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FRESH FORK MARKET

ALMANAC Volume Two , 2015


LOCAL PROVISIONS FOR

MODERN DOMESTIC LIVING


F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T is a weekly grab bag of local, sustainably-produced foods. We call it a Farm Buying Club — similar to a CSA (community supported agriculture) program. By working with more than 100 family farms, we’re able to assemble a meal plan based on what’s in season, including fresh produce, whole grains, farm-fresh eggs, grassfed dairy products, and pasture-raised meats. At Fresh Fork Market, we take pride in bringing you old-fashioned foods from local fields, available for pickup weekly at more than two dozen locations across Northeast Ohio.


OUR PRODUCT

O AT H The fundamentals of Fresh Fork Market


Whether it’s providing funds to buy

Many of our growers practice

The term “all natural” doesn’t count

equipment, making investments in

organic production, with more

for much. With beef, for instance,

breeding stock, or sharing the risk

gaining organic certification each

that means real meat, but no

when creating a new product, we’ve

year. The bulk of our produce

promises beyond that. For us, it’s

built powerful relationships with

providers follow natural soil

all in thinking about the animal.

numerous small farmers. The items

building techniques and resort

Cows are ruminants, born to extract

in your share are the culmination

to good old hard work to

nutrients from grass, which is why

of deep-seeded collaborations.

root out the weeds.

our beef is 100% grassfed. Call it what you like, it’s just that simple.

“Free Range” and “Cage Free” don’t

Warren at Snowville Creamery says

We mean it, and we take it seriously.

guarantee your animal has been

it best — “I don’t use organic grains

It sets our hours. It plans our truck

raised with the sky above it or grass

because you can’t buy organic grains.”

routes. We work around the clock

underfoot. We believe in a higher

Instead of expensive, outsourced,

to ensure that we can get our

standard. That’s why all our animals

nutrient-poor rations, our turkeys,

food to you as close to harvest as

are pasture-raised. Our hogs root

chickens, and hogs have only the

possible. This means perishable

up acorns in the woods, and our

freshest local, certified non-GMO feed.

produce at the height of its flavor.

Not only do we value farms that

chickens live in protected pastures.

For us, being local is as much about

No further

values as it is about proximity. We

explanation

are stewards of the land — we

work with family farms within a

needed.

fold environmentally-conscious

75-mile radius of Cleveland that

practices into our own business.

have a mission to do the highest

From compostable crates to reusable

quality, healthiest, and most

jars, we want a sustainable second

sustainable production.

life for your share’s packaging.


FRESH FORK MARKET

ALMANAC Volume Two , 2015

F E A T U R E D Trevor and the Fresh Fork team man the grill, Taste of Tremont


F E A T U R E S 6

Contributors

7

P R O F I L E Jonas Raber

8

Letter from the Founder

10

Staff Roundtable

1 2

Fresh Fork Family

14

P R O F I L E Stutzman Farms

1 6

Calendar

47

Our connections with the community

A month-by-month walkthrough of 2015 with special event features

3 0

P R O F I L E Humble Pie Baking Co.

3 2

Centerfold

3 4

P R O F I L E Log Cabin Berries

3 5

P R O F I L E Maurer Farms

3 6

Locations

23

A glamour shot fresh from the farm

34

A map of our weekly delivery sites throughout Northeast Ohio

3 8

What’s in Your Bag

40

Parker’s Techniques

A breakdown of your summer share

Tips for eating, processing, and preserving your fresh produce

4 6

P R O F I L E Ohio City Meat & Curing

4 8

Ingredients and Recipes

7

Getting to know the folks behind the bag

55

11 41

Demystifying frequently asked-about items, from beets to beans to beef

5 8

Forkstagrams

6 0

Glossary

6 2

Policies

6 4

Parting Shot

24

Your snapshots from a year of shares

31

Common terms from local farms

An overview from pick-up to payment

48


FRESH FORK MARKET ALMANAC

CONTRIBUTORS LIKE MOST OF OUR PROJECTS, this publication is a collaboration between passionate people who are good at their jobs and aren’t afraid to put in some hard work. We recognize all their efforts.

IMAGERY

TIM HARRISON is a documentary photographer

based in Cleveland who specializes in editorial and commercial work. His photographs have appeared in The Wall Street Journal, USA Today, and Der Spiegel magazine. Tim served as a cryptologist

A D D I T I O N A L M AT E R I A L S F R O M Sanne Berg Stock P A G E 4 5

Magdelena Kucova Beef Bones P A G E 4 5

Max Shebeko Fritters P A G E 4 9

Adam Molka Tomato Soup P A G E 5 0

Karissa Van Tassel Beets P A G E 5 1

Charlotte Lake Kale Squares P A G E 5 2

Anna Didora Salad P A G E 5 3

Mark Minka Risotto P A G E 5 4

Paul Goode Texas Caviar P A G E 5 5

Frank Bach Tomatoes P A G E 6 1

T H A N K S T O P A R T-T I M E F R E S H F O R K E R S Jess Beard

Kirsten Dickerson

in the US Navy and graduated from Kent State

Brie Dobrow

Connor Feher

University, where he currently teaches Visual

Laura Jolliff

Cat McAllester

Storytelling. He and his family have been members

Kyle McCarty

Branden Micks

since 2009. Documenting the growth of Fresh Fork

Eric Szymborski

Nicole Vaudrin

Market and seeing the new connections between

AND A SPECIAL THANKS TO BIG AL

customers and farmers has been one of the most

Huge thanks to Allyson Fink for her endless support — through crazy ideas and an even crazier schedule. Thanks for working the truck or events so we can spend time together, even when all we get say to each other is “We need more hot corn!” — T R E V O R

rewarding photographic journeys of his career. W W W.T I M H A R R I S O N P H O T O . C O M

DESIGN

A L M A N A C P R O D U C T I O N D E TA I L S Printed for Fresh Fork Market by Activities Press MENTOR , OHIO

Almanac paper from the Millcraft Company CLEVELAND, OHIO

Please address any additional inquiries about content, copies, or reprints to Fresh Fork Market. PHILIP M C FEE subscribed to Fresh Fork in 2010.

C O N TA C T I N F O R M AT I O N

He is the founder of Flying Hand Studio, a design

MAILBOX DOORBELL

firm that works with a range of clients in dining, arts, and urban development. Philip and Tim will never let Trevor forget about that one pheasant

6 |

Fresh Fork Market P.O. Box 609612 Cleveland, OH 44109

Fresh Fork Offices 3800 Woodland Ave. Cleveland, OH 44115

hunt where they bagged more birds than he did.

Call 1-800-861-8582 or write to us at info@freshforkmarket.com.

W W W . F LY I N G - H A N D . C O M

W W W. F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T. C O M

FRESH FORK MARKET


JONAS

RABER

PASTUR E- RA IS E D B I R DS DO N ’ T J U ST HAV E A DEEPER FLAVO R , they have a sense of curiosity to match. When photographer Tim Harrison and his son Otto went to document the Raber turkeys in the fall of 2013, he found that out firsthand. As 3-year-old Otto led the turkeys around the pasture like the Pied Piper, Tim asked Jonas if his children played with the turkeys. “Not typically,” he said. Why? Tim asked. Jonas replied that because of their diet of grains and grubs, the turkeys tended to be especially interested in ”shiny things.” Oh, like shirt buttons, Tim said. “Sure,” Jonas nodded. “Or eyes.” Needless to say, Otto’s just fine and still serving as Fresh Fork’s junior photo assistant, and Jonas continues to raise a smarter breed of bird. He and his brothers have been raising chickens,

and ensure efficient grazing. This technique also

turkeys, and laying hens for Fresh Fork Market for

helps promote healthier land for future grazing. In

more than five years. The Rabers raise their fowl

addition to what the birds forage for on pasture,

using what are referred to as “chicken tractors” —

they are fed only non-GMO grains and never any

mobile pens that protect the birds from predators

antibiotics or hormones. Or buttons. Or eyes.

2015 ALMANAC |

7


WELCOME TO THE COMMUNITY A L E T T E R F RO M FO U N D E R T R E VO R C L AT T E R B U C K

FARMS, FIELDS, AND FORKLIF TS

8 : 0 0 am

9 : 0 0 am

10 : 00 am

A day on the road with Fresh Fork

11 : 00 am

12 : 00 pm

1 : 00 pm

Our pick-up trips are all-day odysseys through the diversity of Northeast Ohio's lands, foods, and cultures. Since spare room is precious (as you'll see), here's a simulated ride-along. 8 |

FRESH FORK MARKET

2 : 00 pm


P OETRY IN MOTION AT THE CUSTOMER BARBECUE

W

WHEN I STARTED FRESH FORK MARKET IN THE SUMMER OF 2008, I was fresh out of college

and new to the area — with no restaurant experience, sales background, or farming expertise.

The odds may have been against me early, but the people of Cleveland never were. I still remember the day the first customer came into our Tremont office and gave me a check for the full season.

After she handed it to me, she asked hesitantly, “Now — you won’t go out of business, will you?” I can say now the same words I responded

growing, vocal family motivated them to expand

with that day: Fresh Fork is here to stay.

in kind. That support, and the mutual motivation,

From those early months, that promise has

has continued to this day, where Fresh Fork

driven me to do more. To work hard for our

delivers goods from more than 100 producers to

customers. To watch our community grow.

thousands of subscribers across Northeast Ohio.

Our sense of responsibility didn’t stop there.

This has been the most rewarding journey

The producers were putting their full faith in

of my life. Thank you for supporting me, my

Fresh Fork to sell their goods, but that was just the

staff, and local farmers through your investment

start. As demand increased, farmers began to raise

in healthy, wholesome food. It’s with this deep

more vegetables, rear more livestock, and invest in

sense of gratitude that I offer you the second

equipment to produce more than ever before.

installment of our Almanac — a testament to our

It was an ideal partnership. The farmers’

Fresh Fork Market community. A showcase of

ambition energized us, and the support of our

how hard we can work, and how far we can grow.

3 : 00 pm

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5 : 0 0 pm

6 : 00 pm

7 : 00 pm

8 : 00 pm

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O P P O S I T E P A G E Loading beans into the thresher at Healthy Harvest Farm, Middlefield 2015 ALMANAC |

9


THE F R E S H F O R K S T A F F A

R O U N DTA B L E

W I T H

T H E

R E G U L A R S

E

EVERYONE ASKS WHAT IT 'S LIKE TO WORK AT FRESH FORK MARKET. On its surface, there are

ups and downs like any job. Sure, things can feel more urgent when you're pushing around half-ton pallets of cider instead of pencils, but no matter what, you can sit down for lunch and swap stories

with your co-workers like old fishing tales. Here are a few of the highlights from around the office. T | T R E V O R C L AT T E R B U C K , Founder K | K E V I N G A S S , Warehouse & Logistics L | L A U R E N F R A N K O , Admin & Customer Service M | M I K E B A R T O S , Warehouse & Logistics

K : (Laughing) Or like the time Big Bronze got towed into a bridge on I-90?

T : Yeah, like that one. The only thing that would have been better was if the tow truck driver had lost our truck and then it'd tumbled down the

The Trucks

freeway and landed logo-side up. We could’ve

The trucks are ... temperamental. One of Trevor's

had advertising on the national news!

advisors with a food-distribution background told him that owning trucks was the worst part of

The Calendar

the business. He might've been on to something.

Our office calendar is a record of the ridiculous

K : (Talking about our cab-over delivery truck) Old girl is getting tired!

T : Well if you guys didn’t bounce her around like she’s a pinball maybe she wouldn't be as tired.

M : Whoa whoa whoa — what's with you guys? You can't be talking about me.

T : Even with all the crown jewels we've had in the past year, the truck issues take the prize.

M : Like the time you spent $7,000 repairing a reefer

10 |

things that happen around here. What goes on it is crazy, but reflecting on it keeps us sane. Some people say life is more amazing than fiction. If so, the calendar is like our short story collection.

M : I've got one for the calendar. Yep — Eric was on time on Saturday morning.

K : You and that calendar. Let me see that. (Reaches for the calendar) Am I on there?

M : Whoa whoa whoa — hands off the calendar.

unit just to get it back and find that it was a

This is very important office documentation.

thrown belt you ended up replacing yourself?

Access to the calendar is earned.

FRESH FORK MARKET


K : . . . So did I earn it?

L : Honestly, though, who can ever predict what

L : Oy vey!

goes on the calendar? Smooth sailing isn’t a

K : Well at least tell me if I'm on it.

given. No one really gets what it’s like to work

M : Let’s see ... is the Gassman on the calendar? Yep,

here. Sometimes you go in at 6:00 a.m. and aren’t

here it is. January 30th. The Gassman forgets that he remembered his cash box and takes two cash boxes on the route. You are in here — and in style.

