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FALL 2010/WINTER 2011

Fourth Corner Nurseries 5652 Sand Rd./Bellingham, WA 98226/TEL 800-416-8640/FAX 888-506-1236/EMAIL sales@fourthcornernurseries.com/WEB www.fourthcornernurseries.com

Native Plants of North America Wholesale Price List Gardening For Life by Dr. Douglas Tallamy, Professor & Chair of the Department of Entomology & Wildlife Ecology, University of Delaware

Chances are, you have never thought of your garden – indeed, of all of the space on your property – as a wildlife preserve that represents the last chance we have for sustaining plants and animals that were once common throughout the U.S. But that is exactly the role our suburban landscapes are now playing and will play even more in the near future. If this is news to you, it’s not your fault. We were taught from childhood that gardens are for beauty; they are a chance to express our artistic talents, to have fun with and relax in. And, whether we like it or not, the way we landscape our properties is taken by our neighbors as a statement of our wealth and social status. But no one has taught us that we have forced the plants and animals that evolved in North America (our nation’s biodiversity) to depend more and more on human-dominated landscapes for their continued existence. We have always thought that biodiversity was happy somewhere out there “in nature;” in our local woodlot, or perhaps our state and national parks. We have heard nothing about the rate at which species are disappearing from our neighborhoods, towns, counties, and states. Even worse, we have never been taught how vital biodiversity is for our own well-being.

We Have Taken It All

The population of the U.S., now over 300 million people, has doubled since most of us were kids and continues to grow by 8640 people per day. All of those additional souls, coupled with cheap gas, our love affair with the car, and our quest to own ever larger homes have fueled unprecedented development that continues to sprawl over 2 million additional acres per year (the size of Yellowstone National Park). The Chesapeake Bay watershed has lost 100 acres of forest each day since 1985. We have connected all of our developments with 4 million miles of roads, and their paved surface is nearly five times the size of New Jersey. Somewhere along the way we decided to convert most of our living and working spaces into huge expanses of lawn. So far we have planted over 62,500 sq miles, some 40 million acres, in lawn. Each weekend we mow an area 8 times the size of New Jersey to within 1 inch and then congratulate ourselves on a job well done. And it’s not like those little woodlots and “open spaces” we have not paved over or manicured are pristine. Nearly all are second-growth forests that have been thoroughly invaded by alien plants like autumn olive, multiflora rose, Oriental bittersweet, and Japanese honeysuckle. Over 3400 species of alien plants have invaded 100 million acres of the U.S, and that area is expected to double in the next 5 years.

Western Region Annual Meeting September 8-11, 2010

Lakeway Inn and Conference Center, Bellingham, WA

Bold Visions for Plant Production “Basics to Innovation”

• Educational Sessions: Efficiency, Propagation, Production, Sustainability, Energy Conservation

• Tour area nurseries in Skagit Valley and Whatcom County

• Bid on plants and material in the Silent Auction

• Guest Speaker Dan Hinkley : “Plant Collecting in Chile”

• Exciting speakers, exhibitors, posters, new and outstanding plants

• Network with peers, learn new techniques and share resources

Everyone is Welcome: for information and registration go to www.ippswr.org

Bumble bee (Bombus mixtus) on tall Oregon grape (Mahonia (Berberis) aquifolium), Portland, Oregon. Photo credit: Jeff Adams/Xerces Society

To nature lovers these are horrifying statistics. I stress them so that we can clearly understand the challenge before us. We have turned 54% of the lower 48 states into cities and suburbs, and 41% more into various forms of agriculture. That’s right: we humans have taken 95% of nature and made in unnatural. But does this matter? Are there consequences to turning so much land into the park-like settings humans enjoy? Absolutely, both for biodiversity and for us. Our fellow creatures need food and shelter to survive and reproduce and in too many places we have eliminated both. At least 40% of Delaware’s plant species are rare or extinct, and 41% of its forest birds no longer nest in the state. Over 800 plant and animal species are rare, threatened, or endangered in Pennsylvania and 150 have already disappeared entirely. Many of those that haven’t suffered local extinction are now too rare to perform their role in their ecosystem. These can be considered functionally extinct. The song birds

(continued on page 10)

Inside this Issue: Gardening for Life.................................................. 1

Trees & Shrubs........................................................ 3 Reference Information........................................... 8

Purchase Order Form.............................................9

Contact Information............................................... 9

Bringing Nature Home .........................................11 Rich's Article........................................................... 11

Herbaceous Wetland & Saltmarsh Plants..........12 Bulbs......................................................................... 14

Seeds......................................................................... 15 Herbaceous Upland Perennials............................16

PRSRT STD U.S. Postage PAID Lynden, WA PERMIT NO 20


Common Name Index Common Name

Genus

Page #

Agoseris Agoseris 15,16 Alder Alnus 3 Alum Root Heuchera 15, 18 American Brooklime Veronica 14 Anemone, Pasqueflower Anemone 16 Angelica Angelica 16 Arnica Arnica 15, 16 Arrow-Grass Triglochin 14, 15 Ash Fraxinus 4 Aspen Populus 5 Aster Aster 12, 15, 16 Balsamroot Balsamorhiza 16 Beach Carrot Glehnia 17 Beach Pea Lathyrus 18 Beardtongue Nothochelone 19 Beardtongue Penstemon 15, 19 Beargrass Xerophyllum 20 Bellflower Campanula 16 Birch Betula 3 Blanket Flower Gaillardia aristata 17 Bleeding Heart Dicentra formosa 17 Blue Eyed Grass Sisyrinchium 13, 14, 15, 19 Bluebells Mertensia 18 Blue-Eyed Mary Collinsia 15 Boykinia Boykinia 12, 16 Buckbean Menyanthes 13 Buckbrush Ceanothus 3 Bulrush Scirpus 13, 15 Burreed Sparganium 14 Buttercup, Western Ranunculus occidentalis 19 Camas Camassia 14 Cascara Rhamnus purshiana 5 Cattail Typha 14 Ceanothus Ceanothus 3 Cedar, Alaska Yellow Chamaecyparis 4 Cedar, Western Red Thuja 7 Checkermallow Sidalcea 13, 15, 19 Cherry Prunus 5 Chickweed Cerastium 17 Chinquapin Chrysolepis 4 Chocolate Lily Fritillaria 14 Chokeberry Aronia 3 Cinquefoil, Herbaceous Potentilla 13, 15, 19 Cinquefoil, Shrubby Potentilla 5 Clematis Clematis 4 Coltsfoot Petasites 13, 19 Columbine Aquilegia 16 Compassplant Wyethia 20 Cone Flower Echinacea 15, 17 Cone Flower Rudbeckia 19 Cottonwood Populus 5 Cow Parsnip Heracleum lanatum 18 Crabapple Malus 4 Currant Ribes 6 Deerbrush Ceanothus 3 Desert Parsley Lomatium 18 Devil's Club Oplopanax 5 Dewberry, Rubus 6 Trailing Blackberry Dogbane Apocynum 16 Dogwood Cornus 4 Douglas Fir Pseudotsuga menziesii 5 Elderberry Sambucus 6 Elk Clover Aralia 16 Fairy Bells Disporum 17 False Hellebore Veratrum 14, 20 False Solomon's Seal Smilacina 20 Farewell to Spring Clarkia 15 Fawn Lily Erythronium 14 Figwort Scrophularia 19 Filbert, Hazelnut Corylus 4 Fir Abies 3 Fireweed Epilobium angustifolium 15, 17 Flax Linum perenne ssp. lewisii 15, 18 Fleabane Erigeron 15, 17 Fool's onion Tritelieia 15 Fringecup Tellima 15, 20 Fritillaria Fritillaria 14 Gayfeather Liatris 18 Gilia Gilia 15 Goatsbeard Aruncus dioicus 16 Goldenrod Solidago 15, 20 Gooseberry Ribes 6 Grass Widows Olsynium (Sisyrinchium) 19 Grass, Fescue Festuca 15, 17

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Common Name

Genus

Page #

Grass, Mannagrass Glyceria 13, 15 Grass, Meadow Barley Hordeum 13, 15, 18 Grass, Oatgrass Danthonia 15, 17 Grass, Oniongrass Melica 18 Grass, Sweet grass Hierochloe 18 Grass, Wild Rye Leymus (Elymus) 15, 18 Grass, Deschampsia caespitosa 12, 15 Tufted Hairgrass Gumweed Grindelia 15, 17 Hawthorn Crataegus 4 Hedge Nettle Stachys 14, 20 Hemlock Tsuga 7 Hickory Carya 3 Highbush Cranberry Viburnum 7 Honeysuckle Lonicera 4 Horsetail Equisetum hyemale 13 Huckleberry Vaccinium 7 Hyssop Agastache 12, 16 Indian Plum Oemleria cerasiformis 5 Inside-Out Flower Vancouveria 20 Iris Iris 13, 15, 18 Juniper Juniperus 4 Kentucky coffee tree Gymnocladus dioica 4 Larkspur Delphinium 14, 15, 17 Lily Lilium 14 Lupine Lupinus 15, 18 Madrone Arbutus menziesii 3 Mahala Mat Ceanothus 3 Manzanita Arctostaphylos 3 Maple Acer 3 Meadowrue Thalictrum 20 Milkweed Asclepias 15, 16 Mint Mentha 13, 18 Mock Orange Philadelphus 5 Monardella Monardella 15, 19 Monkey Flower Mimulus 13, 15, 18 Mountain Ash Sorbus 7 Mountain Mahogany Cercocarpus 4 Mugwort Artemisia 15, 16 New Jersey Tea Ceanothus 3 Ninebark Physocarpus 5 Oak Quercus 5 Ocean Spray Holodiscus discolor 4 Onion, Wild Allium 12, 14, 15, 16 Ookow Brodiaea 14 Ookow Dichelostemma 14 Oregon Box Paxistima myrsinites 5 Oregon Grape Mahonia (Berberis) 4 Paintbrush Castilleja 17 Partridgefoot Luetkea 18 Pearly Everlasting Anaphalis margaritacea 15, 16 Persimmon Diospyros 4 Pine Pinus 5 Popcorn Flower Plagiobothrys 15 Prairie Smoke Geum triflorum 17 Raspberry Rubus 6 Redbud Cercis 3 Rhododendron Rhododendron 5 Rice Root Fritillaria 14

Common Name

Genus

Rose Rosy Pussy-Toes Rush Sage Salmonberry Sanicle Sea Blush Sea Plantain Sedge Self Heal Serviceberry Shooting Star Sitka Valerian Skullcap Skunk Cabbage Snowberry Soap Plant Spicebush Spike Rush Spiraea Springbeauty Spruce Stonecrop Strawberry Sumac Sunflower, Maximilia Sweet Cicely Sweet Gale Thimbleberry Thrift Tobacco Trillium Twinberry Viburnum Violet Walnut, Butternut Water Parsley Water Parsnip Waterleaf White Rush Lily Wild Ginger Willow Willowherb Witchhazel Wood Rush Woolly Sunflower Yampah Yarrow Yellow Avens Youth on Age Yucca

Page #

Rosa 6 Antenneria microphylla 15, 16 Juncus 13, 15 Artemisia 3, 15, 16 Rubus 6 Sanicula 19 Plectritis 15 Plantago maritimum 13, 15 Carex 12, 15, 16, 17 Prunella 15, 19 Amelanchier 3 Dodecatheon 15, 17 Valeriana 20 Scutellaria lateriflora 13 Lysichiton 13 Symphoricarpos 7 Chlorogalum 14 Calycanthus 3 Eleocharis 12 Spiraea 7 Claytonia 15 Picea 5 Sedum 15, 19 Fragaria 17 Rhus 5 Helianthus maximiliani 15 Osmorhiza 15, 19 Myrica gale 5 Rubus 6 Armeria 16 Nicotiana 15 Trillium 14, 15 Lonicera 4 Viburnum 7 Viola 14, 15, 20 Juglans 4 Oenanthe sarmentosa 13 Sium 14 Hydrophyllum 15, 18 Hastingsia 14 Asarum 16 Salix 6 Epilobium luteum 13, 17 Hamamelis 4 Luzula 15, 18 Eriophyllum lanatum 15, 17 Perideridia 15, 19 Achillea millefolium 15, 16 Geum macrophyllum 15, 17 Tolmiea 14, 20 Yucca 7

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower)

Iris douglasiana (Douglas Iris) tubes


Trees & Shrubs Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Abies grandis (Grand Fir) Northwest native conifer with glossy, deep-green needles. The most common true fir of the lowlands, grand fir provides important cover, nesting sites, and seeds for birds, squirrels, and other wildlife. Maximum height 200-250'. SS western WA lowland, Willamette Valley Plugs avail Dec15-Feb15 Plugs Styro-8 .66 .46 .36 .33 Styro-10 .94 .66 .52 .47 Acer circinatum (Vine Maple) FACU+ Large deciduous shrub native to Pacific Northwest forests. Red fall color, irregular growth habit with multiple stems to 25-35'. Has excellent soil binding, erosion control capabilities. Tolerates sun or shade, but not competition in the root zone. SS northwest WA lowlands, southwest WA lowlands, east slope Cascades Seedling 1-0 3-6 .55 .39 .30 .28 2-0 6-12 .60 .42 .33 .30 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 18-36 1.10 .77 .61 .55 3-4' 1.70 1.19 .94 .85 Transplant 2-1 3-6 .76 .53 .42 .38 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50 B&B 6-7' 24.00 21.50 7-8' 29.00 26.00

Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Amelanchier alnifolia (Serviceberry, Juneberry) FACU Native shrub from 6-20 feet tall on moist to dry well drained sites. Showy white flowers, edible fruit. An important shrub for wildlife habitat. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. Has excellent soil binding, erosion control capabilities. SS western WA lowland, east slope WA Cascades, ID, UT Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 .44 .40 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 18-36 1.60 1.12 .88 .80 Transplant 1-1 6-12 1.20 .84 .66 .60 12-18 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 Amelanchier canadensis (Shadblow Serviceberry) FAC or FACU Large deciduous shrub native in Eastern North America with showy white flowers in spring and sweet blue-black fruit. Beautiful yellow to orange fall color. Can reach 20 feet tall. Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 .44 .40 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50 B&B 30-36" 14.50 3-4' 17.50 4-5' 22.50

Acer glabrum v. douglasii (Douglas Maple) FAC Large deciduous native shrub, to 35'. Prefers dryish sites, sun or shade. Leaves are wine-red in fall. Has excellent soil binding, erosion control capabilities. N CA seed source is variety torreyi. SS northwest WA lowlands, east slope WA Cascades, ID, N CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .70 .49 .39 .35 2-0 6-12 .90 .63 .50 .45 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 18-36 1.30 .91 .72 .65

Acer macrophyllum (Bigleaf Maple) FACU Grand deciduous shade tree to 100' for large open spaces. Rapid growth quickly provides shade and large woody debris for streambanks. Flowers are an early nectar source. Bright yellow fall color. Has excellent soil binding, erosion control capabilities. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 .76 .53 .42 .38 12-18 .88 .62 .48 .44 18-36 1.10 .77 .61 .55 3-4' 1.30 .91 .72 .65 Acer rubrum (Red Maple) FAC Native tree in the eastern US, although has been introduced far beyond its native range. A commonly-used ornamental tree, with nice flowers and showy fall color. Variable, but can get 60 feet tall. Young trees tolerate shade but grow well in full sun also. Aggressively reseeds itself – have caution planting outside its native range. SS NY Seedling 2-0 3-6 .50 .35 .28 .25 6-12 .60 .42 .33 .30 12-18 .70 .49 .39 .35 18-36 .90 .63 .50 .45 Alnus incana ssp. tenuifolia (Mountain Alder) FACW Native nitrogen-fixing shrub or small tree to 35', with attractive white bark. Prefers moist ground, most commonly found east of the Cascades. SS east slope WA Cascades, N CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .56 .39 .31 .28 12-18 .70 .49 .39 .35 18-36 .90 .63 .50 .45 Alnus rubra (Red Alder) FAC Rapid-growing native deciduous tree to 80-100'. Nitrogenfixing pioneer species on mineral soils, yellow fall color. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .70 .49 .39 .35 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Plugs Styro 15 .95 .67 .52 .48 Alnus sinuata [A. viridis ssp sinuata, A. crispa] (Sitka Alder) FACW Native shrub or small tree to 20-25'. Nitrogen fixer with good ornamental or urban buffer tree potential, tolerates wide variety of soil and light conditions. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. Has excellent soil binding, erosion control capabilities. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .70 .49 .39 .35 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Calycanthus occidentalis (Spice Bush) FAC Attractive California native shrub to 12’ with fragrant leaves and deep-red flowers. Common in riparian habitats. SS northern CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.20 .84 .66 .60 Carya ovata (Shagbark Hickory) FACU Eastern US native deciduous tree reaching 90 feet tall. SS NY, OH Seedling 1-0 6-12 1.20 .84 .66 2-0 12-18 1.60 1.12 .88 Transplant 2-1 12-18 1.70 1.19 .94 Ceanothus americanus (New Jersey Tea) Lovely flowering shrub native in the mid-west and eastern North America. The leaves were traditionally used for tea. Prefers sandy or rocky soils in full sun or partial shade. SS IA Seedling 2-0 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 Ceanothus cordulatus (Whitethorn Ceanothus) Southwestern native evergreen shrub with fragrant white flowers, reaching 2-5 feet tall. Prefers sunny, well-drained conditions. SS northern CA In production Ceanothus cuneatus (Buckbrush) Evergreen shrub to 8 feet tall with white to pale-blue flowers. Extremely drought tolerant. Native in Oregon and California. SS northern CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Ceanothus integerrimus (Deerbrush) Nitrogen-fixing native shrub with fragrant blue flower clusters, attractive deciduous foliage. Prefers full sun and dry conditions. SS east slope WA Cascades, northern CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50

Acer glabrum v. torreyi (Torrey Maple) FAC, FACU Lovely deciduous shrubby tree native to northern California. SS CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .70 .49 .39 2-0 6-12 .90 .63 .50 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 Acer grandidentatum (Bigtooth Maple) Deciduous tree native in the Rocky Mountain states. Reaches 30 feet tall. Prefers moist but not wet sites. SS UT Seedling 1-0 3-6 .90 .63 .50 .45 2-0 6-12 1.10 .77 .61 .55

Grade

Amelanchier utahensis (Utah Serviceberry) Western native drought-tolerant shrub with beautiful white flowers and dark red fruits. A wildlife favorite. SS UT Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 .44 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 2-0 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 18-36 1.60 1.12 .88 Arbutus menziesii (Pacific Madrone) Pacific Northwest native evergreen tree. Naturally occurs in sunny dry sites near saltwater shoreline. Not easy to transplant. SS southwest BC Only available in November-December B&B 24-36" 14.90 36-42" 18.90 Arctostaphylos columbiana (Hairy Manzanita) Native evergreen shrub to 12' with smooth red-barked branches and gray-green leaves. Prefers sunny well-drained conditions. SS Puget Sound area lowland In production Aronia [Photinia] melanocarpa (Chokeberry) FAC, FACWNative shrub in eastern North America with white flowers and dark purple fruits. Grows well in sunny or partially shady moist sites. Our seed source not from North America. SS Russia Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 18-36 1.30 .91 .72 .65 Artemisia tridentata v tridentata (Big Sagebrush) UPL Grey-green shrub with highly fragrant foliage, 3-7’ tall. Native in dry interior regions, tolerates poor soil conditions. Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 6-12 .80 .56 Betula occidentalis (Water Birch) FACW Attractive small tree or large clump-forming shrub to 30' tall with reddish-brown bark. Found along streams and in moist forests, Alaska to California, east of the Cascades. SS east slope Cascades Sold out Betula papyrifera (Paper Birch) FACU Northwest native deciduous tree, to 100'. White peeling bark in older plants and oval to round leaves with golden fall color make this an attractive ornamental. SS northwest WA lowlands, ME Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .49 .39 .35 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50

Ceanothus lemmonii (Lemmon’s Ceanothus) Low spreading shrub to 3' tall with attractive foliage and blue flowers in late spring. SS northern CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Ceanothus prostratus (Mahala Mat) Prostrate evergreen shrub with lovely blue flowers. West Coast native, prefers sunny well-drained sites. SS northern CA Only available in November-December Seedling 1-0 1-4 .70 Ceanothus sanguineus (Redstem Ceanothus) Northwest native deciduous shrub to 9' tall, with red stems and white flowers. Difficult to grow in a container. Found on gravelly soil in southern British Columbia to California, eastward to Montana. SS ID, northwest WA, east slope WA Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Ceanothus velutinus (Mountain Balm) Northwest native aromatic shrub, to 3-12' depending on conditions. An attractive ornamental with fragrant white flowers. Prefers well-drained soils in sunny or partially shaded conditions. Nitrogen-fixing capabilities allow the species to thrive in nutrient-poor soils. Difficult to grow in a container. SS ID Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 2-0 12-18 .90 .63 Cercis orbiculata [C. occidentalis] (California Redbud) UPL Large shrub with beautiful pink to purple flowers. Tolerates drought and poor soils, attracts beneficial pollenating insects. SS northern CA Only available in November-December Seedling 2-0 6-12 .60 .42 12-18 .80 .56 18-36 .90 .70 Cercocarpus montanus (Mountain Mahogany) UPL Attractive slow-growing shrub or small tree native in coastal chaparral and pinelands, Oregon and California east to Rocky Mountains. SS UT Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 .44 .40 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50

Bare-root trees and shrubs are available from late November through April. Plants are sold in bundles of 50 with a minimum total order of $100.

