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Frankston

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An independent voice for the community

Your weekly community newspaper covering Frankston, Frankston South, Karingal, Langwarrin and Seaford For all advertising and editorial needs, call 03

FREE

Tuesday 9 March 2021

5974 9000 or email: team@baysidenews.com.au www.baysidenews.com.au

On the frontline Acting clinical director of emergency medicine Dr Jonathon Dowling (pictured) was one of the first Peninsula Health staff members to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Picture: Supplied

Hospital celebrates first COVID jabs Brodie Cowburn brodie@baysidenews.com.au FRONTLINE workers at Frankston Hospital have begun to receive the COVID-19 vaccine. Peninsula Health staff began to receive their first vaccine doses on 3 March. Nurse Vanessa Nolan said “it went absolutely fine, barely felt a thing.” “It was a really simple and seamless process. I sat in the chair, signed

a consent form, got the vaccination, sat down for about 15 minutes or so and then back off to work,” she said. “I’ve seen the effects of the virus on people and their families. I’m just doing my part to get vaccinated, not just to protect myself and my family from infection, but everyone else in the entire community. “Every vaccine that is received brings us that further step closer towards curbing the spread of the virus in our community.” Ms Nolan has been working in the

Bass Ward at the hospital, which is dedicated to caring for COVID-19 patients. The vaccination clinic for staff has been set up at the hospital’s John Madder Hall. Around 15 staff are based at the clinic, tasked with delivering doses to more than 100 staff members a day. Peninsula Health says that a trained immunisation nurse is on site to administer adrenaline if someone has an adverse reaction. The Pfizer vaccine was granted provisional approval from the Therapeu-

tic Goods Administration for use in Australia in late January. “Following a thorough and independent review of Pfizer’s submission, the TGA has decided that this vaccine meets the high safety, efficacy and quality standards required for use in Australia,” the TGA said. The TGA approved the use of the AstraZeneca vaccine in mid-February. Peninsula Health acting executive director of medical services, Dr Shyaman Menon, said “we are pleased to be able to provide some of our frontline workers – doctors, nurses and support

services staff – their first dose of the COVID-19 vaccine.” “As we continue to respond to the pandemic, this is an important step to help keep our people safe and well, and enable them to continue to provide the best care for our community. Congratulations to our multidisciplinary team here at Peninsula Health for all their tremendous work getting our Staff COVID-19 Vaccination Clinic ready, in particular the Infection Prevention and Control Unit and Pharmacy.” Continued on page 5

SECOND CHAIR TO BE EQUAL OR LESSER VALUE

luducoliving.com.au


NEWS DESK Proudly published by Mornington Peninsula News Group Pty. Ltd

PHONE: 03 5974 9000

Published weekly and distributed to Frankston, Frankston South, Karingal, Langwarrin, Seaford, Baxter and Somerville

Circulation: 28,320

Audit period: Apr 2018 - Sept 2018

Source: AMAA; CAB Total Distribution Audit for further information visit auditedmedia.org.au

Editor: Brodie Cowburn 0401 864 460 Journalists: Brodie Cowburn, Stephen Taylor, 5974 9000 Photographers: Gary Sissons, Yanni Advertising Sales: Anton Hoffman 0411 119 379 Real Estate Account Manager: Jason Richardson 0421 190 318 Production and graphic design: Marcus Pettifer, Dannielle Espagne Group Editor: Keith Platt 0439 394 707 Publisher: Cameron McCullough REGULAR CONTRIBUTORS: Peter McCullough, Stuart McCullough, Craig MacKenzie, Ben Triandafillou ADDRESS: Mornington Peninsula News Group PO Box 588 Hastings 3915 Email: team@baysidenews.com.au Web: baysidenews.com.au DEADLINE FOR NEXT ISSUE: 1PM ON THURSDAY 11 MARCH 2021 NEXT ISSUE PUBLICATION DATE: TUESDAY 16 MARCH 2021

An independent voice for the community

We are the only locally owned and operated community newspaper in Frankston City and on the Mornington Peninsula. We are dedicated to the belief that a strong community newspaper is essential to a strong community. We exist to serve residents, community groups and businesses and ask for their support in return.

ARTIST Melanie Caple will make Frankston her canvas this month. Picture: Supplied

Students collaborate with street artists STREET artists will get to work painting murals for the Big Picture Fest later this month. Artists who will make their mark on Frankston this year include Dave Court, GhostPatrol, Brett Piva, CTO, Melanie Caple, Jason Parker, Julian Cla, Wina Jie, and Maxine Gigliotti. Artist Melanie Caple said she was excited to get to work alongside local students. “I am working with Frankston

High School students to develop a large mural. We are aiming for a high quality outcome that not only strengthens and extends the students’ artistic abilities, but also engages the school community and the Frankston community at large,” she said. “I am encouraging the students to think about what the wider Frankston landscape means to them. We’re going to introduce pastel coastal colours, ref-

erence the natural landscape, and keep it bold. “Art has the power to inspire and engage and spark dialogue. I also want it to be a marker for the students who paint it, something that instils pride and connection to place.” The festival will take place from 19 March to 21 March. For more information and for a full list of events, visit www.discoverfrankston.com.

The nurturing home your loved one deserves at Mornington. Welcome to Village Glen Aged Care Residences on the Mornington Peninsula, where residents and their families can enjoy peace of mind and support every step of the way.

Settle into the beautiful residences with stunning bay views, featuring in-house physiotherapy, high-level nursing care, robust lifestyle programs, and world-class cuisine.

Watch the “Video Tour” on the website and call to book a private inspection. www.villageglen.com.au 03 5958 6800 827-829 Nepean Hwy, Mornington, VIC 3931

PAGE 2

Frankston Times

9 March 2021


Councillors seek arbitration to resolve Facebook dispute Brodie Cowburn brodie@baysidenews.com.au FRANKSTON Council will enter into an arbitration process with one of its own councillors over contentious social media posts. Cr Steven Hughes’ conduct has been called into question over his recent social media activity. Cr Hughes has been posting content on his Facebook page criticising council decisions, at times likening council’s local laws to those in the Soviet Union and North Korea. At council’s February meeting, the mayor Kris Bolam said the posts would be “subject to a councillor conduct panel”. Ultimately, councillors have decided apply for an arbitration process instead. “At its council meeting on Monday 1 March, councillors resolved to bring an application for an internal arbitration process under section 143 of the Local Government Act 2020, alleging multiple acts of misconduct on the part of councillor Steven Hughes in relation to his Facebook posts on 18 February 2021, and 1 March 2021,” Cr Bolam said. “The new council is focused on working together, getting on with the job and supporting our community to recover from the extreme impacts of COVID-19. We simply do not have time for these unnecessary distractions, which is why this process has been initiated.” Two of Cr Hughes’ posts were singled out by councillors when they voted to apply for arbitration. The most recent post was on 1 March, when Cr