K : Hey, I got the cash boxes right eventually! M : But wait, there’s more! Check it out now and

done until eleven at night. If you can even tell when you’re done. My family thinks I’m crazy.

K : (Laughing) You mean the Fresh Fork widower’s association? Tell Joey he can meet Stephen and Allyson and Brie on Thursdays to commiserate.

get two for the price of one! February 10th: The

T : I’m glad you guys all understand it. Some days

Gassman gets the truck stuck at Jonas Raber’s.

I feel bad that you get stuck working late, and

K : No, that wasn’t my fault! He hadn’t plowed his driveway.

T : Don't make me defend the trucks, here. You got stuck again an hour later in Jonas Hershberger’s driveway. Do you see a trend?

K : (Laughing) The second one didn’t look as bad.

The Hours The way we operate, we have to be flexible. To get food that’s same-day fresh, you have to balance a lot of variables. Heat. Rain. Unpredictable yields.

when I try to explain it, I end up feeling defensive.

L : But Trevor, think of how many times Mike has gone to pick up the milk, which was on schedule, then something broke and he ended up having to wait to get the milk bagged. Or when you go to David’s and he didn’t receive your letter or he ran out of something and had no fast way of telling you so. The thing is, you take the worst of them. How many times in the summer do you go out at 11:00 p.m. to go do a farm route to make sure we have supply

We just have to smile and say, “I didn’t plan on

for morning deliveries? In the “widower’s

a 4:00 a.m. duplicate farm run to get the trucks

association,” I think Allyson wins the prize for

loaded and out today, but I’ll do what it takes.”

being the most patient person on earth.

We’re grateful in times like these that, for great local food, our customers can be as flexible as us.

T : Hey — what can I say? I’m a very lucky guy in a lot of ways.

2015 ALMANAC |

11


F R E S H F OR K FA M I LY TH E PEOPLE WE CONNECT, SERVE, AN D SU STAI N

A S TO L D BY T R E VO R C L AT T E R B U C K

I

I N T H E E A R LY M O N T H S O F 2 0 1 2 , I WA S I N A H O O P H O U S E W I T H H A R V E Y K E M P F when he

asked me what I’d be doing on a particular Thursday later in the spring. When I replied that I was free as far as I knew, he told me to save the date — because it was the day of his wedding. When I congratulated

him, he said “Without you, Betty and I wouldn’t be getting married.” Taken aback, I jokingly asked if they met as part of Harvey’s booming bean operation — driven in large part by demand from our subscribers. “In a way,” he replied, thoughtfully. “In our community

Among scores of moments from the past six years,

we can’t get married until we have the means to

this moment, perhaps more than any other, may best

support a wife and children. Without the business

represent the importance of the work that Fresh

you have provided, we wouldn’t be starting a family.”

Fork Market does for our local farming communities.

A B O V E Healthy Harvest Farm, home to the growing Kempf family, Middlefield

A F OU N D FA M I LY O N E T H AT YO U ’ L L B E H A P P Y

12 |

THE MEMBERS OF THE FRESH FORK MARKET COMMUNITY are out there already. We simply provide the opportunity for them to unite around common interests. To experience this connection, linger at

TO SPEND SOCIAL TIME WITH

a pickup one week. Go to one of our events. Ask for recipes on our

O U T S I D E O F T H E H O L I D AY S

Facebook page. Many members of the thriving movement of people

FRESH FORK MARKET


Q

Q U E S T I O N S C O M E W I T H T H E T E R R I TO RY W H E N YO U ’ R E A N E W PA R E N T. When Nicole Filippi became a mother in 2008, she began to ask herself about her food. Though she’d always avoided the obvious

junk foods, she had never really considered herself a health nut. But with her growing family, she began to wonder — How do I know which foods are safe to eat? Which are free of harmful chemicals, synthetic

hormones and antibiotics? What foods will both look appealing and provide nutrients for my family? Nicole’s questions were similar to ones we regularly

able to devote her time to figuring out how to feed a

receive from hundreds of other young mothers and

family healthy meals they would enjoy; to exploring

fathers. Nicole signed up for Fresh Fork Market to

tricks for preserving food and saving money; and to

have access to trusted, safe ingredients. She then was

getting her kids involved in food and cooking.

A B O V E Nicole and her sous chef prepare an apple crisp for dessert, Westlake

who are interested in quality food, health, sustainability, and the success of our region also happen to be Fresh Fork customers. The passion and knowledge of this thousands-deep family is like nothing else. We’re a dynamic, progressive company, and we get that sense of energy from the community we’ve cultivated around Northeast Ohio. 2015 ALMANAC |

13


STUTZMAN

FA R M S

M

MON RO E ST UT ZMA N ’ S STORY I S A S ORGA N I C AS TH E P RO D UCT H E SELL S. In his late 20s, he left his job at a traditional Amish machine shop to join his father’s business — processing organic grains for

small farmers in and around Holmes County. Monroe augmented his father’s operation by erecting grain bins, pouring the foundation for an expanded mill, and collecting equipment at auctions around the country. An early 20th-century dehuller from a Kellogg’s factory. A century-old stone roller. Steam and water-

powered machines. Monroe pieced them all together and ran them using a leather belt and a diesel engine. His mill has added capabilities over the years and

washing. Not so under Monroe’s watch. In addition,

now has the ability to fully process grain into flour,

Stutzman flours are never bromated — a potentially

a process detailed on the facing page. Stutzman’s

carcinogenic practice used in many U.S. mills to

processes only organic grains, and Fresh Fork Market

unnaturally accelerate gluten-producing reactions.

only sells the ones he purchases from local farmers. Fresh Fork and Stutzman Farms share a stickler’s

Monroe’s product is superior across the board. He starts with a higher quality, fresher raw input.

sensibility when it comes creating organic flour.

By making only whole grain flours, he preserves the

Many commercial grain operations use toxic

essential oils, nutrients, and fiber found in the germ

fumigants to eradicate pests in their grain bins,

and bran. As a result, Stutzman Farms flour is a

and then process the product without thorough

whole food we’re quick to endorse and proud to sell.

A B O V E The granary at Stutzman’s — a veritable whole-grain wonderland, Millersburg 14 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


S P E LT B E R R I E S

1907 DEHULLER

MAKING PUFFED GRAIN

R E A DY TO LOA D

I N S I D E T H E M I L L AT ST U T Z M A N FA R M S

| HOW TO PROCESS A FINER FLOUR

1

|

GRAIN BINS Field-dried grains are stored in containers.

8

|

G R AV I T Y TA B L E Sorted grains are further separated by mass.

2

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RECEIVING HOPPER Sifted grains are stored before processing.

9

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WEIGHER The grains’ cumulative weight is tracked here.

3

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DEHULLER The grain’s hull is separated from the kernel.

10 |

R O L L E R M I L L (for oats) Large steel drums crush grains into rolled oats.

4

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G R A I N E L E VAT O R Shovel-shaped cups transport the groats.

11

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G R I N D E R (for all flours) Stone wheels grind the rolled oats into flour.

5

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SIZING SCREEN Raw grains are sifted for efficient milling.

12 |

SIFTER Large clumps and bran are sent to be pulverized.

6

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FA N N I N G M I L L Dust and straw are blown off the grains.

13 | The re-added bran makes whole-wheat flour.

7

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SORTING SCREEN Grains are shaken and sorted by size.

14 | The final product is packaged in 50-pound bags.

HAMMERMILL

BAGGER

G R A I N A N AT O M Y A raw oat’s inedible hull protects the kernel (also called a groat or berry). 2015 ALMANAC |

15


THE YEAR IN LOCAL FOOD

CALENDAR FRESH FORK MARKET DOESN’T JUST REFLECT THE SEASONS through the contents of its shares. Our calendar is a celebration of the cultivation cycle, regional culture, and the local food scene. In the following pages, you’ll see how picking up a share is just the beginning of how you can experience a taste of the “modern domestic living” we speak to in our tagline.

F E A T U R E D Passing the plate at an early-summer supper, South River Vineyard, Geneva 16 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


M AY S U N D AY

Farmers plant their summer crops in freshly-turned fields. W H AT ’ S I N S E A S O N | Ramps, young greens, asparagus, pea tendrils, scallions

M O N D AY

T U E S D AY

W E D N E S D AY

T H U R S D AY

F R I D AY

2015

CALENDAR

S AT U R D AY

26

27

28

29

30

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9 Fresh Fork at the Cleveland Flea

10

11

12

Signs of Spring: Early Vegetables, Foraged & Wild

17

18

19

REMINDER

Baby Food Making

First Payments Due

24

25

13

14

15

16

20

21

22

23

27

28

29

30

Tribe Night with Fresh Fork Market

26

31

SELECTED

EVENTS

11 | Early Vegetables, Foraged and Wild By the end of winter, everyone is eager for Signs of Spring. Learn what we can find in our woods and backyards.

12 | Tribe Night with Fresh Fork Market Join a loud contingent of Forkers as we deliver a dose of excitement to the corner of Carnegie and Ontario.

19 | Baby Food Making Even the youngest Fresh Forkers need tasty meals. Join mother and raw-foods expert Marisa Pelser as she demonstrates healthy and easy recipes for your infant.

A NOTE EVENT TIMES & CALENDAR

BABY FOOD MAKING

Because our events are based on the availability and freshness of ingredients, their dates and times are subject to change. This calendar can serve as a reference, but for the latest information about the time, cost, and details of our events, we encourage you to visit W W W . F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T . C O M 2015 ALMANAC |

17


JUNE S U N D AY

31

M O N D AY

Early crops mark the start of the Fresh Fork Market season. W H AT ’ S I N S E A S O N | Lettuces, peas, radishes, leafy greens, strawberries

T U E S D AY

1

W E D N E S D AY

2

REMINDER

June Payments Due

3

Butcher Series: The Best Burger

SUMMER SEASON BEGINS WEEK 1 |

7

8

9

10

T H U R S D AY

F R I D AY

4

5

at Bike Cleveland’s Share Your Draft

at Cleveland Zoo’s Zippity Zoo Doo

16

17 WEEK 3 |

21

22

6

11

12

13 Fresh Fork at the Cleveland Flea

WEEK 2 |

15

S AT U R D AY

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

Chicken 101

14

2015

CALENDAR

23

24

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

18

19

20

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

25

26

27

Pop-Up Dinner at the Cleveland Zoo WEEK 4 |

28

29

30

1

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

2

3

4

Grilling Techniques

SELECTED

EVENTS

2 | Butcher Series : The Best Burger Do you work your beef just until it is loosely packed or until it is firm and has a juicy bite? Learn to craft the perfect patty in this patio-cooking primer. F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N O N B E E F, S E E PAG E 5 6

8 | Chicken 101 Each year we start the season with a whole chicken. This hands-on class pairs you with Chef Parker Bosley as he demonstrates how get the most from your bird.

22 | Pop-Up Dinner at the Cleveland Zoo What do gorillas and Fresh Fork Market members have in common? They both get their greens from the same place! Join us for this inaugural event among the animals, which doubles as a fundraiser for the Zoo Society. 18 |

FRESH FORK MARKET

GRILLING TECHNIQUES

29 | Grilling Techniques If your house is an oven, take the heat outside! Chef Bob Sferra leads this popular event at Sterle’s Country House.


J U LY S U N D AY

28

M O N D AY

29

Shares are overflowing with sun-ripened summer staples. W H AT ’ S I N S E A S O N | Cucumbers, garlic, onions, berries, summer squash

T U E S D AY

30

W E D N E S D AY

T H U R S D AY

1

F R I D AY

2

3

2015

CALENDAR

S AT U R D AY

4

REMINDER

Jul. Payments Due WEEK 5 |

5

6

7

8

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

9

10

Knife Skills

Beet Lab

WEEK 6 |

12

13

14

15 WEEK 7 |

19

20

Taste of Tremont

Vegetarian Cooking

21

22 WEEK 8 |

26

27

28

11

29

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

16

17

18

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

23

24

25

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

30

31

1

Vegan and Raw Food Basics WEEK 9 |

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

SELECTED

EVENTS

11 | Beet Lab at the Grovewood Tavern Learn how to cook with nature’s candy at this event dedicated to one of our favorite versatile vegetables. F O R M O R E O N CO O K I N G B E E TS , S E E PAG E 5 1

19 | Taste of Tremont We join some of the country’s best chefs for a day of cooking fresh food on narrow neighborhood streets.

27 | Vegan and Raw Food Basics TA ST E O F T R E M O N T

A NOTE EVENT TIMES & CALENDAR

See how satisfying vegan cuisine can be. You’ll be asking for seconds with these memorable recipes.