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Trees & Shrubs Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Chamaecyparis nootkatensis (Alaska Yellow Cedar) FAC Northwest native conifer to 100 feet tall or more, with downsweeping branches. SS BC Canada Plugs 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Transplant P-1 6-12 1.10 .77 .61 .55 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 18-36 1.50 1.05 .83 .75 B&B 6-7' 37.00 7-8' 49.00 Chrysolepis (Castanopsis) chrysophylla (Giant Chinquapin) West coast native broadleaved evergreen tree in the Beech family. Lovely slow-growing tree that is shade and drought tolerant. SS OR Seedling 1-0 1-3 2.00 3-6 2.90 Clematis ligusticifolia (Western White Clematis) FACU Native climbing vine east of the Cascades and throughout the western US with small white flowers and puffy white seedheads. Used for erosion control in intermittent stream areas of the arid west as it tolerates moisture as well as drought. SS WA east slope WA Cascades Seedling 1-0 3-6 .50 .35 .28 .25 6-12 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 12-18 .70 .49 .39 .35 18-36 .90 .63 .50 .45

Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Diospyros virginiana (American Persimmon) Eastern US native deciduous tree, with distinctively-cracked thick bark. Edible fruit is delicious when fully ripe and is eaten by nearly all birds and mammals. Tolerant of a wide range of site conditions but does best in moist, well-drained sites. Slowgrowing to 60 feet tall, optimum fruit-bearing age is 25-50 years old. SS KY, AR Seedling 2-0 18-36 1.00 .70

Fraxinus latifolia (Oregon Ash) FACW Northwest native deciduous tree to 60'. A true wetland tree with bright green leaves. SS Willamette Valley OR Seedling 1-0 6-12 .56 .39 .31 .28 12-18 .64 .45 .35 .32 2-0 18-36 .90 .63 .49 .45 3-4' 1.20 .84 .66 .60 Gymnocladus dioica (Kentucky Coffee Tree) Midwest and eastern native large shade tree in the legume family. Roasted seeds historically used as a poor coffee substitute, but raw seeds are poisonous. SS Iowa Seedling 2-0 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 18-36 1.50 1.05 .82

Cornus alternifolia (Alternate-leaf Dogwood) Eastern US native large shrub to 25 feet tall common in forest understories. White flowers in mid-may and fruit eaten by birds. Endangered in FL. SS PA Transplant 1-1 6-12 1.10 .77 .61 .55 Cornus nuttallii (Pacific Dogwood) Small tree to 40 feet tall with rich green leaves, gray-green beneath. White flowers in April or May, often sporadic blooming in summer. Red to orange fruit in fall. Difficult to establish due to disease susceptibility. SS Willamette Valley OR, northern CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .74 .52 .41 .37 6-12 .90 .63 .50 .45 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Cornus sericea [C. stolonifera] (Redtwig Dogwood, Red Osier Dogwood) FACW Thicket-forming native shrub with dark-red stems, white flower clusters, white berries. Great wildlife and erosion-control plant. Grows to 10-14 feet tall, often used as an ornamental. Our western WA strain is disease resistant here. SS northwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR, east slope WA Cascades, ID Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .38 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 18-36 .80 .56 .44 .40 3-4' 1.10 .77 .61 .55 4-5' 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 Transplant 2-1 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.20 .84 .66 .60 3-4' 1.70 1.19 .94 .85 Corylus cornuta v. californica (Beaked Hazelnut, Filbert) NI Small tree or multistem shrub to 25 feet tall in sun or shade. Excellent wildlife plant; nuts are food for birds and squirrels. Coppices quickly after disturbance. SS western WA lowlands, east slope Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 1.30 .91 .72 .65 12-18 1.70 1.19 .94 .85 2-0 18-36 2.90 2.03 1.60 1.45 36"+ 4.50 3.15 2.47 2.25 B&B 6-8' 32.50 30.50 Crataegus columbiana [C. piperi] (Columbia Hawthorn) Large thorny shrub or small tree to 15' tall, with attractive white flowers and red fruit in the fall. Excellent for hedgerow or wildlife plantings. Prefers sunny moist conditions, locally common in northwestern Washington, more so in the east. SS MT Seedling 2-0 6-12 .80 .53 .44 12-18 .90 .63 .49 Crataegus douglasii v douglasii (Douglas Hawthorn) FAC Shrubby tree to 30 feet tall with large thorns, white flowers in early spring and black fruit. Excellent wildlife plant; flowers attract butterflies and fruit attracts birds. Commonly found along streams. SS Willamette Valley OR, SW WA, east slope WA Cascades, ID Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 2-0 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 18-36 1.40 .98 .77 .70 3-4' 1.60 1.12 .88 .80 Crataegus suksdorfii (Black Hawthorn) FAC Tree or large shrub to 35' with thorns, white flowers and black fruit in August. Excellent wildlife plant; flowers attract butterflies and fruit attracts birds. Will form an impenetrable barrier. Prefers moist habitats in sun or partial shade. SS northwest WA lowlands, east slope Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 2-0 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 18-36 1.40 .98 .77 .70 3-4' 1.60 1.12 .88 .80 Transplant 2-1 12-18 1.10 .77 .60 .55 18-36 1.30 .91 .72 .65

4

Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Liriodendron tulipifera (Tulip Tree) FACU, FAC Beautiful deciduous tree native to the Eastern states. Fastgrowing to 120 feet tall, with attractive flowers and yellow fall color. SS TN Seedling 1-0 6-12 .90 .63 Lithocarpus densiflorus (Tanoak) UPL Beautiful evergreen tree native in the coast ranges of Southern Oregon and California. Acorns are widely eaten by people and wildlife. Shade tolerant and drought tolerant in cooler climates. SS CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 1.20 Lonicera ciliosa (Orange Honeysuckle) Native twining vine with showy yellow-orange flowers, attractive to hummingbirds. SS western WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 .70 .49 .39 .35 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.30 .91 .72 .65 18-36 1.50 1.05 .83 .75 Lonicera hispidula (Hairy Honeysuckle) West Coast native trailing vine with white to pink flowers and red fruits. SS western WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 1.40 .98 Lonicera involucrata (Black Twinberry) FAC Northwest native shrub reaching 14' in height. Yellow flowers and purplish black fruit are great for wildlife. This shrub is fast-growing and provides excellent erosion control. Prefers moist, open to partially shaded sites. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands, WA outer coast, UT Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 2-0 18-36 1.30 .91 .72 .65 3-4' 1.60 1.12 .88 .80 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 18-36 1.50 1.05 .83 .75 Note: Mahonia aquifolium often defoliates during transplanting, however, once new roots are established they will quickly re-foliate.

Reyna Hamamelis vernalis (Ozark Witchhazel) FACU or FACW Southeast native deciduous shrub. SS MI Transplant 1-1 6-12 1.10 .77 .61 12-18 1.45 1.02 .80 Hamamelis virginiana (American Witchhazel) FACU or FACEastern native shrub with delicate yellow flowers in early winter. SS PA Seedling 2-0 6-12 .90 .63 .50 Holodiscus discolor (Ocean Spray) Northwest native deciduous shrub to 20', with creamy-white flowers in long clusters, orange fall color. Provides an important nectar source and erosion control. Prefers partial shade to full sun and well-drained soil. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR, east slope WA Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 2-0 18-36 1.30 .91 .72 .65 Juglans cinerea (Butternut) FACU Eastern native tree with edible nuts. Grows to 80 feet tall in sunny, well-drained conditions. SS PA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .90 .72 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.40 1.12 Juglans nigra (Black walnut) FACU Eastern native tree, to 100 feet tall, with large edible nuts. SS IL. PA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .90 .72 .54 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.40 1.12 .84 Juniperus scopulorum (Rocky Mountain Juniper) Evergreen shrubby tree native in the arid west. Slow-growing and drought tolerant, berries are a bird favorite. SS UT, ID Seedling 2-0 3-6 .90 .63 .50 .45 6-12 1.10 .77 .61 .55 Transplant 2-1 6-12 1.80 1.26 .99 .90

Mahonia [Berberis] aquifolium (Tall Oregon Grape) A Northwest native shrub with shiny evergreen foliage, yellow flowers and dusty blue berries. Prefers moist to dry welldrained soil in full sun to partial shade. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. Grows to 3-7' in height, strongly rhizomatous. SS western WA lowlands, east slope WA Cascades Seedling 2-0 3-6 .50 .35 .27 .25 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 18"+ 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Transplant 2-1 3-6 .70 .49 .38 .35 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 Note: Mahonia nervosa is harvested and shipped the same day, we recommend that this plant only be transplanted during the late fall months. Mahonia [Berberis] nervosa (Cascade Oregon Grape) Native rhizomatous, evergreen shrub with yellow flowers in early spring followed by blue berries. Grows in dry to moist well-drained soil in partial to full shade. Available late November-December only. SS western WA lowlands Seedling 2-0 1-3 .60 .42 .36 .30 3-6 .70 .49 .42 .35 6"+ .90 .63 .49 .45 Mahonia [Berberis] repens (Creeping Oregon Grape) Smaller, eastern form of Mahonia aquifolium. SS ID Seedling 1-0 3-6 .76 .53 .42 .38 2-0 6-12 .90 .63 .49 .45 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Malus [Pyrus] fusca (Pacific Crabapple) FAC+ Native shrubby tree to 35' tall. Flowers and fruits are attractive and beneficial for many kinds of wildlife. Prefers moist to wet habitats, including near salt water and estuaries as well as freshwater locations. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 .48 .40 2-0 6-12 .90 .63 .54 .45 12-18 1.10 .77 .66 .55 18-36 1.30 .91 .72 .65 Transplant 2-1 12-18 1.40 .98 .77 .70 Myrica gale (Sweet Gale) OBL Northwest native deciduous shrub 3-4' tall. Found along margins of bogs, estuaries, and lakes; leaves emit sweet scent when rubbed. Coppices quickly after disturbance, waxy fruits eaten by birds in winter. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 1.60 1.12 .88 .80 2-0 6-12 1.70 1.19 .94 .85 12-18 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 18-36 2.00 1.40 1.10 1.00 Transplant 1-1 12-18 2.40 1.68 1.32 1.20


Trees & Shrubs Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Oemleria cerasiformis (Indian Plum) Our earliest native spring bloomer, reaching 12-18' with white flowers and purple fruit. A bird favorite. This is one of our most attractive and beneficial native shrubs for landscape use. Coppices quickly after disturbance, best in moist rich soil, sun to partial shade. SS western WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 .70 .49 .38 .35 6-12 .96 .67 .53 .48 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 2-0 18-36 1.40 .98 .77 .70

Potentilla fruticosa (Shrubby Cinquefoil) FACNorth American native small shrub to 3-4', with yellow flowers, drought tolerant. Ours is seed grown native, not a cultivar. SS Okanogan region WA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .90 .63 .50 .45 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 18-36 1.50 1.05 .83 .75

Oplopanax horridus (Devil’s Club) FAC+ Northwest native deciduous shrub with upright prickly stems, large leaves, and showy berries in fall. Prefers moist, partially shady to shady sites. Common in Alaska south to Oregon, east to Montana. SS southwest WA lowlands In production

Prunus emarginata (Bitter Cherry) Northwest native shrub or small tree, reaching 45' in height. Common in moist forests, along streams, and in open areas. Bright red fruit is wildlife food. SS northwest WA lowlands, northern CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.30 .91 .71 .65 3'+ 1.80 1.26 .99 .90

Paxistima myrsinites (Falsebox, Oregon Box) Western native evergreen shrub reaching 2-3' tall. Attractive plant for sunny or partially shady sites with well-drained soil. Drought tolerant. Cloned from selected northwest WA plants 2" pots 2.20 1.98 Field pot 12-18" 5.90

Populus balsamifera ssp. trichocarpa (Black Cottonwood) FAC Northwest native deciduous tree. Fast growing to 120'. Likes deep moist soils and full sun. SS northwest WA lowlands, WA east slope Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .44 .31 .24 .22 12-18 .56 .39 .31 .28 18-36 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 3-4' 1.10 .77 .60 .55 4-5' 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 Transplant 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50 3-4'+ 1.50 1.05 .82 .75 Populus tremuloides (Quaking Aspen) FAC+ Western North American native tree to 90'. White bark and heart-shaped “quaking” leaves make it nice as a small grove. SS ID Seedling 1-0 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 2-0 18-36 1.60 1.12 .88 .80 3-4' 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 4-5' 3.00 2.10 1.65 1.50

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Quercus garryana (Garry Oak) Our northwest coastal oak. A broad, gnarled, deciduous tree to 80 feet tall. Acorns are wildlife food. Prefers good drainage. Ours are root-pruned for transplant success. SS southwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR, San Juan Islands, east slope WA Cascades Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 .44 .40 6-12 .90 .63 .49 .45 2-0 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.30 .91 .71 .65 Transplant 1-2 6-12 1.10 .77 .60 .55 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 18-36 2.00 1.40 1.10 1.00 B&B 3-4' 19.50 4-5' 27.50 5-6' 29.50 Quercus kelloggii (California Black Oak) Beautiful California native deciduous oak, reaching 50' tall in favorable locations. Yellow or orange fall color, acorns are an important wildlife food source. SS CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 1.50 1.05 .82 .75 2-0 12-18 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 18-36 2.00 1.40 1.10 1.00

Quercus palustris (Pin Oak) FAC, FACW Eastern native oak reaching 100' tall. Often used in landscaping. SS MO, KY Seedling 2-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 18+ 1.10 .77 .60 .55

Physocarpus capitatus (Pacific Ninebark) FAC+ Tall native shrub with attractive leaves and beautiful white pom-pom flower clusters in spring. Benefits wildlife with cover, nesting sites, and food, and fibrous roots have excellent soilbinding qualities. Prefers moist ground in sun to partial shade. Grows to 15-18'. SS northwest WA lowlands, southwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50 3-4' 1.20 .84 .66 .60

Pinus contorta v. contorta (Shore Pine) Two-needled pine with rounded stature to 40'. Adaptable to many soil types, from moist areas around lakes and bogs west of the Cascades to well-drained or nutrient-poor locations. Tolerates salt spray along shorelines. SS BC Vancouver Isl, WA outer coast Plugs available Dec15-Feb15 Styro-5 .60 .42 .33 .29 Transplant P-1 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 .94 .66 .52 .47 B&B 5-6' 27.90 6-7' 37.90

Size

Quercus lobata (California White Oak) FAC California native oak reaching 100’ tall with a rounded, spreading crown. Many wildlife species use the acorns for food. SS CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 1.50 1.05 .82 .75 2-0 12-18 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 18-36 2.00 1.40 1.10 1.00

Philadelphus lewisii (Mock Orange) An excellent native with fragrant, snow-white flowers, attracts butterflies. Prefers a sunny well-drained site. Grows to 8-12' tall. SS western WA lowlands, east slope WA Cascades, ID Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.30 .91 .71 .65 Transplants 1-1 6-12 1.10 .77 .60 .55 12-18 1.40 .98 .77 .70 18-36 1.80 1.26 .99 .90 2-2 24"+ 2.40 1.68 1.32 1.20

Picea sitchensis (Sitka Spruce) FAC Pacific Northwest native lowland conifer reaching 120-200' tall, common in wet habitats. Fast-growing, with dense root systems for erosion control. Provides important wildlife habitat and shade for streams. Our plug stock was selected for best resistance to bud worm, and low-elevation for restoration plantings. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS western WA outer coast Plugs available Dec15-Feb15 Styro-5 .60 .42 .33 .29 Styro-15 .94 .66 .52 .47 Transplant P-1 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 .94 .66 .52 .47 18-36 1.14 .80 .63 .57

Grade

Quercus rubra (Northern Red Oak) FACU Midwest and eastern native oak commonly used in restoration, reforestation, and landscaping where space permits. Fastgrowing to 100 feet tall in sunny, moderately moist sites. SS IA, Kentucky Seedling 2-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 18-36 1.10 .77 .60 .55

Physocarpus capitatus (Pacific Ninebark) Prunus virginiana v. melanocarpa (Black Choke Cherry) FACU Northwest native shrub or small tree to 20'. Black fruits are favored by birds. Commonly found in moist sites east of the Cascades. SS ID, OR Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 2-0 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 18-36 1.10 .77 .60 .55 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 Pseudotsuga menziesii (Douglas Fir) Fast-growing tree with densely-set, soft needles that are darkgreen to blue-green in color. A Northwest native. Grows to 70-250' in height, preferably in deep moist soil and full sun. SS western WA lowlands (403) Plugs available Dec15-Feb15 Styro-5 .60 .42 .33 .29 Styro-15 .94 .66 .52 .47 Transplant P-1 6-12 .74 .52 .41 .37 12-18 .94 .66 .52 .47 18-24 1.14 .80 .63 .57 Quercus gambelii (Gambel Oak) Small deciduous tree of the Rocky Mountains, to 25'. are wildlife food. Needs good drainage. SS UT Seedling 1-0 3-6 .90 .63 .49 2-0 6-12 1.40 .98 .77 12-18 1.60 1.12 .88

Acorns .45 .70 .80

Rhamnus [Frangula] purshiana (Cascara) NI Small tree with glossy green deciduous leaves, reaching 40', excellent ornamental potential. Prefers moist to mesic soils in full sun to partial shade. Birds like the black fruit, and beavers rarely bother this tree in stream-bank plantings. SS northwest WA lowland, Willamette Valley OR, northern CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .70 .49 .38 .35 6-12 .90 .63 .50 .45 refigure 2-0 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.20 . 84 .66 .60 3-4' 2.40 1.68 1.32 1.20 Rhododendron macrophyllulm (Pacific Rhododendron) Lovely evergreen shrub with showy pink flowers. Native in coniferous forests from Puget Sound to northern California. 2" pots 3.80 2.66 2.09 1.90 Field pot 7.40 6.50 Rhus glabra (Smooth Sumac) North American native rhizomatous shrub to 15 feet tall, prefers sun and well-drained soil. Bright orange-red fall color, red berries are good wildlife food. Will spread to form a thicket, control erosion. SS MT Seedling 1-0 6-12 .60 .42 .33 .30 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 Rhus trilobata (Skunkbush Sumac, Squawbush) Western native drought-tolerant shrub to 6' tall. Small flower clusters lead to fuzzy orange fruits. SS UT Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 2-0 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 18-36 1.40 .98 .77 .70 Rhus typhina (Staghorn Sumac) Eastern North American native shrub or small tree to 24 feet tall, with down covered stems, good fall color. SS PA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .42 .33 .30 2-0 12-18 .90 .56 .44 .40 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50

Unit Price 50 100 500 1000 A unit is one plant. All pricing is for individual plants based on total quantity purchased per species. Plants are available in bundles of 50 only.

