Page 1

What’s for Volume #09 Summer 2013 Inside this Issue: To CEO or Not to CEO? That is the Question pg 1-2

written by Milt Miller, President at Milton Miller Consulting

The new Community Eligibility Option (CEO) allows high poverty schools to offer both breakfast and lunch at no charge to all students while eliminating the traditional school meal application process for schools. CEO benefits students and the school nutrition department’s bottom line—it increases participation in the school nutrition programs by offering breakfast and lunch for free to all students, reduces administrative work for school districts by eliminating the need to qualify students for free and reduced-price meals and track which children are participating, and improves the overall financial viability of the school nutrition programs in high poverty schools. CEO is available this school year in the District of Columbia, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New York, Ohio, and West Virginia, and will be available in all states at the start of the 2014-2015 school year. To all of you School Food Service Directors out there this seems too good to be true. No more Free and Reduced Meal Applications, no more Free and Reduced Meal software data input, and oh yea, no more verification rituals each year. This is truly a gift from the Food Service Gods! But for some LEAs, maybe it’s not. Before jumping, look at how your district will be impacted by this program. While it truly is a great program there are some hidden impacts that need serious consideration before you throw away your Free and Reduced Meal software and put verification behind you. Do your homework on the financial ramifications this option has on your whole school community not just the food service department. Before running head long into the arms of the greatest federal program ever, consider the following: •

Will this program be conducted by school or district-wide?

Have I used the calculator provided to know the projected financial impact on my program?

Why Indiana Won’t Use Free Lunch Numbers To Indicate Poverty Anymore pg 2 From the Chef: Banana Bread Squares pg 3 What Can School Sell Instead of Candy? Trash Bags pg 4-5 New Rules Aim to Rid Schools of Junk Foods pg 5-6 Important Time Management Solutions to Make You More Efficient pg 6 Hands Free School Fundraising pg 7

Follow Us Online...

For feedback and article ideas or submissions please email: asmith@foodserve.com next page>

food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco


What about E-Rate, Title 1, and other programs dependent on income eligibility?

Is my (Direct Certification percentage x 1.6) greater than or equal to my current F&R percentage?

Will creating a new job not funded by the food budget for income data collection be a problem?

Have state and federal funding sources requiring eligibility information been contacted?

Will this really increase revenue and decrease work for my particular district?

If you answered yes to all of the above, then this option may be the real deal for your district. If you have not considered all of the above or said no to some, more research is necessary. Read the reports from the pilot states carefully to determine what issues they may have had. Kentucky has very good information on workflow and state funding issues that require eligibility and how they addressed them. Pay close attention to E-Rate and Title 1 handling of this option and make sure it will work for you. If you still need to gather income eligibility information be-

cause you are implementing by school or for funding based on income eligibility, you will need a person not paid by your food service department or by NSLP reimbursement funding. This person will handle the Household and Income Forms (HIF) necessary to accomplish this program. Think about how this may impact your workflow. Again, Kentucky has great workflow charts and materials for this purpose. If you need income eligibility information or you are not doing this program district-wide, better keep that Free and Reduced Meal software, you will need it. This is the area that determines if this program is really less work for the food service department and the district. The Community Eligibility Option is truly a great program for insuring low-income children get nutritious meals. It breaks down many barriers that the old application process caused in limiting access to free meals and creating bad debt from unpaid meal accounts. It should increase participation and if your Direct Certification percentage is above 50 percent then this should be the way for an LEA to go. BUT there definitely are areas that should be investigated by all stake holders in the LEA before diving in. I recommend you take a careful look before leaping.

Why Indiana Won’t Use Free Lunch Numbers To Indicate Poverty Anymore BY KYLE STOKES | http://stateimpact.npr.org/indiana

Members of the State Board of Education voted unanimously Monday to continue funding five takeover schools at 2012-13 levels. At issue is roughly $1.3 million in federal School Improvement Grants, money earmarked for turnaround efforts that the schools received last year. But as Indianapolis Star reporter Scott Elliott notes, it’s unclear whether Superintendent Glenda Ritz and the Department of Education can honor the State Board’s directive: But state board members voted to add a provision requiring that the takeover school operators receive the same funding next year as this year. After the meeting, board members Pickett and David Shane said the aim was to require Ritz to replace roughly $1.3 million each school received from SIG last year for any school that does not receive the grant again. Where Ritz would get the money is unclear, as she argued she can direct per-pupil aid, special education money and federal grants based only on directives in state or federal law. “If they don’t get it from SIG, they have to get it from somewhere else,” Shane said. “The SIG money is basically supplemental startup funding.” Ritz said she couldn’t say more until she got legal advice. “There are a lot of legal questions about this,” she said. The vote came after EdPower CEO Marcus Robinson told the State Board his company might not be able to continue its work at Indianapolis’ Arlington High School without another infusion of SIG dollars. A Florida company, Charter Schools USA, is running three other schools in Indianapolis. Before turning over four struggling schools to the state, Indianapolis Public Schools campaigned to keep as many students as possible in the district. As a result, many students enrolled in other IPS schools, and the state-run schools haven’t been able to recover their student counts. Only about 400 students finished the 2012-13 school year at Arlington. That’s down from more than 1,200 students in 2011-12, the last year IPS controlled the school. Because initial funding estimates were based on enrollment at the schools before state takeover, the turnaround operators started last year with one of the highest per-pupil funding amounts in the state. That amount dropped after a judge ordered the state to repay IPS $6 million and Gary $1.3 million for students that had not stayed at the takeover schools. The Department of Education negotiated a settlement with the schools. A decision on federal SIG money isn’t likely until mid-summer.

