Page 1

1-7 May 2015

{ Barnali Dutta/FG }

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

G

urgaonites are thinking afresh about their residence choices (and maybe even offices soon). In the wake of the earthquake in Nepal, which wreaked havoc with human life, property and the heritage of the erstwhile Himalayan Kingdom, many are now wondering if they should move into highrise multi-storeyed buildings at all. This time the impact of the earthquake was felt quite distinctly, with tall buildings swaying disconcertingly. In fact the quake was clearly felt on ground floors too. The good fortune was that no high-rise was ‘impacted’ by the shocks. But for those tantalising seconds – in fact a minute plus this time, which truly felt like eternity – most people panicked, as they hurriedly descended the ‘unending’ flights of stairs. Malik, a resident of Sushant Lok Phase 1, says, “I had recently thought of buying a new flat in a DLF high-rise, but now I am worried. The earthquake and the consequent devastation have been really scary. Now I am very apprehensive of high-rises. Actually, honestly, I was never a fan of skyscrapers' I am ok with 'resonable' heights.” An official of the technical team of Homestead Infrastructure, a large building and construction company in Gurgaon, knowingly comments, "It is not earthquakes that kill, but the buildings. It depends on how resilient a building is on structural design. Building an earthquakeresistant structure has a lot to do with the foundation, which is designed according to the height and shape of the building. The entire NCR falls in the 'High Damage Risk Zone IV’. We incorporate best practices to ensure that we design and construct projects that can withstand quakes in this seismic zone. We have been strictly following the guidelines prepared by NDMA  and National Building and Construction Code for the building of earthquakeresistant structures. In fact high-rises built using cuttingedge technology can withstand earthquakes much better than normal ‘quake-resistant’ buildings." Sumit Bharana Director, Era Infrastructure, says, "To-

RNI No. HARENG/2011/39319, Postal Regn. No. GRG/35/2014-2017

Code Red

The National Building Code of India (NBC) is a national instrument providing comprehensive guidelines for regulating the building construction activities across the country. It serves as a Model Code for adoption by all agencies involved in building construction works - be they Public Works Departments, other government construction departments, local bodies or private construction agencies. The Code contains: n Administrative regulations, development control rules and general building requirements n Fire safety requirements n Stipulations regarding materials, structural design and construction (including safety) n Building and plumbing services The National Building Code of India envisages that all high-rise buildings should have earthquake resistant attributes, such as good structural configuration, lateral strength, adequate stiffness and good ductility. day we are building more highrises than ever and these come with their own set of safety concerns - earthquakes being the biggest natural risk. The National Building Code of India (NBC) envisages that all highrise buildings should have earthquake resistant attributes such as good structural configuration, lateral strength, adequate

stiffness and good ductility. We have incorporated all the norms laid down by NBC and have been following the guidelines of NDMA (National Disaster Management Authority) as well. We go for the best possible engineering procedure to make the buildings earthquake resistant." Amarjit Bakshi, Managing Director, Central Park, says, “Our build-

ings have earthquake-resistant designs and we follow all mandatory norms that are applicable to NCR Seismic Zone 4. The design takes into consideration all parameters from a structural safety point of view. The structure is adequately strengthened through the use of sheer walls, to cater to ‘movements’ during an earthquake. This apart, the structure is also vetted by third party structural consultants, to ensure that all safety norms are taken care of." While an earthquake is a natural disaster that cannot be predicted, there are  preventive measures that can be adopted. Jayshree Ghosh, an architect, says, “Every State in India has its own (building) code. The potentially earthquake prone areas necessitate a more stringent code and stronger building bye-laws, which are to be followed for the construction of buildings. Architects have to follow the National Building Code and Neufert – Architects’ Data (an architectural standard). For instance, hilly areas have a different testing pattern and code.” Dr. Abhay Shrivastava, Head of Disaster Management, HIPA (Haryana), says, "We have everything, but are we really prepared for any sudden

prakhar PANDEY

Vol. 4 No. 37  Pages 16  ` 10

crisis? This is a tough question to answer. Yes, our Government is working on measures to improve Disaster Management techniques, but we need to be much more aware and active. We have already worked on a project called ‘Capacity Building in District Management’ for nine districts. We are now working on another 12 districts.” Dr. Shrivastava says that India is today much better placed to tackle post-quake issues. He adds that the country has enough resources, but there is a need to prioritise. “Hospitals and the police force are the two most worked entities during any crisis impacting human life. But the infrastructure currently available may not be adequate to handle a sudden natural crisis of the nature that we have just witnessed (in Nepal). Our system should better comprehend the different facets of such a crisis, to ensure that we can be of best help to the masses,” he says. He is cautious about ‘retrofitting’. The buildings, according to him, should have stringent bye-laws and accountability around aspects such as soil testing. “Nowadays there are many high-rises and it is tough to comment on those buildings. Contd. on p 6

Hai Ye Gurgaon Meri Jaan Union Power Minister and the Haryana CM have flagged off the Smart City model for Gurgaon. Power Grid Corporation would undertake a Geographic Information System (GIS) mapping - called ‘One Map Gurgaon’ - of the City. The Corporation would also set up a Smart Grid for Gurgaon, to ensure 24x7 power to the current sectors within a year. Gurgaon’s Master Plan would be suitably amended to incorporate the Smart City planned initiatives.


02

1-7 May 2015

RNI No. HARENG/2011/39319 Postal Regn. No. GRG/35/2014-2017 Vol. 4 No. 37   1-7 May 2015

Editor:

Atul Sobti

Correspondent:

Barnali Dutta

Sr. Photographer:

Prakhar Pandey

Sr. Designer:

Amit Singh

Marketing Executive: Kumar Thakur Dy. Manager A/cs & Admin: Shiv Shankar Jha

C ontents

Comment...

Our Impending Disasters Tragedy has overtaken the people and visitors in Uttarakhand. The disaster seems far away…distant. Our local issues seem miniscule. There is maybe some ‘comfort’ in that – in believing that the Millennium City, and our posh residences and office complexes in particular, offers us immunity from any calamity. How wrong we could be. There are scenarios building towards some impending disasters – and there seems to be no stopping them. The real estate juggernaut just rolls on - while planning and providing for civic services and amenities continues to be treated as an irritant. Some scenarios are being man (Administration) made; some will be triggered by the fury of Mother Nature – when even her patience at her exploitation runs out.

Editorial Office

...P 10

108, Aap Ka Bazar, Gurudwara Road, Gurgaon-122001, Haryana Phone: +91 124 421 9092 Emails:

editor@fridaygurgaon.com letters@fridaygurgaon.com adsales@fridaygurgaon.com Friday Gurgaon (Weekly) edited, published and printed by Atul Sobti on behalf of Arap Media Ventures Pvt. Ltd. from 108, Aap Ka Bazar, Gurudwara Road, 
Gurgaon-122001, Haryana Printed at AGS Publication, D-67, Sector 6, Gautam Budh Nagar, NOIDA – 201301, Uttar Pradesh

The views expressed in the opinion pieces and/or the columns are those of the author and do not necessarily represent the views of, and should not be attributed to, Friday Gurgaon or Arap Media Ventures Pvt. Ltd.

Spritual... Life is but a Dream

Wellness... Taming Chronic Diseases (Part 2)

Would you believe that we are all living a dream? That we are mere actors on a stage and the real us is somewhere else in this world; that we are just a projection, an incarnation of a part of us? That we incarnate on earth to learn to ‘live’ within a limited and difficult environment (and where we seem to have temporarily forgotten our true nature)? That our life on Earth is just a brief moment in a much larger existence - there are other dimensions of existence that we live in before and after we come to this world?

Having highlighted Vegetables & Fruits (in Part 1), we move on to Proteins which should ideally form a little more than a quarter of a ‘healthy and balanced plate’. Thousands of proteins make up the enzymes that power zillions of chemical reactions and the haemoglobin that carries oxygen in our blood. These muscle-building nutrients come from varied sources. In traditional societies, depending on the region where man lived, meat consumption varied between 10 to 20% of total food consumed.

...P 12

...P 13

Bon Vivant... As The World Dances Universally speaking, Dance has been looked up to as a prayer. Dance is a connect between the body and the soul, the mind and the intellect. Dance is conceptualised around positive movements, gestures and posture, which often make the dancer swirl in exhilaration. It also helps dispel negative traits like anger, frustration, ill feelings, stress and dissatisfaction. Dance is a collective pursuit as well as an individual passion; though the spirit of Dance lives within the individual, it helps connect various communities through a cultural oneness.

Friday Gurgaon Empanelled with DAVP

...P 15

Empanelled with DIPR, Haryana

Special ....