Because our events are based on the availability and freshness of ingredients, their dates and times are subject to change. This calendar can serve as a reference, but for the latest information about the time, cost, and details of our events, we encourage you to visit W W W . F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T . C O M 2015 ALMANAC |

19


E V E N T

B U R N I N G

S P O T L I G H T

R I V E R

F E S T I VA L

Saturday, August 29, 2015

W

WHY DID THE CRITTERS CROSS THE RIVER? We’ll get to that in a bit. With Cleveland’s kitchen

talent, standing out at culinary showcases can be a challenge. So for several seasons at Burning River

Festival, we’ve been doing demos of a different stripe. Ones that speak to who we are. Ones that bring our farm-formed sensibilities to a more urban environment. From a pluck-it-yourself spent hen clinic in 2013 to last year’s varmit free-for-all featuring Woodchuck Bourguignon, we’ve been upping the ante each year. This year’s centerpiece is a surprise, but it’s safe to say the experience will be just as

interactive and unexpected as always. So why did the critters cross the river? To get away from us!

20 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


AUGUS T S U N D AY

M O N D AY

26

The heat produces the year’s most colorful crops. WHAT ’S IN SEASON | Melons, eggplant, tomatoes, peppers, corn

T U E S D AY

27

28

W E D N E S D AY

29

T H U R S D AY

30

F R I D AY

31

2015

CALENDAR

S AT U R D AY

1 Thresher’s Day

WEEK 9 |

2

3

4

5

WEEK 10 |

9

10

11

12

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

6

7

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

13

14

Preserving the Bounty

17

18

19 WEEK 12 |

23

24

25

26

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

20

31

SELECTED

21

22

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

27

Vitamix Class

30

15 Canning Club Meetup #1

WEEK 11 |

16

8

28

29 Burning River Festival

WEEK 13 |

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

EVENTS

1 | Thresher’s Day A hard day’s work deserves a big supper. That’s exactly what follows this day of family-friendly activities in Amish country, including a traditional horse-drawn oat harvest.

10 | Preserving the Bounty Keep the bright flavors of the warm months around for the whole year. Learn to ferment, can, freeze, and dehydrate all your summer favorites at this workshop.

25 | Vitamix Class A collaborative class on maximizing your share, hosted in the new kitchen at the Vitamix world headquarters.

A NOTE EVENT TIMES & CALENDAR

T H R E S H E R ’ S D AY

Because our events are based on the availability and freshness of ingredients, their dates and times are subject to change. This calendar can serve as a reference, but for the latest information about the time, cost, and details of our events, we encourage you to visit W W W . F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T . C O M 2015 ALMANAC |

21


SEPTEMBER S U N D AY

30

M O N D AY

31

T U E S D AY

1

High tunnel growing takes root. WHAT’S IN SEASON | Potatoes, beets, turnips

W E D N E S D AY

2

T H U R S D AY

F R I D AY

3

4

2015 C A L E N DA R

S AT U R D AY

5

REMINDER

September Payments Due WEEK 14 |

6

7

8

9

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

10

11

WEEK 15 |

13

14

12 Fresh Fork at the Cleveland Flea

Easy Meals

15

16

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

17

18

19

Tomato Overload WEEK 16 |

20

21

22

23

24

WEEK 17 |

27

28

Customer Appreciation BBQ

Fall Braising and Vegetables

29

30

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

25

26

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

1

2

SELECTED

3

EVENTS

7 | Easy Meals Chef John Selick has a young family and a busy career. For him, dinner can’t be cumbersome. Join him to learn quick tricks and tasty recipes to get dinner done fast.

14 | Tomato Overload This time of year, everyone’s knee-deep in tomatoes. We’ll teach you how to store and use them all year long.

28 | Fall Braising and Vegetables B R A I S I N G A N D FA L L V E G E TA B L E S

A NOTE EVENT TIMES & CALENDAR 22 |

As cool weather approaches, Parker Bosley will fill your belly while teaching you how to create delicious, hearty meals with heavier fall meats and vegetables.

Because our events are based on the availability and freshness of ingredients, their dates and times are subject to change. This calendar can serve as a reference, but for the latest information about the time, cost, and details of our events, we encourage you to visit W W W . F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T . C O M

FRESH FORK MARKET


E V E N T

S P O T L I G H T

C U S T O M E R

B A R B E C U E

Sunday, September 27, 2015

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WITH FRESH FORK MARKET, YOU AREN’T JUST A CUSTOMER, you’re a member of a community. And every community deserves a day to celebrate. Each fall, at the Hill ’n Dale Club in Medina, we host a free, bring-your-own-plate potluck for our subscribers. Friends and families help themselves to barbecue and sides, play games, and watch Trevor take on an all-ages field in a pie-eating contest. By the end, kids are napping in cars and a few adults treat themselves to a well-earned beverage by the bonfire. It’s a long day, but we’re no stranger to those around here. Besides, this one doesn’t feel much like work. It’s a celebration of the Fresh Fork Market community.

2015 ALMANAC |

23


E V E N T

S P O T L I G H T

FA R M

T O U R

Saturday, October 10, 2015

T

THE FARM-TO-TABLE MOVEMENT HAS CHANGED HOW WE EAT — there’s no doubt about that. But, as a term, farm-to-table has lost some of the immediacy it once had. We believe the connection

should mean more than just miles to the plate. We want our customers to get a chance to meet the producers, connect with the land, and learn about innovative production techniques. For a full day every fall, our subscribers can have the chance to wake up at dawn, put on their boots, and

visit farms around Northeast Ohio. And with a range of stops as varied as the items in a weekly share, everyone on the tour is able to see the craft and care that go into making the local foods they love.

24 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


OCTOBER S U N D AY

27

M O N D AY

28

T U E S D AY

29

Crisp days and heavy bags mark summer’s end. WHAT ’S IN SEASON | Cauliflower, apples, sweet potatoes

W E D N E S D AY

30

T H U R S D AY

1

F R I D AY

2

2015

CALENDAR

S AT U R D AY

3

REMINDER

Oct. Payments Due WEEK 18 |

4

5

6

7

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

8

9

10 Farm Tour

WEEK 19 |

11

12

13

14

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

15

16

17

Cabbage Mania WEEK 20 |

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19

20

21 WEEK 21 |

25

26

27

28

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

22

23

24

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

29

30

31 SEASON ENDS

First Winter Paymt. WEEK 22 |

SELECTED

S U M M E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

EVENTS

12 | Cabbage Mania “The cabbage is such a versatile vegetable. It is very healthy, can be stored for weeks and even months if cared for properly — and it has endless possibilities,” explains chef Parker Bosley. Every year at this popular event, he backs up that boast with a full slate of creative cabbage dishes. Recent highlights include a cabbage cake, carrot-stuffed cabbage rolls, and fried cabbage with garlic, in addition to a spectrum of flavorful soups, salads, pastries, and sautées.

CABBAGE MANIA

F O R M O R E O N CO O K I N G C A B B AG E , S E E PAG E 4 9

A NOTE EVENT TIMES & CALENDAR

Because our events are based on the availability and freshness of ingredients, their dates and times are subject to change. This calendar can serve as a reference, but for the latest information about the time, cost, and details of our events, we encourage you to visit W W W . F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T . C O M 2015 ALMANAC |

25


E V E N T

S P O T L I G H T

THANKSGIVING DINNER Monday, November 9, 2015

T

THANKSGIVING MEANS DIFFERENT THINGS TO DIFFERENT FOLKS. Football. Friends. Family. For us, it’s all about feasting. At Fresh Fork Market, we start our planning for this special beer dinner

before the first shoots of spring peas. We want every customer to have a memorable banquet, and it takes a season of prep. This event, at Market Garden Brewery, is about appreciating the bounty of

Ohio’s local foods; about new twists on familiar fare; about family-style dining with new friends. Chefs Parker Bosley and Adam Lambert put on a show, walking through unique methods for turkey and sides. Everyone leaves with a full stomach and new tips on how create their own holiday feasts.

26 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


NOVEMBER S U N D AY

1

M O N D AY

2

T U E S D AY

3

First snows fall; hearty crops thrive. W H AT ’ S I N S E A S O N | Brussels sprouts, kale

W E D N E S D AY

4

T H U R S D AY

5

F R I D AY

6

2015

CALENDAR

S AT U R D AY

7

WINTER SEASON BEGINS WEEK 1 |

8

9

10

11

W I N T E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

12

13

14

Thanksgiving Beer Dinner WEEK 2 |

15

16

17

18

W I N T E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

19

20

21

REMINDER

Order deadline WEEK 3 |

22

23 Thanksgiving Order Delivery

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30

24

W I N T E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

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26

27

28

2

3

4

5

Thanksgiving Order Delivery

1

SELECTED

EVENTS

4 | The Winter Season Begins

WINTER PICK UP

A NOTE EVENT TIMES & CALENDAR

Fresh Fork Market offers a winter share program from November to May. After three consecutive weeks to start, it switches to deliveries every other week. In the winter, there are fewer fresh vegetables available, so we mix in more high tunnel produce and summer vegetables frozen during the previous months. The winter shares are heavier — not just from the overflowing bags, but from the increased amount of meat included in each week’s choices. As a result, we only offer an omnivorous share option. For more details and sample weekly bags, visit our website.

Because our events are based on the availability and freshness of ingredients, their dates and times are subject to change. This calendar can serve as a reference, but for the latest information about the time, cost, and details of our events, we encourage you to visit W W W . F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T . C O M 2015 ALMANAC |

27


DECEMBER S U N D AY

29

M O N D AY

30

T U E S D AY

1

Sugars help veggies fight the freeze. WHAT’S IN SEASON | Carrots, cabbage, squash

W E D N E S D AY

2 WEEK 4 |

6

7

8

9

T H U R S D AY

3

F R I D AY

4

2015

CALENDAR

S AT U R D AY

5

W I N T E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

10

11

12

DEADLINE

Holiday Orders

13

14

15

16 WEEK 5 |

17

18

19

W I N T E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

20

21

22

23

24

25

26

27

28

29

30

31

1

2

WEEK 6 |

W I N T E R S H A R E | Pick-ups throughout the Greater Cleveland area

SELECTED

EVENTS

11 | Deadline for Holiday Orders

H O L I D AY S E A S O N T R E AT S

Holidays from Fresh Fork Market mean traditional treats from nearby sources. For a tasty entrée or culinary centerpiece for your family gathering, we have hams, geese, racks of lamb and more. For gifts, we offer a wide selection of desserts — including seasonal sweets from providers like Humble Pie Baking Co. In addition, we offer savory and sweet packaged goods, plus a line of kitchen ceramics made specially for us by an area artist. Make your holiday a local one! FOR MORE ON HUMBLE PIE, SEE PAGE 30

A NOTE EVENT TIMES & CALENDAR 28 |

Because our events are based on the availability and freshness of ingredients, their dates and times are subject to change. This calendar can serve as a reference, but for the latest information about the time, cost, and details of our events, we encourage you to visit W W W . F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T . C O M

FRESH FORK MARKET


JANUARY

E A R LY

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

S AT

27

28

29

30

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

17

18

19

20

21

22

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25

26

27

28

29

30

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

WHAT ’S IN SEASON | Red cabbage, onions, carrots, potatoes

2016

P O T E N T I A L L AT E -W I N T E R E V E N T S

Butcher’s Series Instructional evenings with Chef Adam Lambert. See the profile below for additional information.

Soups, Stews, and One-Pot Meals Parker Bosley shows how to craft a range of hot soups, hearty stews, and one-pot meals for your family.

Complete Casseroles Classics like chicken noodle casserole meet modern dishes like vegetarian hash in this instructive event.

Pierogi Party

FEBRUARY

What could be more Cleveland than an all-ages, familyfriendly down-home dumpling shindig in Slavic Village?

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

S AT

31

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

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29

1

2

3

4

5

WHAT’S IN SEASON | Turnips, napa cabbage, onions, squash

Whole Grains Learn about how flour is processed and ways to adapt recipes to incorporate more whole, healthy grains.

PARKER BOSLEY’S WINTER PLAN

MAKE A MEAN BEAN

MARCH SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

S AT

28

29

1

2

3

4

5

6

7

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1

2

WH AT ’ S IN S E A S O N | Shallots, lettuces, onions, spinach

With all our early-season events, there’s one constant. Whether we’re talking classic French cuisine or on-the-fly fare, if Parker’s present,

APRIL

there will be beans, and they’ll be killer.

SUN

MON

TUE

WED

THU

FRI

S AT

Throughout the winter, he shares a range

27

28

29

30

31

1

2

of his legendary legume recipes with event

3

4

5

6

7

8

9

attendees. After all, beans are a perfect, pantry-

10

11

12

13

14

15

16

friendly seasonal staple. And when you’re

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21

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looking for a hearty side in a snowy month,

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29

30

who better to guide you through than a chef

WHAT ’S IN SEASON | Greens, peas, ramps, early asparagus

who practically holds a Ph.D. in bean cookery? 2015 ALMANAC |

29


30 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


HUMBLE

PIE

B A K I N G Cº

A S TO L D BY T R E VO R C L AT T E R B U C K

I

I FIRST MET DIANE SIKORSKI AT THE END OF OUR SECOND SUMMER. She’d been baking pies at home

and was thinking of starting a business selling them. One day, after sampling a few at my office, she asked if I’d be interested in carrying Humble Pie’s products. “Sure,” I said. “How about 400 pies for the first week of

November?” Without hesitation, she said she’d get working on it. To this day, that attitude defines Diane — craft, care, and a dedication to getting things done, even if she has to get more than a little creative to make it work. I still remember Diane delivering those first pies to us.