Standard Age Notation 2-1 Years in seedbed - Years as transplant

5


Trees & Shrubs Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Ribes aureum (Golden Currant) FAC+ Attractive native deciduous shrub to 9 feet tall, with fragrant yellow flowers and fruit that attract birds. Found east of the Cascades in moist to dry sites. SS east slope WA Cascades, WY Seedling 1-0 3-6 .50 .35 .27 .25 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 2-0 18-36 1.10 .77 .60 .55 3-4' 1.30 .91 .71 .65 Ribes cereum (Wax Currant, Squaw Currant) NI Native deciduous shrub to 6’ tall, with white to light pink flowers and red fruit. Found east of the Cascades in dry sunny locations. Seedling 1-0 3-6 .50 .35 .27 .25 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 Ribes divaricatum (Black Gooseberry) NI Heavily thorned small shrub, from moist to wet habitats in Western Wash. Black fruit is wildlife food. Good for hedgerow, wildlife, and barrier plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 .60 .42 .33 .30 12-18 .70 .49 .38 .35 2-0 18-36+ 1.00 .70 .55 .50 Ribes lacustre (Swamp Gooseberry) FAC+ North American native prickly shrub 2-4' tall, with pale red flowers and black fruit. Prefers moist to wet sites in partial shade. SS western WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 1.10 .77 .60 6-12 1.40 .98 .77 12-18 1.70 1.19 .94

Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Rosa pisocarpa (Peafruit Rose) Western native rose with clusters of pink flowers and small red hips. Rhizomatous, grows to 6-8', likes moist habitats. Good for erosion control, wildlife, and barrier plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 2-0 18-36 1.30 .91 .71 .65 Rosa rugosa (Rugosa Rose) Non-native Introduced shrubby rose with white to pink fragrant flowers and large red hips. Seedling 1-0 6-12 .56 .39 .31 .28 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 18-36 .80 .56 .44 .40 Transplant 1-1 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 .50 12-18 1.10 .77 .60 .55 18-36 1.20 .84 .66 .60

6

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Rubus leucodermis (Black Cap Raspberry) Northwest native prickly shrub to 5' tall, with tasty black fruit. Not rhizomatous, but arching branches will root at the tip to form new clumps. Tolerates dry rocky soils, partial shade. SS northwest WA lowlands, northern CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .70 .49 .38 .35 12-18 .80 .56 .44 .40 2-0 18-36 1.10 .77 .60 .55

Salix hookeriana (Hooker Willow) FACW- or FACW A coastal wet habitat willow with cottony leaves and stems. Has a shrubby growth form reaching 20' tall, and produces a good spring bloom. Salix piperi is sometimes included with this species. SS northwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 18-36 .96 .67 .53 .48 3-4' 1.10 .77 .60 .55 Live stake .25/ft .20/ft

Rubus parviflorus (Thimbleberry) FACU+ Northwest native shrub to 5-8', rhizomatous, with good soilbinding properties. A common roadside plant with showy white flowers and edible red fruit, beneficial for wildlife. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. Prefers moist to dry soil in sun or partial shade. SS northwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR, northern CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50

Salix lucida ssp. lasiandra (Pacific Willow) FACW+ or OBL Shrubby tree to 40-60' tall with elongated leaves, and yellowgreen bark. Excellent soil-binding and wildlife-enhancing properties. Likes wet habitats. SS northwest WA lowlands, east Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 18-36 .96 .67 .53 .48 3-4' 1.10 .77 .60 .55 Salix piperi (Piper’s Willow) Now considered Salix hookeriana. USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). Salix prolixa [S rigida] (Heartleaf Willow, MacKenzie’s Willow) OBL Native shrubby willow to 25 feet common along rivers in western North America. SS northwest WA lowlands, east slope WA Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 18-36 .96 .67 .53 .48 3-4' 1.10 .77 .60 .55 Salix rigida v. macrogemma [S. prolixa] (Heartleaf Willow, MacKenzie’s Willow) Please see Salix prolixa – revised nomenclature Salix scouleriana (Scouler’s Willow) FAC or FACU Multi-stemmed tree common on the coast and inland in moist to dry conditions in gravelly soils, full sun to partial shade. Drought-tolerant and salt-spray tolerant. “Tall” form grows to about 50', “short” form to about 30'. Has excellent soil binding, erosion control capabilities. SS northwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.20 .84 .66 .60

Ribes roezlii v roezlii (Sierra Gooseberry) California native drought tolerant shrub with white flowers and prickly purple fruits. SS CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .90 .63 6-12 1.10 .77

Rosa nutkana (Nootka Rose) NI Western native rose with showy pink flowers, and large, solitary hips. Strongly rhizomatous, will form thickets 6-8' tall in dryish to moist habitats. Good for erosion control, wildlife, and barrier plantings. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands, southwest WA lowlands, ID Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 2-0 18-36 1.30 .91 .71 .65

50

Salix geyeriana (Geyer’s willow) Western North American native willow to 15' tall, for wet habitats. SS southwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 18-36 .96 .67 .53 .48 3-4' 1.10 .77 .60 .55

Ribes nevadense (Pink Sierra Currant) California native deciduous shrub with beautiful pink flowers in showy clusters. Often found along mid-elevation streams, this beauty will take winter-spring wet and summer drought conditions. SS Northern CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 6-12 .90 .63 12-18 1.25 .87

Rosa gymnocarpa (Bald Hip Rose) NI Western native rose with masses of pink flowers and small red hips, nice in dry shade plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 1.00 .70 .55 .50 6-12 1.20 .84 .66 .60 12-18 1.40 .98 .77 .70 2-0 18-36 1.80 1.26 .99 .90

Size

Rosa woodsii (Wood’s Rose) FACU Native rhizomatous rose with clusters of red hips, common on the east side of Cascades. SS east slope WA Cascades, ID Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 2-0 18-36 1.10 .77 .61 .55

Ribes lobbii (Gummy Gooseberry) West Coast native prickly shrub with beautiful flowers. SS east slope WA Cascades Seedling 1-0 3-6 1.50

Ribes sanguineum (Red Flowering Currant) Native shrub with showy pink-red flowers in the spring and dark-blue berries. Prefers well-drained conditions in sun or partial shade. Grows to 12' in height. Note: this species may be difficult to grow in a container. SS northwest WA lowlands, OR coast range Seedling 1-0 3-6 .80 .56 .44 .40 6-12 1.10 .77 .60 .55 12-18 1.40 .98 .77 .70 2-0 18-36 1.60 1.12 .88 .80

Grade

Salix scouleriana (Scouler’s Willow) Rubus spectabilis (Salmonberry) FAC Northwest native shrub to 6-10', with reddish-purple flowers and edible fruit. Flowers are an important early nectar source. Rhizomatous and thicket-forming in moist to wet conditions. SS western WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 3-6 .60 .42 .33 .30 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 2-0 18-36 1.30 .91 .71 .65 3-4' 1.40 .98 .77 .70 Rubus ursinus (Pacific Blackberry, Dewberry) Northwest native prickly vine, with long trailing stems rooting at the tip, white flowers, and tasty black berries. Common along the coast and in lowland clearings. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline and bluff plantings. Good for erosion control. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 2-0 18'+ 1.30 .91 .72 .65 Salix amygdaloides (Peach-leaf willow) FACW Large shrub or small tree to 40’ tall, with long narrow leaves. Common east of the Cascades to the Atlantic along streambanks. SS WA east slope Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 Salix bebbiana (Bebbs Willow) FACW Common native willow in wet to dry sites. Shrubby to 12' tall. SS east slope WA Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 18-36 .96 .67 .53 .48 Salix exigua (Coyote willow, Sand-bar willow) OBL, FACW Large shrub to 25', with long narrow leaves. Forms colonies by root suckers. Common east of the Cascades to the Atlantic along streambanks. SS WA east slope Cascades Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30

Salix sessilifolia (Soft Leaved Willow) FACW Native streambank willow with strong running roots. Excellent erosion control qualities. Grows to about 25' tall. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 Salix sitchensis (Sitka Willow) FAC or FACW Our most common shrubby willow, coast and mountains. Tolerates wide range of soil and moisture conditions in full sun to partial shade. Excellent erosion control qualities. SS northwest WA lowlands Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .60 .42 .33 .30 2-0 18-36 .96 .67 .53 .48 3-4' 1.10 .77 .60 .55 Live stake .25/ft .20/ft Sambucus caerulea (Blue Elderberry) See Sambucus nigra – revised nomenclature Sambucus nigra ssp caerulea (Blue Elderberry) Northwest native shrub 15-20' tall, with showy white flower clusters which attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Blue fruit is wildlife food and can be made into jellies and wines. Prefers moist to dry soils in sun to partial shade. Fast-growing once established, provides some erosion control. SS northwest WA lowlands, east slope WA Cascades, ID Seedling 1-0 crown .60 .42 .33 .30 3-6 .70 .49 .38 .35 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 18-36 1.50 1.05 Sambucus racemosa (Red Elderberry) FACU One of the best native shrubs for wildlife. A dense, pyramidal shrub with clusters of creamy white flowers, which attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Red fruit is loved by many bird species. Vigorous, to 20'. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings, provides some erosion control. SS northwest WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR Seedling 1-0 crown .60 .42 .33 .30 3-6 .70 .49 .38 .35 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 .90 .63 .49 .45 2-0 18-36 1.70 1.19 .93 .85 3-4' 1.90 1.33 1.04 .95


Trees & Shrubs Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Sorbus scopulina (Western Mountain Ash) NI Western North American native shrub to 12' tall, with white flower clusters and orange-red fruits. Prefers sun and mediummoist conditions. SS MT Seedling 2-0 3-6 1.80 1.26 6-12 2.00 1.40

Symphoricarpos occidentalis (Western Snowberry) Deciduous shrub found in moist places east of the Cascades. Small white berries often cling through winter to provide food for wildlife. SS ID Seedling 1-0 6-12 .90 .63 .50 .45 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55

Sorbus sitchensis (Sitka Mountain Ash) Northwest native shrub 10' in height. Commonly found in open or sparsely wooded sites in the mountains. Red to orange berries are wildlife food. SS western WA mid-montaine, east slope Cascades In production

Symphoricarpos oreophilus v. utahensis (Mountain Snowberry) Native shrub reaching 5' in height, with puffy white fruits. Found in open sites east of the Cascades SS east slope WA Cascades, UT Seedling 1-0 6-12 .90 .63 .50 .45 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55

Spiraea betulifolia (Shiny Leaf Spirea) NI Low native shrub to 2-3' with beautiful ornamental qualities, soft green foliage and white flower clusters in early summer. Dry, sunny to partially shaded conditions. SS east slope Cascades Seedling 1-0 3-6 .70 .49 .39 .35 6-12 .80 . 56 .44 .40 2-0 12-18 1.00 .70 .55 .50 18-36 1.20 .84 .66 .60 Transplant 2-1 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 18-36 1.50 1.05 .83 .75 Spiraea douglasii (Hardhack Spirea) FACW Native deciduous shrub grows to 6-12' tall with showy pink flowers. Prefers wet habitats, spreading vigorously by rhizomes. Competes favorably with reed canary grass. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS western WA lowlands, Willamette Valley OR, northern CA Seedling 1-0 6-12 .50 .35 .27 .25 12-18 .70 .49 .38 .35 18-24 .90 .63 .49 .45 2-0 18-36 1.00 .70 .55 .50 3-4' 1.20 .84 .66 .60

Thuja plicata (Western Red Cedar) FAC A magnificent native tree with drooping branches. Shade tolerant but not dependent. Grows to 80-200' tall in moist to wet soils. SS western WA lowlands (430, 221, 201), SE Vancouver Island Plugs available Dec15-Feb15 Plugs Styro-6 min 4" ht .66 .46 .36 .33 Styro-15 min 8" ht .94 .66 .52 .47 Transplant P-1 6-12 .80 .56 .44 .40 12-18 .94 .66 .52 .47 18+ 1.20 .84 .66 .60

Grade

Size

50

UNIT PRICE 100+ 500+ 1000+

Tsuga heterophylla (Western Hemlock) FACUAn important native conifer in western forests, tolerant of sun or shade in well-drained soil. Grows to 200' tall. SS western WA lowlands (412), Oregon Coast Plugs available Dec15-Feb15 Styro-5 .60 .42 .33 .29 Styro-15 1.10 .77 .61 .55 Tsuga mertensiana (Mountain Hemlock) FACU Northwest native conifer, slow growing to 120'. Common at high elevations. SS SW British Columbia Plugs .80 .56 .44 .40 Transplant P-1 6-12 .96 .67 .53 .48 12-18 1.20 .84 .66 .60 Vaccinium ovatum (Evergreen Huckleberry) West coast native evergreen shrub, densely bushy to 6-8' tall, light pink flowers and blue berries. Most common in semiopen woods, in soils high in organic matter. A lovely shrub for ornamental plantings. Has excellent soil binding, erosion control capabilities. Cloned from selected western WA lowland plants. 2" pots 2.00 1.89 1.79 1.49 Vaccinium parvifolium (Red Huckleberry) Deciduous huckleberry found in the understory of western forests. Prefers moist soil with plenty of organic matter, fruits better with more sunshine. Cloned from selected northwest WA lowland plants. 2" pots 2.00 1.89 1.79 1.69 Viburnum ellipticum (Oval Leaved Viburnum) Northwest native deciduous shrub to 12' tall, with white flowers, black fruit, and reddish fall color. Found in moist woodlands in southern Washington to northern California. SS southwest WA lowlands Seedling 2-0 6-12 1.00 .70 .55 12-18 1.20 .90 .72

Symphoricarpos albus (Common Snowberry) FACU Common deciduous shrub to 4-7 feet tall with persistent white fruit, which is an important winter food source. Spreading by rhizomes, this shrub provides excellent erosion control, and is tolerant of wide range of conditions from wet to dry, full sun to mostly shady. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS western WA lowlands, ID, Willamette Valley OR Seedling 1-0 6-12 .90 .63 .50 .45 12-18 1.10 .77 .61 .55 2-0 18-36 1.30 .91 .72 .65 Transplant 1-1 12-18 1.50 1.05 .83 .75 18-36 1.70 1.19 .94 .85

Viburnum opulus v. americanum [V. trilobum] (Highbush Cranberry) Northern North American native shrub to 12' tall, with showy white flower clusters and bright red fruit, preferred by wildlife. Common in moist woods in Alaska and northern British Columbia, less common southward to Columbia Gorge. SS northwest WA lowlands Transplant 1-2 6-12 1.20 .84 .66 12-18 1.30 .91 .71 18-36 1.60 1.12 .88 Yucca glauca (Small Soapweed) Evergreen perennial with tough sword-shaped leaves and greenish-white flowers in tall clusters. Native from Montana south to Texas and New Mexico. SS UT Seedling 1-0 .80 .56 .44 2-0 .90 .63 .50

Symphoricarpos hesperius [S. mollis v. hesperius] (Trailing Snowberry) Prostrate shrub with light pink flowers and white berries. Native in Pacific coast states and Idaho woodlands. SS N CA Seedling 1-0 3-6 .90 .63 .49 6-12 1.10 .77 .60 12-18 1.30 .91 .71 2-0 18-36 1.50 1.05 .82

Vaccinium parvifolium (Red Huckleberry)

7


References Azous, A and Horner, R (eds). 2001. Wetlands and Urbanization: Implications for the Future. Lewis Publishers. Brayshaw, C.T. 1996. Trees and Shrubs of British Columbia. UBC Press. Buckingham, N.M., E.G. Schreiner, T.N. Kaye, J.E. Burger, E.L. Tisch. 1995. Flora of the Olympic Peninsula. Northwest Interpretive Association. Egan, D. and E.A. Howell. 2001. The Historical Ecology Handbook, A Restorationist’s Guide to Reference Ecosystems. Island Press. Environmental Protection Agency. 1995. Ecological Restoration: A Tool to Manage Stream Quality. Publication #841-F95-007. US EPA. Fitzgerald, T. and M.D. Terrell. 2000. Landscaping With Native Plants in the Inland Northwest. WSU Cooperative Extension Bulletin MISC0267. Franklin, J. and C.Dyrness.1988. Natural Vegetation of Oregon and Washington. Oregon State University Press. Great Plains Flora Association. 1986. Flora of the Great Plains. University Press of Kansas. Guard, J. 1995. Wetland Plants of Oregon and Washington. Lone Pine Publishing. Harper-Lore, B. and M. Wilson. 2000. Roadside Use of Native Plants. Island Press. Hitchcock, C.L., A. Cronquist, M. Ownbey, and J.W. Thompson. 1969. Vascular Plants of the Pacific Northwest. 5 volumes. University of Washington Press.

A Note on Nomenclature

Several species have recently experienced name changes resulting from continuing research. We have tried to list plants by their current names, with previous or other commonly-used names noted. Current names are from the PLANTS Database at http://plants. usda.gov. Wetland indicator status can also be found on that national plant database. Some species, notably the willows, are amazingly variable in their morphology. We do identify our stock carefully, but our Salix lasiandra, for example, may look somewhat different than the plants in your area due to natural variation within the species.

Custom Propogation Services

If you have a project requiring plant species not listed in this publication, plants propagated from seed provinces other than those listed, or very large quantities of plants in a particular size, then we encourage you to consider using our custom propagation services. We have extensive experience producing plants to meet special contract requirements. During the past ten years we have successfully completed growing contracts for the U.S. Forest Service, Seattle City Light, Seattle Metro, and the Washington Departments of Transportation, and Fish & Wildlife. Our experienced staff is always ready to discuss your plant needs; to find out more about this service, contact Todd Jones at (360) 592-2250.

Unit Price 50 100 500 1000 A unit is one plant. All pricing is for individual plants based on total quantity purchased per species. Plants are available in bundles of 50 only.

Standard Age Notation 2-1 Years in seedbed - Years as transplant SS = Seed Source

8

Johnson, D. and T. O’Neil (directors). 2001. Wildlife-Habitat Relationships in Oregon and Washington. Oregon State University Press. Johnson Skelly, F. and B. Johnson. 1998. Gardening for Hummingbirds in Western Washington. Wild Words. Johnson Skelly, F. and B. Johnson. 1998. Gardening for Butterflies in Western Washington. Wild Words. Kershaw, L., MacKinnon, A. and J. Pojar. 1998. Plants of the Rocky Mountains. Lone Pine Publishing. Kimpo, A., B. Castle, and J. Bloom. The Wetland Handbook. King Conservation District. Klinka, K., Krajina, Ceska, and Scagel. 1989. Indicator Plants of Coastal British Columbia. UBC Press. Kruckeberg, A. 1982. Gardening with Native Plants of the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Press. Leigh, M. 1999. Grow Your Own Native Landscape, A Guide to Identifying, Propagating, and Landscaping with Western Washington Native Plants. Native Plant Salvage Project, Thurston County WSU Cooperative Extension.

Parish, R., Coupe, R. and D. Lloyd. 1996. Plants of Southern Interior British Columbia. Lone Pine Publishing. Pearson, D. and C. Klimas, eds. 1996. The Role of Restoration in Ecosystem Management. Society for Ecological Restoration. Pettinger, A. 1996. Native Plants in the Coastal Garden, A Guide for Gardeners in British Columbia and the Pacific Northwest. Whitecap Books. Pojar, J. and A. MacKinnon, eds. 1994. Plants of the Pacific Northwest Coast. Lone Pine Publishing. Potash, L. and C. Aubry. 1997. Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest Native Plant Notebook 2nd Edition. North Cascades Institute. Richter, K.O. Criteria for the Restoration and Creation of Wetland Habitats for Lentic-Breeding Amphibians of the Puget Sound. King County Natural Resource Division. Sabine, B.J. editor. 1993. National List of Plant Species That Occur In Wetlands. Resource Management Group.