Summer’s Here

Plus Other Stories.... Social

Stop the Auto-pilot....................................................P 7

IF YOU ARE NOT GETTING FG COPIES REGULARLY

Social

Here & Now.................................................................P 7 Kid Corner

Activities/Events/Exhibitions/ Seminars..........P 8-9 SMS NR to 08447355801

Comment

...P 14

UNESCO World Heritage List - India....................P 11


03

1-7 May 2015

Priceless Shoes & Clothes Multi Brands Factory Outlet

Take Your Pick Of Everything From Jackets, Trousers, Denims, Sports Wear, Shirts, Tees, Sweat Shirts & Wide Range of Footwear

Shop No. 14, Shree Ram Mandir Complex Opp. Celebrity Homes, Palam Vihar, Gurgaon

7838382828

For Special discounts like https://www.facebook.com/pricelessindia

ADMISSION OPEN 2015-2016

ADMISSION OPEN 2015-2016

AMC

400/-

ANNUAL MAINTENZNCE CONTRACT

Authorised Dealer

In Tune With Your Needs & Aspirations

WAZIRABAD, GURGAON

BALIAWAS, GURGAON

L.K.G. TO 12th Classes (Co-education)

L.K.G. TO 12th Classes (Co-education)

ENGLISH MEDIUM

The Salient Features: Experienced and qualified staff Limited seats for classes L.K.G to 12th Lush and green play ground Transportation available Airy & Spacious Rooms Commerce & Arts Stream

ENGLISH MEDIUM

The Salient Features: Experienced and qualified staff Limited seats for classes L.K.G to 12th Lush and green play ground Transportation available Airy & Spacious Rooms Commerce & Arts Stream

PER BATTERY PER YEAR

INVERTER BATTERY CAR BATTERY

TULIP ENTERPRISES

BIKE BATTERY

SHOP NO. 14, RAM MANDIR COMPLEX H- BLOCK, PALAM VIHAR OPP. CELEBRITY HOMES

UPS BATTERERIES INVERTERS door step

services

+91 9999080486/8010434235

Good News 24x7 Hours

Door to Door Service

Om Sai Travels

Mobile: 9818161944, 9818830251

HOURS SERVICE

Contact:

Pardhan Ramphal Kabadi

Keep Your City Clean use recycled water Avoid Polythene bags An Initiative by Nature International

Spl. Tour Booking for Haridwar, Mathura, Vrindavan, Vaishno Devi & Golden Temple Amritsar

9311530360, 8802649208 Ram Mandir, Palam Vihar, Gurgaon - 122017 (Hr.) Note: Driver Contact Not Allowed

Sharad Goel

contactus@niggn.com

To Advertise in FG

9868163312 adsales@fridaygurgon.com


04

1-7 May 2015

THE WEEK THAT WAS

 New BJP State govt. completes 6 months.  Over 13 lakh acres have been impacted by the untimely rains across Haryana; CM announces that a total of almost Rs 1,100 crores will be disbursed to the affected farmers, from May 1; 50 lakh MT of wheat, at Rs 1,450 per quintal, have already been procured (against a target of 65 lakh MT). For the upcoming Kharif season, farmers will get interest free loans (on Rs 10,000 crores budgeted), and sugar factories are being given Rs 500 crores support. The High Court’s stay on the issuance of Occupation Certificates for projects in the new Sectors 68 to 80 continues; current residents in these sectors will be supplied water via temporary pipelines. CM promises new State policy for affordable housing, and also for identification of allottees for EWS housing; over 1,000 Ashiana EWS apartments in Sector 47 have not been occupied for years now, despite asking for applications twice (because all were rejected). Gurgaon MLA Umesh Agarwal is appointed as the Chairman, Transport Committee, for Haryana; he promises to upgrade the bus service and bus stand in the City. CM Khattar inaugurates the National Transmission Asset Management Centre (NTAMC) of Power Gird Corporation in Manesar, which will monitor and control power infrastructure and transmission systems, including 192 substations, of Power Grid

Corporation across the country.  Now birth certificates in Haryana will be issued within 7 days, and sent to the parents – there would be no need to visit any centre.  NGT orders municipal corporations across NCR to stop the burning of any waste within the next 30 days; burning of waste will carry a Rs 5,000 fine.  (BJP) State govt. floats a new Haryana Olympics Association – the third in the State!

 

 

 A 17-year-old domestic help hangs herself in Sector 57; her employers are booked for abetment.  A 19-year-old girl from the North East is raped in a DLF 1 guesthouse by an attendant.  An 8th. class girl is kidnapped and raped by a contractor, in Devilal Colony.  A Delhi-based Class 12 student is allegedly raped by her social network friend on the pretext of marriage.  2 girls are severely beaten up in a mall on Sohna Road.  Kherki Daula toll plaza staff is beaten up by locals, twice last week.  A doctor is robbed of his car at gunpoint, in Sector 23A.  A gold chain is snatched from an ex-BSNL executive. who was assaulted just outside his house in Sector 23A.  A Mewat man, who is believed to have stolen over 100 vehicles from Metro parking lots, and was on bail, is held when he tries to steal again; 12 bikes and a car

are recovered and his capture helps close 14 cases. A company’s email is backed and Rs 18 lakhs embezzled. Hero Motocorp complains to police about a fake recruitment agency allegedly operating on its behalf. An Iraqi national, who was getting his wife operated at a hospital, is reportedly robbed of 16,000 dollars, 3 non-functional buses at the bus stand catch fire; 1 is gutted. Gurgaon Police and corporates set up Society for Safe Gurgaon (SSG), which will in turn set up Citizen Service Centres (CSCs) across the City.

 Town & Country Planning (TCP) Dept. gives DLF 30 days to apply for Final Completion Certificates for DLF Phases I to 4; DLF started Phase 1 in the early 80s.  NGT finds 15 projects of builders in default of 2010 Forest guidelines; penalty would be Rs 50,000 each, and can even mean the sealing of a project for a repeat offence.  Hundreds of residents assemble at Kachra Chowk crossing to protest the ongoing construction in the Aravalis.  23 Primary and Middle schools in Gurgaon District will soon get girls’ toilets; earlier 25 Senior Secondary schools had been given this facility.  5 educational institutions are allotted land by HSIIDC at IMT, Manesar.  Union Railway Minister Suresh Prabhu says that Gurgaon Railway Station will soon be upgraded as

Nepal Helplines 0124 2316100, 0124 2303333 (for aid to Nepal) 1800-180-4646 Helpline for children with special needs

part of a Public Private Partnership (PPP) initiative. A new rail reservation centre at Sector 18 is inaugurated by Rao Inderjit Singh, MP, Gurgaon and Union Minister. Haryana Roadways and other transporters intend to strike against the proposed Road Transport Bill, in which fines for traffic offences have been substantially increased.  The Central Post Office of the City will soon offer ATM services to its 70,000 account holders.  MCG seeks time to deposit Rs 22 crores for the setting up of a drain that would run from Rajiv Chowk to Kherki Daula. 65 cadets participate in the CRPF Passing Out parade - including 4 women cadets. There is a drive by the Election Commission to align Aadhaar Cards with Voter ID cards. HUDA issues 3 lakh IDs and passwords for property owners, enabling them to track the status of their property online. 6,244 panchayats of Haryana are now connected over email; web pages of each village will soon be set up. The temperature in the City drops for a few days, coinciding with the earthquake in Nepal.

24-30 April 2015

Watch and listen to

'Hai Ye Gurgaon Meri Jaan' a ballad on Gurgaon, based on the legendary song... 'Ye hai Bombay Meri Jaan'.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHKm54U913g

OR View it at the FG Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/fridaygurgaon

RNI No. HARENG/2011/39319, Postal Regn. No. GRG/35/2014-2017

Vol. 4 No. 36  Pages 16  ` 10

{ Friday Gurgaon }

The Premier Bet

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

W

ith the IPL season in full swing, beware if you have a friend or relative taking too much interest in cricket, asking for large sums of cash from the family, ready to take loans, and even willing to pay usurious interest - he could be bitten by the 'IPL Betting' bug. Millionaires, auto drivers and everyone in between are said to have been caught in this betting menace, which many participants say is a big trap waiting to suck you in. Once you have bitten the betting bug, there is no freedom, there is no release. It is like digging your own grave and walking into it. So dangerous are the consequences of betting that one can lose lakhs of rupees, and even fortunes, on a single cricket match. In Gurgaon, IPL Betting has found a large number of ‘patrons’. Some people who have burnt themselves in this betting say that people with large amounts of cash - traders, land owners, property dealers and even students - have been indulging in this ‘sport’. Akash (name changed), who

actively bet in the last two IPL series, says that he has lost almost one crore rupees in betting (also called ‘satta), and he says that there are many more like him. “I have lost my mind. I have to pay Rs. 3 lakhs per month as interest to those who loaned me the money for the betting. I don’t have any source of regular income. I have land, which has increased much in value, and that was why people gave me money,” he says. The IPL betting network has a formidable logistics network, and there are a large number of bookies that take the bets, accept the money and then distribute it to those who have won the bets – after taking their Shylock cuts. Another person who has lost a lot says that, like the cricket commentary that comes ‘live’ on TV, the betting network also runs a live commentary on mobile phones. This can be heard by betters on payment of a fee. The commentary covers live betting rates and the odds, which keep on changing with every ball. The time difference between the TV telecast and the live betting commentary is also sometimes used by the betting syndicate to make a ‘profit’.

