celeste Van Rooyen | Emil Latumbo |

Photographer Contributors: Celeste Van Rooyen | Ashley Adriatico | Jan Michael Vincent Castillo

Special Thanks to: Yen Reb | Mr.Maneef Mohammad | Mr. Abdul Jaleel | Mr. Bader Al Nomani | Gulf Photo Plus | Light House Studio | Advance Media | Majestic Hotel | Saladicious Restaurant |

Fujifilm X-F1 Fujifilm has launched the latest addition to its highly acclaimed X series.

GODOX QT 600 A View from a Professional Photographer

issue 8 cover.indd 1

2/12/13 12:35 PM

As we open a new chapter in our life, get underway our new services under FullFrame Studio and reach another milestone under our belt, what better way to start up the pages but to deliver this 8th issue under its fold. Much have changed to our publication and through our supporters great deal of enthusiasm, we continue to move forward. We devoted time, effort and placed our heart to every page with in this issue, hoping that each photos we share and every words we utter will reach our reader’s inner passion, inspire them to continue their undying devotion to keep the flare intact. For this issue, we want to highlight the very essence of Lifestyle Photography and its influence not only with the art but with the industry as well. See how the style had merge with the commercial side of the craft and how enticing the discipline had became and thrilled both spectators and artists alike. Get an exclusive peek of the final frames created by our beloved Tony Karam as he recreated an early 60’s Metro Bistro that graces the Cover Page of our magazine. And between these pages, witness as we expanded our wings and featured not only locally acclaimed photographers in the Middle East but internationally commended artists like Sean Armenta as well. This issue of FFM’s Lifestyle Photography had truly tested our limit, as we try to conquer the odds. Nevertheless we are confident that everybody will find something interesting inside. So from the FullFrame Team we express our greatest gratitude to everyone who contributed for this issue and for everyone’s undying encouragement. Enjoy running through the pages and as always, we hope to bring more inspiration to all. Once again, Be Inspired! Keep your eyes wide open!

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info@fullframemag.com Tel.: +971 4 441.53.47 Fax: +971 4 442.58.47 Mob: +971 56 276. 1179 info@fullframemag.com www.fullframemag.com

Team


36 Depth Of Focus Celia Peterson

Content Volume 1 Issue 8

10 Cover Story the Dark 12 Amidst Pete Eckert Photography 14 Lifestyle By: Celeste Van Rooyen Session 16 Photo Ashley Adriatico Focus 22 On Stuart Flisher / Petr Probst Artist 26 The Paul Aiken

29 Review Michael Cruz

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The Artist Paul Aiken

31 Techniques Emil Latumbo 34 What’s New of Focus 36 Depth Celia Peterson

44 TIPS By: Rhonda Callow 46 GPP Photography Festival

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On focus

the Frame 48 On Celeste Van Rooyen the Lens 54 Behind Sean Armenta

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Lifestyle Photography Celia Van Rooyen


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Emirates Photography Winners 2012

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Role Reversal Rocky Gathercole

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Random Clicks

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On the Frame Celeste Van Rooyen

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What’s New

Photography Competition 60 Emirate About the Competition Lifestyle Photography 66 My By: Jay Alonzo

69 FullFrame Studio Opening clicks 72 Random Photographers Gallery

79 Classifieds Community Sevice

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Behind the Lens Sean Armenta

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Cover Story


COVER STORY | Tony Karam

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being a Lebanese, had graced our magazine and provided us the cover page of this issue. And having Lifestyle Photography as the center piece of this copy, nobody else could be more perfect to handle the project but this lad who is the most sought after photographer and has esteemed client base such as Chanel, Dior, Escada, Prada, Ferre and many more. For this issue, FullFrame Magazine had best picked Lifestyle Photography as the concept. Our choice could never have been better as Lifestyle Photography has been a relentless breakthrough in today’s industry. More and more artists are being pulled into this discipline as this style has been offering more creative freedom in a more realistic production setting.

Tony Karam Photographer

Ask anyone in the photography industry here in the Middle East of who do they consider as the best artist in their field is, only one man unanimously comes out from everyone’s lips, the name Tony Karam resonance vibrantly in the air and without a doubt, he is the best of today’s photography business. FullFrame is lucky enough that this legend, with a proud root of

Having in mind Lifestyle Photography as our concept, FullFrame Team together with the group composed of extreme talents such as Fashion Designer Yen Reb and Make-Up Artist Ivy Kep Peralta, recreated an early 60’s environment. Highlighting the way of life during those years, we turned the luxurious environment of Saladiscious Restaurant in the walk of JBR, into an exact replica of what a metro bistro had look like before. Model Jory Bakr was a perfect choice for her classic beauty and dressed with a stunning garment inspired with a Grace Kelly looks of tight fitting white robe and black-gloves, a standard of an elegant goddess was restored… Passionate and frankly sexually romantic early chic.

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UNYIELDING ICONS | Pete Eckert

Occasionally people refuse to believe he is blind. But for Pete, he is a visual person. He just can’t see.

Pete Eckert didn’t take photography seriously until he went totally blind. He was trained in sculpture and industrial design and have always been a visual person and planned to study architecture at Yale, but then he started to lose his sight. A doctor told Pete that he had Retinitis Pigmentosa and left the room without further comment. And while listening to Dr. Dean Edell, on a San Francisco TV network, he learned that he would go completely blind. He remember the doctor’s words and they hit him like a hammer; “A person with RP gradually looses their sight until they go completely blind and there is currently no cure for RP.”

Amidst the Dark Pete Eckert

It took him two years to recover and figure out what to do. He was a carpenter by that time and do first-rate works. So he never needed to hunt for a job. None-the-less he worked very little, just enough to pay the rent and for food. His girlfriend, Amy, stood by him during those difficult times. Amy and Pete were engaged but he worried about the future. At one point he laid out charts graphing the loss of vision over time for her, and told Amy if she left him after they are married, he wouldn’t hold it against her. But she stuck it out and thankfully stayed with him through thick and thin of times. Pete knew he had to stop one day driving the Moto Guzzi that he loves so much and working on construction sites was also becoming alarming. He finally came to a decision to move to the east coast, so he could be near his family. From there, he started to move on and later on earn an MBA and a black belt in martial arts. His two fears were how to make money and how to protect himself. His MBA and black belt helped but his problems were far from over. By the time he received his degree he was nearly blind. He could still read but the construction of images is a bit fussy. He tried to get banking jobs. Fate is not with him and was turned down each time when he told them that he is going blind. It was his first inkling of the stigma of blindness. After visiting a friend in Sacramento he realized it was a good place for blind people. It’s flat, the streets are laid out to the compass, it has good transportation, and Amy like the weather. They are fortunate enough to afford a house and soon found a job with the state. He was doing woodcuts and had purchased a wood lathe. Each day when Amy came back from work he showed her the day’s art. Through times and bringing the same topic at table every time she comes back from work, she get bored of it and she barely would sit down before Pete could ask how it looked. So he decided that he needed a new faster media and something to make a living. One day when he was cleaning out a drawer Pete found his mother in laws’ old camera. It was innate with him that he likes mechanical things, so Amy found it adoring at the same time funny and made a fooling with him. He asked her to describe the settings to him so he could figure out how to use the 1950’s Kodak. He found the camera fascinating and he thought a blind guy doing photos in a non-visible wavelength would be amusing. Pete was

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hooked. He knew nothing about film or manual cameras but he is eager to learn with it. His first photography outing after a thousand questions at the camera store started it all. Again he was asking a million questions at the camera store. He had searched for photography books and bought his own computer and talking scanner. He taught himself how to use the adaptive software. It sort of worked out and a little is better than nothing. He started taking photos with a Mamiya flex and fell in love with it. For him, he was just only a tourist in the sighted world. We can look into the workplace but aren’t allowed to enter. So he does something else and slips photos under the door from the world of the blind to be viewed in the light of the sighted. He views his work during the event of taking the shot in his mind’s eye. He sees each shot very clearly, only he uses sound, touch, and memory. Pete is more of a conceptual artist than a photographer and his influences come from his past memory of art and what he now find in the world at large. Pete is not bound by the assumptions of the sighted or their assumed limits. The camera is more than just another means of making art for him. He is trying to cut a new path as a blind visual artist. Sighted people don’t help him make the art. They do give him feedback before he does the final large prints, and that is all. He shoots the image, develop the film, and do the contact print. He said that he could cut sighted people completely out of his process but he wanted the sighted people to be involved. For him it is a good bridge between the blind and sighted and he wanted to be included in the world and be accepted.