Link, R. 1999. Landscaping for Wildlife in the Pacific Northwest. University of Washington Press.

Spear-Cooke, S. ed. 1997. A Field Guide to the Common Wetland Plants of Western Washington and Northwestern Oregon. Seattle Audubon Society and Washington Native Plant Society.

Martin, A., Zim, H. and A. Nelson. 1951. American Wildlife and Plants, A Guide to Wildlife Food Habits. Dover Publishing.

USDA, NRCS. 2004. The PLANTS Database, Version 3.5 (http://plants.usda.gov). National Plant Data Center, Baton Rouge, LA 70874-4490 USA.

Menashe, E. 1993. Vegetation Management: A Guide for Puget Sound Bluff Property Owners. Wash. Dept. of Ecology Publication # 93-31.

Washington State Department of Ecology. 1993. Restoring Wetlands in Washington: A Guidebook for Wetland Restoration, Planning and Implementation. Washington State DOE Publication #93-17.

Wetland Indicator Status

WETLAND INDICATOR STATUS can be found online at The PLANTS Database, (http://plants.usda. gov). OBL - Obligate Wetland Occurs with an estimated 99% probability in wetlands FACW - Facultative Wetland Estimated 67-99% probability of occurrence in wetlands FAC - Facultative Equally likely to occur in wetlands and nonwetlands FACU - Facultative Upland 67-99% probability in nonwetlands, 1-33% in wetlands UPL - Obligate Upland >99% nonwetlands (if a species doesn’t occur in wetlands in any region, it is not included on the National List) NI - No Indicator Insufficient information available to determine status + indicates a frequency toward the higher end of the category - indicates a frequency toward the lower end of a category Indicator status is based on available information, and does not always reflect the full range of each plant species. Status is sometimes different in different regions.

Estimating and Planting Spacing Number per sq. ft. 6 inch ................................................ 4.000 per sq. ft. 8 inch ................................................ 2.250 per sq. ft. 12 inch .............................................. 1.000 per sq. ft. 15 inch .............................................. 0.640 per sq. ft. 18 inch .............................................. 0.444 per sq. ft. 24 inch .............................................. 0.250 per sq. ft. 30 inch .............................................. 0.160 per sq. ft. 36 inch .............................................. 0.111 per sq. ft. 48 inch .............................................. 0.062 per sq. ft. 8 foot ................................................. 0.015 per sq. ft. 10 foot ............................................... 0.010 per sq. ft.

Area Formulas Circle ............................................ Diameter x 0.7854 Triangle ..................................... Base x Height x 0.5 Rectangle ......................................... Length x Width

Metric Conversions 10 cm ................ 3.9 in 15 cm ................ 5.9 in 20 cm ................ 7.9 in 25 cm ................ 9.8 in 30 cm ............... 11.8 in

50 cm ................. 19.7 in 60 cm ................. 23.6 in 80 cm .................. 31.5 in 1.00 m .......... 3 ft, 3.4 in 2.00 m .......... 6 ft, 6.7 in

We accept Visa and Master Card

Sales hours: 8 AM-4 PM PST Monday through Friday Toll free: 800-416-8640 Fax: 888-506-1236


Contact Information

Plant Availability

BARE-ROOT NATIVE PLANT SALES AND SHIPPING Julie Whitacre, Sales, sales@fourthcornernurseries.com Todd Jones, Growing Contracts, toddjones57@hotmail.com Phone: (360) 592-2250 Fax: (888) 506-1236 Address: 5652 Sand Road Bellingham, WA 98226 CONTAINER NATIVE PLANT & ORNAMENTAL SALES Angie Ballard Phone: (360) 734-0079 Fax: (888) 506-1236 Address: 3057 E. Bakerview Road Bellingham, WA 98226 SEED SALES & PROPAGATION

Richard Haard, Ph.D. richardh@fourthcornernurseries.com Veronica Wisniewski veronica@fourthcornernurseries.com Phone: (360) 592-2250 (888) 506-1236 Fax:

Bare-root trees and shrubs are shipped from December through early April, and emergents are shipped late March through November (spring and fall are best).

Grading

We take care to grade and ship high-quality, healthy plants, true to name and count. Height grades are measured from the soil line. 1-0 seedlings are almost always single-stemmed. 2-0 seedlings may be single-stemmed or branched, and generally have a more developed root system than 1-0’s. Transplants are mostly but not always branched and have more developed root systems than seedlings. If you require special grading regarding branching or root systems, or quantities other than our standard bundle size, please ask and we will do our best to meet your needs. There will be a $0.50 per plant extra charge for special grading.

Terms and Conditions

Prices: Prices in this list are for stock on hand; availability and price may change. Prices are FOB our growing grounds. Non-credit customers or customers placing contract growing orders must submit a 25% deposit. The balance is due in full before shipping for all non-credit customers. Volume discounts are built into our pricing structure. We accept Visa and Master Card. A 25% restocking charge will be billed on canceled or returned orders. Minimum order: Total order $100.00 minimum. Bare-root seedlings are available in bundles of 50 only, large transplants in bundles of 10 or 25. Add $0.50 per plant for special grading and handling. Shipping: Bare-root orders will be shipped UPS, at cost, unless otherwise specified. All other orders may be picked up by calling a few days before you wish to pick up. Orders held for shipping after April 1st must be prepaid and are subject to additional storage charges. Claims: We take great care to provide quality, healthy nursery stock. However, we can give no guarantee, expressed or implied, as to productiveness or life span. Any stock received in unsatisfactory condition must be reported immediately. Plant claims will be reviewed and credit issued where justified; at no time will we be responsible for more than the purchase price.

ACCOUNTING & BILLING

Allison Jones, allisonj@fourthcornernurseries.com Phone: (360) 592-2250 Fax: (888) 506-1236 Address: 5757 Sand Road Bellingham, WA 98226

We do not guarantee plant survivability after leaving our care.

WEBMASTER

Ken Boettger, knarly@upickers.com Jose cleaning seed

Purchase Order

SOLD TO:

Date_____________________________________

Business Name______________________________________________________ Address_____________________________________________________________ City____________________________State___________Zip__________________ Contact Person______________________________________________________ Telephone (_ ______)________________Fax (___________ )_________________

SHIP TO (if different): Name_______________________________________________________________ 5652 Sand Road, Bellingham, WA 98226 TEL (360) 592-2250 FAX (888) 506-1236 EMAIL sales@fourthcornernurseries.com WEB www.fourthcornernurseries.com QUANTITY

SIZE

Substitutions (please check):

❑ If size ordered is unavailable, substitute next: ❑ largest size available ❑ smallest size available (You will be charged for the size shipped) ❑ No substitutions

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Please sign and return with a 25% deposit. Payment will be due before shipping.

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9


(continued from page 1)

that brighten spring mornings have been in decline since the 1960s, having lost 40% of their numbers so far. Birds that breed in meadows are in even more trouble. Once common species such as the northern bobwhite, eastern meadowlark, field sparrow, and grasshopper sparrow have declined 82%, 72%, 68%, and 65%, respectively, in total numbers, and are completely absent from many areas that used to support healthy populations.

Why We Need Biodiversity

For most of us, hearing such numbers triggers a passing sadness; but few people feel personally threatened by the loss of biodiversity. Here’s why you should. Biodiversity losses are a clear sign that our own life-support systems are failing. The ecosystems that support us - - that determine the carrying capacity of the earth and our local spaces - - are run by biodiversity. It is biodiversity that generates oxygen and clean water; that creates topsoil out of rock and buffers extreme weather events like droughts and floods; and that recycles the mountains of garbage we create every day. And now, with human induced climate change threatening the planet, it is biodiversity that will suck that carbon out of the air and sequester it in living plants if given half a chance. Humans cannot live as the only species on this planet because it is other species that create the ecosystem services essential to us. Every time we force a species to extinction we are encouraging our own demise. Despite the disdain with which we have treated it in the past, biodiversity is not optional.

Parks Are Not Enough

I am often asked why the habitats we have preserved within our park system are not enough to save most species from extinction. Years of research by evolutionary biologists have shown that the area required to sustain biodiversity is pretty much the same as the area required to generate it in the first place. The consequence of this simple relationship is profound. Since we have taken 95% of the U.S. from nature we can expect to lose 95% of the species that once lived here unless we learn how to share our living, working, and agricultural spaces with biodiversity. 95% of all plants and animals! Now there is a statistic that puts climate-change predictions of extinction to shame. And studies of habitat islands with known histories, such as Barro Colorado Island in the Panama Canal and Ashdown Forest in England, have so far shown these predictions to be accurate. Species are lost at the same proportion with which a habitat is reduced in size. The good news is that extinction takes awhile, so if we start sharing our landscapes with other living things, we should be able to save much of the biodiversity that still exists.

Redesigning Suburbia

What will it take to give our local animals what they need to survive and reproduce on our properties? NATIVE PLANTS, and lots of them. This is a scientific fact deduced from thousands of studies about how energy moves through food webs. Here is the general reasoning. All animals get their energy directly from plants, or by eating something that has already eaten a plant. The group of animals most responsible for passing energy from plants to the animals that can’t eat plants is insects. This is what makes insects such vital components of healthy ecosystems. So many animals depend on insects for food (e.g., spiders, reptiles and amphibians, rodents, 96% of all terrestrial birds) that removing insects from an ecosystem spells its doom. But that is exactly what we have tried to do in our suburban landscapes. For over a century we have favored ornamental landscape plants from China and Europe over those that evolved right here. If all plants were created equal, that would be fine. But every plant species protects its leaves with a

10

20 most valuable woody and perennial native plant genera in terms of supporting biodiversity in the mid-Atlantic region

Plant Genus Quercus Prunus Salix Betula Populus Malus Vaccinium Acer Ulmus Pinus Carya Crataegus Picea Alnus Tilia Fraxinus Rosa Corylus

Woody Plants Common Name # of Lepidoptera Plant Genus species supported

oak black cherry willow birch poplar, cottonwood, aspen crabapple blueberry maple elm pine hickory hawthorn spruce alder basswood ash rose filbert, hazelnut

534 456 455 413 368 311 288 285 213 203 200 159 156 156 150 150 139 131

Solidago Aster Helianthus Eupatorium Ipomoea Carex Lonicera Lupinus Viola Geranium Rudbeckia Iris Oenothera Asclepias Verbena Penstemon Phlox Monarda

Perennials

Common Name

# of Lepidoptera species supported

goldenrod asters sunflower joe pye, boneset morning glory sedges honeysuckle lupine violets geraniums black-eyed susan iris evening primrose milkweed verbena beardtongue phlox bee balm

115 112 73 42 39 36 36 33 29 23 17 17 16 12 11 8 8 7

species-specific mixture of nasty chemicals. With few exceptions, only insect species that have shared a long evolutionary history with a particular plant lineage have developed the physiological adaptations required to digest the chemicals in their host’s leaves. They have specialized over time to eat only the plants sharing those particular chemicals. When we present insects from Pennsylvania with plants that evolved on another continent, chances are those insects will be unable to eat them. We used to think this was good. Kill all insects before they eat our plants! But an insect that cannot eat part of a leaf cannot fulfill its role in the food web. We have planted Kousa dogwood, a species from China that supports no insect herbivores, instead of our native flowering dogwood (Cornus florida) that supports 117 species of moths and butterflies alone. In hundreds of thousands of acres we have planted goldenraintree from China instead of one of our beautiful oaks and lost the chance to grow 534 species of caterpillars, all of them nutritious bird food. My research has shown that alien ornamentals support 29 times less biodiversity than do native ornamentals.

References:

Your Garden Has a Function

Shepherd, M., Buchmann, S., Vaughan, M., Hoffmann Black, S. 2003. Pollinator Conservation Handbook. The Xerces Society

In the past we didn’t design gardens that play a critical ecological role in the landscape, but we must do so in the future if we hope to avoid a mass extinction from which humans are not likely to recover. As quickly as possible we need to replace unnecessary lawn with densely planted woodlots that can serve as habitat for our local biodiversity. Homeowners can do this by planting the borders of their properties with native trees - plants such as white oaks (Quercus alba), black willows (Salix nigra), red maples (Acer rubrum), green ashes (Fraxinus pennsylvanica), black walnuts (Juglans nigra), river birches (Betula nigra) and shagbark hickories (Carya ovata), under-planted with woodies like serviceberry (Amelanchier canadensis), arrowwood (Viburnum dentatum), hazelnut (Corylus americnus), blueberries (Vaccinium spp). Our studies have shown that even modest increases in the native plant cover on suburban properties significantly increases the number and species of breeding birds, including birds of conservation concern. As gardeners and stewards of our land, we have never been so empowered to help save biodiversity from extinction, and the need to do so has never been so great. All we need to do is plant native plants!

Tallamy, D.W., M. Ballard, and V. D. D’Amico. 2010. Can alien plants support generalist insect herbivores? Biological Invasions. 12:2285-2292. Burghardt, K.T., D.W. Tallamy and W. G. Shriver. 2008. The impact of native plants on biodiversity in suburban landscapes. Conservation Biology 23:219244. Tallamy, D. W. and K. J. Shropshire. 2009. Ranking Lepidopteran use of native versus introduced plants. Conservation Biology 23:941-947.

Recommended reading:

Tallamy, D. 2007. Bringing Nature Home. Timber press. Louv, R. 2005. Last Child in the Woods. Algonquin Books. Wilcove, D. 2008. No Way Home. Island Press Stolzenberg, W. 2009. Where the Wild Things Were. Bloomsbury

Salix geyeriana. Willow species have a variety of growth forms and are excellent for sustaining biodiversity.


Bringing Nature Home

What we do

Bringing Nature Home is a recent book by Dr. Douglas Tallamy, a Professor and Chair of the Department of Entomology and Wildlife Ecology at the University of Delaware. One of his major research goals is to better understand the many ways insects interact with plants and how such interactions determine the diversity of animal communities. He has published over 72 research articles on related topics. This is a well-written, inspiring book that describes the various roles of insects in ecological systems, mostly focusing on their conversion of solar energy, by eating plants, into the protein source that is the basis of all terrestrial food webs. The roles of insects in pollinating our food crops, as well as native plants, has been receiving substantial press lately; add to that pest predation and we start to realize how underappreciated are our six-legged friends. Bringing Nature Home translates the results found by many biological field researchers into a big-picture call-to-action regarding how we manage the land in our care to encourage biodiversity. While there is awareness that nectar-producing flowers sustain pollinators for part of the year, insects eat the leaves and other plant parts for a substantial portion of their diet. Due to their shared evolutionary history, native plants support much greater insect diversity than introduced plant species. That insects consume parts of plants is not to be feared, but instead encouraged as a sign of a healthy functioning ecosystem. Tallamy includes chapters describing common insect families and some native plant genera that support high insect species diversity (please see the accompanying table.) While most of the research and examples of species in the book center on the Mid-Atlantic bioregion, the ecological concepts are pertinent wherever we live. Within many of the tree and shrub genera listed by Professor Tallamy, here in the Pacific Northwest, we have our own native species that support insect diversity. In addition, there are more great native perennials that serve insects including species in the genera Allium, Anaphalis, Delphinium, Dodecatheon, Erigeron, Heracleum, Lomatium, Sedum, and Urtica (from Pollinator Conservation Handbook, The Xerces Society.) More excellent native plant choices largely from the Northwest can be found in the rest of our catalog. Providing food for native insects by planting native plants is an important first step in sustaining the food and natural resource web that includes us. Besides food sources, insects also need appropriate nesting and overwintering habitat that is free of insecticides. The choice of native plants is also crucial here. Many butterflies will lay eggs exclusively on certain host plants. If native species of caterpillars are eating what you plant then you’ve achieved the intended goal. Some cavity nesting insects benefit by growing plants with pithy stems such as those found in Heracleum, Sambucus, Cornus, Rubus, and Rhus. Ground nesters require undisturbed ground and others benefit from standing dead trees or woody debris in the landscape. For more ideas on creating habitat to sustain biodiversity, check out www.xerces.org and http://bringingnaturehome.net for information and books on the subject.

Fourth Corner Nurseries is a wholesale native plant nursery located on 77 acres in the coastal lowlands of Whatcom County, Washington. Our customers are primarily other wholesale native plant nurseries that rely on our propagation skills. Incorporated in 1982, we have a small self-directed workforce of approximately 15 full-time employees. We produce two/three million direct-seeded, field-grown, bare-root plants every year, with approximately 500 species from nearly 1500 individual seed sources of trees, shrubs, grasses, perennials and emergents. Typically we direct seed into seedbeds and harvest the plants after one or two years. We began propagating native plants in 1987 as an experimental diversion from our then B&B production of ornamental trees and shrubs. The timing of our startup was coincidental with the developing market for native plants. What followed became a farming operation to supply an emerging demand for native, bare-root plant material. We sell our plants to other nurseries for resale as potted material and/or directly planted in the natural environment. In our region the bare-root planting window occurs in early spring, late fall and winter. Many of the species we field propagate are classified by ecologists as occurring in water saturated soils or even totally immersed in water. When we started, other propagators were growing these plants in wet boxes, immersed in water. We found that we could grow these emergent species in our welldrained sandy loam nursery soil. We also found that it was the competitive factors, not strict water requirements, which determined the success of these specialized species in their natural environment. This was our contribution to ecological knowledge. Our annual growing cycle typically begins by collecting seeds from natural populations a year or more before planting. Most of our customers have specific seed source requirements. Plantings can occur almost every month of the year, with spring and fall plantings the busiest. We have a two-year growing cycle with harvest beginning in the first year and, in some cases, replanting as transplants for an additional year. Often, we need to pre-treat our seed to break dormancy before planting. This warm and/or cold moist stratification has been a challenge, especially before propagation protocols became

widely available for native species. Many of our methods for seed treatment, planting and growing have developed through trial and error, yet we are always striving to improve. Our latest improvement has been adopting a New Zealand developed seeder, the “Seed Spider” (which is now used in California vegetable production), for our native plant seeding. Growing, harvesting, processing and shipping are accomplished by a dedicated crew. Because of our PNW coastal location, we are fortunate to have warm dry summers and moist, mostly unfrozen winters. This allows us to operate year-round and assures steady work for our crew. Our workers are here for the long term and have developed very specialized sets of skills; we are very proud of their accomplishments. In summer, labor efforts are directed to weed control and irrigation. Harvest and shipping of emergents and perennials take place during most months. Tree and shrub bare-root harvest begins in November, continuing through March. Some dormant shrub material inventory is maintained in our coolers through June for late season projects. By October the rains return to the PNW and the grower’s task is to convince the vigorous juvenile native plants to set buds and establish dormancy. We begin our harvest as soon as leaves drop in the fall; typically the plants are lifted, placed into totes and brought into our grading room for sorting and shipping. UPS is a favored shipping system; however, direct customer pickup and truck shipments are also available. We are fortunate to have soils suitable for our specialized agriculture as well as a Washington State “Water Right.” We realize that energy and fertilizer resources will become scarce and more expensive in the further. We strive toward sustainable production and, as any bare-root producer understands, our intensive growing system is very difficult to sustain productivity, year after year. To help us mitigate this problem, we apply compost and have a cover-cropping and soil-nutrition monitoring program in place. Our goal is to never have bare, fallow fields.