“I love pinching the crusts together and decorating

They were in every size and shape of box imaginable.

the edges by hand,” Diane says. But that painstaking

“I’ve been bargaining with the loading-dock guy at

attention to detail is also present in her entire process,

Costco for weeks,” she told me with a laugh and

from picking individual berries to testing each batch

a tired smile. The customers loved all the options,

of leaf lard for the perfect consistency. She takes great

including Confetti, which Diane calls “a party in a pie,”

pride in her pies, jams, and her business — all made

all made with local fruit she’d put away in season.

from scratch, with her own two hands.

A B O V E Diane lives a life of pie — posing with a creation ready for the oven, Avon Lake 2015 ALMANAC |

31


C E N T E R F O L D H O G H A V E N Wholesome Valley Farm

C O M I N G FAC E -T O - FAC E W I T H YO U R F O O D — sometimes literally — is a big part of what Fresh Fork Market is all about. Our community has deep respect for all our animals and the hardworking producers who raise them. For our customers, meeting a hog on pasture is less of an elephant-in-theroom and more of an acknowledgment that, were it not for Fresh Fork, the pig would never have lived in the first place. Of course, our efforts with farm-animal conservation are driven by edible traits. But thanks to those efforts, heritage breeds — like our Berkshire hogs — are now coming back and flourishing in unprecedented numbers. Raised in the rolling hills of Holmes County, these pigs forage for food and are fed only non-GMO grains. They live a good life, and it shows through in the superior quality of their meat. There’s only one fitting way to give thanks: Praise the Lard.

F E A T U R E D A T R I G H T Berkshire hogs have a nose for prime pasture, Wilmot, OH

32 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


2015 ALMANAC |

33


LOG

CABIN

BERRIES

A

AT F R E S H F O R K , W E ’ R E A L L N E R D S AT H E A RT, and Tyler Gruskiewicz’s work with blackberries is

exactly the kind of thing we geek out for. Tyler’s efforts were born as a Future Farmers of America project in high

school on two acres of family land. Beginning as a study of blackberry growing systems and their potential within a diversified farm, Tyler’s research eventually blossomed into Log Cabin Berries — an operation that yields great fruit with a minimal environmental impact. And that’s just the kind of sustainable effort we’re proud to support.

Tyler uses blackberry varieties renowned for their

chemical fertilizers, weed control, fungicides and

fruit size and flavor. He plants them on raised

pesticides. In addition, the trellis system creates a

beds covered in weed paper and trains the berry

more flexible, resilient plant — one that can fold

canes to grow through a rotatable cross-arm trellis

horizontally to weather harsh winters under cover.

system. By using this system to create smarter vine patterns, the plant can focus richer nutrition

in Log Cabin berries is beyond compare. It’s proof

on fewer canes instead of diluting it across the

positive that smarter systems, attention to detail,

many canes that would exist without pruning.

and a little healthy nerdery can come together to

This efficient growth also eliminates the need for

34 |

All in all, the taste does the talking, and the flavor

FRESH FORK MARKET

create a superior product.


M AU R E R FA R M S

S

S O M E T I M E S YO U C A N ’ T P R E D I C T W H AT K I N D O F C H A N G E T H E N E X T S E A S O N W I L L B R I N G ,

but in the farm community, a strong resolve and a little corny humor can get you through a lot of things.

Despite an evolving local landscape, the Maurers — Carol, her husband David, and their son Roger — have been doing peachy farming their land just south of Wooster for more than half a century. They produce sweet, plump strawberries; abundant sweet corn; and, yes, delicious peaches — when the weather agrees.

The prime location of Maurer Farms is both a

from nearby neighbors. But even with the changing

blessing and a curse — being at the center of a

face of the community, the Maurers have continued

growing township puts them close to customers, but

to sit proudly at the literal crossroads. Their farm

that desirable location has found them flanked by

market serves as a hub, offering items from their land

new residential developments in recent years.

and other local fields, in addition to serving as a

With Wooster’s growing population, turning to some of the tried-and-true methods for scaring

center for you-pick-it produce. With their resilient attitude, sustainable practices,

away hungry birds and other critters would mean

and fresh, flavorful crops, the Maurers stand to do

the most reliable harvest would be noise complaints

berry well — no matter what the future brings.

2015 ALMANAC |

35


W E E K LY S H A R E D I S T R I B U T I O N

L O C AT I O N S Summer Season , 2015

Avon Lake

LAKEWOOD

15 LORAIN

Avon

5

Rocky River

10

90

Westlake

Sheffield

Amherst

23

Bay Village

Sheffield Lake

71

Brooklyn

14

480

North Olmsted

90

Brook Park

North Ridgeville

E LY R I A

80

Olmsted Falls

Berea

18

Middleburg Heights

9

Strongsville

Oberlin

P I C K

A

P I C K U P

71

BRUNSWICK F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T ’ S retail business began with a handful of Cleveland families and has grown to include distribution at more than two dozen locations across Northeast Ohio. For your convenience, we allow customers to attend any public pickup. We do ask that you choose a home location on your online profile, but if you’re traveling, stuck at work, or simply forget, you can show up at another location without notifying us. Friends, family, and neighbors also are welcome to pick up your weekly share. 6 MEDINA 36 |

FRESH FORK MARKET

71


24

W E D N E S D AY

Willoughby

1 Playhouse Square 2 : 3 0 P M t o 3 : 3 0 P M

Wickliffe 90

2 Brecksville 3 : 0 0 P M t o 6 : 0 0 P M

90

3 Solon 3 : 0 0 P M t o 6 : 0 0 P M

8

4 Downtown / East 4th 4 : 0 0 P M t o 6 : 3 0 P M

271

Collinwood

21

90

4

16 17

1

5 Lakewood 5 : 0 0 P M t o 8 : 3 0 P M

13

Bratenahl

CLEVELAND HEIGHTS

5

19

University Heights

6 Medina / Brunswick 7 : 0 0 P M t o 9 : 0 0 P M

Mayfield Heights

11

22 CLEVELAND

7 Chagrin Falls 7 : 0 0 P M t o 9 : 0 0 P M 8 Grovewood Tavern 7 : 3 0 P M t o 9 : 0 0 P M

Beachwood

T H U R S D AY

SHAKER HEIGHTS

9 Strongsville 2 : 3 0 P M t o 6 : 0 0 P M

271 77

7 Garfield Heights

PA R M A

480

Chagrin Falls

Bedford Solon 77

3

Independence Northfield

2

Mentor

10 Westlake 2 : 3 0 P M t o 6 : 0 0 P M 11 Beachwood 2 : 3 0 P M t o 6 : 0 0 P M 12 Akron / Highland Square 5 : 0 0 P M t o 8 : 0 0 P M 13 Mayfield Village 7 : 0 0 P M t o 9 : 0 0 P M 14 North Olmsted 7 : 0 0 P M t o 9 : 0 0 P M 15 Avon 7 : 0 0 P M t o 9 : 0 0 P M

Brecksville

F R I D AY Broadview Heights

Twinsburg

271

16 UH / Case Campus 1 : 0 0 P M t o 3 : 0 0 P M 17 University Circle 4 : 0 0 P M t o 7 : 0 0 P M 18 Middleburg Heights 4 : 0 0 P M t o 7 : 0 0 P M

80

20

Richfield

Hudson

19 Cleveland Heights 4 : 0 0 P M t o 7 : 0 0 P M 20 Hudson 4 : 0 0 P M t o 7 : 0 0 P M S AT U R D AY

21 Bratenahl 9 : 0 0 A M t o 1 0 : 0 0 A M 22 Tremont 1 0 : 0 0 A M t o 2 : 0 0 P M 77

23 Rocky River 1 0 : 0 0 A M t o 1 2 : 0 0 P M Cuyahoga Falls

Fairlawn

25 Copley / Fairlawn 1 0 : 0 0 A M t o 1 2 : 0 0 P M

25 12 Copley

24 Mentor 1 1 : 0 0 A M t o 1 : 0 0 P M

AKRON

2015 ALMANAC |

37


WHAT ’S IN

YOUR BAG An overview of the ingredients in your weekly share

F E A T U R E D The bounty of a mid-summer pickup, Tremont 38 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


FA R M F R E S H

PRODUCE

GRASSFED

FA R M ST EA D

MEATS

ORGANIC

DAIRY

T

A RT I SA N

GRAINS

FOODS

T H E C O N T E N T S O F YO U R B AG vary from

see what we’ve featured for the past several

week to week, based on what items are available

seasons, check out our website and browse our

locally. Our farmers employ a diverse range of

archive of weekly newsletters. For a sample

production methods, but the common thread is

of what types of products come in a typical

simple — we want only the freshest ingredients.

summer bag, see the diagram below. Every week

Over the course of the season, our subscribers

will feature different items — for more examples,

will enjoy more than 300 different products. To

visit www.freshforkmarket.com/bag-contents.

S

SMALL

ONE WHOLE CHICKEN or PORK ROAST

ONE BUNCH BEETS

TWO BULB ONIONS

ONE BUNCH CARROTS or KOHLRABI

TWO POUNDS TOMATOES

ONE BABY BOK CHOY

TWO POUNDS PEACHES

L

LARGE

ALL SMALL SHARE ITEMS

ONE BUNCH SPINACH

ONE POUND GARLIC SCAPE & BLACK PEPPER LINGUINE

TWO POUNDS APRICOTS

V

Vegetarian SMALL

TWO CUCUMBERS

TWO ZUCCHINI

V ALL SMALL SHARE ITEMS

MINUS MEAT ITEMS

TWO POUNDS TWO APRICOTS CUCUMBERS

ONE BUNCH SPINACH

TWO ZUCCHINI

ONE POUND GARLIC SCAPE & BLACK PEPPER LINGUINE

ONE PACKAGE VEG. BURGERS

Vegan SMALL

VEGETARIAN SHARE WITHOUT PASTA Plus VEGETABLE SUBSTITUTIONS 2015 ALMANAC |

39


TIPS & TRICKS FROM PARKER BOSLEY

TECHNIQUES A guide to processing and preserving your food

S

SOMETIMES YOUR WHOLE SHARE DOESN’ T MAKE IT BACK . When it’s high summer and the berries are especially tempting, your bag’s likely to be a little lighter when you get home — even if the pickup is just down the street. But once you’re home, what do you do with the contents of your share? In this section, we share some of Parker Bosley’s most helpful hints for keeping your food fresh and flavorful.

UNPACKING

AND

STORING

YOUR

PRODUCE

SUMMARY | QUICK STORAGE TIPS Leafy Greens

When you get home after picking up your share, don’t put your bag in the fridge. Empty it and care for each item. Wash and dry your vegetables. In many cases, as with carrots, greens, and cabbage, a little moisture is good — but make sure to give potatoes, onions, and beets an extra pat-down. Store washed produce in a closed container, but leave a degree of breathability, like an open corner of a bag. Proper temperature is also key to proper storage. Items like potatoes, tomatoes, and winter squash shouldn’t be refrigerated, but rather stored in a dark, cool area, kept at around 55 degrees. Coldstorage items should be kept, ideally, at around 36 degrees, in an environment with high humidity. Most people keep a box of baking soda in their fridge to combat odors, but a bowl of water does more by keeping your produce fresh and moist. When in doubt, just keep it constant. If items come refrigerated, keep them refrigerated. 40 |

FRESH FORK MARKET

— Includes lettuce, chard, spinach, kale, beet greens — Like it cold and moist — Remove any root crop if present (beet, turnip, radish) — Wash, spin dry, store in plastic bag with paper towel — To revive, plunge in ice-water bath and spin dry

Root Crops — Includes beets, turnips, radishes, and more — Remove leafy greens to store — Wash appropriately and resist temperature change

Potatoes — Store in cool, dark area with plenty of air flow — Avoid moisture

Tomatoes — Never refrigerate — Keep in a cool, dark location

Small Fruits — Includes raspberries, strawberries, blackberries, etc. — Refrigerate ASAP — Eat as quickly as possible — Macerate them — cut, toss with sugar and brandy, enjoy

Tree Fruits — Allow to fully ripen at room temperature — Store in paper bag to facilitate ripening — Refrigerate to slow ripening process


GET TING

THE

MOST

OUT

OF

YOUR

SHARE

SUMMARY | MEAL PLANNING 101 Create a Process Start with the most perishable items — Lettuces, leafy greens, heirloom tomatoes, small fruits — Find dishes like salads that highlight the fresh flavors — Use fruit as a snack; have berries washed and prepped Then use the least familiar items

One of the things we hear most from our customers is that having a weekly influx of ingredients — both familiar and unfamiliar — has made them more dedicated, creative meal planners than they ever were before subscribing to Fresh Fork Market. A good starting point is to eat small fruits as soon as you can — and that same principle covers all perishable items, from heirloom tomatoes to more delicate leafy greens. After perishable ingredients, tackle something unfamiliar. The next section of the Almanac deals with a number of these ingredients, like celeriac and kohlrabi. Leave durable and familiar foods for last so you’ll always have available dishes that are in your wheelhouse. It’s also possible to incorporate the bulk of your share’s contents into cohesive cooking projects that create leftovers for days. The contents of our bags are often chosen to have thematic similarities or compatible flavor profiles. This method, which Parker calls “Cook for a Day, Eat for a Week” is detailed more in the righthand column.