Hughes wrote that “a taste of North Korean justice comes to Frankston with a move that would make Kim Jon-Un nod in approval.” “Two weeks ago, Frankston Council voted through the most repressive social media code of conduct in its entire history. The new laws silence criticism and give the mayor control of how a councillor can communicate with Frankston residents on social media. Just 14 days later, we are seeing those laws being used as intended: to silence any dissent or free thought, and to create fear amongst councillors if they dare oppose the regime,” he said. “The new laws are absurd and make a mockery of basic human rights. If the majority of councillors vote to send Cr Steven Hughes to face trial then Cr Hughes must publicly agree and support the decision to sanction himself. If he was to defend himself publicly against the charges then he could be accused of not supporting a council decision and face more punishment for the crime of self defence. It’s a perverse loop of guilt that is worthy of a Pyongyang courtroom.” As of 4 March, the posts remain on Cr Hughes’ page. Cr Bolam told The Times that council could not yet provide a timeline of the arbitration process, or an estimate of how much it will cost ratepayers. “It is difficult to provide a timeframe, as the arbitration process is conducted by parties external to the council. The application will be finalised and referred to the Principal Councillor Conduct Registrar at the State Department of Jobs, Precincts and Regions, who will conduct an initial assessment. If

the PCCR determines that the application is not frivolous, vexatious, misconceived or lacking in substance; and that there is sufficient evidence to support an allegation of a breach of the councillor code of conduct, he will proceed to appoint an arbiter from the panel list,” he said. “The cost of arbitration depends on the fees of the particular arbiter appointed by the PCCR, and the duration of the arbitration process.” Cr Hughes said “I made two posts, one about freedom of speech and the other about the need for a rate reduction due to the insanely high amount Frankston residents pay in rates. Even though these posts were 100 per cent truthful, council was offended and has chosen the path to send me to arbitration. This is a sad day for transparency as all I did was to speak openly and honestly about the poor decisions Frankston council has made.” A copy of the arbiter’s decision will be tabled at a future council meeting if it proceeds to that stage. Cr Hughes also resigned from three of council’s committees at the 1 March public council meeting. The decision to initiate the arbitration process was opposed by Cr Hughes and his son Cr Liam Hughes. The remaining seven councillors voted in favour of the motion. FRANKSTON Cr Steven Hughes’ Facebook posts have landed him in trouble. A post made on 1 March (pictured above) featured a dolphin Photoshopped onto the North Korean flag. Pictures: Supplied

EVERY TEST HELPS US PROTECT EVERYTHING WE’VE ACHIEVED Every test keeps us on top of this virus. And keeps us doing the things we love. So even if your symptoms are mild, or you’ve been tested before, every test helps.

For testing locations visit CORONAVIRUS.vic.gov.au Authorised by the Victorian Government, 1 Treasury Place, Melbourne

Frankston Times

9 March 2021

PAGE 3


NEWS DESK Police patrol

with Brodie Cowburn

Teenagers arrested for alleged car thefts FIVE teenagers have been charged after a string of alleged crimes across Frankston, Cranbourne and Langwarrin between 24 February and 1 March. Five cars were allegedly stolen over the course of the week. Police say that an Audi sedan was stolen from a Yarram Court home in the early hours of 24 February, a Holden Commodore was taken from Mallum Avenue on 27

February, a Hyundai Highlander was stolen after a home invasion on Alcon Court just after midnight on 28 February, and a Jeep Cherokee and BMW X5 were taken from a Kirkby Court home the next night. All cars have since been recovered. It is also alleged that a taxi driver was threatened and robbed on Ashleigh Avenue on 27 February, and

that an aggravated burglary was committed at a Strzelecki Court house at 2.30am on 28 February. Five teenagers have since been arrested over the alleged crimes. A 15-year-old Frankston boy was charged with two counts of handle stolen goods, two counts of assault police, two counts of resist police, knowingly deal with the proceeds of crime, act in

manner prejudicial to good order of police gaol, and deal property suspected proceeds of crime. He was bailed to appear before a children’s court. A 14-year-old Cranbourne North boy was also charged with armed robbery, assault with a weapon, use controlled weapon, attempted theft of motor vehicle, two counts of theft of motor vehicle, home invasion, aggravated

burglary, and criminal damage. He was remanded to appear at court at a later date. A Cranbourne North boy and two Frankston boys, aged between 17 and 16, were held in custody. Police say they are not looking for anyone else in relation to the alleged incidents.

Burnout party up in smoke A LARGE gathering of drivers allegedly doing burnouts in Carrum Downs last week has ended in three arrests. Police say that they received reports that around 100 vehicles were gathered at Frankston Gardens Industrial Estate just before 11pm, 1 March. A police statement read that “a number of vehicles present were engaged in high risk driving behaviour performing burnouts in close proximity to pedestrians and other motorists”. Three drivers were pulled over in the surrounding area after police arrived and the crowd dispersed. Police say a man is “expected to be charged in relation to driving in a manner dangerous, improperly use motor vehicle, careless driving and use unroadworthy vehicle. His 2002 Holden Commodore sedan was also impounded for 30 days.” The man also allegedly returned a positive oral fluid test for drugs. A second man was pulled over on Hall Road. Police alleged that he was not displaying his P plates, didn’t have his licence on him, and was driving an unroadworthy Holden Commodore. A third man was arrested and is expected to be charged with drive at speed dangerous and exceeding the speed limit. Police allege that the 18-year-old was detected driving at 160kmph in a 90 zone. His Holden Commodore will be impounded. Any information to Crime Stoppers at 1800 333 000

PAGE 4

Frankston Times

9 March 2021


Vaccine rollout gets underway Continued from page 1 The devastating COVID-19 pandemic has killed more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Just over 900 deaths in Australia have been attributed to the disease. Dunkley MP Peta Murphy has also received her first vaccine dose. Ms Murphy was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2019, and said she took the vaccine “in order to show people with underlying health conditions, that make you either more vulnerable to catching COVID or make it harder for you to fight COVID off if you catch it, that it’s okay to get vaccinated.” “If you fall into category 1B, then the public health message is that if you’re worried about anything, talk to your GP, talk to your specialist. But like me, get the advice that it’s safe, get vaccinated,” she said. “It’s really a public health imperative.” Peninsula Health acting clinical director of emergency medicine Dr Jonathon Dowling also received the vaccine last week. “I’d like to reassure everyone that it’s safe, that it’s easy,” he said. “We want to have as many of our staff vaccinated as possible, particularly in the high risk settings so we can continue to care for people as they present. Many of my colleagues have seen firsthand the effects of COVID-19 on our patients as they have come through, so I think that’s driving a lot of the interest in the vaccine from our teams as we start taking those steps towards a post COVID world.” For more information on COVID-19 vaccines visit health.gov.au.

MONTEREY SECONDARY COLLEGE

PENINSULA Health Vanessa Nolan receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. Picture: Supplied MONTEREY SECONDARY COLLEGE

MONTEREY INVITES

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OPEN NIGH Free family BBQ food giveaways. and drink stalls, prizes and giveaways.