{ Barnali Dutta/FG }

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

B

ody art and piercings are a popular form of self-expression in today’s world – increasingly one of individualism and ‘show’. On the road, in coffee shops and in campuses, more than a few youngsters (and some more youngat-heart) can be seen flaunting their ‘skin art’. The pierced form is permanent. Welcome to the world of Tattoos. However, before you get a puncture, do care, if not beware. The first question you should have is whether a tattoo would harm your skin…or more. The process does involve needles and ink. The tattoo itself, once ‘healed’, is not bad for your skin. The problem is when complications arise during the healing process. A tattoo is essentially a series

The ‘victims’ say that they got involved in betting primarily because it was a source of entertainment, and also to make some money in the process. “It looks easy. And while there is no one who really pushes you into it, it is almost impossible

to exit”, they say. The odds in gambling are always staked against individuals, and for every winner there are multiple losers. Deepak Kumar (name changed) says that people have not only lost their fortunes and taken huge debt, some have

Look before you Tattoo of punctures by which dye is inserted into different levels of the skin - so it is by nature an invasive process. When done correctly and in a sterile environment, there really are no complications, though there may be discomfort due to bleeding or pain. However, it's important to keep potential complications in mind. One potential risk is that of a bacterial infection at the tattoo site. Symptoms of this include redness, warmth and a pus-like drainage. You may also have a ‘reaction’ to the tattoo, in which bumps called ‘granulomas’, or excessive scarring, may appear. Some people may have a serious allergic reaction to the types of dyes used in tattoos. So it's important to leave the tattoo parlour with a list of the

even committed suicide. Akash, servicing a debt of one crore, says that the pressure of the debtors is so much that it is impossible for him to move out – whether within the village or even in the city. He adds that a number of youth from cash rich families in villages also indulge in this pastime, and it has become an addiction for many. Even corporate executives have caught the betting bug, with many putting money on their favourite team and players. Apart from the match result, Akash says that a lot money is won or lost on ‘sessions’, wherein bets are placed on how much a team will score within a few specific overs. Many of the people also bet on the total that a particular team will score. Although the ‘intelligent’ try to hedge their risks by betting on both teams, this ‘strategy’ often fails…and then, once addicted, they look for big wins. Akash says that his family members initially did not know that he had taken to betting - he told them he was engaged in business. However, the loss of one crore has rattled his family, and he is now trying to compensate the loss. However, he realises that it will be impossible unless he sells a small chunk of his land. Contd. on p 4

types of dyes used, just in case. A more serious risk is the spread of infectious disease, which can be avoided by being particular about the tattoo parlour you use. Diseases such as Hepatitis B, Hepatitis C, Tuberculosis, Tetanus or HIV can spread if a tattoo ‘artist’ uses ‘dirty’ equipment. Therefore, before you get your tattoo, make sure that the parlour uses an autoclave, or a heat sterilisation machine, on all nondisposable equipment. Needles and tubes should be removed from sterile, new packages before every tattoo job. Satty, owner of Angel Tattoo Design Studio, says, “Tattoos are in vogue and people like to ornate themselves for various reasons. The youth are quite crazy about tattoos, and sometimes they come up with creative, innovative thoughts that they want ‘applied’ on Contd. on p 4-5

FG Last Week Issue Cover Page


05

1-7 May 2015

Epicentre

Dance Date: May 2 Time: 7:30pm Arpanam, an evening of Bharatanatyam recital by the disciples of Priya Venkataraman, a renowned Bharatanatyam exponent. Theatre Date: Sunday, May 3 Time: 5:30pm Love In The Park (Eng/60mins) Director: Nisa Shetty; Producer: Akshara

Theatre Date: Sunday, May 3 Time: 7:30pm 12 Angry Men (Eng/75mins) Director: Rakesh Palisetty; Producer: Akshara Theatre. Tickets at Rs. 350/- & 250/available at the Venue. Suitable for 18 years & above. Music Date: May 5 Time: 7:30pm Nostalgia – (Hindi) Film songs from the Golden Era: 40s to 60s Sung by Anjila Gugnani Producer: Svarpan & SaMa.

Run For Nepal (Part 1) Date: May 3 Time: 11am Venue : Leisure Valley HUDA Ground Book Reading/Meet The Author Date: May 7 Time: 10am Venue : Coopers Grill & Bar, 33 DLF Star Tower, Sector 30 Meet author Shunali Khullar Shroff. Special guest - Suhel Seth.

Traditional Musical Instruments of Japan – Photo Panel Exhibition Traditional Music varies not only as per historical, but also social and geographical conditions. The Japanese are known to be  great guardians of their tradition and culture.  Date: Upto May 30 (closed on Sundays and Public Holidays) Time: 11am to 7pm Venue : The Japan Foundation, New Delhi Entry Free Japanese musical instruments can be categorised as String, Percussion & Wind. String instruments include the Biwa, Koto and Shamisen; the Taiko forms a part of the Percussion instruments; and Shakuhachi is a kind of Wind instrument. No reservations or passes required for any event. entry is free. Seats will be given on first come first served basis.

To Advertise

9868163312 9818303901

Theatre Cast: Dhruv Shetty, Shaily Priya Pandey, Yashna Shetty, Ankur Anand, Vijay S. Kumar and others. Tickets at Rs. 350/- & 250/available at the Venue. Suitable for 18 years & above.

adsales@fridaygurgon.com 24-30 October 2014

RNI No. HARENG/2011/39319, Postal Regn. No. GRG/35/2012-2014

Vol. 4 No. 10  Pages 16  `10

The Lotus has bloomed here

{ Abhishek Behl / FG }

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

N

ew’ Gurgaon, which was the hub of ‘Aam Aadmi politics’ during the Lok Sabha elections, and voted almost en bloc in favour of the AAP candidate Yogendra Yadav, embraced saffron in the Assembly polls. In the Lok Sabha polls, the BJP candidate, Rao Inderjit Singh, had polled 6,44,780 votes, while INLD's Zakir Hussain got 3,70,058 and AAP candidate Yogendra Yadav got 79,452 votes. Yadav, however, polled almost 27,000 votes from the Gurgaon assembly area, and it was expected that if AAP had fought the Assembly elections, it would have been a strong contender for the Gurgaon constituency. In the absence of a viable alternative to the Congress, many of these 'AAP voters’ and several others preferred to go with ‘Modi BJP’. In fact all the four seats in Gurgaon District (Gurgaon,Badshahpur, Sohna & Pataudi) have gone to the BJP. In the Gurgaon assembly constituency, BJP candidate Umesh Agarwal won by a record 84,000 votes (over his nearest rival, Gopi Chand Gehlot, of INLD). What has surprised many has

{ Barnali Dutta / FG }

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

T

he states in India’s North East – Assam, Arunachal Pradesh (formerly NEFA), Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura - are often referred as the Seven Sisters of our country (lately Sikkim has also been clubbed in this segment of Northeastern states). However, considering the treatment meted out to the people hailing from this region by the rest of us Indians, particularly in New Delhi and Bangalore, it seems that we do not even consider them a part of our country or of us, let alone seeing them as a family member. Seemingly due to their ‘Mongoloid’ fea-

been the average performance of Congress candidate Dharambir Gaba, who came a distant third. He was expected to win, riding on the strong Punjabi vote bank of almost 70,000 votes. All the permutations and combinations of the political pundits were proved wrong not only in Gurgaon, but across Haryana as well. It seems that people once again – even for an Assembly election – voted overwhelmingly for BJP in the name of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Even the strong, tried and tested caste arithmetic was proven incorrect in this election, says Vijay Arora, a Congress supporter. He is rankled by the poor performance of the Congress, particularly in Gurgaon, which is considered a ‘Punjabi’ seat. Gaba, backed by this community, has won it four times - and it was because of this performance that he was given the mandate. "Punjabis did not vote for Gaba this time. When we see the voting pattern boothwise, we realise that the BJP

It had been a brave decision of Amit Shah to sever ties with the Haryana Janhit Congress (HJC), when the latter refused to budge from its 50-50 stand, considering that BJP had no real independent ‘standing’ in Haryana (of course, in retrospect, if he could take on the Shiv Sena in Mumbai, the HJC decision would have been a ‘cakewalk’). Shah also stayed away from any ‘tie-up’ with INLD. With a repeat historic performance in Haryana, at Lok & Vidhan levels, Modi-Shah have proved that they are indeed mega game-changers. In many areas of ‘new’ Gurgaon, including DLF, Sushant Lok and adjoining localities, a large number of people did not even know the local party candidate, but still voted for BJP. Even Umesh Agarwal admitted that people had voted with Modi in mind. Akshay, who has worked for the INLD for a long time, says that despite a large number of people promising to vote for their candidate, they finally preferred to vote for BJP due to Modi. In fact a large number of Jaat voters, who have never ‘crossed the line’, also entered the saffron space, due to the magnetic attraction of the