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HIGHLIGHTS| Celeste Van Rooyen

Lifestyle Photography What is Lifestyle Photography? It’s a tricky subject to put into words as I’m sure it is seen slightly different when it comes to classifying images under this category. But I know what it is not: It’s not a fashion shoot – as it’s not making specific clothing look great; But it could, just like fashion, be the only other type of photography to break all the ‘rules’ of right and wrong in a shoot. It’s not a test - as it’s not making a specific model look amazing. It’s not a wedding but could be a moment in a wedding or event. It could be the combination of the candid nature of photojournalism with the artistic preparations of studio portraiture to achieve ‘a day in the life’ look with an editorial quality. For her, with Lifestyle Photography, there are mostly more than one person involved to capture natural reactions of, and interaction between its subjects; and most definitely with no posing for the camera. Your lifestyle shoot would be an image shot in the moment replicating an action on a more realistic setting, as events are occurring that make you feel that everything has not been directed or arranged. However, it could also be a shoot for advertising or commercial purposes with a big added production, styled with beautiful real life models, an appropriate setting and needed lighting to obtain the highest quality for an image. Big lifestyle productions also portray the feeling of real life for the real life target market the advertising is aimed for. Still with no too obvious posing, the models then pose to look natural, acting to support a certain mood. There is minimal arranging involved but not over-staging. If something looks too perfect, it does not come off as real. Someone once called it a “bundle of behaviors“. This may be a good way of getting at the essence of what Lifestyle Photography is trying to achieve. It implies there is more to a person than just one angle or emotion. We are many behaviors and emotions bundled together. And as we have tried to define Lifestyle Photography as an art that aims to capture those moments in time that we want to remember, be it real life events, situations, or milestones; lifestyle photography coherently lives with the artistic representation of the snapshots that reflects the slices in our life. Capturing the moment in a still image is such a wonderful and fulfilling creative passion and ever since when digital cameras have been introduced in the market and taking pictures are incredibly cheaper than the early years where film and developing would cost fortune not only to amateur photographers but even professional ones, lifestyle photography had been a driving force in photography class. And as time progresses and more innovation could uplift the standard of taking photos, lifestyle photography could have reached its highest potential and doing so is just a matter of interest and discipline in the craft.

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“Lifestyle photography coherently lives with the artistic representation of the snapshots that reflects the slices in our life. It aims to capture those moments in time that we want to remember, be it real life events, situations, or milestones.�

CELESTE VAN ROOYEN P H O T O G R A P H Y fashion, food, beauty, lifestyle Volume 01 | Issue 08 | 2013

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PHOTO SESSION | Ashley Adriatico

A Glimpse of the Past: Recreating the 1930’s Glamour Ashley Adriatico


Ever since Ashley started as a photographer, she had always wanted to capture an image of a timeless charm and have that nostalgic concept that would bring back the era where the modern fashion started. And for her, tracing it back to the early 1930’s where fashion trends was all about rebellion, is when the real fashion could ever begin. People were phasing out at the rigid formalities of the Victorian era and going over the standards that came with the prohibition era. And who better else could exemplify this but the very notorious couple of Bonnie and Clyde. This is where the concept for the Photo Session of one of the most outstanding Photographer/ Radio Jock, Ashley Adriatico came from. She wanted to relive one of the scenes depicted in movies and documentaries for Bonnie and Clyde infamous adventures. And no better time to incorporate this photo shoots but within this issue of FullFrame Magazine which entirely focuses on Lifestyle Photography and recreation of those moments in life. As a meticulous artist that she is, preparation was not an easy thing to do. Ashley thinks that every photographer would agree with her that when they envision an image, the most challenging part is getting the right place, the models and the elements that would put through all together in one frame. Recreating a specific moment needs one to be keen with details. She admitted that it took her a lot of time doing research before she could even bring to an imagination of what she wants to attain with her shoot. She started the project by looking for the best place that will suit her concept. Elia Restaurant in the Majestic Hotel Burdubai came out to be on top of her list as the venue for her photo session. From the moment she had set an eye on the very western of the Restaurant, Ashley knew that this is what she needed to recreate the early bistro. For the main models, and even right before she could had build this concept, Ashley has been saving one of her charms in the presence of Crystal Van Lloy. Her vintage looks made her perfect to portray the part of Bonnie. All Ashley needed now is someone to play the part of Clyde Barrow. She recalled searching on street to find the right cast but without any luck most probably because she couldn’t see anyone who has that classic appeal of a male vigilante. Soon, fate had smitten onto her, and through a friend working in Montage Promo, she had found the Clyde she’s been looking for in the presence of Fabian Magnago. And making the scene more realistic, she added the elegant beauty of Shona Royston into the mix to further increase the element and drama of the early 1930’s era. Ashley’s next step was to bring a team composed of the best in the business to aide her with her project. She taps on the talents of Fashion Designers Garvy Molinos Terrado and John Muniz, to provide the lady models with the dresses to fit. Having more than five years experience in the UAE market and being known for their collections of dresses inspired by the 1930’s era fashion with a twist of modern silhouettes, these two are right for the job. On the other hand, Zafar Ahmad of Dorian C Grey provided our Clyde with the suit to wear to emphasize his personality. She also brings the very talented Hair and Make-Up Artist Jonas Tolentino to recreate the vintage, elegant look for the models. And of course, Ashley again assembled her group that is working their wonders behind the camera and assisting her in every production. As the day of the Photo Shoot comes, from the production to the models, and into the lighting composition, all is set as what Ashley had perceived it should be. And with a couple of hours and limitless laugh, the session has come to its end. Ultimately, for her, she had achieved her goals and feels that she had experience again the glory of the early 1930’s and relive the life of Bonnie and Clyde even for a moment in Dubai. The excitement of recreating a scene for Lifestyle Photography will always be something she will continue to do. Her passion within the craft and being an artist in her own way is what makes her to take off from imagination and brings them into the arms of reality. And from baring her heart and soul with every photograph she takes, she creates an extraordinary image and a goal to make the viewer stop for a minute, influence their emotions & show them real life. Website: www.ashleyadriatico.com


“Those instants behind creating a moment are what I cherish most within Lifestyle Photography. Nothing could inspire an artist more to take off from imagination and brings them into the arms of reality, than having fun in what they do for work.�


ON FOCUS | Stuart Flisher

Stuart Flisher

The clarity and a more realistic representation of an image had always been abundant and noticeable with the still images Stuart Flisher has developed, most probably because he had always prohibited or limit himself to say the least, on digitally reconstructing his figures. Never did he dwell upon post production to be his strongest suit within his photography, perhaps because of his inner voice and guilt of not giving the proper justice for the beauty of a raw picture, but not to misinterpret that he consider digitally enhancing a figure after the shoot as unethical. He acknowledges the fact that there are times that it is desirable or necessary or even attributed to an individual’s style to incorporate photo enhancing through post production to achieve the output preferred, but just being true to the core of an exquisite portrait has been a value he has inherited from his biggest inspiration in photography and the same person who covered his parents’ wedding. And like the early years of the art of photography, where computer aided photo manipulation has never been publicly marketed or worse not even present yet, Stuart visualizes concepts and prepares his work area as what he had imagined the output should be. As a photographer he considers that if you maintain your core value and understanding which aspects of post production remains a part of photography, you can happily delve into the world of photo manipulation or graphic art as and when needed. For awhile, Stuart had become an isolated photographer with keen interest on landscapes and architecture as his focus. He has been practicing street photography and been into travelling to places like Turkey, UK, Spain, France and Vietnam

Website: www.clickme.ae

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last year just to capture the mood and vibrancy of landscape subjects. Ansel Adam is one of the early photographers he looks up to and had greatly influenced his style. Adam’s works made him expand and practice the discipline of black-andwhite photography and stick with the excitement of exposing the artistic viewpoint of sceneries. He enjoys the complexity of looking for the right angle to capture and bring the most appealing perspective of a simple matter. He considers his piece and entry to a photo shoot competition promoting Ras Al Khaimah as his biggest break in public photography. The image that he took at the famous Al Jazeera Al Hamra of a run-down structure with car tires in the foreground received high commendations and brought much fame to his name. His technique requires him to lessen as much as possible the number of people included in his photo and so not to divert attention from his subject and concept. Commercially, he considers food photography as his specialty and by having a lot of experience taking photos of his wife’s bakery and inculcating his own photographic and lighting skills as well, he had craftily created a more luscious angle for every subjects. He acknowledge that his skills in photography are continuously evolving and images took by Kareem Negm and Marie Duprie had greatly inspires him to expand his method. Most recently, Stuart has been studying the technique by Paul Aiken and trying to encompass his own style to all of these methodologies to bring a more artistic appeal on his works. His ambition within this year is to have his own exhibit and demonstrate his non commercial photos.