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School Tours commencing regularly from 5:30 Live music family friendl Performed by students in See our stat Performed by our20 brand newstudents school new facilities in Silvertop St Frankston North | 9781 77 music program. Centre of Ex in our brand new T ll t 3th fl NY ffi Theatre, @ ilSpo school music program. and m

family BBQ,YOU food andTO OUR 2021 MONTEREY Free INVITES

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School Tours commencing regularly from 5:30, then enjoy our new grounds and facilities in a family friendly atmosphere.

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TUESDAY MARCH 16, 5:30pm - 7:pm Free family BBQ, food and drink stalls, prizes and giveaways.

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our brand new school including thenew Seenew ourfacilities state of the art 20 Silvertop St Frankston North | 9781 7700 | https://www.monterey.vic.e music program. Centre of Excellence, facilities including the Centre T ll t 3th fl NY ffi Theatre, @ il Sports Stadium 022 2345 5 of Excellence, Sports and Theatre, more.

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TUESDAY MARCH 16 20 Silvertop Street, Frankston North VIC 3200 | 9781 7700 | www.monterey.vic.edu.au 5:30pm-7:30pm

Frankston Times

9 March 2021

School Tours commencing regularly from 5:30, then enjoy our new grounds and facilities in a family friendly atmosphere.

PAGE 5


NEWS DESK

New place for dogs to play A FENCED dog park has opened at Melaleuca Reserve in Langwarrin. The project was partly-funded and organised by the Langwarrin Community Centre. LCC manager Sam Neeman said “this dog park is a great outcome for all the dog lovers in Langwarrin and shows what we can do when we work together.” “I’m really proud that Langwarrin Community Centre is able to reach beyond the walls of our building and work with the community to create

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Frankston Times

9 March 2021

this accessible dog park.” The project was first discussed by LCC in 2017. Dogs and their owners turned up in numbers last week as the fenced off area finally opened for all to enjoy.

THE grand opening of a new fenced off-leash dog area in Langwarrin. Picture: Supplied


To help the public assess their mobility, and most importantly safeguard their risk of serious health implications, we have developed four simple tests to try at home. NECK ROTATION

SIT TO STAND • Sit in the middle of your chair. Cross your arms over your chest. • Keeping your back straight and arms across your chest... • Stand straight up and then sit back down. Did you do this easily or was it hard?

• Sitting down, keep your shoulders still and against the chair. • Turn your head all the way to the left as if you were looking over your shoulder. How far around did you get? • Repeat on the right. Was it even? Was it comfortable?

TRUNK SIDE BEND

SINGLE LEG STANCE

• Stand with your feet comfortably apart. • Run a hand down the side of your leg so you side bend without leaning backwards or forwards. • Repeat on the other side. Was it even and was it comfortable to do?

• In a safe environment free of trip hazards, stand upright with feet together and place hands on hips. • Lift one foot off the ground. Do not allow your legs to touch. Time how long you can stand without moving. • Repeat on opposite side. Are you able to stand on each leg for at least 40 seconds? (If under 60 years)

What do my results mean? If you are unable to perform or feel pain with one or more of these tests it indicates that your spine is not functioning correctly, and you should seek further assessment from a Chiropractor.

What does a new patient visit include? • Detailed history taking • Comprehensive full spine and nervous system examination

COMPLIMENTARY NEW PATIENT VISIT for March Mobility.

• Neurological and orthopaedic testing • X- Rays (if clinically indicated)

CALL 9785 6411 and mention this March Mobility Month article to claim this offer.

WELLBEING NATURAL HEALTH GROUP 96 Warrandyte Road, Langwarrin

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Ph: 9785 6411

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w w w.we l l b e i n g g ro u p . c o m . a u Frankston Times

9 March 2021

PAGE 7


NEWS DESK

Boat ramps high on minister’s agenda Stephen Taylor steve@baysidenews.com.au THE state government is being urged to hurry up its takeover of managing Mornington Peninsula’s boat launching ramps. It is believed the state of the boat ramps was high on the agenda during a recent meeting between Fishing and Boating Minister Melissa Horne and shire CEO John Baker. In the lead-up to the 2018 election the state government promised to “embark on the biggest reforms to the way that boating infrastructure is managed that Victoria has ever seen [by] fixing boat ramps, abolishing boat ramp parking and launching fees, and reforming boat ramp management in Port Phillip and Western Port”. The plan was outlined in the preelection handbook: Labor’s plan for fishing and boating 2018. The handbook says $27 million would be spent on fishing, with money collected from boat licence and registration fees to be spent on improving facilities and safety for boaters and abolish boat ramp parking and launching fees. (“Spring takeover for boat ramps” The News 3/6/19). But the high-profile Futurefish Foundation has accused the shire and management committees of neglecting the ramps in both bays. Director David Kramer describes the situation as “disrespectful to the thousands of boat owners crying out for improved facilities after decades of neglect”. “Boaters and fishers visiting the

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Frankston Times

9 March 2021

RYE boat ramp is one of many in Port Phillip and Western Port that Futurefish Foundation director David Kramer says are being neglected. Picture: Yanni Mornington Peninsula contribute significant tourism dollars to the local economy, and yet the assets that attract their visits are neglected to such a level that people are not going boating on busy days now,” Mr Kramer said. He said there were “problems with every boat ramp” from Dromana to Sorrento. Mr Kramer said the channel at Tootgarook was only dredged once a year “leaving the boat ramp unusable during the prime winter and spring calamari season”. “The channel needs to be dredged twice a year and become an all-year-

round-usable ramp,” he said. Tootgarook also needed a car park along the foreshore to “get the cars and trailers off the side of Point Nepean road”. Anecdotal evidence supports Mr Kramer’s claim that a lack of boat and trailer parking at the Tootgarook – as well as the congestion on the ramp – is causing problems. “Up to six boats and trailers are parking up Burdett Street near the state school,” a boater told The News. A lack of enforcement meant that single cars were parking in boat trailer bays at Rye.

“On a busy day, launching of boats exceeds the number of car and trailer car parks, resulting in cars and trailers parking on grassed areas,” Mr Kramer said. “Yet, on a busy day, often more than 50 car parks are taken up by single cars.” The Rye channel also needed monitoring and dredging, Mr Kramer said. “On very low tides, larger boats are unable to use the channel.” He said the Tyrone boat ramp, channel and launch area needed dredging. “Several years ago, the committee of management thought it was a good idea to run the bay walking trail right

through the car park on the south side of Point Nepean road,” he said. “This resulted in Tyrone becoming the only boat ramp car park in Australia that offered only parallel parking. It is an absolute joke to expect drivers to parallel-park with a trailer on. The bay trail must be realigned and angle parking reintroduced.” Dredging was also needed at Sorrento where “one third of the tie up area is unusable due to the sand build up”. “The Andrews government made an election commitment to make boating better during this term of government and they have set up a Better Boating Fund [generating] $30 million annually for all this maintenance and improvements,” Mr Kramer said. “They just can’t get the council or the committees of management to do the work.” A member of the minister’s Boating Strategy Roundtable Group, Mr Kramer believes the ramps need to be managed by one authority that will “show proper care for the facilities and get them to a condition that meets boaters’ expectations”. “On 1 February, Better Boating Victoria was moved under the Victorian Fisheries Authorities control,” he said. “The VFA has a strong record for getting things done, and fishing in Victoria has never been better. “Now it is time for boat ramps to take the same path.” Mornington Peninsula Shire was contacted for comment.