PM. In adjoining Badshahpur, the BJP candidate, Rao Narbir Singh, had to face a stiff contest against Rakesh Daultabad of the INLD and (BJP) Party rebel Mukesh Sharma, who made the contest quite interesting. While it was a neck-to-neck race in Badshahpur hinterland, the BJP candidate got overwhelming support from many ‘new’ Gurgaon colonies, which are still a part of this constituency. Almost 95 per cent votes in these ‘new’ Gurgaon colonies went to Narbir Singh - giving him a chance to become an MLA after a long time. The ‘elite’ corporate crowd did vote in many areas. In Pataudi and Sohna too the BJP won by huge margins, again despite not so strong candidates. In Pataudi, Bimla Chaudhary won by a good number, and she ascribed her victory to PM Modi and also to her mentor, Gurgaon MP Rao Inderjit Singh, who has quite a large following in the Ahirwal belt. So strong was the BJP wave in the urban areas that even ‘personal connections’ were swept away in the Modi wave. RS Rathee, an Independent, who had performed well in the last polls, managed only a couple of thousand in this election. Prem Bhatia, who stays in Sushant Lok, says that people

tures, and certain ‘associated’ behaviour, the Northeasterners have often been viewed with contempt (if not hate) by a particular section of ‘mainstream’ Indians. They are ‘dismissed’ derisively as Chinks or Chinkies (something that even the Chinese are not called today). Even the ladies are not spared, and are given anything but a ‘sisterly’ treatment. Their fairness, features and ‘modern’ dressing makes them ‘fair play’ for the locals. The men are often beaten up, though they will not be cowed down easily. These aspects were also observed by the Additional Sessions Judge of Dwarka Court in Delhi, Virender Bhat, while delivering the recent judgement in the Dhaula Kuan gang-rape case,

sentencing the five accused persons (incidentally belonging to Mewat, near Gurgaon) to life imprisonment. These beasts had raped a girl hailing from Mizoram, who had been working at the call centre of a BPO in New Delhi. It is shocking that within this year itself, three such racial attacks have taken place in Gurgaon. In the latest sickening episode, three young men from Nagaland, who were working at a BPO, were attacked by some perverted locals at Ghosi village in the vicinity of Sikanderpur. Around 100 people from the Northeastern states live in this village. The victims were assaulted for a flimsy reason; they had refused to offer a round of drinks for the locals.

asha PaNDEY

Dance Date: May 1 Time: 7:30pm Odissi recital by Vani Madhav, disciple of Sudhakar Sahu, along with her senior disciples.

Life & Style Exhibition Date: May 1 Time: 11am Venue : Courtyard by Marriott, B Block, Sector 27, Sushant Lok-1

has won even in areas considered to be our strongholds. The people have just voted for Modi," he admits. Analysts say that the Lok Sabha polls had shown that Gurgaon, particularly the new areas, would vote BJP, and it has now been proved beyond doubt that Gurgaon has become a bastion of the Party. Meanwhile, another strong ‘belief’, that an Independent always wins from at least one seat in the District, has been belied.

Desi Apartheid

Contd. on p 4 

Contd. on p 4 

NAYI SUBAH Empower Your Domestic Workers! Help them get their Voter IDs in Gurgaon

Nayi Subah team works along with home owners to empower domestic workers If you need help, please contact us. Email: nayi.subah.ggn@gmail.com Phone: +91 9650959335 Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/nayi.subah.gurgaon


06

Code Red

 Contd from p 1

If these collapse due to an earthquake, and subsequent investigation finds inadequacies in the safety norms followed, it will land many of the builders in deep trouble,” he says. Though vital equipment like gas cutter, victim location machine and thermal image camera – which are necessary for tackling any disaster - are not available with the department concerned, DRO Ajit Singh is not unduly alarmed. ”We are ready for any disaster. There are enough resources. Our police force is well prepared and so are the hospitals and the blood banks. We also conduct mock drills once or twice a month. There is no reason to panic. Anyway, a natural disaster will not knock before it comes. If anything happens, we just have to act ‘as required’. While a natural disaster can strike at will, our preparedness and the ability to deal with a crisis is most important,” he

says. According to TLC Satya Prakash, DC, Gurgaon, Nature’s natural balance should not be disturbed. Referring to the Aravali forest area, he says that it has played a very significant role in ensuring an ecological balance. However, he admits that the benefit of this in terms

Proactive Strategy

E

SS NE T

N

DISASTER MANAGEMENT

ASS

F A CEB O O K

RUC

REHA

ERY

TION

BILITATION

RESCUE IMMEDIATE RELIEF

Fundamental to Prompt and Effective Response

RE SP O

ON ST

C

R

EC OV

ES

S

RE

M

EN

T

INCIDENT

NS E

P R E VE NTI O

C

PR DEVE E ITY L O PAR C P PA M A

ED

N

GATION MITI

Holistic & Continuous Process

C over S tory

1-7 May 2015

NDMA

of, say, helping reduce the impact of a natural disaster, is difficult to assess. For instance, Nepal, he says, was more eco-friendly prakhar PANDEY in terms of forest cover, and yet it was mutilated by the recent earthquake. “According to me it is the geological conditions that dictate the kind of risk an area can have and how much it will be impacted by a natural disaster,” he says. The low groundwater situation in Gurgaon may be a more pertinent issue, as it should have a direct impact on the level of ‘shock’ from underground. Higher density of water at all levels, including just below the (land’s) surface, should be able to lessen an earthquake’s impact. Would low groundwater therefore be a doublewhammy for this Millennium City? The citizens of Gurgaon are clearly worried about the impact of such a disaster and find little comfort in the City’s ‘preparedness’. Alarms have been

What we ignore, at our peril, is our responsibility to mitigate the possibility of serious damage to human life and property when such a natural calamity strikes. We just keep building…whatever and however and wherever. Nepal is a stark example of that, despite the country having been in an earthquake ‘anticipatory’ mood for years. Buildings of all types had just been allowed to mushroom everywhere. How quickly we forget that the 1988 Nepal earthquake, near the Indian border, had affected much of northern Bihar. It left cracks in 50,000 buildings, including the Raj Bhavan and the old secretariat building in Patna.

The low groundwater situation in Gurgaon (like in Bhuj) may be a more pertinent issue, as it should have a direct impact on the level of ‘shock’ from underground. Higher density of water at all levels, including just below the (land’s) surface, should be able to lessen an earthquake’s impact. Would the low level of groundwater therefore be a double-whammy for this Millennium City? raised and people have been cautioned that more such shocks could be felt in the coming weeks. The City reportedly sits on 7 fault lines and can possibly be hit by a 7.5 (Richter) scale earthquake. However, there are also the ‘realists’ like Shama Ali, who resides near Galleria Market. She says, “I came here from Kashmir fifteen years ago, for a better life. Now where do I go? What is safe? Where is it really safe? Can I run away from such a disaster, if it were to strike? How much can I do? I cannot now leave my house and run away. I believe that the best answer is to prepare well for such disasters.” It is important that people are made aware of their nearest evacuation sites - such as low-rise schools and parks; have access to emergency food and water supplies; pre-determine how to contact family members and friends or gather together after a disaster. Identity cards, phone numbers, addresses as well as information on blood type should be carried on one’s person. Everyone should have the contacts of important government institutions and other private groups that can help in an evacuation process or provide immediate relief. Finally, it is always best to test. We must continue to regularly carry out community drills – in residential, commercial, industrial and institutional areas. We must conduct safety audits of current buildings and high-rises, and now strictly ensure that they are made as per laid down building codes before they are approved. The rest we can perhaps leave to Providence! u

After reading FG on paper or online, you can also comment on the various articles/stories, on FG Website www.fridaygurgaon.com

or on (FG) facebook www.facebook.com/fridaygurgaon


S ocial

1-7 May 2015

Stop the Auto-pilot { FG Bureau }

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

T

ravelling in shared autos in Gurgaon might be cheaper as compared to other modes of transport, but it is a security and safety nightmare for a large number of women - and even men - using this mode. The drivers of these vehicles neither wear ‘official’ dresses, nor do the autos have registration plates, and many of the ‘drivers’ do not have a ‘proper’ licence. Gurgaonbased social activist Sharad Goel says that he has petitioned the District administration to ensure that these shared autos are streamlined, else he will file a public interest litigation in court. Goel says that commuting is very difficult in these shared autos because these are routinely overloaded; an auto that has a capacity of 6 passengers invariably carries double the capacity. The drivers of these autos often drive rashly, jump traffic lights and cause accidents. Goel adds that even the newly introduced green and yellow autos should be regulated

and monitored. It almost seems that anyone can buy an auto and start plying it on the roads of the Millennium City. In his petition to the District administration, Goel has demanded that every auto driver should have a valid licence and wear a uniform that has his nameplate; and the vehicle should be officially licensed and properly maintained. The government must focus on ensuring the safety and security of the commuters. Passengers also complain that many times the drivers demand ‘excess’ fare for the same route, because there is no meter system in Gurgaon and there is no check on them. For example, for going from HUDA City Centre to Subhash Chowk, sometimes the auto driver will demand one hundred and fifty rupees, says one of the commuters. Goyal says that it is the duty of the government to streamline the thousands of autos that are running in the City. “How can Gurgaon become a global city when the authorities cannot even regulate the basic facilities like autos?” he asks. Goel says that he has nothing against shared

or private autos, but the service to commuters must be safe, secure and reasonably priced. The local residents say that the traffic police have been quite ‘liberal’ with the auto drivers, probably due to corruption or ‘political’ reasons (many shared autos are allegedly run under the ‘protection’ of local leaders). The territories of auto operators are defined, and ‘union’ members are told to respect territorial jurisdiction; a breach could lead to a fine or even an assault. The territorial division can also mean that a commuter has to change three autos within a span of 5 kilometers to reach a destination. There are no clear defined routes, and whatever has been decided by the union is final. The result is that the auto (especially shared auto) business in Gurgaon continues to run unchecked, severely affecting lakhs of commuters…apart from spewing pollution. The residents of Gurgaon are now eagerly looking forward to the improved and enhanced bus service (and bus stops) that was announced by the local MLA Umesh Agarwal recently. He has been appointed as the Chairman, Transport Committee, Haryana. u