“ As a photographer if you maintain your core value and understanding which aspects of post production remains a part of photography, you can happily delve into the world of photo manipulation or graphic art as and when needed.�

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ON FOCUS | Petr Probst

Petr Probst For Petr Probst and his almost 30 years worth of experience within the line of photography, nothing for him can still compare with capturing people emotions, their happiness, and the extra ordinary moments of their lives. For him taking image and having real person as your subject is like being a part of them and being the tool to let them speak out. He compares photography as directing a film, you lead people to do what you think is artistic but at the same time see through their personalities and let them do what is natural for them. Photography is more of giving someone the time to expose something essential about their character, to tell their stories, and preserve those moments. Petr started learning photography when he was just a kid at around the age of 12. His mom was the usual person behind the camera and taking snaps during their family events. Petr believes that it was his childish curiosity that eventually led him to have a camera at hand. He recalls bothering his mom so much to get the basics learning from her. Starting from loading a film to the camera, setting the exposure to the wet development process, all of these things he takes gratitude to her. Later when he was around 15, Petr started learning from the books and got his first ever assignment. He was tasked to capture the moments for his high school events and he knew from those times that he has the calling to be a photographer. Time passes and with a lot of seminars and trainings that he had attended, Petr came to meet his dream of being a professional photographer. He became one of today’s most desired talents on taking portraits and lifestyle photography. His aspiration of keeping to what he believes in, of taking the images and preserving the beauty within people, still sticks with him and mostly takes private clients and covers their special moments and portraits. Seeing his clients overwhelmed and astonished when they get a glance at his works, is his biggest achievement in his career. And buying those images and have it hanged in their wall makes him feel in cloud of ecstasy. He said that his passion for photography keeps him motivated and pushes him to better polish his skills and he hopes to be more active in the business within this year.

Website: www.photoprobst.com

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“Photography is like directing a film. You lead people to do what you think is artistic but at the same time see through their personalities and let them do what is natural for them.�


THE ARTIST | Paul Aiken

Capturing Emotions as a Way of Life Paul Aiken


Paul Aiken’s inspiration comes from the brilliance of seeing a person at his best. He considers himself as a “People Photographer”, and really loves capturing the human emotions. Nothing gives him more pleasure than freezing those special moments and preserving the instance of life and makes it last for eternity. He is best known for capturing fitness, athletes and sports photography and later on, in his six years of professional career, extended to beauty and fashion editorial, portraits and events shoot. This Cayman Island lad has always been into the art of photography since his early 20’s and enjoys the secrets that a photograph reveals. When asked about his personal photography style, Paul finds it hard to define himself and look upon other photographer as well, that finding an identity is an issue that most struggles with. Not that he couldn’t characterize what separates him from the others, but mostly he doesn’t like to be placed in a “box” and personally thinks that defining one’s style would just limit a photographer’s creativity. However, what he believes in is that experiences will define one artist from another that can easily be distinguished through their artwork. He thinks that we all do naturally develop a style, but for him to be restricted and labeled for a certain style would just hold him barred. Every time that Paul becomes bored with a certain style after a while, he tends to look for changes. He makes sure to attend at least two workshops from his peers per year to look for inspiration and stay fresh so that he don’t get fixed in a creative rut. He shared his ideology that being stuck in a certain style would be a photographer’s death sentence, because client’s tastes changes as well and ultimately you have to please them or have no job at all. Professional photographers have to remember that the photos are a mere product commercially and if you can’t sell it, you have no business at all. Paul’s goal for this year is to host his first exhibition here in Dubai, if chance permits him to do. To open a studio and capture a front cover worthy image for Harper Bazaar Magazine

is under his list as well. Nothing else too crazy in his set objectives, for so he believes that he has achieved something already in all aspects of being a photographer. It all depends on what we see as achievements and he had set his own different goals for himself. Financially, he has been stable already with all the projects that he has been handling from clients and through this, he have established his own photography group composed of various artists based in Dubai. His craving for creativity, commercial marketing and fame achievements have been satisfied as well. For him, it may seem to be different but all so important to an artist and most importantly for the business of photography. He confessed that he have gotten covers for great magazines that paid him nothing, and have been paid handsomely for commercial and private works that the public will never know he had captured. All of these served a purpose for him and these things were great achievements for him. They all satisfied his desires to date, but for him, tomorrow is another day. Website: www.paulaikenphotography.com


THE ARTIST | Paul Aiken

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“To be restricted and labeled for a certain style would just hold an artist in barred and would just limit a photographer’s creativity.”

Volume 01 | Issue 08 | 2013

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REVIEW | Michael Cruz

Model Number: QT600 Max Power: 600WS Guide Number(m ISO100): 76 Color Temperature :5600±100K Operating Voltage: AC200-240V/50Hz or AC 100-120V/60Hz Power Output Control: 50 steps from 5.0-10.0(1/128-1/1) Modeling Lamp: 150W Recycle Time: 0.05-1.2s Triggering Mode: Sync cord, Slave triggering, Test button, Wireless control port Flash Duration: 1/5000s-1/800s I have received the privilege of using the Godox QT600 strobes courtesy of Fullframe and Advance Media a few days back (during the time of writing) and I wanted to give some of my initial impressions about the strobes to help other photographers who might be on the look for a new lighting system. Bear in mind that I have never used these strobes before, although I have worked with strobes like Profoto and Elinchrom. As mentioned above, this is by no means a scientific review; this is a quick real-world user experience kind of review. So let’s start with it… I came to the studio not knowing what lights to use and what modifiers will be available, all I knew is that the strobes are composed of 600 watts. Let’s make this clear again, I didn’t have any previous experiences with any Godox equipment so I have no knowledge on how to operate it. I figured this is a good test to see how userfriendly it is. At first glance, it is no different from any other strobes out there. When I first received my Elinchrom strobes, I didn’t have any time to read the manual or study them, I just used them straight away without any problem. Let’s find out if the Godox QT600 can match that ease of use.

User Experience / Operations / Ease of Use Without reading any manuals, I proceeded with my shoot as usual. The interface is pretty straight forward. You can immediately notice the knob that controls the power. It starts from 5.0 all the way up to 10.0. I find the knob easier to use, since you don’t have to press multiple times to change the power of the strobes. You just have to turn it and you can easily go from the minimum power to the maximum power a lot quicker. I also like the fact that Godox lets you fine-tune the power settings in between the range of ten clicks before it jumps to plus/minus 1 and at a full stop of power setting. So overall it gives you 50 steps from the minimum to the maximum setting. The knob can easily be turned and you can feel the nudges every step so you can tell how many turns you did without looking at the display. When you change the power settings, it will give you a small beep to indicate that it is already set, so no need to fire the flashes to adjust and set the new settings. It automatically does the power dumping for you.

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It does come with an external trigger (transmitter/receiver) in which you can control the power and some other settings like the beep sound and so on. There’s probably some more advance features on the triggers that could greatly help a photographer achieve the maximum output from the specs but maybe a little review of the manual is required to get the most out of the remote trigger. However, without configuring anything, you can put the triggers on both the strobe and your camera and you are set to go. You just have to make sure that you are using the same channel on your strobe and your camera trigger and you can shoot right away.