— Kohlrabi, beets, kale, radishes, turnips, rutabaga — Have fun and search for rewarding recipes — Make sure everyone in the house tries the dish Use what you’re comfortable with — Sweet corn, tomatoes, carrots and others — Don’t freeze thawed meats — use them — Stir fry is an easy way to use vegetables

Cook for a Day, Eat for a Week! Plan or think ahead — Choose your recipes — Match preparations to produce (see next page for more on methods) — Set aside time to cook — Thaw ingredients if needed Have a stocked pantry — Staples: Butter, milk, eggs, cheese — Grains, flour, and dried (or frozen) pasta — Dried beans, or beans cooked and then frozen — Herbs and spices Prep everything at once — Wash, dry, cut and trim — Soak or precook dried ingredients — Roast, steam, or boil root vegetables for later dishes Prepare “master” dishes — Can set the theme for all accompanying dishes — Examples: Roast chicken, braised pork shoulder — Have fallback or adaptable side dishes 2015 ALMANAC |

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P R E PA R AT I O N S T H AT M A K E A D I F F E R E N C E S U M M A RY | P R E PA R AT I O N M E T H O D S Quick-Wilting and Light Sautéing — Preserves color, moisture and full flavor — Softens tougher textures; boosts nutrient absorption — A few minutes in light oil or butter

Sweating Once you’ve stored your share and are planning your meals, it’s time to consider your prep methods. With produce, it’s important to think about families — vegetables that can be cooked in similar ways or substituted easily for each other within recipes. Tender and sweet greens like lettuce, baby greens, or chard benefit from a light touch. They can be quick wilted or sautéed — or used raw in salads and smoothies. When mature, kale, collards, and other cabbage-family greens can be pan-cooked on higher heat, followed by a longer simmer until tender. Other, spicier relatives like mustard greens and mizuna can be sautéed at high temperatures and mixed with other greens to mitigate the hot, peppery flavor. Root crops — turnips, rutabagas, beets, and the like — can be oven-roasted with olive oil and sea salt at high temperatures; baked in foil like a potato; or, with turnips or celeriac, mashed and served alone or mixed in with potatoes. Whole grains can be used in salads or ground into flour for baking. Generally, an overnight soak for heartier grains like spelt and barley is best, followed by a stovetop simmer until soft. Alternately, a Vitamix can grind them into fresh flour. 42 |

FRESH FORK MARKET

— Very low, slow heat with oil or butter — Do not brown veggies at all — Parchment paper cover vents steam; preserves juices — Applicable for root crops, onions, and even tomatoes

Blanching — Submerge produce in boiling water briefly — Place in ice bath immediately, remove and dry — Enhances color, loosens skins, softens some fibers — Kills ripening enzymes: Ideal for freezing — Excellent for beans and cabbage for salads

Cook Vegetables Separately — Particularly for gratins or composed dishes — Allows appropriate cooking methods for different veggies

Flavor Considerations Use honey to cut acid — Mellow sour flavors in tomato sauce and ratatouille Add acid to liven up a dish — Vinegar or citrus near the end of cooking Salt is your friend — Enhances your ability to taste and is acid-neutral Fats as nature intended — Use butter, lard, and natural oils

And Always: Recycle All You Can! For vegetable stock — Stems: Beet tops, kale and chard ribs — Cores: Cabbage and corn cobs — Ends: Trimmed pieces of squash, carrots — No starches or skins For meat stock — All bones and any meat scraps — No organ meats


HONING

YOUR

PROFICIENCY

WITH

A

KNIFE

S TAY S H A R P | A K I T C H E N K N I F E P R I M E R Anatomy of a Knife : Common parts and features TA N G

BUTT

Chefs at any level can’t create dynamite dishes with tools alone. Proper knife technique and usage are some of the most asked-about topics at our classes. And whether you’re cutting a tomato or processing a side of beef, the proper knife for your task in the kitchen makes life easier. When cutting, make a claw shape with the hand you’re holding the object in, tucking in

BOLSTER

HANDLE

SPINE

FAC E

TIP

EDGE

A Guide to Common Knives and Their Uses

Chef ’s K N I F E Your go-to knife for daily use, including most types of cuts

Paring K N I F E Handy for small, precise tasks like peeling and trimming

Utility K N I F E An everyday knife for a range of tasks from cutting to slicing

the tips of your fingers and using the flat of

Bread K N I F E

your knuckles as a guide. Make sure to cut on a

A serrated edge allows you to cut soft items without tearing

flat surface, and square off rounded vegetables or oblong items to rest them on a flat edge.

Carving K N I F E Its long, thin blade allows you to cut large, even slices of meat

For slicing large items, use a chef’s knife (see

Boning K N I F E

right) to cut down and forward in a circular

A fine tip and curved blade let you separate meat from bone

motion, keeping the tip low. Precision chopping of larger vegetables is performed with a similar, steady motion. For herbs and other delicate

Santoku K N I F E An Eastern-style combination of a chef’s knife and a cleaver

items, perform a back slice and pull the blade

Cleaver

steadily backwards at a low angle with no

For cutting through bone and separating joints in meat

downward motion to maximize slicing while minimizing crushing. To finely mince aromatics, use a rock chop, stabilizing the tip of the knife

KITCHEN SHEARS For a range of tasks, from trimming twine to cutting herbs

with your free hand while dragging your blade

HONING STEEL

through the pile of pre-diced ingredients.

Key to keeping your blades sharp — realigns worn edges 2015 ALMANAC |

43


P R E S E R V I N G

T H E

B O U N T Y

O F

S U M M E R

S U M M A RY | P U T T I N G U P YO U R F O O D Freezing Fast preservation for fresh vegetables — Most veggies maintain quality for 12-18 months at 0°F — Blanching / quick cooling are necessary for most items — Exceptions: Herbs and green peppers — Dry Pack: Frozen together in a “lump” — Tray Pack: Frozen individually; packed together

Water Bath Canning Shelf storage for high-acid produce

One of the problems that many people have is how to sustain the bounty of an Ohio summer through the following seasons. As you know, brighter produce gives way to heartier staples between December and May. If you want to experience summer in the off-season and still eat locally, canning, freezing, and preserving can carry those flavors into the winter. You may know from experience that preserving comes with its share of questions: What can you freeze the way it is? What needs to be blanched? How do you can fruits and veggies? What canning gear do I need? Can I make my own jams and preserves? And these are just a few of them. Fresh Fork Market offers several avenues for people looking to get into canning and preserving. One is our “Preserving the Bounty” classes, taught by Parker, Clark Pope, and other career canners. The next one is in late July. If you’re a novice canner, a veteran, or someone just looking to get quick tips, you can join our Canning Club on Facebook at www.facebook.com/FreshForkMarketCanningClub. 44 |

FRESH FORK MARKET

— Preserves high-acid foods like pickles, tomatoes, and jams — Kills bacteria and enzymes — Contents mush be less than 4.6 pH to avoid botulism — Use tempered jars, proper lids, and headspace — For safety, add extra acid (like lemon juice) to tomatoes

Pressure Canning Foiling spoilage with temperature and pressure — Kills bacteria in low-acid foods like vegetables — For safety, do not rush processing — Follow manufacturer’s guidelines closely — Necessary for carrots, squash, green beans, and others

Dehydration Ancient methods in a modern kitchen — One of the oldest methods of food preservation — Low overhead: Only requires an oven — Set to lowest temperature — over 200° will cook — “Raw dehydrating” requires a temperature below 115° — Lay out vegetables on mesh- or cheesecloth-covered frame — Keep oven door open to vent moisture — Allow drying time between 4 and 12 hours — Perfect for stews, soups, and sauces

Lacto Fermentation Funky on the tongue; good for your gut — Centuries-old method with healthy enzymatic properties — Fermentation promotes friendly bacteria and nutrients — Food is preserved with lactic acid — Should be refrigerated — Examples include “live” pickles, sauerkraut, kimchi, miso — Probiotic-rich and good for digestion


S T O C K S

O U R

FAV O R I T E

I N V E S T M E N T

R I C H S T O C K | T H E T W O - D AY R E C I P E Rich stock, whether just-made or frozen, is a cornerstone of making sauces and soups. Parker’s legendary process — from start to stock — will require a least two days. On the first day you will make the stock and let it cool overnight to concentrate the fat. On the second day you can remove the fat that has risen to the top and then boil the stock to evaporate water and concentrate the flavor. After that, the stock can be stored for use in future dishes.

Day One Creating good stock requires time, appropriate ingredients and attentiveness — but the rewards are well worth it. Bones, vegetables, herbs, wine, and water and a good stock pot will yield a product that enhances any dish. When making meat stock, there should be some meat on the bones. Beef necks; chicken wings and necks; and pork necks or feet are excellent. The bones should be in small pieces—two or three inches wide. You may choose to brown the bones before making the stock. You can do this in a 350° oven or in the stock pot over medium heat with a little butter or a neutral oil. Stir the bones often and do not allow the meat to burn. Deglaze the roasting vessel when finished. A cup of dry vermouth works very well for this. As your stock-making becomes more complex, you may choose specific wines for the deglazing process. Riesling goes well with pork, and red wine with beef bones. With chicken stock, you may want to brown the vegetables in butter first. Do not salt or pepper the stock in advance — season when using it in recipes.

Crafting the basis of a complex flavor profile

3 LBS 1 1 1 1 2 TBSP 1 TSP 1

Bones, browning optional Celery stalk, chopped Onion, peeled and chopped Carrot, chopped Garlic clove, crushed Fresh Italian parsley

Fill with water to 2 – 3” above the ingredients; add more if necessary

Dried thyme Bay leaf

Heat water, bones, and vegetables in an 8 qt. pot until boiling. Skim for impurities. When stock begins to clear, lower temperature to medium / medium-low — with occasional bubbles but not at a rolling boil. Add herbs and cook for 4 – 5 hrs. Add water when necessary to keep bones submerged. Remove from heat; let cool. Strain through a damp cloth into a container and refrigerate overnight. The next day you can remove the fat that has come to the top — a narrow container works best for concentrating the separated fat.

Day Two Reducing volume and intensifying flavor Skim accumulated fat and return to heat until boiling. Skim again, and turn heat to medium. When total volume has been reduced to roughly half of start volume, remove and allow to cool. Ladle into plastic containers, label with date, and freeze for future use. 2015 ALMANAC |

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O H I O C I T Y M E AT & C U R I N G

A

ADAM LAMBERT HAS BEEN A FIXTURE IN THE LOCAL CULINARY COMMUNITY for years now. From his

training, crafting pierogies at Lola and cheeses at Bar Cento, to his recent stint as chef and charcutier at The Black Pig, Adam brings a wealth of experience to Fresh Fork. Over the years, Adam has led countless classes for us, sharing his butchery expertise and creating a bond with our community. And, as is the case in most successful long-term relationships — we’re preparing to take our commitment to the next level.

In 2013, Adam and Trevor traveled to Lexington, KY,

are of particular importance for the artisan products

to train with renowned French chef Dominique

that Fresh Fork is interested in making alongside Ohio

Chapolard. During his single week in America, he

City Meat & Curing, Adam’s butchery business.

instructed a small group in the art of seam butchery

We’re proud to announce that in 2015, we will open

and hog husbandry. From that, Trevor gained

a joint storefront in Ohio City. The location will offer

unparalleled insight into the breeding business, and

whole-animal butchery alongside premium products

Adam picked up a new batch of old-world techniques.

from Fresh Fork’s product line. This venture is the

Since then, the pair has traveled to farms across the eastern US collecting breeds of hogs. These breeds

exciting evolution of our years-long collaboration — stay tuned to our website for the latest.