Celebration of Aaroh 2015 at the Annual Day of Sangeet Mahavidyalaya, Sector 14

07

Here & Now { Shobha Lidder } Don't be everywhere at one time Focus more on one thing Multitasking is no more fashionable When you work mindfully It is like meditating When doing some mechanical job The mind strays away to petty stuff Confusion arises in the mind We lose focus, cannot find Things as we need Eat mindfully, so they say Enjoy the food on the plate Certain hobbies keep mind & body focused Like painting, stitching, reading, writing Fixing with tools When the mind is fixed on the object At task, it relaxes One mind one thought...that is the art Of mindfulness...and serenity When at work, work with delight When at home, give home its priority right When with friends attend to them Listen to your child's prattle, don't pretend When with parents give them your attention Their failures don't mention Nor deride them, or show off Sort the puzzle each day In your own special way Be here & now The kaleidoscope is unique Be mindful what you speak. Shobha Lidder Writer, Journalist, Teacher, Trainer, Social Activist, Reiki Master, Pranic Healer

INTACH Heritage Quiz 37 teams participated in the INTACH Heritage Quiz for Corporates 2015 conducted by INTACH-Gurgaon Chapter. The winners were: Indian Oil ‘A’ Team – K Suresh & D Taneja Indian Army Team – Lt Col (Dr) S Bhattacharya & Major (Dr) Sandip Singh Indian Oil ‘B’ Team – Saranga Bordoloi & Chandan Mahata

Shell Team – Preyoshi Ganguly & Venkata Pendayala Hachette Team – Thomas Abraham & Amish Raj Mulmi Reckitt Benckiser Team – Tanmay Prusty. Raghav Chandra, Additional Secretary & Financial Adviser, Ministry of Culture, Government of India was the Chief Guest. The Quiz was conducted by the Xpress Minds team headed by Quiz Master Kunal Savarkar. Indian National

Trust for Art and Cultural Heritage (INTACH) is a nonprofit organisation set up in 1984 to involve its members in protecting and conserving India’s vast natural, built and cultural heritage. It has 175 Chapters across India. INTACH-Gurgaon Chapter is supporting over 40 Heritage Clubs in Gurgaon schools, organising Haats to promote the crafts of India and raising funds for the restoration, conservation and protection of heritage structures.


08

1-7 May 2015

K id C orner

day

Mother Earth

C

elebrating Earth Day is a means of educating and reminding ourselves that our planet needs to be conserved and nourished. Earth Day was celebrated in the Junior Wing of American Montessori Public School.  At a special assembly, the choir group sang a song on ‘Mother Earth’. A Tearing and Pasting competition was also held.

Don’t Litter yan n Earth Day, R l na io at rn te In School, Sector an 40 organised it Sk n io Inter Sect Class r fo n io tit Compe we ‘If IV on the topic: be ill w re litter the futu bitter’.

O

Disaster Preparedness

T

he teachers of Ryan Global School conducted a workshop on Disaster Management. The students were sensitised on precautions to be taken during a natural calamity such as an earthquake. The students were instructed to remain calm and alert. Teachers and children also participated in an evacuation drill. Everyone in the School prayed for the victims of the Nepal earthquake and maintained a 2 minutes silence as a mark of respect for those who lost their lives in this disaster.

Earth Day celebration at S.D. Adarsh Vidyalaya

s

am of My Dre ld r o W y M i dream of a church on the beach where all go to preach i think of that beautiful beach which i know is beyond my reach i dream of a nation without any dissension where peace and prosperity rules over the ocean blues

i dream of taking a risk of touching the blazing asterisk although it is only a dream i wish to travel the realm        i have an dream  to eat an ice -cream which is far more luscious than any treat in the human world of greed i dream that i’m a megaman soaring the skies like superman yet as sharp as batman mixed with the humour of spiderman i know my delusion is nothing but mere illusion yet to realize them i’ll try my best and on god i leave the rest. Archita Sharma Class VIII A Ryan International School, Sector 31


1-7 May 2015

09

K id C orner

Calming the Mind

S

tudents of Ryan International School, Sector 40 attended a workshop on ‘Aggression Management’. Aggression is a growing concern even among children these days. School Head Ms. Peeya Sharma nominated the student Peer Moderator to attend the Workshop, to understand the reasons for anger and to learn effective techniques for managing and constructively channelising children’s energies. The Peer Moderator then conducted in house sessions in the School.

Musing at the Museum

G

urugram Public School organised an educational trip for the students of Classes VI – VIII to the National Science Museum. ‘Emerging Technologies - A look into the future’, is the latest addition to the galaxy of galleries at the Museum. Some other galleries are: ‘Human Biology - the miracle of Human Life’; ‘Information Revolution’ - the march from cave paintings to the Internet; Fun Science’ - full of hands-on exhibits explaining the fundamentals of science.

Tap on each of these for sub-categories

Kid Corner Check out what Gurgaon kids are up to

If you wish to be featured in ‘Kid Corner’ (for publishing your school’s activities and achievements), please mail us at fridaygurgaongallery@gmail.com

Global Exclusive Global news and features, from 'dpa'

prakhar PANDEY

Archive Check out all the earlier issues, sequentially

WE BS IT E

G-Scape All our Photo-features Coming Up Plan your weekend 'dos'

Video/Photo Gallery of Events covered by FG


10

1-7 May 2015

C omment

FG had carried a Cover Story on Gurgaon’s Impending Disasters in Vol. 2, issue 45 (June 28 to July 4, 2013), after the Uttarakhand tragedy. Not much has changed. Will the Nepal earthquake finally wake us up?

Our Impending Disasters

T EDITORIAL Atul Sobti

Letter To The Editor Natural Disasters are leading to a colossal loss of human lives and damage to properties. A natural calamity is the direct result of the harm and destruction that we have done to Nature. A possible simple solution could be to ban tree felling for at least the next ten years and make planting of at least one tree a mandatory moral duty of everyone for these ten years. Bimal Mohanty

ragedy has overtaken the people and visitors in Uttarakhand. The disaster seems far away…distant. Our local issues seem miniscule. There is maybe some ‘comfort’ in that – in believing that the Millennium City, and our posh residences and office complexes in particular, offers us immunity from any calamity. How wrong we could be. There are scenarios building towards some impending disasters – and there seems to be no stopping them. The real estate juggernaut just rolls on - while planning and providing for civic services and amenities continues to be treated as an irritant. Some scenarios are being man (Administration) made; some will be triggered by the fury of Mother Nature – when even her patience at her exploitation runs out. Water That we live on a barren landscape is well known; we are now ensuring that it moves towards a desert status. The ground water is not only depleting fast, it is reaching a very critical level – where there is threat of severe contamination and even poisoning. The new canals/water channels and Master Plans will only remain on paper – as the same water, before reaching Gurgaon, would be prioritized for Delhi, and many Haryana villages and towns on the way. Water is too precious for anyone to pass up, however cemented the canal is. So as not have a spanner put in the real estate works, the Administration has conveniently circumvented the NCR Planning Board, while finalizing its Gurgaon Master Plan. What solution can we hope for, when even simple Rainwater Harvesting has not been implemented as planned? A new Gurgaon II (new sectors) is under construction, in full swing, with borewells still allegedly being used to extract ground water. The Administration is complacent, seeing that many have found a solution in daily water tankers (that charge almost Rs 1,000 per round). The tankers would soon swarm all our roads and highways – along with the diesel tankers providing the fuel for power. They would ensure that each residence and establishment remains tanked up – always. We are well on our way to achieving Fatehpur Sikri status. Garbage/Sewage Our City has no planned connectivity of drains, and sewage and storm water drains coincide. During the monsoons the sewage is stormed by the rainwater, and flows back onto the roads. Most of the sewage is anyway not treated, and just flows onward into the Yamuna. The new sectors will only pile up further muck, as civic facilities are an after-thought to the development of new spaces. The lag, between the coming up of residences and civic services, would probably be a decade – provided there is improvement

in the latter henceforth. Mother Yamuna’s revenge may not be far off, with even a trailer playing out this season. The river’s flooding could reverse the flow, and push all the sewage right back on us. The potent combination of sewage and garbage is also a very visible scenario. In many areas garbage lies uncollected, there is anyway no segregation, and garbage treatment capacity is woefully inadequate. (Garbage) Landfills are filling up the Aravallis, as well as contaminating the ground water – a rare combination/contribution to disaster! Earthquake We have the highest of high-rises coming up in an earthquake vulnerable area. Previous mild earthquakes have already led to cracks in new, modern buildings of well-established developers. Gurgaon II (new sectors) now has hundreds of builders constructing lakhs of residences, offices and commercial establishments. Some of these builders have very little experience, some are ex-property brokers – and they are here to make a killing. It is a different matter that the current slow-down in real estate is instead killing them. It would be no surprise to see the quality of construction becoming the first casualty. Earthquakes will also bring problems of fire and collapse. Fire tenders currently can barely impact the tops of a few condos and complexes. Only DLF is on a high ladder. And what about EWS houses and slums – and ‘old’ Gurgaon? They are even now on weak ground, and would clearly be the first casualties in any calamity. Unfortunately, they also have no access to private solutions. Action It is time we bit the bullet. Ground water usage has to be strictly stopped, with even a plan for capping the current borewells. Gurgaon II (new sectors) development definitely needs to be postponed till the basics of water, power and sewage/garbage are taken care of (at least 80%) in the current sectors of Gurgaon. And in Gurgaon II, these civic facilities need to be first set up, taken care of, before anyone is allowed to reside in, or colonize, these new sectors. To ensure this, the head of Town & Country Planning, and even the CM, must be held personally accountable. The network of sewage and storm water drains – separate – must be completed on priority. Badshahpur Nallah, and its connectivity, needs to be taken up as a separate project. Every multi-storeyed project (current and new sectors) of over 75m height must be inspected separately by an expert(s) on building construction, to check for the structure’s ability to withstand an earthquake of a certain intensity. The Disaster Management Authority must specifically spell out the plan for ‘old’ Gurgaon, in case of an earthquake.u