Frankston

property

NIGHT SWIMMING PAGE 3

TUESDAY, 9th MARCH 2021

FRANKSTON, FRANKSTON SOUTH, FRANKSTON NORTH, SEAFORD, CARRUM DOWNS, LANGWARRIN

Speak to your agent about listing on realestateview.com.au. Be seen everywhere.


‘a lifestyle village for the over 50’s’ 249 High Street, Hastings, 3915 www.peninsulaparklands.com.au

SOLD

$180,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

$190,000

Kitchen with great bench space Lounge room with air-conditioning Renovated bathroom and laundry Rear verandah, single carport

u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Large lounge & dining area Galley kitchen with upright stove Two large bedroom both w/BIR’s Separate laundry and bathroom

$240,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Huge kitchen with separate dining Large lounge Two bedroom both w/BIR’s Single carport

NEW

$240,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

$250,000

Open plan living Kitchen & dining with bay windows Renovated bathroom and laundry Garage with auto roller door

u u u u

UNDERCT A CONTR

$270,000 u u u u

Bed

Bath

Car

2

1

1

Lounge with air-conditioning Open plan kitchen and dining Built-in robes to both bedrooms 3.3kw solar panel system installed

$265,000 u u u u

UNDERCT A CONTR

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Bath

Car

2

1

1

Open plan living Great kitchen, dining area w/ bay window Two bedrooms with BIR’s Single garage with auto roller door

$279,000 u u u u

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Car

2

1

1

Huge kitchen and lounge Dining area with bay window Two bedrooms with BIR’s Single carport

SOLD

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1

Two bedrooms with BIR’s Large lounge with raked ceiling Spacious kitchen/dining area Garden shed, single garage

$325,000 u u u u

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Bath

Study

Car

2

1

1

1

Open plan living Great kitchen Dining area with bay window Outside entertaining area with timber deck

To arrange your site inspection contact David Nelli 0403 111 234 or at the office on 5979 2700 / Email: david@peninsulaparklands.com.au mpnews.com.au

Tuesday, 9th March 2021

FRANKSTON TIMES

Page 2


ON THE COVER

MOUNT MARTHA OASIS HIDING IN PLAIN SIGHT THE cursory Saturday afternoon drive-by simply will not do with this splendid Mount Martha home, set just moments from the quaint shops and cafes of the village. The neat, yet unassuming facade of the home does little to reveal the spectacular pool and garden delights that await within. The expansive living zones have been thoughtfully designed to embrace a magnificent resort-class entertaining area that just soaks up the sun and is complete with a luxurious pool and spa set in the beautiful established gardens. Lucky owners can relax on the sun decks or take a meal in the comfortable outdoor room which has a built in barbecue. The interior is superb; boasting a decor that gives a gracious

HOME ESSENTIALS

tip of the hat to the deco period with wonderful servings of sleek blacks, crisp whites and subtle shades of beige. Handsome polished timber floors flow throughout a series of stunning, beautifully decorated living and dining zones including the fabulous kitchen which has a stone-topped breakfast bar, an enormous wine fridge and stylish mirrored splash backs. Providing generous living options are the five excellent bedrooms that are well placed throughout the home for space and privacy. The elegant master suite gleefully spreads out through what is roughly the middle of the home, with his and hers walk-in robes to one side and a huge, breathtakingly well done ensuite to the right.

Branching off from here is a versatile space for a home office or gym. There is a smaller fifth bedroom with built-in robes and a guest bedroom down the hall also has a walk-in robe and an equally impressive ensuite. The first floor is perfectly set up for the older children with two more bedrooms each featuring a study nook and walk-in robe. There is a shared full bathroom also on this level. Live a life of convenience close to shops, nature trails and beaches, all the while enjoying the timeless elegance of a home where only a private inspection can reveal its true beauty.n

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ADDRESS: 17 Watson Road, MOUNT MARTHA FOR SALE: $3,500,000 - $3,800,000 DESCRIPTION: 5 bedrooms, 3 bathrooms, 3 car AGENT: Amanda Haimona 0419 387 682, Bonaccorde, 4/42 Lochiel Avenue, Mount Martha, 5974 8900

mpnews.com.au

Tuesday, 9th March 2021

FRANKSTON TIMES Page 3


INDUSTRIAL & COMMERCIAL

THINK INSIDE THE SQUARE TRULY iconic properties that are coveted by investors and developers alike are rarely made available to the market. Defying this is ‘Barkly Square’ at 53-55 Barkly Street, Mornington, home to well-known nightclubs and hospitality venues plus major retail businesses. The site comprises a combination of nine retail shops and restaurants which have a total building size of 1015 square metres on a 2029

PROPERTY ESSENTIALS

square metre block. Total net income is currently $517, 777 per annum after land tax. Offered for sale by auction on behalf of the Mortgagee in Possession, the property is being jointly marketed by Nichols Crowder in conjunction with Stonebridge Property Group in Southbank. “Barkly Square is a jewel on the Mornington Peninsula,” explains Jamie Stuart of Nichols Crowder Mornington.

“It’s just off Main Street and close to many shops and two major shopping centres which add to its appeal.” Rorey James of Stonebridge Property Group also added “With the beach just a short walk away and the property serviced by over 1500 car parks with 160 metres of combined corner frontage, this property is going to attract national and international attention”.n

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ADDRESS: 53-55 Barkly Street, MORNINGTON AUCTION: Wednesday, 17th March at 12 Noon on-site AGENT: Jamie Stuart 0412 565 562, Nichols Crowder, 4/230 Main Street, Mornington, 5925 6005

mpnews.com.au

Tuesday, 9th March 2021

FRANKSTON TIMES

Page 4


NEWS DESK

‘Parklets’ program extended

VOLUNTEERS steer a surfer safely to shore when the Disabled Surfers Association made its debut at Clifton Beach in Tasmania. Picture: Supplied

Surf day gets go ahead THE Disabled Surfers Association Mornington Peninsula branch heads back into the water at Point Leo on Saturday. The event, which is expected to see hundreds of volunteers helping surfers enjoy their time in the waves, is the first for this year. The January event was cancelled due to COVID-19 restrictions and Saturday’s day at the beach will include taking precautions with sanitisers available and equipment being frequently cleaned. The number of people attending the event will fall safely within state government limits and there will be restrictions on crowding around the Point Leo Lifesaving Club.