Performance The first thing I noticed with the Godox QT600 strobe is the extremely fast recycle time. It goes from 0.05 seconds recycle time at half power and 1.2 seconds at full power which is pretty fast compared to some other strobes. From experimenting and trying it out, I also found out that this strobe can produce up to 10 continuous flashes per second as well. What is more fascinating is that it has a precise power regulation system and I didn’t use any battery pack or some other power storage device for it. It was just connected directly to a power socket on the wall. During the testing period, I didn’t notice any major differences regarding the color temperature from shot to shot. In fact it was hardly noticeable at all that everything seems to be the standard between all the strobes. However, I could see that the temperature on a lower power setting was warmer than at the full power settings. Beside this, there is nothing much I could see that really caught my attention to stop. I used it for almost two hours and I didn’t see any major color shifts the entire shoot. Another thing I noticed is that at the lowest power setting, the lights are actually moderately dim. Don’t get me wrong, this is


actually a good thing. In my Elinchrom’s lowest settings, it is still pretty bright so I am not able to use lower apertures, and hence the need for ND filters is unavoidable. Using these strobes at the lowest setting, and mind you I’m using three strobes at a time, I can use my 50mm 1.2 with no problem. This is really good for those who want to achieve a shallow depth of field effect. According to the specifications, the flash duration is from 1/5000 to 1/800, which is really great for stopping actions. I can foresee this strobe being used for sports shoots or any fast action shoots for that matter. Not all strobes are capable of this. In fact the ones that are capable of this are high-end strobes with a price range only people with deep pockets can afford. I personally didn’t try any actions shots, but on paper, this should be capable of capturing fast-moving actions, may it be indoors or outdoors. With that assumption, this strobe should be excellent for sports events outdoors. I am not sure regarding the weather resistance of the body itself but if the conditions are not extreme (i.e. raining or sand storms) I don’t see why you won’t be using this strobe outdoors.

Camera settings: f1.2 | 1/160 | ISO 125

Final Verdict To conclude my experience shooting with the aid of Godox QT600, I can vouch that it is one of the most outstanding strobe for both indoor and outdoor use. Photographers can easily capture a series of astounding swift moves and fast-changing facial expressions, while clearly catching each frame perfectly in instant and turn it into an eternal beauty. Excellent for any style of photography and most especially for high-speed photography, Godox QT600 is a magnificent choice to go with in strobes. I think if you haven’t invested on any strobes or lighting system or if you are a flash user and you wanted to upgrade to a more powerful lighting system, you should definitely consider checking this one out. This might also be a good investment for sports photographers who demand fast lighting duration. Overall, I think the Godox QT600 is a very capable system that will elevate your lighting needs to the next level.

Pros:

- Fast recycle time - Very fast light duration - Precise power settings - Lowest settings allow you to shoot wide open (low aperture)

Cons:

- The modeling light is fixed at 150w and it’s not adjustable - It is quite bulky for a 600 watts strobe compared to others with the same power

Camera settings: f8.0 | 1/100 | ISO 250

Model: Ashely Isabella Al Saffar

Michael R. Cruz Is a Photographer / Photo-Enthusiast / Digital Artist / Gadget Geek based in Dubai, UAE. His photographs have been published in newspapers, magazines including Conde Nast Traveler London and other architectural and travel books. Michael also conducts workshops that teach photography and post-processing. To view Michaels’ photography, you can visit his blog: www.michaelrcruz.com and photo stream in: www.cruzm.com.


TECHNIQUES | Emil Latumbo

How To Create Less Saturated Lomo Effect.

Step 2:Open the image and create a New Curve Adjustment Layer

Original Photo

Step 3: Click the color dropdown in the Adjustment curve palette again and select the Red color. Create a Curve by selecting a dark area point from the curve and bring it down. Then select light area a point from the curve and move it down, again. Step 2: Click the Color dropdown in the Adjustment curve palette. Select the Green Color. Create an “S� Curve by selecting a dark area point from the curve and bring it down. Then select light area a point from the curve and move it slightly up.

Step 5: Highlight the merged layer. Select Filter > Lense Correction from menu. The Lense Correction window will open. Click the Custom Tab and set the vignette to -100. Click ok when done.

Step 4: Select or highlight the Curves adjustment layer. Then Press CTRL + Shift + ALT + E to create a new merged layer.

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Step 6: To control the saturation of the image. Create a new Hue and Saturation adjustment layer. Set the saturation to -8 (to make a less saturated image).

Step 7: Add more conrast by creating a new Brightness/Contrast Ajustment Layer. (this is optional depending on the image that you are working on) For the brightness enter a value of -5 and for the contrast enter -10.

Step 8: Then Press CTRL + Shift + ALT + E to merge all the layer.

Emil Latumbo (Graphic Designer/Web Designer/Internet Marketer/ Photographer)

Output Photo

A Graphic Designer by Profession. His love for photos was influenced by his father. The passion ignited a year ago when he had a chance to own a Canon 600D. His journey started with Solo Photowalks in parks and finally joined by friends in Facebook to whom he shared his Photoshop Skills. Noticing that a lot of people need help in post processing and compositing, he started to craft easy to follow Tutorials that eventually lead to the creation of the www. secretworkflow.com (a website where he can share his Post Processing secrets).

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Grandstores

Fujifilm X-F1

Fujifilm has launched the latest addition to its highly acclaimed X series, the X-F1, a premium stylish camera with retro looks and a sleek minimalist design. The camera sports a large 12 mega pixel EXR CMOS image sensor, RAW and JPEG image recording, Full HD video at 1080p (30p) resolution, burst shooting of upto 10fps, with 4 x zoom and a new control interface. The bright 3.0 inch premium clear LCD monitor allows for perfect framing and is great for playback of images and videos. The manual zoom lens feature which has become an identity of the X series is present in X-F1 , giving users a range of up to 100 mm with optical image stabilization. Several burst modes and interesting special effect features add to the unique identity of the camera.

EPSON L200 ALL IN ONE PRINTER

Print Smart and Save more with World’s 1st Original Ink Tank System WHY CHOOSE THE NEW EPSON L200? The Epson Original Ink Tank System is ideal for high print volumes. With a page yield of up to 12,000 pages for black and 6,500 pages for color, the Epson L200 Printer offers great value for money. Specially fitted with filters and tank caps to control airflow and ensure minimal ink wastage from moisture evaporation, the integrated design minimizes print head clogging and keeps your work space clean. Assured quality with Epson genuine inks Epson inks assure you of brilliant prints. Every 70ml bottle of Epson super high capacity ink comes with a unique 13-digit code that ensures its authenticity, and a cap for easy storage of any unused ink. As they are Epson super high capacity inks, you can be assured of the same vivid colors even after weeks of storage! Fast Ink Top-up (FIT) Technology reduces ink wastage with frequent print head No more frequent ink refills, clogged valves or wasted ink with Epson Fast Ink Top-up (FIT) Technology. A Choke Valve controls the ink flow and assures you of more value for every ink bottle you use. Simply lock the device when you are transporting to minimize ink leakage or wastage. Superior print and copy speed for tight schedules With a draft print speed of 27 pages per minute for black

| WHAT’S NEW

Nikon SO1

“Small things have a way of overmastering the great”; Nikon’s latest offering, the SO1 is a true mini wonder. The super light weight camera packs 10.1 megapixels with resolutions up to 3648 x 2736 for great print outs and 3x optical zoom to get that perfect controlled shot. The 2.5 inch touch screen allows for easy use and settings control, anti reflective coating ensures clear displays even outdoors. To add to the vibrant appeal the SO1 comes in a variety of body colors for you to choose from. With an internal memory of 7.3 GB, you will have plenty of memory to capture stunning images and capture video in 1280 x 720(30fps); the SO1 is the right choice for all those who are looking for an ultra compact quality camera.

and copy speed of 11 seconds, you can cut down waiting time significantly. Scan and copy with added convenience Perform an effortless scan and enjoy convenient one touch copying. Getting ready for that big presentation has never been this efficient and easy! Unsurpassed print quality With a high resolution of 5760dpi, expect exceptionally high photo-quality prints. In addition, it allows you to create and produce borderless photo prints for all your creative needs. For more information about Epson printers visit your nearest Grand Stores Digital showroom or selected electronic retailers in the UAE.


DEPTH OF FOCUS | Celia Peterson

A Spotlight of Perseverance

“Starting up a career in photography is not an easy breeze that anybody could just sweep through. Sweat, blood and tears… These are the things that you have to bestow to pursue and succeed in this field.”