1-7 May 2015 Yoga is now being listed as the 33rd. item on the UNESCO World Heritage List – India. The govt. has just finalised the ‘logo’ for International Yoga Day, to be celebrated worldwide on June 21st. Yoga is accepted as a 6,000+ year old physical, mental and spiritual practice having its origin in India (Bharat).

About The IDY Logo n

Folding of both hands in the logo symbolises Yoga, the union, which reflects the union of individual consciousness with universal consciousness, a perfect harmony between mind & body, man & nature - a holistic approach to health & well being.

n

The brown leaves symbolise the Earth element, the greeen leaves symbolise Nature, blue symbolises the Water element, brightness symbolises the Fire element and the Sun symbolises the source of energy and inspiration.

n The logo reflects harmony and peace for humanity,

which is the essence of Yoga.

UNESCO World Heritage List - India Cultural (Yellow) n  Agra Fort (1983) n  Ajanta Caves (1983) n  Buddhist Monuments at Sanchi (1989) n  Champaner-Pavagadh Archaeological Park (2004) n  Chhatrapati Shivaji Terminus (formerly Victoria Terminus) (2004) n  Churches and Convents of Goa (1986) n  Elephanta Caves (1987) n  Ellora Caves (1983) n  Fatehpur Sikri (1986) n  Great Living Chola Temples (1987) n  Group of Monuments at Hampi (1986) n  Group of Monuments at Mahabalipuram (1984) n  Group of Monuments at Pattadakal (1987) n  Hill Forts of Rajasthan (2013) n  Humayun’s Tomb, Delhi (1993) n  Khajuraho Group of Monuments (1986) n  Mahabodhi Temple Complex at Bodh Gaya (2002) n  Mountain Railways of India (1999) n  Qutb Minar and its Monuments, Delhi (1993) n  Rani-ki-Vav (the Queen’s Stepwell) at Patan, Gujarat (2014) n  Red Fort Complex (2007) n  Rock Shelters of Bhimbetka (2003) n  Sun Temple, Konârak (1984) n  Taj Mahal (1983) n  The Jantar Mantar, Jaipur (2010) Natural (Green) n  Great Himalayan National Park Conservation Area (2014) n  Kaziranga National Park (1985) n  Keoladeo National Park (1985) n  Manas Wildlife Sanctuary (1985) n  Nanda Devi and Valley of Flowers National Parks (1988) n  Sundarbans National Park (1987) n  Western Ghats (2012)

C omment

11


12 { Dr. Rajesh Bhola }

W

ould you believe that we are all living a dream? That we are mere actors on a stage and the real us is somewhere else in this world; that we are just a projection, an incarnation of a part of us? That we incarnate on earth to learn to ‘live’ within a limited and difficult environment (and where we seem to have temporarily forgotten our true nature)? That our life on Earth is just a brief moment in a much larger existence - there are other dimensions of existence that we live in before and after we come to this world? That in between lives we return to a kind of heaven where we debrief, see our old friends, plan the next life and then move on to a new journey? People who have had a ‘near death’ experience report that it felt more real than ‘life’ and they ‘understood’ things from an unexplainable perspective. If all the above is true, then the ‘reality’ of our life on Earth pales when compared with our broader existence. It’s like being in a play or a simulation, which may have meaning of its own, but there is so much going on beyond the stage and the simulator. Is our time in this world somewhat scripted and purposeful? Are we here to learn some lesson or accomplish some spiritual task, before moving on to another existence? Is this world an illusion? Does this earthly world, like a magician, use some kind of ‘misdirection’ to get us to focus on the more trivial aspects of existence and ignore its more fundamental and important aspects? Could it be that we are sleepwalking, as in a dream, in this illusory world, and that we only ‘wake up’ into a real world when we die? Did that dream world have to be created? Probably not, because it is all in our mind. Even the physical world exists only in our mind; it is the imagination of our cosmic mind or spiritual consciousness. Physical matter does not ‘exist’, and even our body is an illusion. Bill Hicks aptly remarked that ‘we are all one consciousness experiencing itself subjectively. There is no such thing as death; life is only a dream, and we are the imagination of ourselves’. Commonly seen as a conduit to another dimension of us, dreaming is a mysterious aspect of human biology that has countless cultural, social and symbolic meanings. Whether as a connection to our spiritual self, our soul or to a deeper part of our psyche, dreams allude to the presence of hidden messages. Like participating in a treasure hunt, we race from clue to clue, desperate to decode the embedded secrets in our dreams… before they disappear. Dreams communicate layers of emotive messages through colour, sound, touch and sight, in unusual combinations that are difficult to comprehend.  Dreaming is a biological and spiritual form of dialogue with our unconscious. Some dreams are epic narratives, with complicated plots, while others are simple but disquieting. We all dream, but we have divergent abilities

1-7 May 2015

Life is but a Dream

to remember our dreams and to distil possible meaning thereof. Is dreaming a skill to hone, a neurological byproduct, or an unrecognised sixth sense? Dreaming often presents a bizarre embodied perceptive - a glimpse into another realm of our existence. To understand this multifaceted language using our waking minds is challenging; the experience needs to be read in a more sensorial way. However, the mystery of what, how or whom we are in communication with, and the potential significance of this knowledge, is a riddle that still confounds us. Medical studies in rapid eye movement sleep, the physical state in which most dreams occur, have led to greater knowledge of the biology of dreaming, but virtually no insights into the dream itself. During sleep the dreamer is in an organism state – a state of the entire body. This physical state differs from the ways in which our body and brain are regulated when we are awake. More recent investigations into the brain by psychologists have revealed detailed information regarding the parts of the brain that are used during the different phases of dreaming. A consistent theme within ‘dream investigation’ is the idea of dreaming as a kind of processing tool. We do not turn off thought; it just takes a different form. Our hallucinatory narratives are not completely cut off from reality; they are rather a different manifestation of it. This alternative reality offers an opportunity to our consciousness (some of which is aware during sleep) to process (the day’s) emotion and the cognitive world free of the contextual inhibitions that are imposed during our waking life.  However, this raises the following questions: Is the dream state more authentic, honest and trustworthy? Would increasing our ability to access our dreaming mind create a more intuitive way of being? How might increased awareness of our dream state enhance our ability to navigate life? Would connecting to our unconscious encourage us to broaden our range of perceptions and feelings. Can we access greater depths of our intrinsic experience in order to ‘explain’ our unplanned and unconstrained impulses?  Traditional views of dreaming in psychology provide insight into our contemporary relationship with dreams. Freud viewed dreams as evidence of our unconscious selves, as results of repressed desires. Dreams became part of a psychological investigation

for diagnosis. Freud’s view of dreams as manifestations of our un-vented psyche differed from Jung’s belief that dreams are linked to a greater collective ‘unconsciousness’. For Jung, dreams contained representations of the instinctive, emotional parts of us, which revealed themselves as symbolic archetypes inherited from ancient images, myths and lore. In both cases, however, dreams contain information relevant to understanding behaviour in our waking life. The key is to understand the language and symbols through which our dreams communicate (like ‘falling in a deep gorge’, ‘being swept away in swirling waters’, ‘being chased’, or ‘teeth falling out’). The content of dreams often seems to be a representation of common anxieties, and therefore many people have claimed to have similar dreams. However, the meaning of such dreams is different for each person. While some believe that dream symbols have a common, collective meaning - if you dream this, it means that – others believe dream content is highly subjective. For example, if someone with a paralysing fear of dogs dreams about a dog, that person will have a very different understanding of the dream from someone who adores dogs. The sensorial experience surrounding the symbol is equally, if not more, important. We may have a dream laden with confusing and violent imagery, but feel extremely calm. But how we feel in these dreamscapes is real; the reality is the reality of our feelings. Like recurring dreams, which do not often change in plot, but can change in temperament and perception. The act of dreaming is a way to communicate with our higher self and to develop intuition. Through practice and guidance from a spiritual teacher, practising Dream Yoga can help bring together the conscious and the unconscious, helping us gain mastery over our mind.  The enhanced dreaming ability can release us from our mind’s tricks, which hinder our capacity to see our unconscious clearly. The understanding of the messages in our dreams requires more the taming of the beast of our conscious mind, than than the decoding of some secret language. Whether grounded in neurobiology or mystical experience, dreams are a fascinating and mysterious aspect of being human. Each night we delve into the depths of our mind and body to experience its full creative and expressive potential. Regardless