11


Herbaceous Wetland & Saltmarsh Plants Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Agastache occidentalis (Western Giant Hyssop) Native perennial redolent of licorice complete with its sweetish flavor, purple flowers attract butterflies. Found in vernally wet areas east of the Cascades. SS Eastern WA. Bare-root seedling .70 .53 Allium validum (Pacific Onion) OBL Wild onion found in wetlands of West Coast States. In production Angelica arguta (Sharptooth Angelica) FACW Western North American native perennial, 3-4' tall, with white flower clusters. Adds interest and wildlife value to ornamental ponds. Prefers moist to wet sites. In production Aster subspicatus [Symphyotrichum subspicatum v subspicatum] (Douglas Aster) FACW West coast native aster of moist habitats with 3-4' tall branching stems and many purple flowers, attracts butterflies. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands, WA outer coast Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .30 .28 Boykinia major (Large Boykinia) FACW This oversized rhizomatous member of the saxifrage family occupies moist areas, but tolerates late season drought. Large palmate leaves and flowering scapes up to 3' tall and topped by 1" white vase shaped flowers make this an attractive plant for the wet edge. SS OR In production. Inquire for availability

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Carex ovalis [C. leporina, C. tracyi] (Tracy’s Sedge, Eggbract Sedge) FAC, OBL Tufted native sedge found in wetlands and along streambanks. SS south Puget Sound lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30

Carex deweyana (Dewey’s Sedge) FAC+ or UPL Native clump-forming sedge found in wooded or partially shaded wetlands of northern North America. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .48 .35 .32

Carex pachystachya (Chamisso Sedge) FAC, FACU Common western US native tufted sedge found in the transition zone from wet to dryish open habitats. Great potential raingarden species. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .32 .29 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32

Carex echinata [C. stellulata] (Star Sedge) OBL Widespread native tufted sedge with narrow leaves and flower clusters that look like little stars. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30

Carex pellita [C. lanuginosa] (Woolly Sedge) OBL Native slender rhizomatous sedge, often found in wetlands, stream banks, and pond edges that may dry out in late summer. SS eastern WA, CO Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30

Carex lanuginosa please see Carex pellita

Carex stipata (Sawbeak Sedge) OBL North American native sedge forming solid clumps in moist areas. Attractive light green foliage, flowering culms to 4'. SS northwest WA lowlands and southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex unilateralis (Mackenzie Lateral Sedge) FACW Western native rhizomatous sedge found in shallow or seasonal wetlands. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex utriculata [C. rostrata] (Beaked Sedge) OBL Widespread North American native sedge with lovely foliage and flowering heads to 4'. Clump forming with rhizomes and stolons on perennially wet sites. In shallow water, creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. SS east slope Cascades In production. Inquire for availability.

Carex aperta (Columbian Sedge) FACW Northwest native rhizomatous sedge for wet areas. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .48 .42 .36

Carex arcta (Northern Cluster Sedge) FACW+, OBL Native tufted sedge found along streambanks and in wet meadows. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex athrostachya (Slenderbeak Sedge) FACW Western native tufted sedge found in seasonally wet meadows. Tolerant of late summer drought. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex bebbii (Bebb’s Sedge) OBL Attractive native narrow-leaved sedge found in wet meadows and clearings of northern North America. SS northwest WA lowlands April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex comosa (Bristly Sedge) OBL Attractive native sedge of marshes and wet meadows. Occurs sporadically across North America. A sensitive plant in Washington. SS northwest WA lowlands, Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .60 .45 .35 .30 Winter price .72 .54 .43 .36 Carex cusickii (Cusick’s Sedge) OBL Western native sedge of marshes and wet meadows. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30

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Carex spectabilis (Showy Sedge) FACW Northwest native tufted sedge. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex stellata please see Carex echinata

Carex amplifolia (Bigleaf Sedge) FACW+ Western native sedge with impressive large broad leaves, flowering spikes to 4'. Attractive for ornamental ponds. Prefers moist soil conditions. SS northwest WA lowlands, east WA Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .48 .42 .36

Carex aquatilis v. dives [C. sitchensis] (Sitka Sedge) OBL Native west coast sedge, tufted on short rhizomes with pretty, drooping flower heads. Attractive for ornamental ponds. Common in wet meadows, marshes and lake shores. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Carex densa (Dense Sedge) OBL West Coast native tufted sedge of seasonal wetlands and wet meadows at low elevations. A sensitive plant in Washington. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30

Boykinia occidentale (Boykinia elata) (Coast Boykinia, Brookfoam) FACW This streamside associate sports sprays of tiny white flowers borne on tall stems anchored in basal foliage. Tolerates summer drought. SS southwestern OR Tubes 1.05

Carex aquatilis v. aquatilis (Water Sedge) OBL Native rhizomatous sedge, common in wetlands across North America. SS east slope WA Cascades Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .60 .45 .35 .33

Grade

Carex comosa (Bristly Sedge) Carex lasiocarpa (Slender Wetland Sedge) OBL Native sedge with narrow leaves to 3' tall, found in shallow water areas and neutral bogs. SS WY Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 Winter price .60 .43 .35 Carex lenticularis (Lakeshore Sedge) Western native tufted sedge found in wet, sunny or partially shaded sites. SS east slope Cascades, southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex leporina please see Carex ovalis Carex lyngbyei (Lyngby’s Sedge) OBL Large, rhizome forming sedge, common along shorelines. SS northwest WA coast Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex mertensii (Merten’s Sedge) FAC or FACW Densely tufted sedge, with attractive flowering spikes, found in dry to moist habitats of the northwest. Excellent ornamental potential. SS western WA mid-montaine, east WA Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex nebrascensis (Nebraska Sedge) OBL Common sedge in wet areas east of the Cascades into the western Plains states. Tolerant of disturbances. SS Eastern WA, UT Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Carex obnupta (Slough Sedge) OBL West Coast native evergreen sedge for moist to wet sites, rhizomatous and vigorous. Attractive sedge in mass, for shade or sun. In shallow water, creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. Containerize for ornamental ponds. SS northwest WA lowlands, western WA outer coast Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .29 .25

Carex vesicaria (Inflated Sedge) OBL Native rhizomatous, mat-forming sedge from freshwater wetlands or streambanks. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .40 .30 Carex vulpinoidea (Fox Sedge) OBL NEW Native clumping sedge found in moist meadows, marshes and ditches. Great potential rain garden plant. More common east of the Cascades but ours from Whatcom County population. SS NW WA lowlands April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Deschampsia caespitosa (Tufted Hairgrass) FAC or FACW Tufted grass native to marshes and wet prairies across much of North America. Attractive narrow foliage and tall flowering plumes. SS southwest WA lowlands April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Distichlis spicata (Seashore Saltgrass, Inland saltgrass) FAC+ or FACW Native rhizomatous grass found in salt marshes and also upland areas in the dry West. An important food source for waterfowl, host plant for butterfly larvae (Wandering Skipper), and erosion control in estuaries. Inland strains are extremely droughttolerant, and may be invasive in some situations. SS northwest WA lowlands In production. Inquire for availability. Dodecatheon jefferyii (Tall Mountain Shooting Star) FACW Western native cyclamen relative often found in wet meadows and along streams from the foothills to alpine in the mountainous west. Prefers moist, sunny or partially shaded sites with rich soils. Fall is a good time to transplant these. SS east WA Cascades, MT Tubes available Spring and Fall only Tubes 1.40 1.10 Eleocharis palustris (Common Spikerush) OBL Widespread native emergent with narrow dark green culms, rhizomatous and mat-forming in shallow water habitats. Creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. Containerize for ornamental ponds. SS Willamette Valley OR Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .45 .35 .32


Herbaceous Wetland & Saltmarsh Plants Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Epilobium luteum (Yellow Willowherb) FACW Western native perennial with lovely yellow flowers and stout rhizomes. Found near streambanks and lake margins. SS WA east slope Cascades Bare-root seedling .70 .48 Equisetum hyemale (Rough Horsetail) FACW Native rhizomatous horsetail, evergreen with unbranched stems. Transplants .50 .40 .29 Glyceria grandis (Reed Mannagrass) OBL Rhizomatous native grass found in wet habitats across most of North America. Creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Glyceria striata [elata] (Fowl Mannagrass) OBL North American native wetland grass. Seed heads are an important waterfowl food source. Creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .30 Hordeum brachyantherum (Meadow Barley) FACW Western native grass, a common component of salt marshes and moist meadow habitats. SS northwest WA lowlands April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Iris missouriensis (Western Blue Flag Iris) FACW, OBL Native iris with white to blue colored flowers on 1-2’ tall branched stems. Transplants best in the fall. SS N CA Bare-root 1-0 seedling .80 .60 .48 2-0 seedling .90 .70 .60 Tubes 1.30 1.10 Iris setosa (Alaska Wild Iris) FAC Wild iris of northern latitudes with stout leaves and stems to 2', dark blue flowers. Prefers a moist or wet sunny location. Propagated from seed. SS SE AK Bare-root 1-0 seedling .80 .60 .48 .40 2-0 seedling .90 .70 .60 .50 Tubes 1.30 1.10 Juncus acuminatus (Tapertip Rush) OBL Common tufted rush found in lake margins and meadows that remain wet all year. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus articulatus (Jointed Rush) OBL Native rush common in wetlands and brackish marshes across much of North America. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus balticus [J. arcticus] (Baltic Rush) OBL North American native rush, strongly rhizomatous, common in brackish marshes, tideflats, and wet meadows. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus bolanderi (Bolander’s Rush) OBL Common west-coast rush of wet meadows and marshes with spherical flower heads. Creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus effusus (Soft Rush) FACW Globally common tufted rush with short rhizomes, found in moist to wet habitats. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Juncus gerardii (Mud Rush) FACW- NEW Rhizomatous, tufted perennial with grass-like leaves up to 1-2' tall. Common in coastal freshwater and saltwater marshes in North America, creating important fish, invertebrate and waterfowl habitat. SS southwest WA coast Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus mertensianus (Mertens’ Rush) OBL Tufted, rhizomatous rush with leaf-like bracts found along seeps, streams, pond edges and in swales and ditches. SS Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus oxymeris (Pointed Rush) FACW+ Beautiful northwest native rush with iris-like leaves, common west of the Cascades in wet meadows and lake shores, sometimes where it dries out in late summer. Strong rhizomes are important for erosion control and sediment retention. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus supiniformis (Spreading Rush) OBL Northwest native wetland plant, growing horizontally and rooting at the nodes. Common in estuarine and freshwater wetlands and ditches, often where inundated in the winter, drier in late summer. SS northwest WA lowlands April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Juncus tenuis (Slender Rush) FACWCommon native rush in habitats that are saturated in the winter but dry out in the summer. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Lysichiton americanus (Skunk Cabbage) OBL The giant golden spathes lurking around the swamp amongst huge fleshy leaves are unmistakable. SS western WA lowlands Sare-root seedlings Small .90 .58 .49 .45 Medium 1.00 .65 .55 .50 Tubes 1.05 .80 Mentha arvensis (Field Mint) FAC, FACW Low growing native perennial, rhizomatous and strongly aromatic. Purple flowers are good for butterflies, seeds eaten by wildlife. Common in wet places, sun or partial shade. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .40 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Menyanthes trifoliata (Bog Buckbean) OBL NEW Rhizomatous aquatic perennial with three-parted succulent leaves and unusual white flowers covered with white hairs on the inner surface. Common in bogs and occasional in lake and pond margins across much of North America. Bare-root divisions .95 .85 Mimulus [Diplacus] aurantiacus (Orange Bush Monkey Flower) Showy orange-flowered subshub native in southwest Oregon and California. A favorite of hummingbirds and pollinating bees. SS CA Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Mimulus cardinalis (Scarlet Monkey Flower) FACW NEW Beautiful west coast native wildflower with red flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Will grow in standing water or regular garden soil but not too much drought. SS Willamette Valley OR Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .36 Tubes 1.05 Mimulus guttatus (Yellow Monkey Flower) OBL Showy native wildflower with yellow flowers, found in moist habitats and in dwarfed form on dry balds. A good butterfly and hummingbird plant. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .30 .27

Juncus ensifolius (Daggerleaf Rush) FACW Common rhizomatous rush with iris-like leaves. Found in wet habitats without deep standing water. SS northwest WA lowlands SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32

Mimulus lewisii (Pink Monkey Flower) FACW, OBL Showy fuschia colored monkeyflower found in moist alpine meadows and stream sides. A good butterfly and hummingbird plant, adds interest and wildlife value to ornamental ponds. SS western WA upland Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .36 Tubes 1.15 1.00

Juncus falcatus v. sitchensis (Sickleleaf Rush) FACW- NEW Rhizomatous tufted rush found in coastal marshes, tideflats and back into sand dune areas. Important for erosion control and sediment retention in coastal areas. SS southwest WA coast Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32

Oenanthe sarmentosa (Water Parsley) OBL White flowered perennial along streamsides and in shallow water wetlands. Creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. Adds interest and wildlife value to ornamental ponds. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Petasites palmatus (Palmate Coltsfoot) FACWRhizomatous perennial 2-3' tall, with large palmate leaves and white to pinkish flowers. Common in wet areas in low to mid elevation forests and openings. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .36 Plantago maritima v juncoides (Sea Plantain, Goose Tongue) FACW+ Common west coast perennial with fleshy linear leaves, found on seashores and salt marshes. An important food source for waterfowl, also edible for people. SS northwest WA coast Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Potentilla pacifica [P. anserina, Argentina egedii] (Pacific Silverweed) OBL Northwest native low-growing perennial, strongly stoloniferous. A quickly spreading groundcover with attractive yellow flowers and leaves with silvery undersides. Found in marshes and stream edges, and on sandy beaches. Salt-tolerant for shoreline plantings. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Scirpus [Schoenoplectus] acutus v. acutus (Hardstem Bulrush) OBL Bold, strongly rhizomatous bulrush, with dark green culms reaching 6' + in standing water. Containerize for ornamental ponds. Widespread native and also used for wastewater filtration. SS northwest WA lowlands, UT Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .32 .29 Winter price .60 .50 .40 .36 Scirpus [Schoenoplectus] americanus (Threesquare, American Bulrush) OBL Widespread native rhizomatous bulrush with triangular stems to 3' tall. Found in fresh or brackish marshes, wet habitats. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Scirpus atrocinctus [S. cyperinus] (Wool Grass) FACW+ or OBL Graceful tufted rush for wet habitats, attractive flowering plumes reaching 4-6'. Creates important egg-laying habitat for amphibians. Excellent for ornamental ponds. SS western WA lowlands, SD April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Scirpus lacustris [S. validus, Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani] (Softstem Bulrush) OBL Widespread native wetland plant spreading vigorously by rhizomes. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .32 .29 Winter price .60 .50 .40 .36 Scirpus [Schoenoplectus] maritimus (Basket Rush) OBL Rhizomatous rush with strong triangular culms to 5'. Fresh or brackish marshes. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Scirpus microcarpus (Small Fruited Bulrush) OBL Common flat-leaved rhizomatous bulrush in wet meadows and shallow water across western and northern North America. An important wildlife plant. Creates egg-laying habitat for amphibians. SS northwest WA lowlands, eastern WA Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Scutellaria lateriflora (Blue Skullcap) FACW, OBL North American native wetland perennial with spreading rhizomes and long clusters of small blue flowers. Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .29 .27 Sidalcea hendersonii (Henderson’s Checker-Mallow) FACW+ Northwest native perennial which sends up spikes of miniature pink hollyhock-like flowers. Found in wet meadows and tidal marshes along the coast. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedlings .75 .52 .45 .40 Tubes 1.20 .96 Sisyrinchium californicum (Yellow-Eyed Grass) FACW, OBL West coast native wildflower with iris-like leaves in a slowly expanding clump and beautiful yellow flowers, 6-12" tall. Likes early spring moisture, will spread by seed. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .60 .45 .39 Winter price .70 .50 .45

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Herbaceous Wetland & Saltmarsh Plants Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Sisyrinchium idahoense (Western Blue-Eyed Grass) FACW, OBL Native wildflower with iris-like leaves in a slowly expanding clump and beautiful blue flowers, 6-12" tall. Likes early spring moisture. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .25 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Sium suave (Water Parsnip) OBL North American native perennial with white carrot-type flowers, common in low marshy ground and shallow water. Adds interest and wildlife value to ornamental ponds. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 . 29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Sparganium angustifolium [S. emersum] (Narrowleaf Burreed) OBL Native rhizomatous perennial for wet ground with up to three feet of standing water. Provides excellent habitat for wildlife and also takes up pollutants readily in bioswales and water quality detention ponds. SS northwest WA lowlands April 15-Dec 1 .65 .47 .38 .34 Stachys chamissonis v. cooleyae (Cooley’s Hedge Nettle) FACW Northwest native rhizomatous perennial 2-3' tall, with pink flowers in mid-summer that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Common in moist clearings. Containerize for ornamental ponds. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Stachys pilosa [S. palustris] (Marsh Hedge Nettle) FACW+ Western native perennial 2-3' tall, with beautiful pink flowers in mid-summer that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. SS western WA Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .55 .40 .35 Tolmiea menziesii (Youth on Age) FACW, OBL Northwest native rhizomatous perennial to 2' tall, with small pinkish brown flowers. Found in moist shady habitats. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling .65 .50 Triglochin maritima (Seaside Arrow-Grass) OBL Rhizomatous perennial with fleshy, grass-like leaves. Common in tidal marshes and mudflats along the Pacific Coast. SS northwest WA coast Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .40 .35 Typha latifolia (Common Cattail) OBL Widespread native perennial with long, flat leaves, persistent seed spike to 6' tall, found in all types of shallow water habitats. Provides good cover and food for wildlife, but does tend to take over. Also used for water quality treatment. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .40 .35 .28 Winter price .60 .48 .42 .36

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Veratrum californicum (California False Hellebore) OBL, FACW Large western native perennial with thick rhizomes and greenish-white flower spikes, moist to wet areas in sun or shade. Goes dormant in mid-summer. SS WA Cascades Bare-root seedling .90 .72 (Fall only) Veronica americana (American Brooklime) OBL Common blue-flowered perennial in wetlands, stream edges, and other wet sites across North America. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Viola palustris (Marsh violet) FACW, OBL Spreading lavender violet of wet marshy areas. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .36 .34

Bare-root wetland perennials are available most months of the year, however, we’ve noticed most vigorous growth transplanting in April or May. From December 1st through April 15 per plant prices are higher reflecting additional harvest costs.