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With sweat, blood and tears… These are the things that you have to bestow, as Celia Peterson expressed her hardships that she had gone through to pursue her passion and lifetime interest of being a photographer. Starting up a career in this industry is not an easy breeze that anybody could just sweep through. There are times, as she could recall that she has to knock at every office doors to offer her service and showcase her portfolio. She had to practice her photography during the day, shooting and testing editorials, and work by night to earn actual money for a living, paying the bills and stuffing the fridge to have a meal. And starting her career in London didn’t make it any easier for her, as you have the very best in the world congregating and competing with each other in the city. The industry for photography was very much congested with the best artists in the line and being a newbie was tough to be in the business as well. However with all of these being said, she found it much easier to start with

her own projects and producing them rather than assisting other photographers with their works. It was a good training though as she had been competing at a very high standard. Her obsession with the craft is what pushed her to continue and make every waking moment in the early days dedicated to carving out a career and making sure she could make a living out of it.

Work Load & Busy Sched Celia Peterson is best known as an editorial and commercial photographer and filmmaker now based on Dubai. She began as a portrait, music and fashion photographer in London and been working for magazines, newspapers and record labels. She travelled globally shooting celebrities, musicians and portraits for clients such as Q, The Independent, The Face and various record labels. Being considered today as one of the


most outstanding photographers in the metro, she had covered several campaigns such as Dove, Emirates, Gulf Air, GSK amongst the others and her works had been gracing the pages of Time, Vanity Fair, Le Monde, Der Spiegel, Business Week and GEO as well. She had set up arabianEye. com, a unique creative image resource providing Middle East with stock photography and footage for advertising, and is now a partner in a media group called Emicom Media. Her busy schedules didn’t hold her back to be a frequent contributor for Corbis and Getty images as well.

Herstory in the Making Kicking it off with shooting way too many holiday snaps, even when just using a “point and shoot” camera back then, it was during her university days that Celia really discovered the power of photography. And having met a few good aspiring photographers and working with them, spurs her interests to flick more and go through all the amazing magazine shops in Soho in London. She had never been pulled to any other creative professions and it was just a case of natural selection that she had inclined solely with photography. And although she had gone through extreme hard times beginning a career in London, Celia had achieved a stable career with what she loves to do in no time. She remembered with a smile that her first paid shoot was for Rolling Stone magazine in London, shooting Vincent Cassell and Monica Balluci… a not so an unpressured beginning, she added with a nasty sarcastic tone on it. Celia has been in the industry doing almost everything already the business can offer. From producing and assisting shoots to working with agencies and freelance projects, eventually she had reached into covering her own photo shoots. She then worked for a music publication called NME and other editorials, shooting musicians and actors. Having a lot of fun from increasingly flying around the world to do so, she expanded her network and work for a variety of record labels, magazines and papers. Style wise, she confessed that she had changed since she first began with the craft. She would like to define her style as having a relatively loose and natural way of shooting across the genres in which she shoot namely lifestyle, portraits and documentary. Celia said that she used to over direct before but now let things flow a little

smoother. For her it’s being able to create those natural moments with somebody so that you can get that unusual natural expression or pose, as the best image that one photographer could achieve. “I cannot stand phony portraits!” she said. And for her, it has to say something about what the person is and her role is just to direct the shot in a way where they are being themselves. When asked if there is any specific picture of her that she loves or standouts the most, she replied that there is nothing in particular in her mind mainly because she moves on fast and don’t really gaze back lovingly at a particular shot. She added that she is too busy planning the next round and getting too excited about that, so she doesn’t have the luxury to dwell on her previous works.

Memoirs of the Past Although she doesn’t get time to recall her earlier shots, Celia shared a lot about her past experiences with her job. There are many moments to recall, but whether she will publicly say them is another matter for her. She said that the best experiences in the job are the foreign trips with the crew and the coming together of all the ideas and hard work, the hilarious moments, the early starts, the late finishes, the insane schedules, would eventually lead you to become like family on those trips. The most bizarre time for her, hands down, was the shoot for Vanity Fair in a war zone she covered. It was traumatic and she was not allowed to go out of the country and banned her from leaving via air flight due to political reasons beyond her control. That was not a fun moment and as it was a holiday, the British embassy was closed, she recalled. Moving on to her worst moment, for her there is nothing specific or single project she complains about, but whenever she is doing her job and feeling pretty much as a single nature and nothing more to it, she had to remind herself of the beauty within photography she fell in love with at the very start.

Being completely motivated all the time is quite tough for everyone and specially back when she was starting out in London, during those rainy days when some incredibly rude picture editors and people not showing up to meetings when you have trekked across town, inconsiderately turns you down, was the most challenging times for her.

On to the Next Chapter For awhile Celia has been moving more across the line of portraits and documentary path, and her desire to continue travelling and meeting new people in life as her driving force to withstand all struggles, means that we shall be expecting more from this maiden. She also had recently started filmmaking and gradually overcoming the far bigger challenges in the field, as everything is new for her and there are a lot of technical matters to get a grip with in this craft. But as long as technology and time will allow her to create visual arts, whatever path it takes her on, Celia could never imagine not having photography as a part of her life.

Website: www.celiapeterson.com

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DEPTH OF FOCUS | Celia Peterson


DEPTH OF FOCUS | Celia Peterson


DEPTH OF FOCUS | Celia Peterson


TIPS | By: Rhonda Callow

What to Look for in a Second hand DSLR Camera Having your own DSLR is important if you are serious about going pro and thinking to purchase a new SLR is expensive and may be way out of your budget. Thankfully, there are secondhand equipments that you can purchase at a much cheaper price. With secondhand cameras, you will surely find a good bargain! Here are some tips and tricks on buying a used digital camera. When buying a secondhand DSLR, it is wise to make sure that the camera was well treated by its previous owner with care. This way, you know you’re getting a good buy and the camera will last at least a couple of years before you need to replace it. Keep in mind, however, that a flawless surface is not the only factor you should consider. Here are several things you should look for when choosing a secondhand DSLR.

The Lens DSLRs today have electronic contact points which carry outs information from the lens to the camera body. It is important that you check these contacts and make sure that they do not show signs of excessive wear and build-up of dirt. These contacts are usually gold in color and must be free of marks. You should also check for your camera’s mirror box and ensure that it is free of dirt and that the mirror is unmarked. While a scratched mirror may not affect image quality, it is a definite sign that the camera has been misused and that there may be other hidden problems that could exist after soon. To check for problems with the lens that comes with the camera, hold it up to the light and check for marks. Some lens may have fungus due to incorrect storage while others may have chips or scratches in the surface. All these can affect the quality of your images and must be avoided at all costs. You should also make sure that the mount for the interchangeable lens isn’t badly worn out because this can allow the light from coming in. Needless to say, this can also affect the result of your images.

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Body Focusing If the camera you have in mind has a manual focusing ring, slowly rotate it to test different focus settings. Make sure that there are no points where it sticks. If it does, then chances are it will need to be taken apart, cleaned and reassembled. You should also check if the autofocus feature of the camera is working properly. To test, point the camera at different subjects at varying distances, press the camera shutter and see how it will react.

The camera body is the most important of all components as it determines how good the images you produce are. Most DSLRs have plastic, paint, or leather covered surfaces. If the camera you intend to buy has scuffed surfaces or the covering is coming away from the body, then you have to think twice before buying it. Sometimes, the damage is repairable but you should remember that these surface marks may mean that the camera has not been looked after.


LCD LCD panels which are scratched do not affect picture quality but it can hugely affect the camera’s resale value. If you are considering of buying a camera that is 5 or 6 years old already, then it is important to check for the status of the LCD. Make sure that the screen is sharp and that there are no bleeds in the liquid crystal. There should be no light or dark patches on the corners of the screen and should be evenly illuminated. To check for the LCD, set the camera to various modes and see if all parts of the LCD work properly.

Batteries Make sure that the batteries of the camera you intend to buy can be easily removed from the body. Also, it is important to check if there are replacement batteries that are still being sold in the market. In several cases, manufacture of batteries for older DSLR models have been discontinued already, and opting to buy these kinds of units are improper and would only cause you headaches to find replacement batteries. Make sure that all contacts in the battery compartment are in good condition. Avoid units which have green, white or brown deposits on the surface. These are signs that the battery had leaked and may have caused damage to the body already.