A maximum 140 surfers are expected to participate with possibly double that number of volunteers helping to run the event which starts at 10.30am. The day at Point Leo follows DSAMP members John Bowers and Bill Hallett attending an inaugural surf day for the disabled at Clifton Beach, Tasmania. Mr Bowers, a former president of the DSAMP, described the Tasmanian event as “a really good day, with 105 volunteers, 25 participants and about 20 carers”. Details for Saturday 13 March at Point Leo are on the DSAMP’s Facebook page. Keith Platt

MORNINGTON Peninsula Shire has extended all parklet permits until 30 April. It says the move follows consultation with traders and “positive feedback” from residents and visitors. The extended outdoor dining program allowed traders to temporarily use car parking spaces for outdoor dining in towns and shopping areas from Mount Eliza to Sorrento. The outdoor dining areas were separated from rods with fences, planter boxes and decking. The shire says most of 400 people asked in a January survey in Rosebud, Mount Eliza and Mornington gave the parklets a score of either nine or 10 (out of 10) and wanted them to be kept in place longer. It found that cafes and restaurants lost about 40 per cent of capacity due to COVID-19 social distancing requirements, with the parklets able to return 90 per cent of that lost seating capacity. “Parklets have been a fantastic feature of our summer and can now be enjoyed until after Easter at no additional cost to traders,” the mayor Cr Despi O’Connor said. “While we have been fortunate to have had relatively few restrictions, there is still a need to social distance and remain COVID safe. Extending the parklets program will support our traders and allow us to continue to dine outdoors through autumn.” Traders wanting to return to normal trading conditions can pack the parklets up earlier by notifying the shire so that signs or infrastructure can be removed.

Eating habits THE Community Plate in conjunction with Peninsula Health and Monash University would like to hear from the public about their experiences of accessing and eating healthy food, including fruit and vegetables Associate Professor Department of Nutrition, Dietetics and Food, Claire Palermo said the

survey responses would help gather insights into healthy eating habits. “It will ultimately help our team to develop a promotional campaign focused on improving healthy eating outcomes in the Frankston and Mornington Peninsula regions,” Ms Palermo said. The survey asks questions like: How many serves of fruit do you usually eat each day? And how often do you eat vegetables with your lunch? “We want to get an understanding about what is important to our community and what barriers may exist in regards to choosing healthy options,” Ms Palermo said. By completing the survey respondents can go into the draw to win a hamper of local products to the value of $100. “We will also be running community workshops in the near future, and we would like for people to register to attend those so they can contribute their ideas about this very topical issue.” To take part in the survey, or to register our interest in the community workshops visit: research.net/r/TheCommunityPlate2021

Basketballers ready SOUTHERN Peninsula Basketball Association’s Big V season starts at Hillview Stadium on Saturday 13 March with the state champion women versus Sunbury at 5pm. This game will be followed by the Division 1 Men versus Collingwood at 7pm. The Youth League Women will play Wallan at 12pm on Sunday 14 March followed by the Youth League Men versus Wallan at 2pm. Southern Peninsula Basketball community engagement officer Peter Caspersz said other programs “in the wings” were walking basketball, an all-abilities program, and an Indigenous program with the Big V playing an Indigenous round.

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Frankston Times

9 March 2021

PAGE 13


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Education coming full circle at Peninsula Grammar By Lucy Gowdie THE paths we walk in education, the roads we travel, are often so fast paced, we forget to look back at the steps we have taken. Yet sometimes, every now and again, the road catches up with us and we realise, what we left behind mattered. As a young graduate teacher, only three years older than the Year 12 cohort I taught, I relied on my untested resolve and unyielding energy to engage my students in their learning. In that classroom, sat an even younger Samantha Hutston, a quiet and shy learner, with a passion for literature and a penchant for exceptional essay writing. As an aspiring leader, now substantially older than the Year 12 cohort I taught, I relied on my years of experience in curriculum design and my understanding of co-education, to engage my students in their learning. In that classroom sat an even younger, Madeleine Dwyer, a quiet and shy learner, with a passion for politics and a penchant for pushing herself. As an experienced Deputy Principal, I stand today, shoulder to shoulder with these two women, these educational leaders in their own right, profoundly proud of who they have become and hoping that the time I spent teaching them, had a small part to play in their decisions to choose the education profession. They say that the legacies we gift our schools as leaders, cannot be measured in outcome, but rather we should look to the influence we have had on others, to the indelible marks we have left on our young people so that they may pursue excellence in their own lives. When I look at Sami and Maddy today, when I hear colleagues speaking of their ingenuity and their energy, when I see students focused and absorbed in their classrooms, I realise that they will be celebrated and successful leaders in their own right. Both women possess the innate understanding of the vocation of teaching and a quiet humility that belies their exceptional

A legacy of education: (left to right) Peninsula Grammar teachers Samantha Hutson and Madeleine Dwyer, Peninsula Grammar Depty Principal Lucy Gowdie and aspriring educator Grace Handley. Picture: Gary Sissons

strength and skill. They say that life comes full circle, and so when I learnt in January, that Grace Handley, a student of Maddy’s, had chosen a career in education, I could not but help smile at the stories Maddy and Grace will now be able to share;

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Frankston Times

9 March 2021


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THE MEANING OF EXISTENCE... AND OTHER SHORT STORIES

The Great Canberra Hunger Games Dash By Stuart McCullough I IGNORED the first message. And the second, too. But as the third, fourth and fifth text messages arrived from various members of my family, I began to suspect something was going on. That something, as it turns out, was a decision to close the Victorian border. If we crossed before midnight, we’d be required to isolate until we received test results. After midnight, we’d have to isolate for a full two weeks. Once upon a time, visiting relatives in Canberra was considered a fairly routine activity. In fact, you might even say it was encouraged. How things have changed. In these uncertain times, I learned that going to Canberra was considered by some to be an activity on par with naked abseiling or sprinkling crack over your muesli in terms of sheer recklessness. Having listened to the announcement, there was a definite vibe that we were getting our just desserts by having the temerity to cross the border. We had to act immediately. I get it. These are serious times and things can change really quickly. That said, I’m not convinced that the whole ‘Hunger Games’ vibe around border closures is entirely called for. That said, my decision to abseil over the balcony and commence the return journey to Melbourne on foot can be attributed to momentary panic. The decision to abandon all my possessions was, while efficient, something I have later come to regret. After several tense minutes of negotiation, my wife convinced me we’d be better off taking the car and I returned to pack my bag. We needed to register. Or log on. Or get letters of transit from Senor Ferrari at the Blue Parrot – I’m not sure which. But within forty-five minutes, we had packed, checked out of our hotel room and were en route to the Victorian border. I’m not sure what I expected – queues of caravans, camel trains or hoards of people on foot and hoofing their way to Wodonga. We charged along the Hume along with every other Victorian

resident keen not to become an involuntary New South Wales resident. We stopped once, for food, in Gundagai. To say that it was busiest day in the history of Gundagai McDonald’s would be something of an understatement. The young staff were doing a sterling job serving customers, all of whom were in a race against time. It was too much for one patron, however. He would have been about my age but was wearing the tightest pair of white pants I’d ever seen. I can only assume they were once the property of a much slimmer man, but this fellow was

wearing them like a denim sausage casing. Perhaps it was the news the border was closing or the fact it was New Years’ Eve. Or maybe the very tight jeans had cut off circulation, but he was in an agitated state. Demanding to know the whereabouts of his large fries, he stated loudly that it was an ‘emergency’. I can only assume he was on his way to the hospital to have the Jaws of Life cut him out of his tight pants. I’m not sure the fries would have helped his cause. Soon enough, we were back on the road just as huge clouds began to roll in. As the clock ticked down, lightning flashed and an hour from Al-