Bulbs Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Allium acuminatum (Hooker’s Onion) Western native bulb with rose-colored flowers, typical onion scent. Found in open, rocky sites. Propagated from seed. SS northwest WA lowlands Bulbs .65 .55 .50 .45 (Fall only)

Delphinium burkei (Tall Meadow Larkspur) FACU NEW Deep blue larkspur which can reach over 3 feet tall, found in openings of Ponderosa pine forests or sagebrush habitats. SS east slope WA Cascades Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only)

Allium cernuum (Nodding Onion) Small wild onion with nodding umbels of pink flowerets. Propagated from seed. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Delphinium glaucum (Sierra Larkspur) FACW NEW Beautiful western native larkspur with dark blue flowers. Prefers moist conditions. Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only) Tubes 1.05 .80

Allium douglasii (Douglas Onion) Strong smelling, showy onion that paints pink vernal moist areas of the shrub-steppe in the spring SS E WA Bulbs .65 .64 .53 (Fall only) Allium amplectens (Narrowleaf Onion) Often-parthenogenic bulbous onion native to Western North America flowering in clusters of white to pale pink. Nice planted in drifts. SS BC Bulbs .75 .64 .53 (Fall only) Allium obtusum v. conspicum (Red Sierra Onion) Low growing native onion with magenta colored flowers from the hills of the Sierra Nevada mountains. Found in sandy gravelly subalpine sites. Propagated from seed. SS Northern CA lowlands Bulbs 1.00 .80 (Fall only) Brodiaea please also see Dichelostemma or Triteleia Brodiaea coronaria (Crown Brodiaea, Harvest Brodiaea) Purple and white flowers of this dainty lily family member appear after leaves have died back sometime around June or July. Bulbs 1.00 .80 (Fall only) Camassia leichtlinii (Greater Camas) FACWEdible western native bulb with showy 2-4' stems of blue flowers. Hardy. Available from August to October only. Propagated from seed. SS northwest WA lowlands SOLD OUT Camassia quamash (Common Camas) FACW Edible native bulb with showy blue flowers. Found in open grassy areas of the western states, prefers spring moisture. Propagated from seed. SS Northern CA Small bulbs .65 .55 .40 .35 (Fall only) Medium bulbs .75 .65 .45 .40 (Fall only) Large bulbs .85 .75 .60 .50 (Fall only) Chlorogalum pomeridianum (Wavyleaf Soap Plant) NEW Tall night-pollinated member of the lily family which unfurls its spider like white striped blue blossoms in the afternoon. SS N CA Small bulbs 1.00 .80 .60

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Delphinium menziesii (Menzies’ Larkspur) Deep blue larkspur with a white face native to coastal bluffs and prairies of the Pacific Northwest. Available fall only. SS northwest WA lowlands Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.05 .95 (Fall only) Delphinium multiplex (Kittias Larkspur) Tall profusely blooming Larkspur found along seasonal streamsides in the shrub-steppe country. Endemic to central Washington. Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only) Delphinium nuttallii (Upland Larkspur) Stunning deep blue northwest Delphinium associated with Garry Oak meadows. Found on coastal bluffs and lowland outwash prairies. SS south Puget Sound lowlands. Small bulbs .70 .60 .49 (Fall only) Medium bulbs .85 .72 .60 .51 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.05 .89 .74 .63 (Fall only) Delphinium trollifolium (Streambank Delphinium) Deep blue delphinium with white highlights appearing in moist woods and along stream banks from the Columbia River Gorge to California. SS Columbia River Gorge Small bulbs .70 .60 .49 (Fall only) Medium bulbs .85 .72 .60 .51 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.05 .89 (Fall only) Dichelostemma congestum [Brodiaea congesta] (Ookow) West coast native of the lily family growing from small bulbs. Flowers a tightly packed ball of purple flowers atop a 1-2' stem with onion like leaves. SS Southern OR, Columbia River Gorge Small bulbs .70 .60 .49 (Fall only) Medium bulbs .85 .72 .60 .51 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.05 .89 .74 (Fall only) Dichelostemma multiflorum [Brodiaea multiflora] (Roundtooth Snake Lily) This lily family member packs a globular cluster of pink to lavender tubular flowers onto 1-3" stems. Grows in clay to heavy soils in the foothills of N CA and S OR. SS N CA Bulbs .80 .70 .60 (Fall only)

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Erythronium oregonum (Giant White Fawn Lily) West Coast native bulb with mottled lance shaped leaves crowned by delicate white lily like flowers. Full sun to part shade in coastal balds and lowland forest. SS Northwest WA lowlands. Small bulbs 1.20 .95 .85 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.40 1.15 1.05 (Fall only) Fritillaria affinis [F. lanceolata] (Checker Lily) Western native bulb with mottled purple and green flowers. Found in open grassy areas lightly shaded forest openings. Propagated from seed. SS southwest WA lowlands Small bulbs .60 .40 .30 .27 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.40 1.10 .90 .65 (Fall only) Fritillaria pudica (Yellow Bell or Johnny Jump Up) Eastern Cascades to Rocky Mountain native bulb with delicate fragrant yellow flowers that usher in spring. SS east WA Small bulbs .60 .40 .30 .27 Large bulbs 1.40 1.10 .90 .65 Hastingsia alba (White Rush Lily) OBL A lily family member from the Siskiyou Mountains with a plume of small white flowers found growing in wet areas. SS N CA Small bulbs 1.00 .80 .70 Large bulbs 1.20 .96 .84 Lilium columbianum (Columbia Lily) Northwest native lily with bright orange speckled flowers, lovely fragrance. Propagated from seed. SS western WA lowlands. Small bulbs 1.00 .85 .70 .60 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.20 1.02 .84 .72 (Fall only) Lilium pardalinum (Leopard Lily) FACW+, OBL Bright orange red orange lily native to Oregon and California. Likes a moist soil regime. SS N. CA Small bulbs .85 .72 .60 .51 Large bulbs 1.00 .85 .70 .60 Lilium pardalinum v. vollmeri (Vollmer’s Lily) OBL NEW NW California and SW Oregon native variety of pardalinum with spectacular red and orange flowers. Prefers moist soil conditions. Large bulbs 1.50 1.28 Trillium chloropetalum (Painted Trillium) NI Stems of three mottled green leaves amongst which nestles a dainty white flower. Found in moist to wet woods. Seed grown rhizomes. SS western WA lowlands. In production


Bulbs Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Grade

Trillium ovatum (Western Trillium) NI North American native wildflower with showy white flowers and stout rhizomes. Found in moist to wet woods. 4+year old seed grown. SS western WA lowlands Bulbs 1.50 1.28 1.05 (Fall only)

Triteleia [Brodiaea] hyacinthina (Fool’s Onion, White Brodiaea) FACU or FACW Western native bulb with lovely white flowers. Prefers springwet summer-dry conditions. SS northwest WA Bulbs 1.00 .80 (Fall only)

Triteleia grandiflora v. grandiflora [Brodiaea douglasii] (Large Flowered Brodiaea) Bright blue umbels grace meadows and hillsides most commonly east of the Cascades. Bulbs 1.00 .80 (Fall only)

Triteleia laxa (Grassnut, Ithuriel’s Spear) NEW California native wildflower bearing a cluster of beautiful blue or purple flowers, each one a little six-pointed star. SS N CA Bulbs 1.00 .80 (Fall only)

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Bulbs are harvested and shipped from August through October only. Many of our perennials, especially the irises, delphiniums, and lomatiums, transplant bare-root best at this time also. Please see the upland perennial section for our expanding wildflower selection.

Triteleia grandiflora v. howellii [Brodiaea howellii] (Bicolor Triteleia, Howell’s Triteleia) NEW Northwest native bulb, white flowers have a blue midvein. SS southwest WA Bulbs 1.00 .80 (Fall only)

Seeds Fourth Corner Nurseries is offering a growing selection of seeds of native herbaceous plants, farm-grown but tracked by original genetic origin. Please inquire for larger quantity discount prices.

1 oz

4 oz

Carex amplifolia (Bigleaf sedge) $10 Carex aquatilis v. dives [C. sitchensis] (Sitka Sedge) $7.50 Carex arcta (Northern Cluster Sedge) $10 Carex athrostachya (Slenderbeak Sedge) $12.50 Carex bebbii (Bebb's Sedge) $7.50 Carex comosa (Bristly Sedge) $10 Carex cusickii (Cusick’s Sedge) $7.50 Carex echinata [C. stellulata] (Star Sedge) $7.50 Carex lyngbyei (Lyngbyei's Sedge) $7.50 Carex mertensii (Mertens’s Sedge) $10 Carex ovalis [C. leporina] (Eggbract Sedge) $10 Carex pachystachya (Chamisso Sedge) $12 Carex stipata (Sawbeak Sedge) $6 Carex unilateralis (Mackenzie Lateral Sedge) $12.50 Deschampsia caespitosa (Tufted Hairgrass) $5 Glyceria grandis (Reed Mannagrass) Glyceria striata [elata] (Fowl Mannagrass) Hordeum brachyantherum (Meadow Barley) Iris setosa (Alaska Wild Iris) $12.50 Juncus acuminatus (Tapertip Rush) $12.50 Juncus bolanderi (Bolander's Rush) $15 Juncus effusus (Soft Rush) $12 Juncus ensifolius (Daggerleaf Rush) $12.50 Juncus supiniformis (Spreading Rush) $8 Juncus tenuis (Slender Rush) $12.50 Mimulus guttatus (Yellow Monkey Flower) $25 Plantago maritima (Sea Plantain) $6 Scirpus (Schoenoplectus) acutus v. acutus $9 (Hardstem Bulrush) Scirpus cyperinus (atrocinctus) (Woolgrass) $9 Scirpus (Schoenoplectus tabernaemontani, validus) $9 lacustris (Soft Stem Bulrush) Scirpus (Schoenoplectus) maritimus (Basket Rush) $9 Scirpus (Schoenoplectus) microcarpus $9 (Small Fruited Bulrush) Sidalcea hendersonii (Henderson’s Checker-Mallow) $9 Sisyrinchium californicum (Yellow-Eyed Grass) $7.50 Sisyrinchium idahoense (Blue-Eyed Grass) $7.50 Triglochin maritimum (Sea Arrow-Grass) $6 Viola palustris (Marsh violet) $35

$20 $15 $20 $25 $15 $20 $15 $15 $15 $20 $20 $20 $12 $25 $10 $8 $8 $6 $25 $25 $30 $20 $25 $15 $25 $50 $12 $18

$45 $45 $36 $75 $75 $60 $45 $36 $54

$18 $18

$54 $54

$180

$18 $18

$54 $54

$180 $180

$18 $15 $15 $12 $70

$54 $45

$180

Achillea millefolium (Yarrow) $7.50 Agoseris aurantiaca (Alpine Agoseris) $10 Allium acuminatum (Hooker’s Onion) $20 Allium cernuum (Nodding Onion) $5 Anaphalis margaritacea (Pearly Everlasting) $5 Anemone multifida (Pacific Anemone) $10 Antennaria microphylla (Rosy Pussy-Toes) $20 Arnica chamissonis (Leafy Arnica) $10 Artemisia michauxiana (Michaux's Sagewort) $10 Artemisia suksdorfii (Coastal Mugwort) $5 Artemisia tilesii (Aleutian Wormwood) $10 Asclepias speciosa (Showy Milkweed) $10 Aster chilensis (Pacific Aster) $7.50 Aster eatonii (Eaton’s Aster) $7.50 Aster foliaceus (Leafy Bract Aster) $15 Aster subspicatus (Symphyotrichum subspicatum) $7.50 (Douglas Aster) Carex tumuicola (Foothill Sedge) $15 Danthonia spicata (Poverty Oatgrass) Delphinium burkeii (Tall Meadow Larkspur) $15 Delphinium menziesii (Menzies' Larkspur) $17.50 Delphinium multiplex (Kittitas Larkspur) $15 Delphinium nuttallii (Upland Larkspur) $15 Delphinium trollifolium (Streambank Larkspur) $15 Dodecatheon hendersonii $25 (Broad-Leaved Shooting Star) Echinacea angustifolia (Narrow Leaved Coneflower)

$15 $45 $20 $40 $120 $7.50 $15 $45 $10 $30 $20 $60 $40 $20 $20 $10 $30 $100 $20 $20 $15 $45 $15 $45 $30 $90 $15 $45

Herbaceous Wetland Plants

Herbaceous Upland Perennials

¼ oz

$30 $6 $30 $35 $30 $30 $90 $30 $90 $50 $4

¼ oz

1 pound

$150 $150

$120

$150 $120

$150

$300

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Coneflower) Epilobium (Chamerion) angustifolium $5 (Common Fireweed) Erigeron speciosus (Showy Fleabane) $7.50 Eriophyllum lanatum (Woolly Sunflower) $10 Festuca roemerii (Roemer's Fescue) $5 Geum macrophylum (Yellow Avens) $5 Grindelia integrifolia v. macrophylla (Coast Gumweed) $5 Helianthus maximiliani (Maximilian Sunflower) $5 Heuchera cylindrica (Round Leafed Alum Root) $25 Hydrophyllum tenuipes (Pacific Waterleaf) $15 Iris douglasiana (Douglas Iris) $10 Iris setosa (Alaska Wild Iris) $12.50 Iris tenax (Oregon Iris) $12.50 Lathyrus japonicus v. maritimus (Beach Pea) Leymus [Elymus] glaucus (Blue Wildrye) Liatris spicata (Gayfeather) $7.50 Linum perenne ssp. lewisii (Wild Blue Flax) Lupinus albicaulis (Sicklekeel Lupine) $5 Lupinus latifolius (Broadleaf Lupine) $10 Lupinus lepidus (Pacific Lupine) $10.00 Lupinus leucodermis (Velvet-leaved Lupine) $10.00 Lupinus littoralis (Seashsore Lupine) $5 Lupinus polyphyllus (Bigleaf Lupine) $5 Lupinus rivularis (Riverside Lupine) $7.50 Luzula multiflora (Common Woodrush) $15 Mimulus aurantiacus (Orange Bush Monkey Flower) $25 Mimulus cardenalis (Scarlet Monkey Flower) $15 Mimulus guttatus (Yellow Monkey Flower) $15 Mimulus lewisii (Pink Flower) $25 Monardella odoratissima (Mountain Monardella) $10 Osmorhiza chilensis (Sweet Cicely) $12.50 Penstemon anguineus (Tongue-Leaved Penstemon) $10 Penstemon attenuatus (Sulfur Penstemon) $10 Penstemon cardwellii (Cardwell's Penstemon) $10 Penstemon ovatus (Broadleaf Penstemon) $10 Penstemon procerus (Tiny-Bloom Penstemon) $10 Penstemon richardsonii (Cut-leaved Penstemon) $10 Penstemon serrulatus (Cascade Penstemon) $10 Penstemon whippleanus (Whipple’s Penstemon) $10 Perideridia oregana (Oregon Yampah) $7.50 Potentilla gracilis (Graceful Cinquefoil) $7.50 Prunella vulgaris (Self Heal) $7.50 Sedum oreganum (Oregon Stonecrop) $50 Sedum stenopetalum (Narrow-leaved Stonecrop) $15 tiny offsets Sidalcea campestris (Meadow Checkerbloom) $7.50 Sidalcea hendersonii (Henderson’s Checker-Mallow) $7.50 Sidalcea malviflora v. virgata (Dwarf Checkerbloom) $7.50 Sisyrinchium californicum (Yellow Eyed Grass) $7.50 Sisyrinchium idahoense (Blue Eyed Grass) $7.50 Solidago (Euthamia) occidentalis (Western Goldenrod) $7.50 Solidago canadensis (Canadian Goldenrod) $7.50 Solidago multiradiata (Northern Goldenrod) $20 Tellima grandiflora (Fringecup) $10 Viola palustris (Marsh violet) $35

Annuals

Clarkia amoena (Farewell to Spring) Claytonia [Montia] perfoliata (Streambank Springbeauty) Collinsia parviflora (Blue-eyed Mary) Gilia capitata (Bluehead Gilia) Lupinus bicolor [micranthus] (Minature Lupine) Mimulus guttatus (Yellow Monkey Flower) Nicotiana acuminatum (Many Flower Tobacco) Plagiobothrys figuratus (Popcorn Flower) Plectritis congesta (Sea Blush)

1 oz $4 $10

4 oz

1 pound

$12

$15 $45 $20 $60 $15 $50 $15 $45 $10 $30 $10 $60 $30 $90 $20 $60 $25 $75 $25 $75 $8 $24 $4 $12 $15 $45 $4 $12 $10 $30 $20 $60 $20 $20 $60 $10 $30 $10 $30 $15 $45 $30 $50 $30 $30 $90 $50 $20 $25 $75 $20 $60 $20 $60 $20 $60 $20 $20 $60 $20 $60 $20 $60 $20 $60 $15 $45 $15 $45 $15 $100 $30 $15 $45 $15 $45 $15 $45 $15 $15 $45 $15 $45 $15 $45 $40 $20 $60 $70

$20 $15

$40 $30

$6 $5 $6 $25 $15 $15 $15

$12 $10 $12 $50 $30 $30 $30

$36 $30 $36 $90

$200 $100

$40

$150

$150 $150

$100 $120

15


Herbaceous Upland Perennials Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Achillea millefolium (Common Yarrow) FACU North American native perennial herb, to 2-4' tall. Soft fernlike foliage; white or pink flower clusters attract butterflies. Rhizomatous and drought-tolerant nature make for effective as well as attractive erosion control. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28 Achlys triphylla (Vanillaleaf) Attractive rhizomatous groundcover composed of three fanshaped leaves atop a slender stalk. Dried foliage smells like vanilla. SS western WA In production. Inquire for availability.

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Armeria maritima (Sea Thrift) Circumpolar native plant of saltwater shorelines with tufted narrow leaves and globular pink flowers. Attracts native pollinators. Drought tolerant. The native variety exhibits twisted leaves and flowering stems distinctive from commercial varieties. SS western WA lowlands Tubes 1.05 .80 Arnica chamissonis (Leafy Arnica) Native herbaceous perennial with yellow sunflower-like flowers. Prefers moist meadows and thickets. SS CO Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32

Actaea rubra (Baneberry) Native perennial herb with white flower clusters and red poisonous berries. A common wildflower in moist partially shaded sites. SS northwest WA In production. Inquire for availability.

Artemisia michauxiana (Michaux’s Sagewort) Compact deep green plant with finely divided foliage from the sub alpine to alpine zone of the Cascades and northwards. SS WA Cascades Bare-root seedling .60 .48

Agastache occidentale (Western Giant Hyssop) Native perennial redolent of licorice complete with its sweetish flavor, purple flowers attract butterflies. Found in vernally wet areas east of the Cascades. SS Eastern WA. Bare-root seedling .70 .53

Artemisia suksdorfii (Coastal Mugwort) Northwest native perennial with clustered stems to 4' and leaves green above and cottony white below. Pleasing sage scent when brushed. Common near the coast on bluffs and on rocky, gravelly, or sandy beaches. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32

Agoseris aurantiaca (Alpine Agoseris) Attractive native reminiscent of orange hawkweed. SS northwest WA Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Allium cernuum (Nodding Onion) Small wild onion with nodding umbels of pink flowerets. Propagated from seed. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Artemisia tilesii (Aleutian Wormwood) This wormwood heralding from the rocky slopes and river bars sports grey frosted foliage and a pleasant scent. SS WA Cascades Bare-root seedling .60 .48

Ambrosia chamissonis v. bipinnatasecta (Heath Bursage) Northwest native perennial, clump-forming, 3-4' tall, found on sandy or gravelly beaches. SS northwest WA lowlands In production

Balsamorhiza macrophylla (Cutleaf Balsamroot) Aruncus dioicus [A. sylvester] (Goatsbeard) FACU+ North American native perennial with showy 4-6' plumes of white flowers. Flowers in sun or shade, prefers moist sites. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28 Asarum caudatum (British Columbia Wild Ginger) Northwest native groundcover in moist shady areas redolent of edible ginger. Curious maroon flowers hide under foliage. Propagated from seed. SS western WA lowlands. In production

Aquilegia chrysantha (Golden Columbine) FAC- or FACW Long blooming long spurred yellow columbine native to the Southwest. Attractive to hummingbirds. SS AZ Bare-root seedling .50 .40

Asarum hartwegii (Variagated Ginger) This Siskiyous native sports glossy deep green leaves with white variagation and the distinctive ginger scent. Propagated from seed. SS northern CA Bare-root seedling .70 (Fall only)

Aquilegia coerulea (Rocky Mountain Columbine) FAC Native perennial with showy blue and white flowers. Found in moist, open to partially shaded sites. SS CO Bare-root seedling .50 .40

Asclepias cordifolia (Purple Milkweed) Beautiful native perennial with showy violet, fragrant flowers. A butterfly magnet. SS northern CA Bare-root seedling .60 .48

Aquilegia flavescens (Northern Yellow Columbine) North American native perennial to 2' tall, with showy pale yellow flowers. Found in moist, open to partially shaded sites east of the Cascades. SS E WA Bare-root seedling .70 .56

Asclepias speciosa (Showy Milkweed) FAC+ North American native rhizomatous perennial with pink to reddish-purple flowers. Found commonly east of the Cascades in moist loamy to sandy soil. Showy fragrant flowers attract butterflies. SS east slope Cascades Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32