Shutter If you are choosing a camera that has a shutter speed control, test all the settings and make sure that you see the difference between the fast and slow shutter speeds. Some shutters may have a high pitch squeak while others may have the dirty magnets (those that control the shutter). The magnet can be cleaned but it is costly and may damage the camera if it is not cleaned with care. On the other hand, if your camera has an automatic shutter, you should try covering the lens or sensor and listen for the two clicks of the shutter – one to open and the other to close. In darker locations, the shutter will take a long time to close. If you are going for an old SLR model, the one that still uses film and has a opening back panel, try opening the back panel and ensure that the shutter blades are not sprained or worn.

Tripod Brush Most cameras have a threaded tripod mount. Make sure to check for this too and that the threads are still intact. Tripod is a necessary tool for photography, and with a defected tripod mount already under the body of the camera, it would be hard to have your camera mounted.

Flash If the camera you intend to buy has a built in flash, notice how long it takes to recharge. In many cases, those cameras which take five to six seconds to charge could already be at the end of its life. If it has a hot shoe flash, then slide in the accessory and fire the shutter and you should be able to determine if the connections are okay. Make sure that the mount is not bent or cracked. Also, if the camera has a flash sync socket plug and a flash gun, you should also check if it fires properly. If you don’t intend to use flash, then these might no longer matter to you, however if you see a problem in any of the three cases mentioned above, then you should ask for more discount on the price of the camera.

Filter Thread If you want to capture great pictures even in conditions where there’s too much light, then you need a filter. Most cameras have a threaded ring in front of the lens where the filter is attached. Make sure that the mount is not dented and the thread is not stripped.

Warranty Even if the camera is five to six years old, you should still ask the seller for a guarantee that allows you to return the product in case you see something wrong with it. Typically, a reputable store offers replacement for defective equipment within 90 days of purchase.

More Articles on Volume 01 | Issue 08 | 2013

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GPP 2013 Unleash Your Inner Photographer Gulf Photo Plus Photography Festival March 1-8, 2013 Dubai Knowledge Village www.gulfphotoplus.com

Billed as the region’s top photography event, GPP 2013 runs from March 1 to 8 featuring a host of hands-on workshops, practical seminars and photography exhibitions as well as access to all of the latest and greatest gear, exclusive offers and free events. Anticipated all year long by able amateurs and professional photographers alike, this weeklong event draws over 1500 participants from around the Gulf, Africa, Europe and the Far East to learn from 13 of the world’s finest photographers.

specializes in helping photographers make the transition from the still image to motion, with his renowned guidance and expertise in videography. These and additional specialist photographers leading the event – including Zack Arias, Scott Hargis, Bobbi Lane, Joe McNally, David Nightingale and David Hobby– will be providing a program of master classes, workshops, seminars and photo shoots covering portraiture, landscape photography, studio lighting, commercial photography, documentary, and fashion photography.

Over the past nine years, GPP has earned a reputation for providing excellent content, unparalleled talent, and photogenic locations only Dubai can offer, creating a photography festival like no other. The GPP instructors are chosen not only for their award winning photography skills, but also for their passion to share their talent and expertise with others. The Dubai Knowledge Village Conference Centre comes alive during the event, with a buzz of energy and inspiration where photographers meet, learn and connect. Among the line-up of celebrity snappers is internationally acclaimed photographer David Alan Harvey, who has shot over 40 essays for National Geographic alongside publishingfive photo books of his own work. Recognized for his award winning talent by the prestigious photographic collective Magnum in 1993, Harvey has become a full and active member of Magnum for the last sixteen years.

Gulf Photo Plus is committed to providing an interesting line-up of fresh topics each year, in addition to the ever-popular PhotoFriday, which will make a welcome return on Friday, March 1. PhotoFriday is an exciting and full day composed of sixteen 90-minute seminars, and panel discussions appealing to a wide range of photography levels, made accessible to a wide audience with tickets prices set within a very affordable range.

Also imparting his knowledge will be David Burnett, a photojournalist with more than four decades of work covering the news – and the people who made it – recording the visual tempo of our age. He is a co-founder of Images, a New York based photojournalism agency, and in a recent issue of American Photo magazine was named one of the “100 Most Important People in Photography”. An additional highlight in the GPP 2013 roster, photo legend Gregory Heisler will lead workshops sharing his technical mastery. Heilser has spent more than 25 years capturing evocative portraiture for Sports Illustrated and TIME Magazine, including 70 cover photos for TIME Magazine alone, which is more than any other photographer to date. Exciting new faces adding to the GPP 2013 line-up include Lindsay Adler, a fantastic New York based fashion and wedding photographer; John Keatley, who’s unique approach to celebrity portraiture and editorial photography incorporates his brilliant sense of humor; Peter Hurley who takes portrait photography to a new level with his previous modeling career adding to his experience both in front of, and behind the lens; and finally Eduardo Angel who

Free Events

Over and above the exciting roster of photography workshops and seminars, the GPP 2013 schedule will also include plenty of free eventsthat will be open to the public. Evening talks by visiting instructors including David Burnett and David Alan Harvey will inspire conversations and discourse on the topic of photography.Harvey will also show an exhibition of his work in the GPP Gallery, where opening night visitors have the opportunity to meet and connect with Harvey and the full line up of instructors. Throughout the week, participants will also be able to browse, test and ask questions about the latest and greatest photography equipment available, displayed by the event sponsors who will be offering exclusive special offers and promotions, only available during the GPP2013 event.

About Gulf Photo Plus

Gulf Photo Plus is a photography organization whose aim is to nurture and develop the photography community here in the UAE and within the region. With a primary focus to offer workshops, seminars, and events that encourage learning and skill development, Gulf Photo Plus has garnered a reputation as the leader in photography events, with the annual Gulf Photo Plus event every March and the FotoWeekend event each November as highlights on the annual calendar. GPP’s central program is coupled with additional events including photography exhibitions, movie nights, and Slidefest evenings where creative individuals can share ideas and find further inspiration. For more information about the exhibition and Gulf Photo Plus activities please visit www.gulfphotoplus.com or telephone +971 4 380 8545. Gulf Photo Plus is open from 10am to 7pm from Sunday – Thursday, open 10am – 6pm on Saturdays.


ON THE FRAME | Celeste Van Rooyen

Mixing Personality with Methodology Celeste Van Rooyen


For Celeste Van Rooyen it is not just being technically sound and proficient with handling the camera and knowing the techniques with the light compositions that allows you to bring out the best image desired. For her, personality counts the most and to be exposed and be familiar with organizing the productions, that is what separates her with the flock in the field. Talent and know how’s are just a part of bringing out emotions, especially when you are dealing with people who are not used to of being in front of a camera. You need a great team, outstanding organizing skills, great communication, a bit of luck, a style, an idea, experience and the personality that makes subjects feel at ease and make them express real emotions naturally. This is what she is good at, to make people look great and let them express genuine feelings. Celeste recalls starting photography as a hobby and just to document something close to her heart, her family and the farm she grew up with. Unexpectedly, and knowing that she had just started photography without any formal lessons, her first works garnered a lot of positive feed backs and won a competition with the images she took. This inspired her to pursue and learn more about the craft. At early years, she had become conscious and aware of what she is able to do in the field of photography. Something innate with her and natural, that she can bring out the best from her subjects made her won more photo contests. She learned from other photographers’ works and take inspiration from almost everything under the sun. And after almost eight years behind the camera, people have recognizes her name and artworks and that always gives her a kick and motivate her to make better in her field. Every time she gets chosen for a job, she considers it as an honor. And whenever her photos get printed on magazines with her name next to it, the same feeling happiness lingers in her with these achievements. Last year, she took the shots for the Costa campaign and saw it bannered everywhere in the city. But for her the greatest pleasure came from that year is, when a certain wedding client was so happy that they paid her more than the agreed amount. It is not about the money that made her more in love with her work but the satisfaction of seeing your clients overwhelmed of what you do that touches her heart. This year she hopes to do more editorials and advertising with great production for magazines. She also aims to continue venturing in new directions in the fashion industry as a variety and since she is great in organizing, she would love to be involved in producing behind the scenes of commercials and big shoots. We are definitely going to see more from her as she tends to be busy as always. She is keeps reminding herself that to make a business run in this cut throat industry, one needs to be an aggressive entrepreneur that knows how to network.