T O P Adam Lambert on the pasture with heritage Red Wattle hogs, Wilmot 46 |

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2015 ALMANAC |

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UNIQUE ITEMS DEMYSTIFIED

INGREDIENTS & RECIPES A S E N S E O F CO M M U N I T Y C O M E S W I T H S I G N I N G U P F O R A S H A R E , but many Fresh Fork Market subscribers find an even greater bond in swapping stories about how they’ve dealt with unique ingredients. When most stores stock packaged and pre-processed foods, it’s less common to encounter roots, greens, and dried beans. This section provides background info and cooking suggestions for some of our most asked-about products — and hopefully may inspire a little adventurous eating along the way.

F E A T U R E D Kohlrabi at daybreak in the fields of Medina County, Homerville 48 |

FRESH FORK MARKET


KOHLR ABI MOST FOLKS REMEMBER THE FIR ST TIME THEY ENCOUNTERED KOHLRABI. It's tough to describe — familiar and foreign at once. Its name comes from a joining of the German words Kohl (cabbage) and Rabi (turnip), a potential nod to its origin. Even rooted in more common crops, it's in a category of its own.

I NGRE DI E N T OV E RV I EW

RECIPE

KO H L R A B I has a tough outer skin and a mild, somewhat sweet flesh. It looks like a root vegetable, but its bulbous base is really a stem that sits above the ground. It appears in a variety of colors, from green to purple. It has tough, leafy greens similar to collards, which can be prepared in a comparable manner. It's nutrient-rich throughout: both a great source of dietary fiber and a wellspring of vitamin C. Once peeled, a kohlrabi can be eaten raw, roasted, or even sliced and fried like a potato. To do this, simply

Kohlrabi Fritters adapted from J O H N P E T E R S O N

2 1 1 1

cut raw kohlrabi into sticks or wedges. Dredge the pieces in a flour of your choosing and then cook, 2 to 3 minutes a side, in a skillet of hot oil. Once golden brown, remove, drain on paper towels, and sprinkle with the seasoning of your choice. Its mellow flavor and semi-porous flesh make it an ideal pairing for creamy sauces and tangy, acidic dressings. Because of this, you often see this versatile veggie as a base in salads or slaws, like in the recipe to the right. Experiment with your own combinations of acids, natural sugars and herbs.

Medium kohlrabi, peeled and trimmed Small onion, finely chopped Small green chili, ribbed and seeded Egg, lightly beaten

¼ CUP ½ TSP 1 TBSP 2 TBSP

All-purpose flour

Salt, pepper, and herbs to taste

Ground coriander Butter Extra virgin olive oil

Grate the peeled and trimmed kohlrabi on the large holes of a box grater. Wrap the grated kohlrabi in a clean dishtowel and squeeze until most of the excess moisture has been removed. Mix the kohlrabi, onion, chilies, beaten egg, flour, and coriander until just combined. Add additional flour by the tsp. if batter seems too wet (mixture should be somewhat firm). In a large, heavy pan, heat the oil and butter over medium-high heat until the butter stops foaming. Add medium ladlefuls of the batter to the pan, gently pressing down on the cakes with the back of a spatula. Cook until crispy and golden brown on each side. Drain on paper towels and serve. S E R V E W I T H Applesauce or crème fraîche

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T OM AT OE S W H E T H E R YO U I N S I S T I T ’ S A F R U I T O R C A L L I T YO U R FAVO R I T E V EG G I E there’s nothing else that says “summer is here” quite like a vine-ripened tomato. This star of the warm months is revered as a centerpiece in many cuisines around the world, particularly those tropical and subtropical climates.

RECIPE

I NGRE DI E N T OV E RV I EW When choosing to grow tomatoes, there is a range of factors a farmer must consider. What variety should he choose? Should he grow a good “packer” tomato? Packer tomatoes are prized for their uniform size and color, firm flesh, and for large crops that come ripe at a uniform time. Or

Tomato Soup from P A R K E R B O S L E Y

3 LBS 2 TBSP 1 CUP 1 CUP ¼ CUP 2 CUPS 1 TBSP 1

Fresh tomatoes, diced Butter or extra virgin olive oil Diced onion Diced celery Sherry or Madeira, optional Chicken or vegetable stock Dried thyme Clove garlic, peeled and minced

Salt and pepper to taste

Place tomatoes on an oiled baking sheet and sprinkle with dried thyme. Roast for 45 minutes in a 350° oven. Stir often to evaporate most of the juice. Cooking will vary depending on the variety of tomato and its ripeness. You want most, but not all, of the excess moisture to evaporate. While the tomatoes are roasting, heat butter or oil in a soup pot. Add the onion and celery. Sauté over medium-low heat, stirring often for about 20 min. If using sherry or Madeira, add and reduce near the end. Add in the stock. Remove the tomatoes from the oven and add them to the pot along with the garlic. Cook for an additional 45 min. Pass the soup through a food mill or blend. Add salt and pepper to taste. For a richer version, add in and heat heavy cream before serving, being careful not to boil the cream.

perhaps a “fresh market” tomato is the way to go. The difficulties with these flavorful varieties are challenges in handling and generally lower yields. Fresh Fork customers will recognize the latter — the heirloom tomatoes we feature all summer are at times delicate but always bursting with flavor. When it comes to serving, we suggest you let the tomato be the center of attention. Serve it on salad drizzled with a delicious aged vinegar and some fresh cheese. Use it to enhance the flavor of a pizza or sandwich. Or try it processed in a garden smoothie, fresh salsa, or sauce. If you can’t get enough of the flavor of tomatoes, consider crafting and canning a savory tomato “jam” to use as a condiment all year long. Your tomatoes should not be refrigerated. Ripe tomatoes do best in a brown paper bag or on a dishtowel-draped plate in a cool, dark location. If you find yourself with a surplus, you can freeze, can, or dehydrate tomatoes (see tips on page 44 for more about preservation). For freezing, consider leaving the skin on. When you remove them from the freezer, the skin will slip right off, allowing for easy processing into sauces and soups.

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B E E T S CALLING BEETS “NATURE’S CANDY ” is a tradition, but it undersells the true range of this versatile veggie. Prepared properly, beets balance a fine sweetness with a deep, earthy counterpoint. They’re available nearly all year and are great boiled, roasted, pickled, canned, or even turned into a chocolate cake.

I NGRE DI E N T OV E RV I EW

RECIPE

Beets are among the most consistent, valuable crops a farmer can cultivate. They grow in any climate — hot or cold. They’re durable. They can be stored and sold throughout winter. And above all, they have abundant utility. Value in vegetables comes from a combination of utility and consumer appeal, which beets have in spades. They can be boiled, roasted, or served as-is. They can be pickled, canned, or made into dehydrated chips. They shine when incorporated into veggie burgers, energy bars, or desserts. And that’s just the root — the greens are a healthy, flavorful addition to a full slate of dishes.

Saltibarsciai LITHUANIAN CHILLED BEET SOUP courtesy of TH E G ROV E WO O D TAV E RN Velvet View original yogurt

the greens away just above the root, wash them,

2 CUPS 3 3-4 1-2 2

and store them in a plastic bag with a damp

Minced fresh dill to taste

paper towel. In taste and nutritional content,

Salt and pepper to taste

In the summer and fall your beets will be sold with the beet greens attached. Immediately cut

beet greens are very similar to Swiss chard and spinach. In fact, Fresh Fork mixes them in with the spinach in our spinach raviolis. The roots should be washed and stored in the refrigerator’s crisper drawer. This will help them retain their moisture. Do not peel your beets before cooking. Either boil

Hard-boiled eggs, peeled and chopped Roasted beets, skinned and chopped Cucumbers, peeled and chopped Scallions or a handful of chives

Boil the beets until a fork slips easily out of them, or wrap in foil and roast in a 425° oven for 45 min. to an hour. Allow to cool, remove skins, and chop. Beets can be made ahead and refrigerated. Process the beets with a food mill or blender. Hard boil the eggs and peel when cooled. Separate the egg whites and yolks. Chop the egg whites and mix the diced scallions or chives into the egg yolk with a fork.

in aluminum foil and roast them. Afterwards, place

Combine all ingredients and chill soup further if necessary. Adjust the seasoning to taste. Garnish with dill and a dollop of sour cream.

them in ice water to loosen the skins. A simple scrub

S E R V E W I T H Sandwiches or dumplings

the beets in salted water or wrap them individually

with a paper towel will remove them with ease. 2015 ALMANAC |

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GREENS LEAFY GREENS HAVE A REPUTATION FOR BEING NUTRITIONAL WONDERS, and they come by it honestly. Many are vitamin-rich and provide a non-dairy source of calcium. Kale even has more iron per calorie than beef. But beyond that, greens have a flavor and flexibility that also makes them standouts in the kitchen.

RECIPE

I NGRE DI E N T OV E RV I EW K A L E was once used as a mere decoration for salad bars and meat cases. Over the last couple of decades, folks have woken up to the fact that this green leafy vegetable offers a vital nutritional boost.

C O L L A R D S have always been common in the South but are gaining in popularity elsewhere. Heartier than many other greens, collards have an

Kale & Onion Breakfast Squares

almost cabbage-like flavor. An ideal companion to

adapted from R E G I N A S C H RA M B L I N G

ham hocks and other low-and-slow ingredients.

1 ½ CUP ½ TSP ½ TSP 1 TSP 1 CUP ¼ CUP ½ DOZ 1 TSP

Bunch kale, preferably Red Russian Red onion, chopped Minced fresh garlic Extra virgin olive oil Tamari or soy sauce Grated cheese Whole-wheat bread crumbs, optional Eggs, beaten well

M U S TA R D G R E E N S are more delicate than

Salt and pepper to taste

Dried marjoram or other herbs

Preheat oven to 350°. Stem and wash the kale. Pile leaves up on top of each other and cut along two axes to create roughly one-inch squares. Heat olive oil in large, heavy frying pan; then add onions and saute 3 minutes. Add garlic and sauté 2 additional minutes. Add kale, turning over as it wilts — cook for about 5 minutes, or until kale is significantly wilted and softened. Put sautéed vegetables into large bowl and add remaining ingredients. Stir gently until well distributed. Oil a pan and bake for 20-25 minutes until eggs are well set and the top is lightly browned. S E R V E W I T H Fresh salsa or herbed yogurt

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FRESH FORK MARKET

other greens but counteract that with a spicier odor and zippier flavor. They provide a great punch in soups and stews and can be mellowed if blanched with an acid — like vinegar or citrus juice.

B E E T G R E E N S are a bonus you receive with every bunch of beets. They can be prepared like other greens and add a subtle beet flavor to recipes.

C H A R D is easily identified by its colorful stalks, which can add vibrancy and deep flavor to dishes. Chard greens have a pleasing, mild taste. Greens hold grit, so wash them well before cooking. Most varieties can be prepared similarly, sautéed in oil (or lard) with garlic or onions. Tougher-leafed greens like collards may benefit from blanching before being sautéed or baked. With a Vitamix or food processor, many can be made into pesto — or, if a milder variety, provide an extra dose of vitamins and minerals in a fruit smoothie.


C A B B A G E A FIXTURE IN A NUMBER OF GLOBAL CUISINES, cabbage recipes and varieties are as diverse as the range of people who enjoy them. From bok choy and napa cabbage in East Asian countries to the domestic green and red cabbages of Europe, each type has its own unique flavor and associated dishes.

I NGRE DI E N T OV E RV I EW

RECIPE

G R E E N C A B B AG E is delicious steamed and served with a little butter, salt and pepper for a simple preparation. It also roasts well. To do this, slice it, laying the slices on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper and brushing with a little oil. Season to your taste and cook in a 400-degree oven for about 30 minutes.

R E D C A B B AG E is slightly more robust than

Cabbage Slaw with Leeks & Apples

its green counterpart and contains much more

from P A R K E R B O S L E Y

iron. When pan-cooked or roasted with an acidic element, it makes a wonderful side dish.

N A PA C A B B AG E and B OK C H OY are great in stir frys. Their natural peppery zing pairs well with other elements. With a full-size bok choy, you’ll want to separate the leaves from the stalks, as the stalks have a slightly longer cooking time. Asian cabbages also freeze well. For freezing tips, see the Techniques section of the Almanac. Cabbage has a tendency to multiply. An entire chopped cabbage can seem about ten times as

½ HEAD 2 2 1 TSP 1 CUP 1½ TBSP 3 TBSP 2 TBSP

Shredded red cabbage

Salt and pepper to taste

Leeks, cleaned and chopped Apples, cored and sliced Dijon mustard Crushed blackberries, optional Vinegar Sunflower oil Fresh minced dill to garnish, optional

Shred the cabbage using the food processor or slice with a knife. Toss the cabbage with salt and place in a colander. Add a weight and let the cabbage soften and drain for several hours.

salads and slaws. Later, when you need a quick

Blanch the chopped leeks in boiling salted water. Refresh in ice water. Drain and pat dry. Rinse the salt from the cabbage. Repeat and dry, then add the leeks. Whisk the mustard, vinegar, and oil into a dressing/vinaigrette; then add it to the cabbageapple mixture. If using berries, add them to the slaw now. Toss and mix the slaw. Taste and then season with salt and pepper. Add herbs and toss mixture.

meal, just toss the shredded cabbage in a wok or

This slaw is best refrigerated for a day in advance.

large as it was before. If a whole cabbage is hard for you to manage in a single recipe, try dividing it up. A great trick is to shred half a cabbage and divide it into meal-sized stir-fry portions. Freeze each portion separately. Enjoy the fresh half in

skillet with other veggies and a simple stir-fry sauce. Dinner is ready with little fuss.