bury, the heavens opened as it began to bucket down with rain. I had no idea what to expect at the checkpoint – would it take hours? Would it be relatively fuss-free? In the end, it took about half an hour to cross the border which – given what we were to learn later about those trying to cross nearer the coast – was absolutely fine. The Police, it must be said, were terrific. It was only slightly awkward when we were asked to show our licenses and my wife was unable to find hers. For a split second, I contemplated telling the officer that my wife was, in fact, a hitchhiker and I had no idea who she was, before all the possible consequences of such a joke were it to backfire flashed before my eyes. Miraculously, she managed to pull it and a rabbit out of her handbag in the nick of time. We had decided to stay somewhere near the border rather than arrive back in town at two in the morning. It was, we thought, safer that way. Trouble was, everyone else had the same idea and accommodation began to vanish faster than a packet of large fries given to a man in tight white pants. Eventually, we managed to find somewhere in Benalla and when we collapsed into bed it felt like a genius move. I’d forgotten it was New Year’s Eve. Those residing in the motel room next door had not, and returned at 2am to set up outside our room and continue drinking and talking at a volume more suited to a wind tunnel than the middle of the night. The next morning, I found a small pyramid of rum and Coke cans on an outside table. Pyramids made of empty cans are like crop circles for drunk people. In the truest sign that they had truly tied one on, the motel key was still in the door. We were home by early afternoon. It was an epic voyage that had seen us endure thunder, lightning, heavy rain, men wearing tight white pants and pyramid-building bogans. But we had prevailed. Now all we had to do is get tested and wait for the results. And that, as they say, is another story. stuart@stuartmccullough.com Frankston Times

9 March 2021

PAGE 15


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100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

Westernport ‘cut up by land sharks’ non-fulfilment! Lieut. Tuckey, like most of the explorers whose names are linked with the history of the Mornington Peninsula, had a tragic end, being captured by the French in 1805, and released in 1815, only to die of African fever whilst exploring the Congo. *** AN employee of the Country Roads Board, Clarence Roy Willis, aged 25 years, was arrested at Mornington last week and lodged in the Melbourne Gaol on a charge of having criminally assaulted an elderly widow of 67 years of age. *** SO Frankston is really to have its bowling green in common with other progressive centres. The green should have been established years ago. Bowling, as a pastime for the man who is not as youthful as he used to be, has come to stay, and its popularity is increasing so much so that the demesne is being invaded by the ladies. To the young, the game might appear to be just about as exciting as skittles, but it is a fact that the game can be developed almost into a science. Mornington has its bowling green, and, in following suit, Frankston has done the right thing. *** DESPITE the fact that the Mornington Peninsula Water Scheme has been completed for several months, water scarcity is still a common complaint between here and Chelsea, and water carting is the order of these days of heat and mosquitoes. Owners of houses have quickly

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a very successful day’s outing, and all that is wanted in that respect is kindly treatment by the weather. *** ADAMSON, Strettle & Co had a very good sale at the Tanti Market on the 21st, when 100 sheep, on account Mr Claude Grice, sold to 31s, and others to 28s, whilst fat lambs brought 14s. *** THE euchre party and dance organised by Mesdames Muday and McSweeney in aid of the funds of the Alfred Hospital, proved a splendid success in every way. The gross receipts amounted to £8/10/-, and, as expenses were small, the ladies above mentioned have been able to send on a cheque for £7 to the hospital authorities. The result is highly satisfactory, and shows what can be done by the exercise of energy and enterprise The gathering was also a great success from a social point of view. Al the card-tables were-filled, and much interest was taken in the competition. Mrs. Paxman donated the 1st prizes for ladies and gents, which were won by Mrs. Fielder and Mr. Frank Andrews respectively. The booby prizes donated by Mrs. McSweeney were won by Mrs. J. Cameron and Mr. McKenzie. The Frankston Orchestra supplied the dance music free of charge, and their generosity was much appreciated. The refreshments served during the evening were also donated. *** FROM the pages of the Frankston and Somerville Standard, 4 March 1921

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availed themselves of the benefits of the scheme, but several tenants of houses have complained that the residences they rent have been neglected in that respect. The State Rivers and Water Supply Commission, which is making preparation for the collection of levies, are, however, considering this matter from the viewpoint of general utility. *** THE Country Roads Board has nowa-days the respect of the general community, but it was not always so. When it first came into existence, 75 percent, of the shire councils opposed it. Today, 90 percent support it. Evidently the remaining 10 percent are sleeping as soundly as ever. Mr. Calder, the chairman, is naturally proud of the fact noted above. The Roads Board does certainly construct good roads, and has been responsible, to a large extent, for the development that has taken place of late in rural districts. Because of that, “The Standard” believes that the Country Roads Board has thoroughly justified its existence. *** “THE Standard” reminds those interested that the Moorooduc sports, under the auspices of the Moorooduc Branch of the Victorian Farmers’ Union, will take place at the Mornington Racecourse on Wednesday next. The programme was advertised in “The Standard’s” last issue, and is a large one, which will necessitate making an early start. The secretary, Mr. James McLellan, has arrangements completed for

12423634-SN31-19

though he was well supported by Jenkins 25, Knuckey 29 not out, Freeman 22 retired, and Cavell 20 retired. *** THOMAS Morse, a resident of Sorrento, was charged in the Criminal Court last week with having unlawfully assaulted Ethel Finney, 26 years of age, at Sorrento on January 22nd last. Morse was acquitted by the jury, and Mr. Justice Cussen discharged him without comment. The jury found that the girl, who admitted being “in trouble” some eight years ago, was a consenting party to all that had occurred. *** A RECENT reference in “The Standard” to the old convict settlement at Sorrento has prompted other journals circulating throughout the Peninsula to enlarge upon the subject. Thus, we see the subject is not without interest. Most of the settlers at Sorrento suffered, evidently, from a tired feeling, for Captain Collins told Lord Hobart they were “a worthless set of people,” who made no attempt to be successful in agricultural pursuits. Still, vegetable gardening and duck raising reached astounding heights of popularity – everyone wanted to cultivate peas and raise ducks! *** “THE Peninsula is beautifully diversified with hills and dales,” wrote Tuckey, the explorer, a century ago, “but the kangaroo seems to reign undisturbed, lord of the soil – a dominion he is likely to retain for ages.” This is one of the most remarkable predictions ever rendered famous by

12485671-DL11-21

Compiled by Cameron McCullough IN criticising the Westernport Development and Decentralisation League, a Melbourne journal says: “As regards Westernport, the land sharks have cut up and sold to the credulous, ‘desirable residential and factory sites’ by the thousands, so they at least have ceased to have any interest in the place .... There has never been any sincerity behind any of these decentralisation proposals.” All we can say is that there ought to be, for Westernport is one of the most neglected of all the natural ports in the world. *** SPEAKING of the dangerous air currents in certain parts of Australia, Major T. H. Shaw, the aviator, regards the country at Dromana as the most tricky for air currents, especially near Arthur’s Seat. At a certain point the air ceases to do any useful work, and instead of the current proving a lifting wind, it forces the machine down. The worst part, however, is between New South Wales and Queensland, where Sir Ross Smith dropped 200 feet. That part is described as “the Bay of Biscay aloft.” *** THE recent cricket match between the Dunlop Rubber Co. and Mornington resulted in victory for the seasiders by 101 runs. The visitors compiled 74 runs, Griffiths being the Mailey with 3 for 9. Mornington made 175, Griffiths heading the scores with 33 retired,