Website: www.celestevr.com Volume 01 | Issue 08 | 2013

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ON THE FRAME | Celeste Van Rooyen


ON THE FRAME | Celeste Van Rooyen

“It’s not just handling the camera and knowing the techniques with the light compositions that allow you to bring out the best image desired. Personality counts the most and having the right substance in dealing with subjects that will make you bring out the real emotions on them.”


BEHIND THE LENS |

Sean Armenta


Standing Witness to the Frame of Time Sean Armenta

Photography allows us to hold on to those precious moments and keep them to last. To slice out those instances, freeze it, and place in a sanctuary. Photographs stands witness to time’s relentless thaw out. A flash that could have faded away into the past and should only exist in memories would always be just a glimpse of events that came yesterday that we could never turn back and grasps them again. Photographs gave us the privilege to see phases before future weighed them down. To travel back in time and live again on those minutes that have took our breaths away and feel the emotions that we felt during those times. Memories measure the richness in life we had and by any means should hold dearly into it no matter what. Our photos will remind us of who we are before and to see what you have shot whether it is 30 years ago or 70 years ago and it would still be relevant, that is what is so amazing about photography. It is timeless, iconic, and relevant. This is the same quality behind every photo Sean Armenta strives for in his own work. Sean, a Filipino photographer based in Los Angeles and widely known for his fashion photography and artworks that have graced in multi international publications and brands such as Maggie Barry, Arden B, Paul Mitchell, Milani Cosmetics and others, to name a few. This Manila bound artist has been in the business for almost eight years already and making waves one over another with his success in his field and style.

The Path Traversed Like most, Sean’s initial exposure to photography was more just like a hobby. Photography to him was something you did on vacations or holidays. “You would see photographs in magazines but I never thought of it as something people did for a living. They were just there, much like the photos that come with a picture frame. You don’t know who those people are but they’re just there. It was something I was aware of, but never thought it could be a career.” Who would have thought that one of the most prestige fashion photographer well known not only in his home base California but all over the world could have ever thought like this. Probably Sean could trace back his interest with photography from his mom. Fascinated by the equipment his mom uses for her hobby, and what is more likely for him is a sci-fi gadget used on those Star Wars flicks, he grew up admiring a manual 35mm camera. His mother taught him the very basics of operating a camera and how to make a proper exposure, so naturally he grew funned of it and took a liking into it. His mom also helped him foster a love for the arts in general, and grew up drawing and painting and doing arts and crafts type stuff. Sean remembers that he had always been artistically inclined from a very young age but never received a formal training for any of it. The ironic part of it was his mom didn’t want him to pursue a career in the arts, so he was actually steered towards a career in medicine. Sooner than later his passion with arts augmented and eventually switched gears and began

assisting to other photographers to learn more about what it was like to be a professional in the industry. After a few years of assisting, he ventured out on his own by building a portfolio of work that he could market to clients. With his immense talent and ingenuity in photography, it didn’t take time and he gets noticed in his field. Covering mainly beauty, fashion and lifestyle images and specializes in editorial, commercial, and advertising photography, Sean have reached into big name clienteles and continues to bring crafty images widely used for brand campaigns. He shoot everything from clothing catalogues, to cosmetics campaigns to celebrities and anything else that piques his interest. Although he has bagging glories left and right, earning a great amount of success financially and career wise, never does it had been Sean’s barometer for success. And for him, being able to make a living out of what he loves to do, is his greatest achievement in life. He had never desired to win awards and never measured success through the material things he gained. Just waking up each morning knowing that he love what he do and get paid to do it, is a feeling that no amount of material wealth can provide. He gets to work with immensely talented and dynamic people who are the best at what they do, get to photograph some of the most beautiful people in the world, and he have a job that never feels like work, what more else could a man ask for. There are not too many people that can say that he loves what he do for a living, in fact most people complain about their job and their life, Sean admitted that he is blessed not to live a life full of regrets.

Difference in Caliber People have varying definition of what “style” is. Most often, people equate style with a distinct visual look. Sean finds that to be too limiting and an inadequate description of an artist’s personal style. He had always believed that your style is the combination of not only how your work looks, but also what your approach to your subject is, as well as your artistic voice. Your style is a reflection of your past experiences that have made you the person you are today, what your hopes and dreams are for the future, and what your personal world-views are, including values, morals, and beliefs. If one is basing style on just how they can make a photo look visually, then the images are very superficial and have no connection to them as an artist, as Sean sees through it. When asked if it is necessarily to have talent in order to capture emotion and expression in a photo, without hesitance he answered no. However he believes that talent is a must in order to be able to do it on a consistent basis at a certain caliber or level of quality. This is what separates those who are able to do it for a career and those who do Website: www.seanarmenta.com

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BEHIND THE LENS |

Sean Armenta

it as a hobby. It’s one thing to be able to do something like photography consistently well when there is nothing at stake. It is entirely different when the responsibility of managing a creative team and creating the visual branding of a multi-million dollar company lies solely on you. Sean remains professional and keeps himself motivated to polish his skill in every corner and still finds way to better himself. In 2013 all he wants is to focus on doing better on his works. He had recently been given a huge opportunity to be involved in a fantastic project, and I really can’t wait to see how that pans out. Sean expects to do a lot more traveling internationally for work and ultimately thinks it would be amazing to be able to use photography as a vehicle for traveling and see the world.


BEHIND THE LENS |

Sean Armenta

“I have never desired to win awards and never measured success through the material things I gained. Just waking up each morning knowing that I love what I do and get paid to do it. It is a feeling that no amount of material wealth can provide.�


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About The Competition Under the patronage of the International Federation of Photographic Art (FIAP) Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority (TCA Abu Dhabi) was organized the Emirates Photography Competition (EPC) 2012 – the seventh in the annual series EPC is aimed at developing photography within the United Arab Emirates by attracting as many photographers as possible, whether amateur or professional and nurturing their talents. The competition programme includes specialised workshops, interactive meetings, seminars as well as solo and collective exhibitions inside and outside the country. The EPC also encourages the comprehensive acquisition and publication of photographic works. As one of the Middle East’s most renowned photographic events, the EPC invites submission of outstanding works of different artistic styles. All participating works must respect performance values and standards of photographic art, as well as FIAP rules. Each year the competition has a main ‘theme.’ There are also four additional themes. There is also a special category for young talent to showcase their work. Last year 2012, EPC celebrated to Iraqi photographer Murad Al-Daghistani (1917-1982), who was a leading photographer in contemporary Arab photography. Daghistani’s work captures the everyday life of his subjects and some creative portraits of the people he encountered. Throughout his career he brought together a modernist view of the world, and captured the cultural values of those around him reflecting the beginning of contemporary Arab photography. Last year ‘Cultural Reflections’ competition theme focused on Daghistani’s work and was a tribute to the importance of his photographic research and study. The competition also continued to feature the Noor Ali Rashed Award which is given to the best Emirati photographer for work that highlights UAE environmental and cultural symbols. Noor Ali Rashed (1929 – 2010) was a leading UAE figure in photographic art, who through his work contributed to the documentation of the life within Emirati society, and its ruling families. EPC also gave awards for the best photographic collection from participants in the Arab world. A FIAP Gold Medal gave to each of the best five participating photographers. Also EPC gave an award for the best five groups from international photography associations and clubs in recognition of the supporting role they play in developing the cultural movement of photography. In last year series, for the first time, there was a ‘Fine Arts in Photography’ award which consists of three gold medals for the best works that present modern innovative ideas that contribute to developing photography. The EPC believes in the inclusive nature of art and its timeless ability to unite the interests and creativity of human beings everywhere, as well as the ability of photography to facilitate interaction and communication amongst people. Keep watching the www.ephotoc.net for the new edition announcement, eighth international competition 2013 with great expectation.