S piritual of memorial evidence each morning, these episodes impact our waking life by helping us process emotion, explore alternatives and make new connections. It is through this alternate sense, experienced free from conscious constraints and through an unconscious mind/body intelligence, that we access information to increase the understanding of our self. We can draw our awareness to conscious influences – aspects or events in our waking life that may influence the content of our dreams. Watching cartoons, science fiction or horror movies before going to bed may explain the medium our unconscious is using to communicate with our mind. As we become more familiar with our waking patterns and influences, this lucidity can increase the depth and method of conversation we have with our unconscious. This shifts the emphasis from the dream narrative or content to sensorial cues, which are difficult to translate. Describing these experiences strips away the embodied experience that holds the message. Even the memory of a dream misses the complete sensory configuration; it is difficult, if not impossible, to recreate a dream’s curious music of sensory transpositions in our waking life. The separation and cultural hierarchy of our senses contributes to how we perceive our dream and where we lay emphasis. Dreaming is a form of self-healing and inner guidance, by way of reconnection with our soul or greater self. Human beings have the ability to transcend time and space while re-connecting with the soul. Dreaming is the retrieving of pieces of the soul that have literally gone missing. Time is another fascinating aspect of dreaming. Even in terms of duration, dreams do not seem to follow our normal experience of time. Despite intricate narratives, significant conversations and detailed experiences, dreams can occur in a matter of just minutes. Our measurement of time does not seem to apply, and time becomes multi-dimensional - the past, present and future become equally accessible during the dreaming state. It is the dreamer’s ability to exist in the future that makes ‘realised’ souls experience the feeling of having experienced something before – via the memory of their dream of the future. There is another aspect of dreaming. Every cell in our body communicates with the others via beams of light, similar to the way that cell phones function. Every cell is our body is made of liquid crystals. The body is quite literally a Biological Internet. There are trillions of little ‘yous’ within the seeming one whole you, and your body is quite literally a hologram made of pure energy. As a matter of fact, the entire universe is contained in every single cell of our bodies, and every aspect of the physical universe is inherent within every cell in the exact same holographic manner. At the macro level it is all an illusion...a dream! u Dr. Rajesh Bhola is President of Spastic Society of Gurgaon and is working for the cause of children with Autism, Cerebral Palsy, mental retardation and multiple disabilities for more than 30 years. He can be contacted at rabhola@yahoo.com


1-7 May 2015

Health & Vitality... Naturally!

{ Jaspal Bajwa }

Nature’s Wonder Food(s) of the Week: Chronic Disease Taming Foods – Part 2 Proteins

H

produced in the most inhumane way through ‘factory-farming’ methods. The latter kinds of meats are positively toxic - loaded as these are with growth hormones, steroids, antibiotics and toxins that flood into the body of the traumatised animals due to the inhumane ‘growing’ and killing methods. Red meats together with dairy products are also the main source of saturated fat, and have negative effects on ‘bad’ cholesterol levels. By staying in the body a longer time, red meats can fester, thereby putting strain on the digestive system. Following a high-protein diet for a long period of time can also weaken the bones. The digestion of protein releases acids into the bloodstream, which the body usually neutralises with calcium and some of this may be pulled from bones. The raging debates regarding meat consumption are fortunately finally coming to a conclusion. Red meats, highly processed meats and Cantonese-style salted fish are now convincingly associated with increased risk of Chronic diseases (Non-Communicable Diseases),

especially heart disease and Type 2 Diabetes, and several cancers. Processed meats include varieties that are smoked, salted or cured by the addition of preservatives. The evidence is conclusive for cancers of the colorectum and nasopharynx. According to the non-profit organisation, the World Cancer Research Fund International (WCRF), ‘since the mid-1990s, the results of studies have strengthened the evidence on red meat and processed meat as causes of colorectal cancer … the evidence on poultry, fish and eggs is generally insubstantial’. It’s time – and it should never be too late - to switch back to healthy, high quality lean proteins.

Tip of the Week

There’s no need to go overboard on proteins. Though some studies show the benefits of high-protein, lowcarbohydrate diets in the short term, avoiding fruits and whole grains means that we miss out on key aspects of a preventative diet that should include large doses of healthful fibre, vitamins, minerals and other phytonutrients.

As mentioned in Part 1, a well balanced, varied and wholesome diet, which is alkalising, mainly plant based and whenever possible fresh and organic, is indeed the best for overall health. When combined with a healthy activity level, the eating of traditional locally available foods tends to work well to cultivate the right kind of immunity enhancing micro-flora in the gut. High quality protein foods are not only good choices for disease prevention, they may also help with weight control. The clear preference should be for plant based proteins, fermented products and lean white meats. Some examples are: lean white turkey or chicken, fish and seafood, beans (black, kidney, mung or pinto), peas, eggs, nuts, seeds and whole grains. Sprouted grains and beans are also an excellent source of proteins. Lentils are not only an amazing source of protein, they also offer carbohydrates and fibre. When it comes to dairy, whey protein and yoghurt are at the top of the charts. However, if fresh organic ‘raw’ milk is not available, products made from nuts or beans – such as fermented soya products (miso & tempeh), as also ‘non-dairy milks’, can be considered. In addition to complete proteins, soya foods (tempeh, tofu, edamame) also offer benefits of fibre and healthy fats. Seafood, which includes fish (salmon, tuna, trout) and shellfish (crab, mussels, oysters) has good quality protein and minerals - with an added bonus of being a good source of Omega-3 fatty acids (heart-healthy fat). For vegetarians, similar benefits may be obtained from Hemp seeds. For Vegans, Spirulina and Chlorella offer excellent nutrition along with a 70% protein content. Quinoa, amaranth, bulgar, brown rice, wheat germ and oat bran offer up to 9 gm per cup of high quality protein (versus the 18 gm per cup from lentils). To be continued: In Part 3 we will cover some other foods that can help prevent chronic diseases.u For Education purposes only; always consult a Healthcare Practitioner for medical conditions

After reading FG on paper or online, you can also comment on the various articles/stories, on FG Website

13

Some high-protein foods are healthier than others because of what comes along with the protein: for example, type of fat, beneficial fibre or hidden salt. The ‘package deal’ determines how good it is for our health. All high-salt and salt-preserved foods, as also high-saturated fat and trans-fat foods, or overly-fried and char-grilled foods potentially lead to increased blood pressure, higher cholesterol levels and risk of cancer, and hence must be minimized, if not completely eliminated, from the diet.

Taming Chronic Diseases (Part 2) aving highlighted Vegetables & Fruits (in Part 1), we move on to Proteins - which should ideally form a little more than a quarter of a ‘healthy and balanced plate’. Thousands of proteins make up the enzymes that power zillions of chemical reactions and the haemoglobin that carries oxygen in our blood. These muscle-building nutrients come from varied sources. In traditional societies, depending on the region where man lived, meat consumption varied between 10 to 20% of total food consumed. In societies that were renowned for people routinely crossing the age of 100, it was much less - at around 7 to 10% ( the exception being islanders or coastal populations, which relied heavily on seafood). Unfortunately, with increasing industrialisation and higher incomes, the consumption of meat, milk and eggs is growing by leaps and bounds. Meat now accounts for about 18 per cent of dietary protein and 23 per cent of dietary fat, with much higher skews in developed countries, higher income groups and urban areas. Recommendations on how much protein is required vary substantially. The Institute of Medicine recommends that adults get a minimum of 0.8 grams of protein for every kilogram of body weight per day. In terms of source of calories, the Institute recommends that 10 to 35 percent should come from proteins. However, too much of a good thing can be bad. Protein intake must be governed by needs and not fads. The higher end of the scale should be reserved for the growing-up years, and for seniors who are prone to muscle-loss. According to the highly acclaimed ‘DASH’ (Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension) diet, which strikes at the root causes of heart disease, the more prudent recommendation is closer to 18 % of calories consumed. In addition to the quantity, the quality of proteins is key. Since meats contain all essential amino acids (which our body cannot synthesise), it is important to consume the ‘right’ kind of meats. There is a huge difference between eating ‘wild’ or ‘range-fed’ lean meats - which are healthy, and meat