Aralia californica (Elk Clover) FAC+, FACW Looks like a shrub, dies back in the winter like an herb. This handsome member of the ginseng family sports globes of tiny white blossoms in mid summer amongst the large compound leaves up to 10 feet tall. SS S OR. Bare root seedlings .80 .70

16

Aster foliaceus v. apricus [Symphyotrichum foliaceum] (Leafy Bract Aster) FACWWestern North American native rhizomatous perennial, 1-2' tall, with purple flowers. Found in moist meadows and open forests. SS northwest WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .35 .30 Aster subspicatus [Symphyotrichum subspicatum v subspicatum] (Douglas Aster) FACW West coast native aster of moist habitats, especially estuaries. 3-4' tall branching stems and many purple flowers attract butterflies. Tolerates salt spray in shoreline plantings. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .30 .28 Balsamorhiza deltoidea (Deltiod Balsamroot) Northwest native perennial with basal leaves and big, yellow, sunflower-like flowers. Prefers dry sunny habitats at low elevations. Transplants best in the fall. SS south Puget Sound lowlands Bare-root seedling .65 .50 .40

Boykinia major (Large Boykinia) FACW This oversized rhizomatous member of the saxifrage family occupies moist areas, but tolerates late season drought. Large palmate leaves and flowering scapes up to 3’ tall and topped by 1" white vase shaped flowers make this an attractive plant for the wet edge. SS ID/MT Tubes 1.05 .80

Angelica arguta is listed in the Wetland Perennial section

Aquilegia formosa (Western Columbine, Red Columbine) FAC Western North American native perennial to 3' tall, with showy reddish-orange and yellow flowers. Found in moist, sunny to partially shaded sites. SS northwest WA lowland Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .38

Aster [Symphyotrichum] eatonii (Eaton’s Aster) FAC+ Native perennial wildflower with blue-purple flowers, attracts butterflies, prefers moist conditions. Adds color and wildlife value to ornamental ponds. SS east slope Cascades Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .35 .30

Balsamorhiza sagittata (Arrowleaf Balsamroot) Native perennial with showy yellow sunflower-like flowers. Found in dry grassy habitats east of the Cascades. Transplants best in the fall. SS northeast WA Bare-root seedling .65 .50 .40

Anemone multifida (Pacific Anemone) Northwest native rhizomatous wildflower. Cream colored cup shaped flowers attractive in alpine meadows. Grows well in lowlands. SS BC, CO Bare-root seedling .70 .50 .42

Apocynum cannabinum (Hemp Dogbane) Native rhizomatous perennial with small greenish-white flowers. Found in moist, partially shaded sites, this species is a traditional source of rope fiber. SS east slope Cascades Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .30 .28

Aster curtus [Sericocarpus rigidus] (Columbian Whitetop Aster) Northwest native wildflower of the Garry oak meadow community. Spreads by rhizomes in favorable conditions. SS south Puget Sound lowlands Bare-root seedling .70 .60

Balsamorhiza macrophylla (Cutleaf Balsamroot) Native to dry prairies of Utah and Idaho, this Balsamroot sports attractive cut leaves along with the yellow sunflowers. SS UT Bare-root seedling .65 .50

Anaphalis margaritacea (Pearly Everlasting) North American native perennial with attractive white flower clusters, woolly gray-green foliage. Rhizomatous and droughttolerant nature make for effective erosion control, also a good butterfly plant. SS northwest WA lowland Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Antennaria microphylla (Rosy Pussy-Toes) Native mat-forming perennial with white-woolly leaves and white (pink tinged) flower clusters on 6-12" stems. Does well in dry sites with full sun to partial shade. SS northeast WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Balsamorhiza hookeri (Hooker’s Balsamroot) Western North American native perennial with showy yellow sunflower-like flowers. Prefers a well-drained sunny site. Transplants best in the fall. Bare-root seedling .65 .50

Please see our BULB section for more allium species

Angelica lucida (Sea Watch) FAC Stout perennial of salt-water shorelines, reaching 5’ with large divided leaves and showy carrot-like flowers. Found in moist areas along the Pacific Coast and sporadically in New England. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .60 .48

Grade

Asclepias tuberosa (Butterfly Milkweed) Prairie native perennial with bright orange flowers, attracts butterflies. Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Aster chilensis [Symphyotrichum chilense v. chilense] (Pacific Aster) FACU or FACWNative perennial with showy blue to lavender flowers found in meadows and moist clearings at low elevations. Attracts butterflies. SS ID Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .35 .30

Boykinia occidentale (Boykinia elata) (Coast Boykinia, Brookfoam) FACW This streamside associate sports sprays of tiny white flowers borne on tall stems anchored in basal foliage. Tolerates summer drought. SS western OR Tubes 1.05 Campanula rotundifolia (Harebells, Bellflower) UPL, FAC Delicate low growing bellflower with tiny heart shaped leaves and attractive large blue bells. Found from sea level to mountain meadows. SS south Puget Sound lowlands Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Carex deweyana (Dewey’s Sedge) FAC+ or UPL Native clump-forming sedge found in wooded or partially shaded wetlands of northern North America. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .48 .35 .32 Carex inops v inops [C. pensylvanica] (Long Stoloned Sedge) Native rhizomatous sedge found in dry to moist meadows and open forests of West Coast states. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Carex macrocephala (Large Headed Sedge) FACNorthwest native rhizomatous sedge found on sandy seashores. Flowering heads large, 2-3"on 6-18" plant. SS northwest WA coast Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .48 .35 .32

Upland perennials are harvested and shipped on a species by species basis timed for optimal survival, typically spring or fall. These species are not available during all months of the year.


Herbaceous Upland Perennials Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Carex mertensii (Merten’s Sedge) FAC or FACW Densely tufted sedge, with attractive flowering spikes, found in dry to moist habitats of the northwest. Excellent ornamental potential. SS western WA mid-montaine Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Carex pachystachya (Chamisso Sedge) FAC, FACU Common western US native tufted sedge found in the transition zone from wet to dryish open habitats. Great potential raingarden species. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Carex pansa (Sand Dune Sedge) FACU West Coast native rhizomatous sedge found along sandy shorelines. Important species for helping stabilize sandy beaches. Has been used as a substitute for lawn grass in well-drained soils. SS southwest WA coast Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Carex tumulicola (Foothill Sedge) FACU Western native tufted sedge with slowly-expanding rhizomes. Found in sunny dry meadows and open forests. SS western WA lowlands In production

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Dicentra formosa (Western Bleeding Heart) West Coast native herbaceous perennial with strong rhizomes, fern-like leaves, showy reddish-pink flowers. Likes moist, shady sites. SS northwest WA lowland Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .40 Disporum hookeri (Hooker’s Fairy Bells) Northwest native wildflower found in forest understory habitats. Creamy white bell-shaped flowers hang from the tips of the stems in late spring. SS southwest WA lowland Tubes 1.10 .90 .80 Disporum smithii (Smith’s Fairy Bells) Northwest native rhizomatous perennial to 3' tall, with white bell-shaped flowers and red fruits. Found in moist coniferous forests. SS western WA and OR Tubes 1.10 .90 .80 Dodecatheon hendersonii (Broad-Leaved Shooting Star) West Coast native wildflower with ovate leaves found in grassy meadows in soil with good drainage. Cyclamen-like flowers are a beautiful magenta. SS western WA lowlands Small bare-root .80 .70 (late fall to mid-winter) Large bare-root 1.10 .90 (late fall to mid-winter) Tubes 1.30 1.00 (available Mar-May)

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Elymus mollis please see Leymus mollis Epilobium angustifolia [Chamerion angustifolium] (Common Fireweed) FACU+ Widespread North American native perennial to 4-6’ tall, with showy pink flowers, good for honey production and butterflies. Strong rhizomes provide excellent erosion control. Common in dry to moist disturbed areas. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Epilobium luteum (Yellow Willowherb) FACW Western native perennial with lovely yellow flowers and stout rhizomes. Found near streambanks and lake margins. SS WA east slope Cascades Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Erigeron peregrinus (Subalpine Daisy) FACW Western native wildflower with showy pink to lavender flowers. Found in mesic to wet meadows and along forest roads at mid to high elevations. SS west slope WA Cascades Bare-root seedling .70 .60 Erigeron phildelphicus (Philadelphia Fleabane) FACU, FACW Widespread native wildflower with small, but numerous showy pink flowers. Prefers moist sunny locations. Not a long-lived plant, but will bloom prolifically and reseed itself freely. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .40

Castelleja miniata (Indian paintbrush) Most common northwest paintbrush with red orange to scarlet flowers atop narrow lance leaved foliage. SS western WA Tubes 1.40 1.10

Erigeron speciosus (Showy Fleabane) Showy western native low-growing perennial in sunny or partially sunny sites. Large lavender daisy flowers from late spring into the summer. SS Puget Sound lowland Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Cerastium arvense (Field Chickweed) Native groundcover which carpets the ground with white flowers in the spring. Drought tolerant, prefers sun or partial shade. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Tubes 1.05 .80

Eriophyllum lanatum (Woolly Sunflower, Oregon Sunshine) Native perennial woolly herb with bright yellow daisy like flowers that attract butterflies. Prefers dry open habitats. SS east WA, northwest WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28 Tubes 1.05 .80

Chamerion please see Epilobium angustifolia

Festuca roemeri [F. idahoensis] (Roemer’s Idaho Fescue) Native bunchgrass for western Washington with attractive fine leaves. SS Puget Sound lowland Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .30 .28

Danthonia californica (California Oatgrass) FACUWestern native bunchgrass found in moist to dry, sunny meadows. SS south Puget Sound lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Danthonia spicata (Poverty Oatgrass) Widespread native bunchgrass found in moist to dry, sunny meadows. SS south Puget Sound lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 Delphinium burkei (Tall Meadow Larkspur) FACU NEW Deep blue larkspur which can reach over 3 feet tall, found in openings of Ponderosa pine forests or sagebrush habitats. SS east slope WA Cascades Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only) Delphinium glaucum (Sierra Larkspur) FACW NEW Beautiful western native larkspur with dark blue flowers. Prefers moist conditions. Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only) Tubes 1.05 .80 Delphinium menziesii (Menzies’ Larkspur) Deep blue larkspur with a white face native to coastal bluffs and prairies of the Pacific Northwest. Available fall only. SS northwest WA lowlands Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.05 .95 (fall only) Delphinium multiplex (Kittias Larkspur) Tall profusely blooming Larkspur found along seasonal streamsides in the shrub-steppe country. Endemic to central Washington. Small bulbs .70 .60 (Fall only) Delphinium nuttallii (Upland Larkspur) Stunning deep blue northwest Delphinium associated with Garry Oak meadows. Found on coastal bluffs and lowland outwash prairies. SS south Puget Sound lowlands. Small bulbs .70 .60 .49 (Fall only) Medium bulbs .85 .72 .60 .51 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.05 .89 .74 .63 (Fall only) Delphinium trollifolium (Streambank Delphinium) Deep blue delphinium with white highlights appearing in moist woods and along stream banks from the Columbia River Gorge to California. SS Columbia River Gorge Small bulbs .70 .60 .49 (Fall only) Medium bulbs .85 .72 .60 (Fall only) Large bulbs 1.05 .89 (Fall only)

Dodecatheon pulchellum (Darkthroat Shooting Star) Dodecatheon pulchellum (Darkthroat Shooting Star) FAC, FACW Easy to grow western native found from coastal balds and up into alpine meadows. Numerous fuschia-colored birds-beak flowers atop a crown of fleshy lance-shaped leaves. Prefers winter and spring moist to wet, sunny or partially shaded sites followed by late summer drought. SS western WA lowlands Small bare-root .80 .70 (winter-spring) Tubes 1.30 1.00 (available Feb-April) Planting Shooting Stars Dodecatheon hendersonii transplanted from tubes have the best chance of blooming in the spring. Bare-root hendersonii planted in late fall will often achieve the most growth before going dormant, with the larger ones possibly blooming if planted early enough. It is normal for these plants to go dormant in late spring. Bare-root hendersonii transplanted in late winter will survive, but tend to go dormant soon after transplanting, not to emerge and bloom until winter-spring the following season. If your plants go dormant, do not give up on them, but let them have a summer dry spell and wait until the following year for the leaves to emerge.

Festuca rubra (Coastal Red Fescue) Coastal native variety of a common grass for western Washington with attractive fine leaves. SS Puget Sound lowland In production Fragaria chiloensis (Coast Strawberry) Native ground-cover with shiny dark-green leaves, white flowers and edible berries. Spreads vigorously by stolons. Common along the coast, thrives in sunny conditions. SS western WA outer coast Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28 Fragaria vesca (Woods Strawberry) North American native perennial ground-cover, strongly stoloniferous, with white flowers and small edible berries. Good for shady areas. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28 Fragaria virginiana v platypetala (Virginia Strawberry) Western native groundcover with white flowers and edible berries. Found in forest openings and meadows. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Dodecatheon jefferyii prefers moister habitats and is actively growing later in the spring and longer into the summer than the other shooting stars. Late-fall planted jefferyii from tubes will have the best chance of blooming the following spring. Dodecatheon pulchellum transplanted from tubes has the best chance of blooming in the spring. Bare-root pulchellum planted early in the winter will achieve the most growth before going dormant. Those planted later in the spring will likely go dormant soon after transplanting, to re-emerge late winter the following year.

Gaillardia aristata (Blanket Flower) Native perennial with showy yellow and orange sunflower-like flowers, 1-2' tall, in sunny moist to dry areas. SS eastern WA Bare-root seedling .70 .60

Echinacea angustifolia (Narrow Leaved Cone Flower) Native prairie wildflower to 2-3' with showy pink-purple flowers. Commonly used as a medicinal plant, also attracts butterflies. Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .40

Geum triflorum (Prairie Smoke) FACU Beautiful native perennial with fern-like foliage, soft pink nodding flowers, and a puff of pink ‘smoke’ for a seed head. Prefers sunny dry sites. SS northeast WA-northwest MT Bare-root seedling .60 .48

Echinacea purpurea (Purple Cone Flower) North American prairie wildflower with showy purple flowers on 2-3' stalks. Medicinal, good cut flower, also attracts butterflies. Prefers full sun. Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .34 .29

Glehnia littoralis (Beach Carrot) Taprooted native perennial found along sandy shorelines. SS north Puget Sound coast Bare-root seedling .70

Elymus glaucus (Blue Wildrye) Drought tolerant native bunchgrass for sunny to partially shaded sites. Great for interplanting with trees and shrubs in restoration plantings to cover bare soil. Populations are genetically variable regarding leaf color and density. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .30 .27 .25

Geum macrophylum (Yellow Avens) FACW+ North American native perennial with short rhizomes and yellow flowers, reaching 3' in height. Found in forests and open areas. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .27

Grindelia integrifolia v. macrophylla (Coast Gumweed) FACW Robust native perennial of Pacific coastal areas with showy yellow flowers, 3-4' tall. Late season bloomer, salt spray tolerant. SS northwest WA coast Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

17


Herbaceous Upland Perennials Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Heracleum lanatum (Cow Parsnip) FAC North American native perennial with striking 6' flowering culms, large leaves. Attracts beneficial insects and many insecteating bird species. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Lathyrus japonicus (maritimus) v. maritimus (Beach Pea) Native perennial with trailing stems and purple flowers, found on sandy and gravelly beaches of the Pacific Coast and Great Lakes. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32

Heuchera cylindrica (Round Leafed Alum Root) An eastern Cascade alum root with heart-shaped leaves crowned by a bottle brush of numerous white cup-shaped flowers. Drought tolerant. SS ID Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Leymus [Elymus] mollis (Dune Wild Rye) Robust clump-forming perennial grass with strong rhizomes. Grows 3-5' tall on coastal dunes and beaches, helps prevent beach erosion. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .60 .42 .36 .32 Winter price .75 .65 .60

Heuchera grossularifolia (Gooseberry Leafed Alum Root) Tall stems of greenish flowers top the cluster of crenallated heart shaped leaves of this alum root of the intermountain region. SS east WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Heuchera micrantha v. diversifolia (Small Flowered Alum Root) Northwest native perennial with numerous sprays of tiny white flowers on stems to 2' tall. Found along stream banks and in rock crevices. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32

Iris innominata (Golden Iris) Yellow flowered iris with maroon veining and narrow grass like foliage native to the Siskiyous of southern Oregon. SS southwest OR Bare-root 1-0 seedling .80 .60 (Fall only) Iris missouriensis (Western Blue Flag Iris) FACW, OBL Native iris with white to blue colored flowers on 1-2' tall branched stems. Transplants best in the fall. SS N CA Bare-root 1-0 seedling .80 .60 .48 2-0 seedling .90 .70 .60 Tubes 1.30 1.10 Iris setosa (Alaska Wild Iris) FAC Wild iris of northern latitudes with stout leaves and stems to 2', dark blue flowers. Prefers a moist or wet sunny location. Propagated from seed. SS SE AK Bare-root 1-0 seedling .80 .60 .48 .40 2-0 seedling .90 .70 .60 .50 Tubes 1.30 1.10 Iris tenax (Oregon Iris) Showy western native iris with blue to purple flowers on 1' tall stems, found in sunny locations. Propagated from seed. Transplants best in the fall. SS southwest WA lowlands, western OR Bare-root 1-0 seedling .80 .60 .48 .40 2-0 seedling .90 .70 .60 .50 Tubes 1.30 1.10

18

Lupinus polyphyllus (Bigleaf Lupine) FACU- or FACW Tall western native perennial with spikes of showy blue flowers. Fixes nitrogen to enhance poor soils. SS garden variety nonnative, OR Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Tubes 1.05 .80

Liatris spicata (Gayfeather) Tall spikes of rosy-lavender blossoms crown this member of the aster family from the Midwest. SS IL Bare-root seedling .65 .50

Luzula multiflora (Common Woodrush) FACU Open woodland and prairie native perennial with grass-like leaves. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .30 Luzula parviflora (Small Flowered Woodrush) FACU, FAC Western native grass-like perennial commonly found in moist forest understory habitats. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .30 (Fall only) Maianthemum dilatata (False lily of the valley) FAC Low growing native perennial, rhizomatous and shade loving. Clusters of tiny white flowers hover above deep green heart shaped foliage. Common in rich, shady areas. SS western WA lowlands In production

Hydrophyllum tenuipes (Pacific Waterleaf) Northwest native ground cover for shady, moist sites that can dry out in late summer. Fuzzy deciduous green leaves make a soft carpet for the forest floor, and lovely creamy flowers attract pollinators. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Iris douglasiana (Douglas Iris) Native iris with pale pink to purple flowers on 1-2' tall branched stems. Native in open grassy areas in Oregon south to California. Propagated from seed. Transplants best in the spring or fall. SS OR Bare-root 1-0 seedling .80 .60 .48 .40 2-0 seedling .90 .70 .60 .50

Lupinus littoralis (Seashore Lupine) Prostrate lupine of seashores and dunes. Salt tolerant, drought tolerant. Clusters of blue and white flowers. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Tubes 1.05 .80

Luzula comosa [L. campestris v. macrantha] (Pacific Woodrush) FAC Open woodland and prairie native perennial with grass-like leaves. SS east slope Cascades Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .30

Hordeum brachyantherum (Meadow Barley) FACU, FACW Attractive clumping barley grass found in meadows from wetter soils to serpentine outcroppings. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .29 .27

Iris chrysophylla (Yellowleaf Iris) Native iris with pale cream flowers tinged yellow with maroon veining on 8' to 1' stems. Found in open woodlands in western OR and CA. Propagated from seed. SS SW OR Bare-root 2-0 seedling .80 .60 Tubes 1.10 .90

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Leymus [Elymus] triticoides (Beardless Wildrye) Native rhizomatous grass reaching 4'. Dry to moist meadows and sagebrush flats east of Cascades into Rocky Mountains. Bare-root seedling .60 .42 .36 .32

Hierochloe odorata (Sweet Grass) FACU, FACW Deliciously scented aromatic grass traditionally used in spiritual ceremonies in both the Old and New World. From a cultivated population. Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .29 .27