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Frankston Times

9 March 2021

PAGE 17


Baden Powell snare upset win to face Sorrento in Provincial Grand Final By Brodie Cowburn

PROVINCIAL

BADEN Powell have locked in a Grand Final spot with an upset win over Old Peninsula. The Old Peninsula Pirates were the team to beat all season, finishing with just one loss on their record after 14 games. Baden Powell secured their finals spot with a fourth place finish. They would have to be at their best to move on to the season decider. Baden Powell chose to bat first. A patient partnership between Craig Entwhistle and Rhys Elmi proved crucial for the batting side. The duo combined for 102 runs. Baden Powell’s middle order wasn't able to provide any further support. At the end of the side’s 40 overs they had 145 runs on the scoreboard. Baden Powell’s bowlers had more work ahead of them to wrap up a shock result. The Pirates’ run chase got off to a shaky start. Opener Dylan O’Malley fell first, losing his wicket for just four runs. It is just his second single-digit score of the year.

Things kept getting worse for the Pirates, as the wickets of key batsmen Thomas La Brooy and Wade Pelzer fell shortly afterwards. A few batsmen went on to make good starts, but none of them went on to make a big score. With just 123 runs on the scoreboard, Old Peninsula lost their last wicket. Rhys Whitling was run out with just under two overs left to play, bringing the club’s season to a close. Baden Powell will face Sorrento in the Provincial Grand Final. Sorrento defeated Langwarrin on Saturday to advance to the final round of finals. Jayde Herrick opened the batting for Langwarrin and proved tricky to deal with. He scored 48 runs, his side’s best effort. Langwarrin set Sorrento a target of 153 to score to win. Opener Jedd Falck’s half-century set Sorrento up well. Their path to victory would prove bumpier than expected though. From 4/145, Sorrento capitulated. They lost their next five wickets for just five runs, giving Langwarrin a chance to snatch victory from the jaws of defeat.

Sorrento managed to hit the winning runs eventually - a Grand Final place locked up with a thrilling one wicket win.

Jackson Mockett played a big part, posting figures of 2/7 and 3/11 respectively.

PENINSULA

THE stage is set. The District Grand Final will be contested by Rosebud and Delacombe Park. Up against the top-of the-ladder Carrum, Delacombe Park would have to bring their best to advance to the season decider. Carrum chose to bat first but had a frustrating time. Many batsmen made good starts, but all were dismissed before they could reach the 25-run mark. Carrum finished all out for 142. Although less than they would have hoped for, they could still secure a win with a brilliant bowling performance. Although both of their openers fell quickly, a strong middle order performance got the job done for Delacombe Park. They wrapped up the win with three wickets left in hand and one over left to play. A dominant bowling display by Rosebud secured them their place in the Grand Final. Rosebud chose to bat first and

PINES and Long Island will do battle in the Peninsula division Grand Final this weekend. Long Island defeated Flinders to advance to the big dance. Star batsman Nick Jewell has struggled at times this season, but looks to be hitting form at the right time. His 62 not out helped Long Island put together an impressive innings. Flinders would have to chase down 196 to win. First drop batsman Shane Beggs top scored for Flinders, putting 45 runs on the board. It ultimately was not enough. Flinders finished their innings at 9/147, 50 runs short of a win. Pines thumped Somerville by nine wickets in their semi-final matchup. Somerville set Pines a target of 95 to win, which they chased down with ease. Pines bowlers Billy Humphrey and

DISTRICT

scored 130 runs. Opener Lyle House top scored with 53. Dromana had no response to Rosebud. They were bowled out for just 75 runs. Michael Clavin was the pick of the bowlers. His 4/24 proved vital for his side.

SUB DISTRICT

TYABB will contest the Sub District Grand Final this weekend after scoring a dominant win over Mt Martha. Mt Martha chose to bat first in the semi-final clash. Their innings didn’t go to plan, as they were bowled out for just 93. Tyabb capitalised on their opponent’s struggles. They wrapped up the win with eight wickets to spare and ten overs left to play. Tyabb will face Carrum Downs in the competition decider. Carrum Downs defeated Balnarring by five wickets in their semi-final clash on Saturday. James Quamby was the winning side’s top scorer with a 50-run knock.

McArdle’s juveniles light up the track HORSE RACING

On fire: John McArdle-trained La Rocque wins the Group Three TBV Thoroughbred Breeders Stakes at Flemington on Saturday. Picture: Supplied

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Frankston Times

9 March 2021

By Ben Triandafillou JOHN McArdle brought up his second two-year-old Stakes winner over consecutive Saturday’s as La Rocque shot clear to comprehensively win the $160,000 Group Three TBV Thoroughbred Breeders Stakes (1200m) at Flemington. Ridden by Jamie Mott, La Rocque sat up on the speed before pulling away from her opposition in the final 100m to win by 1.5-lengths over the Anthony and Sam Freedmantrained Flying Evelyn. The victory kept the Kuroshio-sired filly’s unbeaten record intact having won twice from as many starts. Her stablemate Tycoon Humma scored an impressive victory in the Listed Very Special Kids Plate (1000m) seven days earlier. Despite her early brilliance, Mornington-based trainer John McArdle said there’s still plenty of improvement to come with La Rocuqe who is owned and bred by his wife Bernadette McArdle. “[La Rocque] just doesn’t know what she’s doing yet. She’s a very green horse, she rolled around a bit today. She’s actually an even better horse ridden behind them,” John

McArdle said post-race. McArdle hinted at spelling La Rocque with her stablemate Tycoon Humma with the early three-yearold Spring races on the agenda. He said it was a tough call comparing the two fillies on ability. “It’s a good problem to have. [La Rocque] has beaten her in a trial but in their work at home there’s not much between them,” he said. Jockey Jamie Mott was thrilled to be heading into the Spring with two talented fillies on the up. “I’ve always had a big opinion of this filly and she’s obviously been to the races twice now for two wins so she hasn’t put a foot wrong but she’s still got a few little things to iron out,” he said. “I can’t wait until we get into a better race and there’s genuine speed and she can sit off them because most of her trackwork we do sit her off and she’s quite electric so when she gets a raceday scenario like that you’ll see the best of her. Obviously, we had the filly win last week so two really nice fillies going forward.”