S E R V E W I T H Roast pork or poultry

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WHOLE

GRAINS

GRAINS HAVE BEEN THE FOUNDATION OF DIETS FOR CENTURIES. Even with the rise of refined grains, many — us included — revere whole grains for their health benefits and flavor. A grain contains everything a plant needs, from energy (endosperm/starch) and nutrients (germ), to the fiber that protects it (bran).

RECIPE

I NGRE DI E N T OV E RV I EW Whole grains are the complete grain, untreated, and presented for consumption as a berry (or a groat if it is oats or buckwheat) or flour. In the processing of the berry into whole-wheat flour, the endosperm, bran, and germ are all included.

Toasted Spelt Berry Risotto from P A R K E R B O S L E Y

2 CUPS 2 TBSP 1 1 QT 2 TBSP ¼ CUP 1 1

Spelt berries, toasted Extra virgin olive oil or other oil Large onion, diced Stock, chicken or vegetable Extra virgin olive oil Butter Acorn or butternut squash Bunch kale or similar greens Salt and pepper to taste

Toss the spelt with the oil and roast on a sheet tray in a 400° degree oven for 15-20 min. Sauté onions in a heavy pan in oil. Add the spelt berries and enough stock to cover the berries. Bring to a boil and reduce to a simmer. Stir occasionally and add stock as the liquid evaporates. When the berries nearly reach desired doneness, cease adding stock and cook off excess moisture. Divide and de-seed the squash. Brush lightly with oil and roast in the oven at 400° until soft. Depending on the size, this will take 30 min. to an hour. Set aside until cool, then remove the flesh from the skin. Wash, rib, and chop the greens.. Use them raw or do a quick sauté to bring out their colors. If cooking, use oil, cider vinegar, salt, and a splash of maple syrup. Blend squash until smooth — the texture of apple sauce. Pour puree into the cooked spelt and bring to a simmer. Cook until thick. Add greens and season.

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FRESH FORK MARKET

These grains also benefit from being ground fresh. Home-ground flour is full of insoluble fiber and nutrients. To grind your own flour at home, you can purchase a small mill or use a Vitamix blender. With the Vitamix, you can grind flour in both the dry and wet containers. Be careful not to run the blender too long, since too much friction and heat can be harmful to the enzymes in the flour. Whole-grain flours should be stored in the refrigerator or freezer to preserve freshness and nutritional value. The germ in a grain contains oils, and those oils can go rancid if the flour gets too warm for too long. We suggest using flour within two months of when it was ground. When baking, remember that whole-grain flours tend to be “heavier” than enriched all-purpose flours. Almost universally, more water will be needed if you’re switching a recipe to whole-grain flour. If baking bread, try using an enameled dutch oven. Preheat the dutch oven; then bake the bread covered for the first half. Halfway through, remove the lid and allow the bread to continue baking uncovered. This locks in moisture and helps the bread to spring into shape faster.


BEANS L E G U M E S , S U C H A S D R I E D B E A N S , A R E C R I T I C A L to the health of our bodies and the health of our agricultural systems. With us, they lower cholesterol and blood pressure — on the farm, they serve as a key player in crop rotation, pulling nitrogen from the air and returning it to the soil where other plants can use it.

I NGRE DI E N T OV E RV I EW

RECIPE

In the kitchen, dried beans are to a cook what duct tape is to a handyman — always good to have around; never hurts in a pinch. Dried beans are hardy enough to last up to a year in the pantry and can be stored for another year once cooked and frozen. As an ingredient, their applications are nearly endless. Beans can be incorporated into cold salads and mashed to make dips. They can star in soups, stews, and casseroles. As a main course, they can be made into a veggie burger or even replace the noodles in a traditional pasta dish. When cooking different varieties of dried beans, always approach each type separately. This will make it easier to achieve uniform doneness. Soaking

Texas Caviar from T R E V O R C L AT T E R B U C K

1 CUP 2 EARS 2 1 1 1 ½ CUP

Dried mixed beans (before cooking) Fresh sweet corn, cut Medium tomatoes, chopped Green pepper, diced Jalapeño, ribbed, seeded, and diced Bunch of cilantro Onion or scallion, diced

beans overnight reduces the cooking time, but if

H O N E Y- L I M E V I N A I G R E T T E

you forget to soak the beans, you can also quick-

tender but not break. Be sure to apply salt or acid/

¼ CUP 2 TBSP 2 TBSP 1 TBSP 2 TSP 1

vinegar once cooking is finished, rather than before.

cook them. To do this, bring the beans to a boil, drain, rinse, and repeat — this time adding fresh water. Slowly simmer the beans until done. They should be

Sunflower oil Red wine or cider vinegar Lime juice Honey Cilantro, chopped finely Garlic clove, minced Salt and pepper to taste

Soak the beans overnight or for at least 6 hours. Drain and rinse the beans. Cover in water — 3 times the volume of the beans. Bring to a boil, reduce heat, simmer gently until tender (anywhere from 90 min. to 3 hrs. depending on the beans). Sauté vegetables briefly and add to the cooked beans. In a bowl, whisk together vinaigrette ingredients, except the oil. Slowly add in oil while whisking. Dress vegetable mixture, season, and serve. S E R V E W I T H Pulled pork barbecue

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BEEF C U D, C U TS , A N D CO O K I N G T I P S

RECIPE

Making the Perfect Burger from A D A M L A M B E RT

INGREDIENT

OVERVIEW

Unlike pork and poultry, beef has the ability to survive entirely off of grass. It is a ruminant animal, which, in the simplest form, means that it has a four-chambered stomach. The first two chambers, the rumen and reticulum, really set it apart. They essentially serve as a giant fermentation tank,

1⁄3-½ LB Grassfed ground beef, per burger

Salt and pepper to taste

FORMING THE BURGER Season the beef lightly with salt and pepper. Mix the meat thoroughly by hand until it gets tacky. Form myosin — a sticky protien — by kneading the meat in a bowl. Pinch off a portion-sized piece and roll it out into a ball. Refrigerate to cool the meat back down. Slam the ball against a clean counter and use the palm of your hand to push the meat out into a patty form. Using a spatula, lift the patty from the counter and season the outside as desired.

based matters to separate solids from acids and water. The solids — the cud you hear mentioned— are then regurgitated and re-chewed to fully extract the nutrients. The formal explanation isn’t quite as fun as the version for school events, which is basically just a handful of synonyms for “barf.” How does this process affect the quality of the meat? Grassfed beef is slower-growing, leaner, and healthier. Its fats are loaded with good Omega-3

GRILLING THE BURGER

fatty acids, particularly conjugated linoleic acid.

Clean your gril and get it extremely hot on one side and cooler on the other (or “indirect”) side. Oil the grates, place your burger on the grill, and cover. Flip the burger after about 3 min. After another 3 min, move the burger to the cooler side of the grill and reduce the heat. Finish the burger at this lower heat for an additional 2 to 3 min. Remove from the grill and let it rest for 3 to 5 min. Serve and enjoy.

These healthy fats boost your immune system,

S E R V E W I T H Fresh slaw or wilted greens

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where bacteria reacts with sugars in the plant-

FRESH FORK MARKET

contain anti-inflammatory agents, and reduce the risk of certain cancers. So does this mean most “all natural” beef you see is 100% grassfed? Unfortunately, it doesn’t. But because of its myriad benefits and superlative flavor, grassfed beef is the only kind Fresh Fork sells.


T H O U G H I T H A S A N ATO M Y L I K E T H AT O F OT H E R F O U R - L EG G E D M A M M A L S , beef can be intimidating because of its size — and because that size lends itself to a greater variety of cuts. To boot, some cuts change names based on geography. In this overview, we’ll clear up some of the complexities.

FRESH FORK REFERENCE

A

BUTCHER’S

GUIDE

TO

An Overview of Cuts and Cooking Methods

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

| | | | | | |

GRASSFEED BRAISE

GRILL

BEEF ROAST

SAUTÉ

Chuck

R O B U S T, B E E F Y TA S T E Chuck, crosscut roasts Blade steak Flat iron, mock tender English roast

8

1

Brisket

TO UG H B UT DE E P-F LAVO R E D Beef brisket (whole cut), flat cut, point cut

4

6

9

10

2

THE FATTIER DECKLE WILL BE MORE TENDER

5 3

Shank

7 3

T H E S L O W- C O O K E R C U T Shank crosscut

O S S O B UCO IS MADE FRO M THIS CUT

Rib

FINE-GRAINED AND TENDER Back ribs, short ribs Filet of rib Ribeye, cowboy steak Ribeye roast

Plate

8

Loin

9

Flank

10

S T R O N G P R I M A L F L AV O R Short ribs Skirt steak (can also be sautéed in fajitas) T E N D E R A N D Q U I C K- C O O K I N G Filet of strip, strip steak, porterhouse steak Hanger steak, t-bone steak Strip roast L E A N A N D F L AV O R F U L Flank steak London broil, flap

Other Cuts Stew beef

| | |

Tenderloin

B U T T E RY T E X T U R E Butt cut, tail cut Tenderloin roast Center cut (filet mignon)

Sirloin

A FA M I LY- F R I E N D LY C H O I C E Ball tip steak and roast Filet, tri-tip Center-cut sirloin, coulotte Tri-tip roast

Round

C H E A P E R , B U T R E WA R D I N G Rump roast Round steak, tip steak Top and bottom round Eye of round

P R E - S L I C E D, G R O U N D, A N D P R O C E S S E D P R E PA R AT I O N S Cubed steak, stir-fry beef, fajita beef Beef kabob, ground beef

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F OR K S TAGR A M S S H A R I N G Y O U R S H A R E S A year of Fresh Fork through your eyes

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O H S TA C I E

SEEKRONIKA

P O I S E I N PA R M A

L I T T L E L E A FA S H

BROOKERGAL

A K J E L DA H L

FRESHFORKMARKET

KDR CLE

D E E J AY D O C

DEBBARAKFITNESS

SHORESOCIETY

KO S K I M

FINKSS

JWEZ30

BLEIBLEI

JESSICA JOELLEN

GETFITINCLE

JOHNWILKESHUTH

S AV O R E V E R Y D AY

ALITHEARCHITECT

JRHINES

P O I S E I N PA R M A

DEBOESTUDIO

K PA N G

DA N M E R K 2 3

FRESH FORK MARKET


B

BY N O W YO U K N O W W E L OV E A G O O D S T O RY, and some of our favorites come from you. Whether you’re a professional chef or a college student dining on a dime, we love to see how you

incorporate our ingredients into your daily lives and meals. These images, a handful of the many with

the #FreshForkMarket tag on Instagram, tell just a few of those stories. Upload your own for next year!

FRESHFORKMARKET

JOHNWILKESHUTH

CHEFSWIDOW

A S H L E Y S H AW C L E

LIFEWITHBEARD

BEARDEDBUCH

KO S K I M

P I N E G AT E R O A D

T RAC E E B RA N DT

R A C H E L E S TA N D L E Y

K J AC KT I C A K

LIFEINCLE

R O X E T TA

S AV O R E V E R Y D AY

J O H N B AU S O N E

RO S I E RAU

P O I S E I N PA R M A

O H S TA C I E

ANGELASUPERP OWERS

JESSBUSE

ALLIEG96

H O L DT H E P I GS K I N

ZO E A DA M S

M Y K I D S E AT S Q U I D

ROSEISAROSETOO

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FRESH FORK MARKET

GL O S S A RY Common terms from our farmers and producers

BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

G E N E T I C A L LY M O D I F I E D O R G A N I S M ( G M O )

The activity of microorganisms in the soil that break

These are plant varieties that have been scientifically

down minerals and make them readily available to plants.

engineered to have specific qualities, such as disease

One of the problems with conventional agriculture is

resistance or tolerance of certain pesticides. GMOs are

that the fertilizers are often acidic and high in salt,

mostly field crops, such as corn and soybeans, that are

which harms microorganisms — making it difficult for

raised for animal feed and ethanol production. Fresh

them to release nutrients from the soil for plants.

Fork Market does not source any crops that are GMOs or

C H I C K E N T RAC TO R

use any GMO feed. See Hybrid and Heirloom for contrast.