Iris bracteata (Siskiyou Iris) Native iris with pale cream to yellow flowers on 1-2' tall branched stems. Native in open grassy areas in Oregon south to California. Propagated from seed. Transplants best in the fall. SW OR Tubes 1.10 .90

Grade

Marah oreganus (Manroot, Wild Cucumber) Northwest native perennial vine, related to cucumbers but with inedible fruit. Vines vigorously twine up trees and shrubs. Large fleshy root difficult to eradicate once established. SS SW WA In production

Heracleum lanatum (Cow Parsnip) Linum lewisii v. perenne (Wild Blue Flax) Common wildflower in dry grasslands and sagebrush steppes. Has lovely sky-blue flowers, used to make linen and paper. SS ID Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Lomatium columbianum (Columbia Gorge Desert Parsley) Queen of the lomatiums, this native of the Columbia River gorge grows to 3' tall with ferny aqua colored foliage from Iris tenax which huge pink umbellate flowers emerge. The dried seed heads with their large flat seeds are attractive. SS Columbia river gorge Bare-root seedling .70 Lomatium dissectum (Fern Leaved Desert Parsley) Western North American native perennial 3-4' tall, with yellow or purple flowers. Found on rocky slopes and dry meadows. SS northeast WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Lomatium macrocarpum (Large-Fruited Desert-Parsley) Western native perennial in dry gravelly sites. SS E WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 Lomatium nudicaule (Bare-Stem Desert Parsley) Northwest native perennial for dry sunny habitats; has open pale yellow umbellate flowers and medicinal value. SS western WA lowlands Avail fall only. Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Lomatium triternatum (Nine Leaved Desert Parsley) Native perennial for dry to moist sunny areas. Parsley scented foliage and yellow flowers. SS east WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Lomatium utriculatum (Spring Gold) Deep green ferny basal foliage emerges in the fall in preparation for the bright lemony yellow flowers that begin a long blooming season in early spring. West side species found in lowland coastal balds. SS south Puget Sound lowlands Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .40 Luetkea pectinata (Partridge Foot) Finely divided bright green foliage and numerous clusters of tiny white flowers make up this familiar ground cover of the alpine zone. SS WA Cascades Tubes 1.10 .90 Lupinus latifolius (Broadleaf Lupine) Shrubby western native lupine with lovely blue flowers. Prefers moist conditions in sun or shade, lowlands to alpine areas. Not long-lived, but will reseed itself freely. SS western WA Tubes 1.05 .80

Melica subulata (Alaska Oniongrass) Western native grass found in dry to moist meadows and forests. Lovely tall stature, from clumps with short rhizomes. Has an edible bulb-like corm resembling but not tasting like onions. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .37 .30 Mentha arvensis (Field Mint) FAC, FACW Low growing native perennial, rhizomatous and strongly aromatic. Purple flowers are good for butterflies, seeds eaten by wildlife. Common in wet places, sun or partial shade. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .40 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Mertensia platyphylla (Breadleaf Bluebells) Northwest native wildflower with light blue flowers and slowlyspreading rhizomes. Prefers streambanks and moist forest habitats. SS Willamette Valley OR Bare-root seedling .80 .68 Mimulus [Diplacus] aurantiacus (Orange Bush Monkey Flower) Showy orange-flowered subshub native in southwest Oregon and California. A favorite of hummingbirds and pollinating bees. SS CA Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Mimulus cardinalis (Scarlet Monkey Flower) FACW Beautiful west coast native wildflower with red flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Will grow in standing water or regular garden soil but not too much drought. SS Willamette Valley OR Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .36 Tubes 1.05 .80 Mimulus guttatus (Yellow Monkey Flower) OBL Showy native wildflower with yellow flowers, found in moist habitats and in dwarfed form on dry balds. A good butterfly and hummingbird plant. Can be short-lived but will reseed itself freely. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .30 .27 Tubes 1.05 .80

Upland perennials are harvested and shipped on a species by species basis timed for optimal survival, typically spring or fall. These species are not available during all months of the year.


Herbaceous Upland Perennials Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Mimulus lewisii (Pink Monkey Flower) FACW, OBL Showy fuschia colored monkeyflower found in moist alpine meadows and stream sides. A good butterfly and hummingbird plant, adds interest and wildlife value to ornamental ponds. SS western WA upland Tubes 1.15 1.00

Penstemon richardsonii (Cut-leaved Penstemon) Eastern Washington native Penstemon with bright pink flowers and cut leaves. This beautiful pollinator-attractor is drought tolerant, often found in open rocky habitats. SS east WA Bare-root .75 .60 .49 Tubes 1.10 .90

Monardella odoratissima (Mountain Monardella) UPL or FACUWestern native perennial with fragrant foliage and pink flowers. Prefers dry, sunny areas, especially east of the Cascades. SS eastern WA and Cascade crest Bare-root seedlings .60 .48 .40

Penstemon rydbergii (Rydberg’s Penstemon) FAC Western native Penstemon similar to P. procerus, but taller. Prefers wet rocky soils. SS ID, N CA Bare-root .75 .60

Nothochelone nemorosa (Woodland Beardtongue) West Coast native wildflower related to Penstemon, found in the forest understory. Has beautiful pink-purple tubular flowers on 2-3 foot tall branched stalks. SS SW WA Bare-root .75 .60 Tubes 1.10 .90 Osmorhiza depauperata (chilensis) (Sweet Cicely) Western native perennial with fern-like foliage and licorice scent. Common forest understory species. SS western WA Bare-root seedlings .50 .40 .32

Penstemon serrulatus (Cascade Penstemon) Beautiful native wildflower with showy pinky-purple flowers. Prefers sun or partial shade, moderate moisture. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root .75 .55 .45 Tubes 1.10 .90 Penstemon speciosus (Showy Penstemon) Vivid blue Penstemon found in rocky and dry places. SS CA Bare-root .75 .60

Oxalis oregana (Woodland sorrel) This western native version of the shamrock makes a good low-maintenance groundcover with light pink flowers for shady sites. Transplants best in early spring. Tubes 1.05 .80

Penstemon barrettiea (Barrett’s Penstemon) Penstemon davidsonii on steroids. Large sprays of bright pink flowers top blue-green leathery foliage of this small shrub. Native to the Columbia River Gorge. SS Columbia River Gorge Bare-root .75 .60

Penstemon fruticosus (Shrubby Penstemon) Low evergreen shrub to 2' tall, with purple flowers that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Native east of the Cascades in dry exposed areas. SS eastern WA Bare-root .75 .60 .49 Penstemon glandulosus (Glandular Penstemon) Northeast Oregon native wildflower found on open, rocky hillsides. Beautiful lavender to light blue flowers. SS Columbia River Gorge Bare-root .75 .60 Penstemon newberryi (Mountain Pride) Beautiful lavender or pink-flowered Penstemon of northern California and southwest Oregon. SS northern CA Bare-root .75 .60 .49 Penstemon ovatus (Broadleaf Penstemon) Bright blue flowered Penstemon with deep green glossy spade shaped leaves. Ranges from woodland to sunny slopes. SS western WA lowlands. Bare-root .75 .60 .49 Tubes 1.10 .90 Penstemon pinifolius (Pineneedle Penstemon) An Arizona/New Mexico native Penstemon with firecracker red flowers. Bare-root .75 .60 Penstemon procerus (Tiny-Bloom Penstemon) FAC Western native Penstemon with lovely blue-purple flowers. Prefers dry, sandy to gravelly soils. SS WA Bare-root .75 .60 .49

Prunella vulgaris (Self Heal) FACU+ North American native low growing perennial with short rhizomes and purple to pink flowers. Has medicinal value. Prefers moist sites, sun or shade. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28 Ranunculus occidentalis (Western Buttercup) Showy buttercup of lowland balds and Garry oak meadows. SS western WA, Willamette Valley Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .39 Rudbeckia californica (California Coneflower) Yellow flowers reminiscent of black eyed susan’s, but smaller. California native from the Siskiyou area. SS southwest OR Bare-root seedling .75 .60 Rudbeckia occidentalis (Western Cone Flower) FACNative perennial to 4-6', flowers in a black cone that attracts birds when seeds are mature. A medicinal plant. SS east slope Cascades Bare-root seedling .60 .46

Sedum divergens (Spreading Stonecrop) Deep green compact leaves of this West coast spreading stonecrop are offset by bright sprays of yellow flowers which attract butterflies. SS east WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28

Penstemon cardwellii (Cardwell’s Penstemon) Prostrate shrubby Penstemon with showy pink flowers that likes sun and well drained soils. SS western OR Bare-root .75 .60 .49

Penstemon davidsonii (Davidson’s Penstemon) Western native penstemon with pink-lavender flowers, found on dry rocky slopes at mid- to high elevations. SS WA In production. Inquire for availablility.

Potentilla gracilis (Graceful Cinquefoil) FAC Western North American native perennial with palmately compound leaves and yellow flowers. Found in moist meadows and clearings. SS southwest WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .30

Scrophularia lanceolata (Lance-leaved Figwort) UPL, FACW NEW A long stem of cup-shaped bicolored flowers of yellow and brown top the deep green saw edged foliage of this denizen of vernal wet meadows and streamsides. Found both sides of the Cascades. SS northern Oregon Bare-root seedling .80

Penstemon attenuatus (Sulfur Penstemon) FAC Northwest native Penstemon with dark blue flowers. SS WA, ID Bare-root .75 .60 .49

Penstemon cyananthus (Wasatch Penstemon) Northern Rocky Mountain native Penstemon with blue flowers. Prefers moist sunny sites. SS UT Bare-root .75 .60 .49

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Sanicula crassicaulis (Pacific Sanicle) NEW Northwest native perennial found in coastal balds, meadows and open forests. Has yellow or purple-tinged flower clusters, great for attracting beneficial pollinators. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .65 .55

Penstemon anguineus (Tongue-leaved Penstemon) FAC Fuzzy leaved and flowered Penstemon with blue to purple flowers. SS southern OR Bare-root .75 .60 .49

Penstemon confertus (Yellow Penstemon) This beneficial pollinator magnet has creamy to light yellow flowers on 8-20" tall stems from May into August. Found in relatively moist areas east of the Cascades. WA Cascades Bare-root .75 .60 .49

Grade

Sidalcea hendersonii (Henderson’s Checker-Mallow) Penstemon strictus (Rocky Mountain Penstemon) Rocky Mountain native Penstemon with red to purple flowers. Prefers dry to moist sites, and can tolerate partial shade. SS CO Bare-root .75 .60 Penstemon subserratus (Finetooth Beardtongue) Northwest native penstemon with blue flowers found in dryish open woods and clearings. SS east slope Cascades Bare-root .75 .60 Penstemon venustus (Venus Penstemon) Western native penstemon with light purple flowers. Prefers dry to moist conditions, can tolerate partial shade. Bare-root .75 .60 .49 Penstemon whippleanus (Whipple’s Penstemon) Rocky Mountain native Penstemon with spectacular reddishpurple flowers. Prefers sunny dry sites. SS CO Bare-root .75 .60 .49 Penstemon wilcoxii (Wilcox’s Penstemon) Western native Penstemon with beautiful dark blue flowers. Prefers sunny dry sites. SS ID Bare-root .75 .60 Perideridia gairdnerii (montana) (Gairdner’s Yampah) Cream colored Queen Anne’s lace type flowers and the smell of caraway characterize this Native American plant food, settlers called wild carrot. SS E WA, W WA, W OR Bare-root .60 .48 .40 Perideridia oregana (Oregon Yampah) Sparse foliage and delicate white umbels of small flowers are the hallmark of this traditional Native American food source. Bare-root .60 .48 .40 Petasites frigidus v. palmatus (Palmate Coltsfoot) FACWRhizomatous perennial 2-3' tall, with large palmate leaves and white to pinkish flowers. Common in wet areas in low to mid elevation forests and openings. SS northwest WA lowlands Bare-root .60 .48 .36 Potentilla drummondii v. breweri (Drummond’s Cinquefoil) Low mat-forming perennial with yellow flowers for dry, sunny habitats. SS east slope WA Cascades Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .30

Sedum lanceolatum v. nesioticum (Island Stonecrop) Compact stonecrop with football shaped leaves topped by bright yellow flowers late spring. Common along rocky balds along the coast. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .60 .48 Sedum oreganum (Oregon Stonecrop) Deep green compact leaves of this West coast spreading stonecrop are offset by bright sprays of yellow flowers which attract butterflies. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 .28 Sedum spathulifolium (Broadleaf Stonecrop) Bluish green succulent foliage develops red highlights in the winter and bright yellow flowers which attract butterflies in the late spring. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Sedum stenopetalum (Narrow-Leaved Stonecrop) Western clump forming native found in sunny rocky habitats at mid to high elevations. Has lovely yellow flowers. SS ID Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Sidalcea campestris (Meadow Checkerbloom) Western Oregon native wildflower with beautiful white or light pink flowers. Found in open meadows and fields. SS Willamette Valley OR Bare-root seedlings .75 .64 Sidalcea hendersonii (Henderson’s Checker-Mallow) FACW+ Northwest native perennial which sends up spikes of miniature pink hollyhock-like flowers. Found in wet meadows and tidal marshes along the coast. SS western WA Bare-root seedlings .75 .52 .45 .40 Tubes 1.20 .96 Sidalcea malviflora v. virgata (Dwarf Checkerbloom) Northwest native perennial which sends up spikes of miniature pink hollyhock-like flowers. SS OR Bare-root seedlings .75 .64 Sisyrinchium californicum (Yellow Eyed Grass) FACW Native wildflower with iris-like leaves in a slowly expanding clump and beautiful yellow flowers, 6-12" tall. Likes early spring moisture. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .60 .45 .39 Tubes 1.05 .80 Sisyrinchium [Olsynium] douglasii (Grass Widows) FACU Early blooming member of the iris family with delicate pink blossoms often found in low elevation meadows, 6-12" tall. SS western WA lowlands. Bare-root seedling 1.00 .90 (Fall only)

19


Herbaceous Upland Perennials Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Sisyrinchium idahoense (Western Blue Eyed Grass) FACW Native wildflower with iris-like leaves in a slowly expanding clump and beautiful blue flowers, 6-12" tall. Likes early spring moisture. SS western WA Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .25 Winter price .60 .43 .35 .32 Smilacina racemosa [Maianthemum racemosum] (False Solomon’s-Seal) Lovely woodland perennial with fragrant white flowers in the spring. Can reach 3 feet tall in moist, partially shaded sites. SS western WA Tubes 1.10 .90 Smilacina stellata [Maianthemum stellatum] (Star Flowered False Solomon’s Seal) FACNorth American native rhizomatous perennial 1-2' tall, with white flowers. Prefers moist, partially shaded sites. SS northwest WA, Willamette Valley OR Tubes 1.05 .80 Solidago canadensis (Canadian Goldenrod) FACU North American native perennial with showy yellow flower spikes that attract butterflies. Common in moist to dry areas. Wide tolerance of soil conditions and rhizomatous roots make this a good choice for erosion control. SS northwest WA, CO Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Solidago missouriensis (Missouri Goldenrod) Western native wildflower, found in moist to dry meadows and open areas. Yellow flowers attract butterflies and other beneficial insects. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Solidago multiradiata (Northern Goldenrod) A well-behaved goldenrod from a variety of alpine habitats with 5-12" tall stems crowned by densely packed yellow flower heads. SS NW WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Solidago [Euthamia] occidentalis (Western Goldenrod) FACW or OBL Native rhizomatous perennial with yellow flowers. Attracts butterflies. SS western WA mid-montaine Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32 Solidago spathulata [S. simplex] (Dwarf Goldenrod) Northwest native perennial with yellow flowers reaching 2 feet tall. Found in sunny, moist to dry habitats at low to mid elevations. SS western WA Bare-root seedling .50 .40 .32

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Grade

UNIT PRICE 50 100+ 500+ 1000+

Stachys chamissonis v. cooleyae (Cooley’s Hedge Nettle) FACW Northwest native rhizomatous perennial 2-3' tall, with pink flowers in mid-summer that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. Common in moist clearings. Containerize for ornamental ponds. SS northwest WA Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .55 .40 .35

Trillium please see our BULB section

Stachys pilosa [S. palustris] (Hairy Hedge Nettle) Western native perennial 2-3' tall, with beautiful pink flowers in mid-summer that attract butterflies and hummingbirds. SS northwest WA Bare-root seedling April 15-Dec 1 .50 .37 .29 .27 Winter price .60 .55 .40 .35

Valeriana sitchensis (Sitka valerian) FAC Western native pale pink or white-flowered perennial found in mid- to high elevation meadows. SS NW WA Bare-root seedling .75 .60 Tubes 1.05 .80

Streptopus amplexifolius (Clasping Twistedstalk) Common forest understory wildflower in the lily family. Cream-colored or yellow bell-shaped flowers hang beneath the leaves, maturing into red berries. Prefers moist shady conditions. In production Streptopus lanceolatus [S. roseus] (Rosy Twistedstalk) Native forest understory wildflower in the lily family. Pink bell-shaped flowers hang beneath the leaves, maturing into red berries. Prefers moist shady conditions. In production Tellima grandiflora (Fringecup) Northwest native rhizomatous perennial with small white flowers. Prefers partial shade, commonly found in moist woods and along streambanks. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .40 .35 Thalictrum occidentale (Western Meadowrue) Northwest native with delicate columbine-like foliage that flutters in the lightest breeze. Female flowers composed of numerous maroon filaments. SS western WA, lowland, ID Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .40 Thalictrum fendleri v. polycarpum (Fendler’s Meadowrue) A delicate-looking northwest native with purplish stems found in shady woods. SS Willamette Valley, OR Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .42 Tubes 1.05 .80 Tiarella trifoliata (Foamflower) FACCommon Northwest woodland perennial, with delicate white flowers in spring. SS northwest WA lowlands In production

Triteleia please see our BULB section Tolmiea menziesii (Youth on Age) FACW, OBL Northwest native rhizomatous perennial to 2' tall, with small pinkish brown flowers. Found in moist shady habitats. SS western WA lowland Bare-root seedling .80 .64

Vancouveria hexandra (Inside-Out Flower) Rhizomatous woodland perennial with delicate white flowers. Common in moist, shady forests in southwest Washington, Oregon, and California. SS western WA lowlands. Bare-root seedling .75 .60 .53 Veratrum californicum (California False Hellebore) OBL, FACW Large western native perennial with thick rhizomes and greenish-white flower spikes, moist to wet areas in sun or shade. Goes dormant in mid-summer. SS WA Cascades Bare-root seedling .90 .72 (Fall only) Viola adunca (Prairie violet) FACU, FAC Deep purple violet of low elevation prairies and rocky coastal outcrops. Heart shaped deep green leaves. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root .75 .60 .50 (Fall only) Tubes 1.20 1.00 Viola palustris (Marsh violet) FACW, OBL Spreading lavender violet of wet marshy areas. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedling .60 .48 .36 .34 Viola praemorsa v nuttallii (Canary violet) Bright yellow violet distinguished by teardrop shaped green leaves with a white indumentum. Found in low elevation prairies with well drained soil. SS western WA lowlands Bare-root seedlings 1.00 .95 Wyethia angustifolia (California Compassplant) FACU West Coast native meadow wildflower with yellow, sunflowerlike flowers. Prefers dryish, sunny locations. SS western WA, eastern WA Bare-root seedling .65 .50 .40 Xerophyllum tenax (Beargrass) A fountain of tough green grasslike foliage from which emerges a dense cone of numerous tiny white flowers. Common understory plant in open coniferous forests. SS western WA In production. Inquire for availablility

Sisyrinchium idahoense (Western Blue Eyed Grass)

Lilium pardalinum v. vollmeri (Vollmer’s Lily)

Iris chrysophylla (Yellowleaf Iris)

Delphinium trollifolium (Streambank Delphinium)

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