FRANKSTON TIMES scoreboard

Pines prevail, Seaford bows out SOCCER

By Craig MacKenzie FRANKSTON Pines overcame the spirited resistance of fellow State 3 outfit Hampton East Brighton in a riveting FFA Cup tie on Saturday. This was a contest from go to whoa and although the final whistle signalled a 2-0 win for Pines their opponents left no-one in doubt about their promotion credentials. In just over 90 minutes a rivalry was born and Hampton East Brighton represents a clear threat to the lofty ambitions of the men from Monterey. Had Pines not prevailed there would have been much discussion around the contest’s most controversial moment. In the 15th minute Pines’ star Tito Vodowaqa exploded into action leaving opponents in his wake. Hampton East Brighton keeper Sebastian Chenkov-Shaw charged just outside his area and as Vodowaqa lobbed the ball over the keeper’s head and prepared to run past him heading into the unguarded goal ChenkovShaw deliberately handled. It seemed a no brainer that the keeper would be sent off but referee Cheng Hoo chose to brandish a yellow card instead. Both sides had chances to break the deadlock but that moment eventually arrived 10 minutes into the second half. The one player on the pitch who attacked Jordan Avraham’s curling free kick on the left with real intent was Simon Webster and he got a faint headed touch which left Chenkov-Shaw stranded. Vodowaqa received some consolation for being denied in the first half when he robbed a defender in the 64th minute and ran off the ball eventually getting it back and striking it past Chenkov-Shaw from the edge of the box for the clincher. While much of the hype around Pines has understandably centred on the club’s Fijian internationals there is a lot of ability and experience in the squad. The Webster twins, Scott and Simon, are good examples. It was as if time stood still as these 38-year-olds were back on their old stomping ground (no pun intended) and looking as mobile as ever. Simon Webster was running as hard at the end of the contest as he was at the beginning even twice vacating his central defensive role in the last 10 minutes and momentarily slotting into a central striker’s role. The Websters’ contribution doesn’t simply centre on their inherited ability

Pines power: Hampton East Brighton’s Marco Francese comes off second best after a Simon Webster challenge as Webster’s Frankston Pines teammate Tito Vodowaqa looks on. Picture: Darryl Kennedy

to read the play. They add steel to the unit and a competitive edge. Avraham is revelling in his midfield role, Joe O’Connor is comfortable with his back to goal and is strong enough to shield the ball and prove an effective target while Max Boulton is starting to recapture match fitness and sharpness after his long lay-off. Pines went into the clash without injured duo Cedric Benza (knee) who is another fortnight away and Alex Roberts (foot) while Matthew Hames has gone to Keysborough. In the other Cup tie last weekend featuring a local club (Somerville had a bye) Seaford United lost 4-1 away to East Kew and coach Peter Schwellinger was forced to take off Blake Hicks and Dylan Waugh as precautionary measures in a physical and sometimes spiteful clash. Substitute Mitch Hawkins scored for Seaford. Schwellinger should learn this week of the full extent of the ankle injury suffered by midfielder Jack Carter the previous week against Baxter but he expects Carter to join Matthias Schwellinger (broken leg) and Mitch Lander (hamstring) on the sidelines. Langwarrin, Mornington, Peninsula Strikers and Skye United join Pines and Somerville in the next round of

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the Cup to be drawn this week. In NPL2 news Langwarrin signed Rogan McGeorge from Casey Comets and Jeremy Min Fa from Malvern City last week. Midfielder McGeorge, 29, is a former Cambridge United player whose first season in Melbourne was with Altona City in 2018. Min Fa, 25, is a former Springvale White Eagles player and can play in either full back roles. In State 5 news Rosebud’s hunt for a new senior coach ended last week when the club announced that it had agreed terms with striker Mark Pagliarulo who will be assisted by Gab Alonzo. No sooner had “Pags” accepted the role than he plunged headlong into a recruitment drive and a shock target is fellow Scot and close friend Dougie Cunnison from State 1 side Keilor Park. The veteran stopper is a former Arniston Rangers and Penicuik Athletic player who is set to train with Rosebud this week. Other targets are ex-Seaford playercoach Matty Morris-Thomas, soon to be ex-Pines player Callum Richardson (who scored for Rosebud against Skye in a friendly), Jarryd McMinimee (Somerville), Louis Griffiths (Somer-

ville), Ashley Scholes (Somerville) and Ryan Monk (ex-Rosebud Heart). Former Baxter keeper Francis Beck, Brandon Monk and teenage Mornington keeper Sean Benz are other possible signings. Cory Osorio was uncertain whether or not to play this year but after last week’s appointment he has agreed to stay. Former Rosebud Heart and Somerville star Carlo Cardoso is a long shot given the travel involved but “Pags” remains keen to sign the experienced midfielder. State 5 rivals Aspendale Stingrays have signed midfielder Taylor Davison from Chelsea, central defender Nick Carter from Kingston City, midfielder Michael Antic from Dandenong City and striker Guilherme Ribeiro who returns to the club after a stint at Berwick City. Last week’s friendlies yielded a mixed bag of results for local clubs. On Thursday Langwarrin lost 3-2 away to Box Hill United while Mount Martha drew 3-3 with HMAS Cerberus in difficult conditions after a heavy downpour at Civic Reserve. Langy’s scorers were George Howard and Damir Stoilovic. Mount Martha was 2-0 down after five minutes but hit back through goals

from Ale Giordano, Kyle Burich and a last-minute pile driver from Bayside Argonauts debutant Neal Byrne. On Friday Chelsea’s friendly at home against Sandringham had to be abandoned while Rosebud lost 4-1 at home to Skye United. A Piers Brelsford second half goal had put Chelsea ahead when home team captain Connor Scott fell awkwardly and had to be taken to hospital where it was confirmed that he’d suffered a fractured and dislocated elbow. Rosebud led after 20 minutes when Richardson broke onto a superb Scholes through ball and lobbed advancing Skye keeper Jonathan Crook. Skye levelled from a Mitch Blake penalty 10 minutes later and the sides went in 1-1 at the break. Rosebud had defended well in the first half but couldn’t keep its higher league opponent at bay in the second period with Mark O’Connor, Blake and Travis Ernsdoerfer rounding off the scoreline. On Saturday the match between Casey Panthers and Somerville Eagles was called off at half-time with Somerville leading 4-2. A first half incident saw players on the Casey Panthers bench run onto the pitch after Somerville’s keeper had been sent off for retaliation. Somerville’s scorers were Davey Jones (3) and Sam Brick. Results of other friendlies on Saturday: Mornington 3 (Josh Hine 2, Matt Harrington) Caroline Springs George Cross 1, Peninsula Strikers 2 (Aaran Currie, Ben Doree) Malvern City 4, Mount Martha 0 Keysborough 3. In other news referee stocks in Victoria are understood to be at their lowest level in years with over 200 less match officials registering than at the same period last year. Peninsula numbers are reportedly down by around 70 and the areas of competition expected to be most affected are community juniors and lower State League divisions. Football Victoria referees manager Luke Brennan was contacted last Tuesday seeking confirmation of the numbers but failed to respond. This week’s friendlies: THURSDAY: Lyndale Utd v Chelsea (Lyndale Secondary College, 6.30pm & 8.30pm). SATURDAY: Baxter v Kings Domain (Baxter Park, 1pm & 3pm), Mount Martha v Old Melburnians (Civic Reserve, 1pm & 3pm).

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9 March 2021

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