For more information and inquiries: • Abu Dhabi Tourism & Culture Authority • P. O. Box 2380 - Abu Dhabi, UAE • Tel: +971 2 657 6378 +971 2 657 6387 • Fax: +971 2 443 9482 • E-mail: ephotoc@tcaabudhabi.ae • Website: www.ephotoc.net

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EMIRATES PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION |

Xiaoxi Liao

China Ball Game In Village Grand Prize

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Ferdous Shabbir Bangladesh Family First Prize

Javier Fernandez Ferreras Spain RAPA (Portfolio) Second Prize

Ismet Danyeli Turkey Blue and Orange Third Prize


EMIRATES PHOTOGRAPHY COMPETITION | Kin Ming Wong China Old Tree at Lake Honorable Mention

Abhijit Nandi India Right to Sacrifice Honorable Mention

Bart Heirweg Belgium Gas Station Honorable Mention

Kemal Kaya

Turkey Local Dance 4 Honorable Mention

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Ahmad Al Saif Saudi Arabia Schools in India Honorable Mention

Matej Peljhan Slovenia Phone Call Honorable Mention

All photos are supplied by Emirates Photography Competetion and has their Organization’s consent to be published in this issue of FullFrame Magazine.

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FOCAL POINTS | By: Jay Alonzo

My Lifestyle (PHOTOGRAPHY)

Wise photographers and studio owners specialize, which is just a logical thing to do now that the photography industry has never been more competitive. Ultimately as one focuses on a specific field, it becomes his trademark that seperates him from the rest. It is only the greedy fool who will aim to cater to all segments of the market, from engagement portraits to weddings to events, then food and interior, commercial photography, etc. Therfore, enlightened hobbyists have been finding a niche of their own that they can excel in and make a name for themselves. Except for a very few photography fields, such as portraiture, most major and legitimate kind of photography is an amalgam of different disciplines. Like travel photography for instance, which is a mix of still life, portraiture, documentary, events, architectural and even food photography, depending on what one wants to shoot. Fashion photography is not a stand alone specialization either. It requires know how in the discipline of studio and environmental portraiture, and sometimes event, still life, and even lifestyle! Most areas of specialization overlap one another. The only differentiating factor is how

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the resulting images are used, the treatment and approach. Lifestyle photography is clearly one such area. Sometimes, a photographer might be thinking he is just doing a fashion shoot or a situational food shoot, yet it can also be called lifestyle photography. But what exactly is lifestyle photography? Search what it means thru Google and its engine will spew out a tiring number of sites defining lifestyle photography in a myriad of ways and points of view. Summing it all up, it simply means taking a photo of a way of life or mode of living of an individual or group. That includes their habits, tastes, moral standards and outlook as well as reflecting their economic state. It simply interprets as shooting how one person leads his or her life. But before you start prepping your gear and start calling on photo buddies for a photo walk in the low income areas of Manila or in the plush avenues of New York, it isn’t exactly a street photography kind of thing. First, who does this kind of photography anyway? And for what purpose? Photographing an Asian construction crew personnel, with hard hat and cover all, squatted on the curb sipping a cup of hot chai

during break time also constitutes lifestyle photography. It could also be a group of boys in a summer time jumping from a bridge down to the river savoring the cool waters. All of these can also be taken while roaming the city on foot whether solo or with a group, and thus called ‘street photography’. Or, if the photographer took these during a trip to a foreign land, he might call it his ‘travel photography’ instead. So you see, lifestyle photography can be clear and vague at the same time yet broad, not specific, like the other disciplines of picture taking. Most of the web sources I checked define lifestyle photography in a more positive light (no pun intended). Not surprising actually for majority of images that are considered legitimately as ‘lifestyle photography’ get utilized in advertisements, posters, brochures, catalogues, websites and of course in...you guessed it, lifestyle magazines. That means lifestyle photography is a major component in commercial and advertising photography as well as in the editorial field. No wonder majority of so called lifestyle shots are of positive note. It has to be if clients using such photo must sell a product, service or an idea.


yet pleasing at the same time, especially if it will be used for commercial or editorial purpose. If it exudes mood, not only a message, that would be nicer. Post processing is done only to clean up a dirty table perhaps, or an overlooked trash in the grass, or to remove some blemishes or pimples from the model, etc. Models doesn’t have to look like the kind you see on catwalks and high fashion magazines. Rather, should be mommy or daddy-like, or a typical banker, health care professional, chef, or whatever you need for your concept. Although it helps if they are good looking. I often hide or retouch brand labels if beverages or gadgets if it cannot be avoided, except for the client’s of course, in a commissioned shot. Finally, your love of life and your propensity to enjoy life, you must have that. Or at least have a keen interest on human condition and ways, for it will definitely show in your work, determining if it will be contrived or natural. And that is basically the defining characteristics of lifestyle photography. It has a concept, hints a visual clue or tells a story of how one leads a life. And it isn’t necessarily the reality. It could be an aspired way of living and status, a dream life.

Before I transferred to the UAE, a major condominium developer hired me to produce photos of their showroom to sell a premium high rise property in Fort Bonifacio. Not only did the project entail architectural and interior photography, in the list were shots of a happy, obviously affluent family having a weekend get-together lunch with the grandparents and in-laws; plus other family scenarios like an elderly couple having drinks at their balcony overlooking the sunset. The pictures are lifestyle photographs, made with the intent to make prospective buyers see themselves “in the picture” and will want that kind of living, hoping they will consider the property as a result. Sometimes it doesn’t start out with an objective to promote something. While vacationing in Boracay Island five years ago, I chanced upon a couple lazing out in the sun, both engrossed in what they were reading. The scene for me was an icon of why people go to Boracay, a place where you can just simply relax and de-stress in a tropical setting. But when Seair, a Philippine regional airline, saw the photo in my web gallery, they licensed it for their cover of Boracay travel guide three years ago. Currently it is used by the Philippines’ Department of Tourism intheir website. An amateur lensman might associate lifestyle photography with people based shots. After all, lifestyle is about people, right? Not necessarily. Sometimes it could be a straight forward shot of a food, a brand name ladies’ bag or a smartphone. Obviously, still life and even know how of the principles of product photography are needed here. And though the subject is an inanimate object, it symbolizes something that speak of the owner or user’s lifestyle. Lifestyle photos, by the way we defined it by now, are best executed outdoors, on location? True. But a lot of this kind of images are being made in the studio as well. If it requires a certain setting, the set is built or improvised upon. Otherwise, a person talking over the mobile phonewith a plain white background can be considered a lifestyle shot too. What is important is there is a story or a concept, and it specifically tells a way of life, whether on going or yearned, depending on who is looking at it. That means a good understanding of human behavior, habits, customs and culture is required, most specially human dreams and aspirations. Lifestyle photography also requires knowledge and experience in taking portraits, in studio or on location or environmental; familiarity in photographing objects and even interiors or architecture. Intensive post processing is shunned for the photo must look as natural as possible

Jay Alonzo is a commercial photographer from Manila, now based in Abu Dhabi and runs Keylite Studio. He has been conducting photo workshops for novices and pros alike for 16 years.

By Jay Alonzo www.jayalonzo.com www.jayalonzophotoworkshop.com 052-9899851 Volume 01 | Issue 08 | 2013

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FullFrame: Unfolds a new Milestone A new page again unfolds as FullFrame soft launches and suspended into the podium their new glorified Photo Studio last February 7, 2013. High end names from different sectors of the business participated on the open shoot as a part of the unveiling of the studio. Located at Churchill Office Tower, Office No. 1209 at the Business Bay Dubai, the Photo Studio is now open for service inquiries and reservation. Call 04 441 5347 for more details and be part of the growing FullFrame. FullFrame would also like to extend its gratitude for the people that in vigorously took part with the soft launching of the studio. Our ever cunning Models: Katrin Osipoua, Crystal Van Lloy, Sihandra Husselmann, Ashely Isabella, and Boyana Yanachkova. Ever dearest Hair & Make-Up Artists: Yhence Sioting, Sofia Yaco, Julio Jeremias, and Danny Ancheta. Best in the business Fashion Designers: Afra Al Abdulla and Daze Tan. We would like to acknowledge also Ivy Kep Peralta, Louie Roque, Emer Balaqui, Ver Sus, Maneef Koya, Abdul Jaleel, and Jinggai Feliciano for showing up and giving their best effort on doing what they are good at and special thanks to our Photographers: Jan Michael Vincent Castillo, Roldan Narag, Donell Gumiran, Michael Cruz, Ashley Adriatico, Suzette Peachie, Rex dela Cruz, Petr Probst, Ahmed Ginawi, Abdul Hakeem and Patrick Lleses for participating on the photo shoot. Volume 01 | Issue 08 | 2013

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All photos taken by: Jan Michael Vincent Castillo


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