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100 YEARS AGO THIS WEEK...

State Premier visits Frankston for first time Compiled by Cameron McCullough THE State Premier, Hon. H. S. W. Lawson, visited Frankston last Saturday. Prior to speaking in the Mechanics’ Hall at night, he was entertained at dinner by the Frankston branch of the National Federation. The function took place at the Pier Tea House, when about 40 ladies and gentlemen sat down to table. Mr H. Gamble, president of the local branch of the Federation, presided. After Dr Maxwell had given the toast of The King, Mr Gamble proposed the State Government. He referred to the fact that on no previous occasion had Frankston been honored with a visit by a Premier of the State. The shire president (Cr W. P. Mason), and Mr Geo. Shepherd (Somerville), spoke in support. The Premier, who replied at length, met with a most enthusiastic reception. “The Press” was the other toast given, proposed by Mr Geo. Keast, and acknowledged by the special representatives of the “Age” and “Argus,” and Mr Young, of the “Standard.” The catering arrangements, as usual, were admirably carried out by Mr Vicars. At 8 o’clock Mr Lawson addressed a crowded audience at the Mechanics’ Hall, when the shire president presided. The Premier, who met with a flattering reception, urged the importance of casting a Nationalist vote, and if they voted 1 for Sambell they were to be sure and vote 2 for Cook, or visa versa. A vote of thanks, moved by Mr

Gamble and seconded by Mr Geo. Keast, was carried by acclamation. Mr Utber, who was to have moved vote of thanks to Premier, was unable to be present, owing to illness in his family. *** THERE was a good attendance of members at the quarterly meeting of the Frankston Social Tent, I. O. R., held on the 22nd ult. Bro Angwin, C.R., occupied the chair. Mr T. Ferrier was complimented on having collected £6 14s in aid of the Blind Appeal Fund, and an acknowledgement was received from the Lord Mayor. Bro. Ferrier thanked all who had subscribed so liberally. *** WE are informed that an Honor Board of a very handsome design, has been ordered for the Frankston Methodist Church. Arrangements are being made for the unveiling to take place on the last Sunday in September. It is expected that either ChaplainGeneral A. T. Holden, C.B.E., B.A. or Chaplain Colonel E. Nye, B.A., will perform the ceremony. *** WE regret to have to report the death of Mr Edward Sage, who, as previously reported, was seriously ill. He was removed to the Alfred Hospital for treatment, but despite all that could be done for him there he passed away on the 24th ult., and was buried in the Frankston cemetery on the following day, the Rev A. P. McFarlane officiating at the graveside. It is said that the deceased was one of the first white people born on the

Peninsula, and has lived in this district ever since. *** A SAD fatality took place in the district on the night of the 24th ult., when a housekeeper, named Kate Pyle, aged 62 years, employed by Mrs Wm Frayne, was accidentally suffocated by smoke, supposed to be the result of the upsetting of a candle, which ignited the clothes of a bed in which deceased was sleeping. She retired to rest in her usual state of health, and failing to appear the following morning to carry out her domestic duties as usual, an investigation was made by Mrs Frayne, who was horrified to find the room full of smoke from the smouldering bedding, and the unfortunate lady quite dead. A magisterial inquiry was conducted by Mr Chas Murray, J.P., when the following finding was brought in: “That deceased met her death by suffocation, caused by her accidentally setting her bed on fire.” The remains were sent to Frankston for interment. *** CRICKET supporters are invited to attend a meeting at the Frankston Hall on Wednesday, 7th inst., at 8 o’clock. Dr Maxwell, the convener, points out that there was no club last year, and much pleasure and exercise was lost in consequence. A revival is hoped for, but it is necessary that all lovers of the game accept this opportunity of attending to assist in the formation of a club. *** CLIP your nails and trim your whiskers!

“Brush-up” smart and show your breed. Hold your own among “fine friskers”, If you don’t you’ll “run to seed!” Wear no garments antiquated, All old fashioned fads abjure For colds refuse all dupes out-dated, Insist on Woods’ Great Peppermint Cure. *** THE origin of the name of Frankston is claimed from two different sources – one that the town was named after Charlie Franks, who was employed by the State to visit the different native camps and distribute food to the natives. Frankston was one of the camps he used to visit, but it was at Little River, Werribee, that he met his end at the hands of the natives. The other source of the name of Frankston that has been advanced is that it was named after Frank Liardet, who, with his brother, owned Ballam Park, now owned by Mr. C. G. Y. Williams. The first bricks used in building at Melbourne were made at Ballam Park. There are large deposits of clay throughout the Peninsula, which were originally basalt, and which has more readily decomposed in the Peninsula than in other districts. This is shown by specimens at the Geological Museum, Melbourne. *** AT a special meeting of the Shire Council held on the 18th inst., Cr. Wells moved, in accordance with notice given at a previous meeting, that the councillors of each riding act

with the engineer in administering the building by-laws. He said at present the whole of the responsibility was thrown on the engineer. He considered councillors had a duty to perform in this connection, and he for one was not going to shirk it. He referred to the fact that Mr. Farmer had been compelled to put up a cantilever verandah, while Cr. Oates, who had erected a shop at the same time as Farmer, had made provision for a post verandah. Cr. Wells said he would like to know if an area had been defined within which cantilever verandahs must be erected. Cr. Oates: I had my application in long before Farmer. Mr. Candy (who represented the engineer) said he personally suggested to Mr. Sambell that new business places in Frankston should be proved with cantilever verandahs. The place was going ahead, and Farmer’s building occupied a position where a combination verandah was necessary. After consideration Mr. Sambell acted on his (Mr. Candy’s) advice. Cr. Wells: It is the fault of the engineer that he takes too much advice. Cr. Wells produced a plan of a building proposed to be erected on a 33-foot frontage, with rooms 13 ft. x 13 ft. This plan, according to Cr. Wells, was turned down for some paltry reason, and Frankston had lost a new building. *** From the pages of the Frankston and Somerville Standard, 2 September 1921

Frankston Times

7 September 2021

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Profile for Mornington Peninsula News Group

Frankston Times 7 September 2021  

Frankston Times 7 September 2021

Frankston Times 7 September 2021  

Frankston Times 7 September 2021

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