W ellness

www.fridaygurgaon.com or on facebook www.facebook.com/fridaygurgaon


14

1-7 May 2015

S pecial prakhar PANDEY

Summer’s

Here


B on V ivant

1-7 May 2015

15

As The World Dances Celebrating International Dance Day, 2015

{ Meenu Thakur Sankalp }

years before returning to France after the Revolution. He fought for the dignity of ballet during the post-Revolution niversally speaking, Dance has years. He died in Saint Germain in been looked up to as a prayer. 1810. The International Dance Day is a Dance is a connect between the tribute to this dancing legend. In 1982, body and the soul, the mind and the the Committee of International Theatre, intellect. Dance is conceptualised around positive movements, gestures in association with UNESCO, decided to solemnise Navarre’s birth anniversary and posture, which often make by observing April 29 as International the dancer swirl in exhilaration. Dance Day. The International Dance It also helps dispel negative traits Council (CID - the acronym for like anger, frustration, ill feelings, Conseil International de la Danse) stress and dissatisfaction. Dance is an NGO that is associated with is a collective pursuit as well as UNESCO. Established in 1973, the an individual passion; though the Council has made untiring efforts for spirit of Dance lives within the promoting Dance all over the world. individual, it helps connect various CID is associated with organisations in communities through a cultural more than 155 countries oneness. Keeping in of the world. It was mind these intricate only a matter of time qualities of Dance, it before CID was chosen is little wonder that to be the custodian of a need was felt to the International Dance celebrate Dance across Day, and from 1982 it has the globe. Thus came become the umbrella about International body for international Dance Day, which is Dance organisations. celebrated on April 29 Every year CID brings each year. The run-up out a theme related to to this Day normally Dance on International begins a week in Dance Day. An eminent advance and continues dancer-choreographer for the subsequent Jean Georges Noverre also two weeks. The special delivers a day, April 29, is the message. birthday of the French CID helps countries Ballet legend Jean Georges Noverre, promote dance. It also the 18th Century dancer-producer. strives to popularise dance Noverre performed all over France, in primary schools. Calling and by the time he had composed his for the world to unite and great work’ ‘Les Fetes Chinoises’, he celebrate Dance, CID came had already become the favourite of up with a unique idea in the French royals. Noverre brought emotional and physical aspects to ballet, 2007. The International Dance Day of that year which had earlier concentrated only on was dedicated to children. the elaborate use of costumes. Noverre The vision was that every was appointed ‘Maitre des Ballets’ child, irrespective of race, colour, sex (Master of Ballets) by the French and creed, should dance freely. Dance, Queen Marie Antoinette. Noverre according to CID, is the ideal platform was respected for his contribution to for bringing people of different cultures bringing tragic narratives into ballet. together. During the International However, after the beheading of the Dance Day ‘fortnight’, conferences, royals during the French Revolution, seminars, congresses, recitals, Noverre was reduced to penury. He performances, lectures and workshops lived in neighbouring England for a few

U

Such is the joy of dancing that, a year ago, during the International Dance Day in 2014, Bharatanatyam dancers of Chennai broke into an impromptu performance at a shopping mall, making it the first instance of a ‘flash mob dance’. A fifteen-year-old, who had taken part in that performance, remarked, “It was amazing to dance in a mall. It was an exhilarating experience.” are organised all over the world, and various organisations do their bit for promoting a Dance culture among their people. Extraordinarily talented dancers (even among those ‘challenged’), teachers, connoisseurs and critics participate wholeheartedly during these two weeks without any monetary consideration. India is a country that has varied forms of Dance, be it Pung Cholam in the North East, Gidda in the North West, Karagattam down South or Lavani in the West - not to forget the thousands of indigenous Dance forms that are today unfortunately crying for attention. The run-up to the celebrations of International Dance Day this year has been impressive.

9868163312 | 9818303901 adsales@fridaygurgon.com

The writer is a renowned Kuchipudi danseuse and choreographer

24-30 October 2014

RNI No. HARENG/2011/39319, Postal Regn. No. GRG/35/2012-2014

Vol. 4 No. 10  Pages 16  `10

The Lotus has bloomed here

{ Abhishek Behl / FG }

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

N

ew’ Gurgaon, which was the hub of ‘Aam Aadmi politics’ during the Lok Sabha elections, and voted almost en bloc in favour of the AAP candidate Yogendra Yadav, embraced saffron in the Assembly polls. In the Lok Sabha polls, the BJP candidate, Rao Inderjit Singh, had polled 6,44,780 votes, while INLD's Zakir Hussain got 3,70,058 and AAP candidate Yogendra Yadav got 79,452 votes. Yadav, however, polled almost 27,000 votes from the Gurgaon assembly area, and it was expected that if AAP had fought the Assembly elections, it would have been a strong contender for the Gurgaon constituency. In the absence of a viable alternative to the Congress, many of these 'AAP voters’ and several others preferred to go with ‘Modi BJP’. In fact all the four seats in Gurgaon District (Gurgaon,Badshahpur, Sohna & Pataudi) have gone to the BJP. In the Gurgaon assembly constituency, BJP candidate Umesh Agarwal won by a record 84,000 votes (over his nearest rival, Gopi Chand Gehlot, of INLD). What has surprised many has

{ Barnali Dutta / FG }

write to us at letters@fridaygurgaon

T

he states in India’s North East – Assam, Arunachal Pradesh (formerly NEFA), Manipur, Meghalaya, Mizoram, Nagaland and Tripura - are often referred as

been the average performance of Congress candidate Dharambir Gaba, who came a distant third. He was expected to win, riding on the strong Punjabi vote bank of almost 70,000 votes. All the permutations and combinations of the political pundits were proved wrong not only in Gurgaon, but across Haryana as well. It seems that people once again – even for an Assembly election – voted overwhelmingly for BJP in the name of Prime Minister Narendra Modi. Even the strong, tried and tested caste arithmetic was proven incorrect in this election, says Vijay Arora, a Congress supporter. He is rankled by the poor performance of the Congress, particularly in Gurgaon, which is considered a ‘Punjabi’ seat. Gaba, backed by this community, has won it four times - and it was because of this performance that he was given the mandate. "Punjabis did not vote for Gaba this time. When we see the voting pattern boothwise, we realise that the BJP

It had been a brave decision of Amit Shah to sever ties with the Haryana Janhit Congress (HJC), when the latter refused to budge from its 50-50 stand, considering that BJP had no real independent ‘standing’ in Haryana (of course, in retrospect, if he could take on the Shiv Sena in Mumbai, the HJC decision would have been a ‘cakewalk’). Shah also stayed away from any ‘tie-up’ with INLD. With a repeat historic performance in Haryana, at Lok & Vidhan levels, Modi-Shah have proved that they are indeed mega game-changers. In many areas of ‘new’ Gurgaon, including DLF, Sushant Lok and adjoining localities, a large number of people did not even know the local party candidate, but still voted for BJP. Even Umesh Agarwal admitted that people had voted with Modi in mind. Akshay, who has worked for the INLD for a long time, says that despite a large number of people promising to vote for their candidate, they finally preferred to vote for BJP due to Modi. In fact a large number of Jaat voters, who have never ‘crossed the line’, also entered the saffron space, due to the magnetic attraction of the

PM. In adjoining Badshahpur, the BJP candidate, Rao Narbir Singh, had to face a stiff contest against Rakesh Daultabad of the INLD and (BJP) Party rebel Mukesh Sharma, who made the contest quite interesting. While it was a neck-to-neck race in Badshahpur hinterland, the BJP candidate got overwhelming support from many ‘new’ Gurgaon colonies, which are still a part of this constituency. Almost 95 per cent votes in these ‘new’ Gurgaon colonies went to Narbir Singh - giving him a chance to become an MLA after a long time. The ‘elite’ corporate crowd did vote in many areas. In Pataudi and Sohna too the BJP won by huge margins, again despite not so strong candidates. In Pataudi, Bimla Chaudhary won by a good number, and she ascribed her victory to PM Modi and also to her mentor, Gurgaon MP Rao Inderjit Singh, who has quite a large following in the Ahirwal belt. So strong was the BJP wave in the urban areas that even ‘personal connections’ were swept away in the Modi wave. RS Rathee, an Independent, who had performed well in the last polls, managed only a couple of thousand in this election. Prem Bhatia, who stays in Sushant Lok, says that people

tures, and certain ‘associated’ behaviour, the Northeasterners have often been viewed with contempt (if not hate) by a particular section of ‘mainstream’ Indians. They are ‘dismissed’ derisively as Chinks or Chinkies (something that even the Chinese are not

sentencing the five accused persons (incidentally belonging to Mewat, near Gurgaon) to life imprisonment. These beasts had raped a girl hailing from Mizoram, who had been working at the call centre of a BPO in New Delhi. It is shocking that within this year itself,

asha PaNDEY

GURGAON’S OWN WEEKLY NEWSPAPER To Advertise

There have already been numerous performances and all auditoria have been booked in advance for April 29. Thereafter, connoisseurs of Dance will attend seminars and group discussions, to help devise ways of making Dance more popular among the general public, especially the youth. The vision is to make Dance a way of life, so that every person may dance without inhibition, without the fear of being judged. Dance can of course help keep our bodies healthy. The new Director-General of UNESCO, Irina Bokova, has proposed a universal vision, which she has called the ‘new humanism’ - a vision open to the entire human community, providing a humanist response to globalisation and crisis, aiming at the safeguarding of social cohesion and the preservation of peace. u

has won even in areas considered to be our strongholds. The people have just voted for Modi," he admits. Analysts say that the Lok Sabha polls had shown that Gurgaon, particularly the new areas, would vote BJP, and it has now been proved beyond doubt that Gurgaon has become a bastion of the Party. Meanwhile, another strong ‘belief’, that an Independent always wins from at least one seat in the District, has been belied.

Desi Apartheid

Contd. on p 4 


1-7 May 2015

FG's Reminder: Vol. 2, Issue 45 (June 28 to July 4, 2013)

Our Impending Disasters

16 G -Scape

Friday gurgaon 1 7, may 2015  

..be the change you wish to see

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you