A large, mobile cage without a floor. Part of the cage

GRAZING

is covered to allow for shade and protection from the

The technique of allowing ruminant mammals (see next

elements. The chickens are provided with fresh water

page) to feed themselves as they would in nature – on

and feed, and the cage is moved daily to a fresh piece

green grass and on pasture. Good grazing requires

of grass. This promotes good pasture management

constant attention from the farmer to provide adequate

by allowing the birds to eat down all the grass, evenly

energy to the animal and to allow the pasture to flourish.

disperse their manure, and continually have access to the fresh grass, seeds, and insects for which they forage.

H E R I TA G E B R E E D S These are breeds of livestock that are not traditionally

CO M M UNITY S UP P O RT E D AG R I C U LT U R E ( C SA)

raised for sale. Because most markets reward farmers

Fresh Fork Market’s Farm Buying Club is modeled after

for the efficiency of their animals (weight gain vs. feed

a CSA. CSAs are traditionally a subscription to one farm,

consumed) or yield (lbs of meat), some of these older

in which a share is equal to part of that farm’s harvest.

breeds have been forgotten about, despite their superior

That farmer grows vegetables, and the customer

flavor. The best way to save a heritage breed is to eat it.

receives a percent of the harvest. Fresh Fork Market

That way farmers breed and raise more animals.

does not grow any of our vegetables or raise any of our own animals; instead, we work with more than

HEIRLOOM

100 family farms. We invest in these farms like a CSA

Plants that can reproduce “true” offspring from their

subscriber would invest in an individual farm.

seeds. These are older varieties of produce that aren’t regularly grown for the commercial market due to their

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FA R M S T E A D C H E E S E

low yields, inconsistent size, lack of disease resistance,

A cheese made on the same farm where the cows,

or difficulty to ship. We are proud to offer numerous

goats or sheep are raised.

heirloom varieties of produce.

FRESH FORK MARKET


HEIRLOOM BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY

WHOLE GRAINS

FA R M ST E A D C H E E S E

RUMINANT

HYBRID A plant variety that is the result of crossing two like

access the outside and using certified organic feed, but

species using natural breeding techniques. Hybrid seeds

also ensuring that the pastures and the butcher shop are

must be purchased each year and do not produce true

also certified organic. Nearly all of Fresh Fork Market’s

offspring. Hybrids have been developed to create more

producers practice organic principles, but few comply

uniform fruit, disease resistance, and higher yields.

with the paperwork and fees to become certified organic.

HIGH TUNNEL A temporary structure that resembles a greenhouse. It is covered in translucent plastic, has no floor, and has no heat. It provides a farmer the opportunity to extend his seasons, start plants earlier, and protect against insects and fungal diseases.

L O C A L LY P R O D U C E D For us, locally produced means more than just made locally. Plenty of products are made in Northeast Ohio using ingredients from around the world. When we work with a producer to create a custom product, be it pasta, salsa, spreads, sauces, or anything — we require that they use local inputs. As a result, it is a scratchmade product that was grown, harvested, and prepared in this region.

PA ST U R E RA I S E D Pictured top left. A technique of raising livestock outside all the time. Where the terms cage-free, free-range, and all-natural all leave room for interpretation, pastureraised does not. It means that the chickens, turkeys, and hogs were all raised outside where they could get exercise, breathe fresh air, and supplement their diet with what they forage for in the soil. For our beef and lamb, this means 100% grassfed on organic pastures.

RUMINANT Mammals such as cows, goats, sheep (lamb), and deer that can live entirely off of a leafy green diet. This is possible because of the special structure of their digestive tract that allows them to ferment food first, which makes more nutrients available for them. Therefore, a true “all natural” diet for beef is 100% grassfed, as we practice.

ORGANIC

WHOLE GRAIN

Despite popular belief that organic means no pesticides

A grain is the seed of a plant, often a grass such as

or sprays, it simply means using organic pesticides.

oat, rye, or even corn. The grain can be ground to

Organic is a method of growing produce that focuses

make flour. Often, the germ is removed to provide a

on healthy soils, beneficial insects, and naturally

longer shelf life. Our grains are only whole grains,

derived herbicides, insecticides, and fungicides. For

which means they have the bran (fiber), endosperm

livestock, it means not only allowing the animals to

(starch), and germ (essential oils) intact. 2015 ALMANAC |

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P OL IC I E S

& PRO C EDURE S

THANK YOU FOR CHOOSING FRESH FORK MARKET to feed your family. Our staff and farmers greatly appreciate your business and hope that we can provide exceptional service, the highest quality products, and the variety you want. We welcome your input and feedback to continue to make our service better. I | Procedures For first timers, the concept of Fresh Fork Market can be weird. You are picking up a bag of groceries — that you didn’t select — from the back of a delivery truck in an open parking lot. It’s no surprise that we’ve been referred to by long-time customers as their “food dealer.” We have tried our hardest to make our service very accommodating and flexible. That being said, to make it work and ensure that everyone gets the maximum value, we do have a few policies that we’ll detail now. T H E P I C KU P P R O C E S S On our website we have a complete list of all the pickup locations, days, and times. You are welcome at any of them, but we do ask that you tell us your primary location. You can specify this on your profile online at www.freshforkmarket.com. Each week, please try to return a clean Fresh Fork Market bag. If you forget, we have extras. At the back of the truck, our staff member will ask for your name. Simply provide the name on the account and we’ll pull up your account. In a matter of seconds we can check you in and provide you with your bag. That’s it.

a sampling of Ohio’s finest farm products. We arrange the package contents to be complementary and the highest value items so that you can get the maximum number of meals out of each package. In addition to the weekly share, you may purchase extra items such as milk, butter, eggs, bread, meats, fruits, syrups and sauces, to name a few things. These items are available two ways: P R E O R D E R | The biggest selection is available on our

website. Orders must be paid in full via credit card and must be placed by Tuesday at midnight for same-week delivery. B AC K O F T H E T R U C K | Many customers prefer to shop at

the back of the truck. Here, we usually have the staples and basic meats and cheeses. You can purchase these via cash, check, credit card, or simply bill them to your account. D O U B L E C H E C K YO U R B AG Our bags are assembled by hand on the back of the truck. The contents change each week and it is easy to make a mistake, and we do. Please double check your bag each week for accuracy, particularly of smaller items like cheeses. Please do this before you get home. We can easily correct any omitted items on the spot.

O H N O ! I M I S S E D M Y P I C KU P ! Relax, it’s no biggie! Unless it is Saturday, there are many options for you to pick up your bag during the week. If you know you’re not going to make it to your normal pickup location, you can go to ANY of our other spots, Wednesday – Saturday. It’s that simple. You don’t even need to tell us! If you’re not able to pick up at all you can send someone in your place to pick up your bag. Just ask them to use your name. If you miss the week entirely, without placing a vacation stop (see policies below), we cannot offer you credits or a replacement. BUYING EXTRA ITEMS The weekly subscription is designed to provide you with

Q U E S T ION S ? L E T ’ S C H AT ! CUSTOMER SERVICE (800) 861-8582

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FRESH FORK MARKET

II | Policies VAC AT I O N S It’s summer and we do realize that many of you have vacations planned, so don’t worry, we’ve got you covered! You’re allowed to skip up to four (4) weeks during the summer. What does this mean? Let us know at least one week in advance if you’re not going to be able to pick up due to a vacation and you’ll receive full value credit for the week you didn’t pick up. If you do not alert us, we will order food in for you and cannot offer you credits. Small bag vacation credits are worth $25 and large bag vacation credits are worth $40.

If you have any questions or need additional information, please reach out to us. For the fastest response, contact me via one of the methods below. I’ll work with Trevor, and the rest of the staff to get you the best information. — LY N T R I E R , C U S T O M E R S E R V I C E M A N A G E R

INFO@FRESHFORKMARKET.COM

PO BOX 609612, CLEVELAND OH 44109

CSALOGIN.FRESHFORKMARKET.COM


H O W D O I R E G I S T E R A VAC AT I O N S TO P ? Do this online or tell one of the greeters at the back of the truck. Vacation requests must be submitted by Saturday at midnight to stop the following week’s delivery. H O W L O N G D O VAC AT I O N C R E D I T S L A S T ? These credits can be used as soon as you return from your vacation and you will have four (4) weeks to use them. After the four weeks, they will be decreased by 50%. Credits expire once the season is over. If you have a vacation planned for the end of the season, please let our staff know so we can apply credits early. We don’t want you to miss out. H O W D O I S P E N D VAC AT I O N C R E D I T S ? The week following your vacation, your credits will be available online to spend. You may use them three ways: 1) to double up, by ordering online, 2) to shop a la carte online, and 3) to shop a la carte at the back of the truck. Your credits will automatically be deducted from your purchases. S W I TC H I N G P I C K U P L O C AT I O N S

current, but sometimes we have to substitute an item you ordered. So please make sure to check it when you pick up! Your order must be placed by midnight on Tuesday to get in your bag for that week, otherwise it will come the following delivery week. Please remember, if your order isn’t paid for when you place it, it won’t be filled! Once the order is placed, it will be on the truck for delivery at the primary pickup location you chose. Please print your confirmation email and bring it with you. If there is something you can’t find or if you have a request for bulk purchases (such as buying a whole cow or pig), please write info@freshforkmarket.com. PAY M E N T I N F O R M AT I O N We offer three (3) different sized packages – the Small, Large, and Full Access, which is the small with additional “credits” to shop online for extras. We offer three dietary plans – Omnivore, Vegetarian, and Vegan.

You are welcome to switch locations without notifying us. We pack each truck with approximately 10% extra food to allow you this flexibility. We do ask that if you are switching locations permanently for the season that you update your online profile. If you have an additional order from online, you must pick it up at your primary pickup location.

PAY M E N T P L A N S

SUBSTITUTIONS

We accept cash, check, credit card, guns, gold, and ammo. We prefer check, as there are no transaction fees. If paying by cash, please get a receipt for your payment. We accept Visa and Mastercard, both which come with a processing fee of 3% that is passed on to the customer.

Each week we try to tell you what should be in the bag. That is before the farmer even harvested the crop. If he runs short due to bad estimating or the quality is poor or the weather reaped havoc (sorry, bad farm pun), we reserve the right to switch out ingredients to provide you with a better option. We’ll try to alert you of substitutions via our Facebook page and at the back of the truck. M I S S I N G O R DA M AG E D I T E M S We pack each grocery bag by hand and do occasionally make mistakes. We try to check all the products for quality and accuracy, but in the situation that we fail, please just let us know and we’ll replace it or substitute it. The best practice is to check your bag before leaving the pickup location. We can correct any problem on the spot. O N L I N E O R D E R S and S P E C I A L R E Q U E S T S We stock hundreds of items for extra purchase each week, from the staples like milk, eggs, butter, and flour, to frozen meats ranging from bacon and ground beef to steaks, venison, and ducks. We list these items, as well as seasonal produce, for preorder online. To place a special order, log in to your account online. You can choose from what is available that week. We do our best to keep inventory

The best value is to pay in full at the beginning of the season. We recognize this isn’t always possible, so we also offer a financing plan where our members pay in monthly installments. You can find payment schedules on our website that show you the cost of each option. PAY M E N T M E T H O D S

S U M M E R 2 0 1 5 P AY M E N T D AT E S

For Full Upfront Payment: May 18, 2015 - Small Payment: $550 - Large Payment: $880 - Full Access: $1,100 For the Installment Payment Plan: - Initial Payment: May 18th - Installment Payments: First of the month, June – October - Installment amounts: + Small: $105, Initial payment. $100, Monthly installments. + Large: $190, Initial payment. $160, Monthly installments. + Full Access: $176, Initial payment. $200, Monthly installments.

MEMBERSHIP FEE There is a onetime membership fee of $25 that covers the cost of reusable bags and administration. No further membership fee will be assessed unless you are an egregious abuser of not returning bags (12 or more outstanding).

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P A R T I N G

S H O T

A T T H E T A B L E Hoyt Block Courtyard, September

TOO OFTEN, THE FRESH FORK STORY REVOLVES AROUND ME. I tend to see it differently. The real story is about the families who have adopted healthier diets built on wholesome, local foods. It’s about the farmers who have created sustainable enterprises that provide for their families and protect the environment. It’s about the community — one that comes to the table not only to eat, but also to share. To share ideas, recipes, and stories that will ultimately help all of us live a more grounded, traditional life.

T R E VO R C L AT T E R B U C K


3 8 0 0 W O O D L A N D AV E C L E V E L A N D, O H 4 4 1 1 5 or call 1 - 8 0 0 - 8 6 1 - 8 5 8 2

F R O N T Savory Spring pop-up event at 5th Street Arcades B ELOW Fresh fare from our raw vegan dinner in September

W W W. F R E S H F O R K M A R K E T.C O M

FRESH FORK MARKET

ALMANAC Volume Two , 2015

SIGN UP R E G I S T R AT I O N N O W O P E N SEASON BEGINS JUNE 3


Almanac | Vol. 2, 2015