food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco


F R O M TH E C H E F Banana Bread Squares

This USDA School recipe is from www.nfsmi.org

Grains/Breads

Grains/Breads Ingredients

50 Servings

100 Servings

Weight

Measure

Weight

Measure

Enriched all-purpose flour

1 lb 12 oz

1 qt 2 ½ cups

3 lb 8 oz

3 qt 1 cup

Sugar

1 lb 1 oz

2 ½ cups

2 lb 2 oz

1 qt 1 cup

Instant nonfat dry milk

¼ cup

½ cup

1 Tbsp 2 ¼ tsp

3 Tbsp 1 ½ tsp

Baking soda

1 tsp

2 tsp

Salt

1 tsp

Baking powder

7 oz

Frozen whole eggs, thawed OR Fresh large eggs (see Special Tip) Shortening

1 ⅔ cups OR 8 each

OR 4 each 1 ¼ cups 1 cup

13 oz

2 cups

1 lb 10 oz

2 ¾ cups

3 lb 4 oz

1 qt 1 ½ cups

Chopped walnuts (optional) 6 ½ oz Banana Bread Squares

1 ½ cups

13 oz

3 cups

Grains/Breads

Nutrients Per Serving Protein Carbohydrate Total Fat

149 2.41 g

2. Combine eggs and water. Add shortening and liquid mixture to dry ingredients. Blend for 30 seconds on low speed. Beat for 1 minute on medium speed.

3. Add mashed bananas and nuts (optional). Blend for 30 seconds on low speed. Beat for 1 minute on medium speed. DO NOT OVERMIX. Batter will be lumpy. 4. Pour 5 lb 10 oz (2 qt 2 cups) batter into each steamtable pan (12" x 20" x 2 ½") which has beenB-05 lightly coated with pan release spray. For 50 servings, use 1 pan. For 100 servings, use 2 pans.

Grains/Breads

Calories

1. Blend flour, sugar, dry milk, baking powder, baking soda, and salt in mixer for 1 minute at low speed.

2 ½ cups

6 ½ oz

*Fresh bananas, mashed

Directions

2 tsp 14 oz

¾ cup 2 Tbsp

Water

B-05

Saturated Fat

1.10 g

Iron

Cholesterol

17 mg

Calcium

38 mg

5. Bake until browned: Conventional oven: 350° F for 35-45 minutes Convection oven: 300° F for 25-35 minutes

Sodium

130 mg

6. Cool. Cut each pan 5 x 10 (50 pieces per pan).

0.8 g

7. For loaf pans: Pour 1 lb 14 oz (3 ⅓ cups) batter into each loaf pan (4" x 10" x 4") which has been lightly coated with pan release spray. For 50 servings, use 3 loaf pans. For 100 servings, use 6 loaf pans.

25.56 g

Vitamin A

45 IU

4.31 g

Vitamin C

1.4 mg

Banana Bread Squares

0.90 mg

Dietary Fiber

Text63:

Grains/Breads

Grains/Breads Bake until browned:

B-05

Conventional oven: 350° F for 50-60 minutes Remove from pans. Cool Convection oven: 300completely. ° F 40-50 minutes

Cut each loaf into 17 slices, about ½" thick.

Comments: *See Marketing Guide.

Marketing Guide for Selected Items Food as Purchased for Bananas

SERVING:

YIELD:

1 piece provides 1 serving of grains/breads.

50 Servings

100 Servings

2 lb 9 oz

5 lb 2 oz

VOLUME:

50 Servings:

1 steamtable pan OR 3 loaves

100 Servings: 2 steamtable pans OR 6 loaves

50 Servings:

about 2 quarts 2 cups (batter) 50 pieces

100 Servings:

about 1 gallon 1 quart (batter) 100 pieces

Edited 2004 Special Tip: For 50 servings, use 2 oz (⅔ cup) dried whole eggs and ⅔ cup water in place of eggs. For 100 servings, use 4 oz (1 ⅓ cups) dried whole eggs and 1 ⅓ cups water in place of eggs.

food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

Variations: A. Banana Bread Squares (Using Master Mix B-01) 50 servings: Omit step 1. Blend 2 lb 7 ½ oz (2 qt) Master Mix with 1 lb 1 oz (2 ½ cups) sugar. In step 2, omit shortening. Continue with steps 3-6. 100 servings: Omit steps 1. Blend 4 lb 15 oz (4 qt) Master Mix with 2 lb 2 oz (1 qt 1 cup) sugar. In step 2, omit shortening. Continue with steps 3-6.

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco


What Can Schools Sell Instead of Candy? Trash Bags By BETH J. HARPAZ | Associated Press NEW YORK (AP) — When Beth Hendrickson first proposed selling garbage bags instead of candy as a school fundraiser, “people laughed at us.”

— after all, how many sheets do families at one small school need? — but the company introduced new prints this year, so Hendrickson’s giving it another go.

They don’t laugh anymore. Hendrickson, principal of St. Ann Interparochial School in Morganfield, Ky., says the school makes $20,000 a year selling garbage bags. And it’s not just parents of the school’s 230 students who buy them. Local businesses and government offices in Morganfield — population 3,500 — buy garbage bags from the school as well.

Not all schools have found success with alternative products, however. Potter Road Elementary School in Framingham, Mass., tried selling organic goodies and items made from recycled materials through a company called Greenraising. Nancy Novo O’Connor, co-president of the parent-teacher organization, said Greenraising was a great vendor to work with, but the organic products “did not raise nearly as much money” as the traditional sale of chocolates and wrapping paper, so they went back to a previous vendor.

“Nobody needs candy,” Hendrickson says. “But trash bags — that’s something everybody needs.” The trash bag sale, done through Bags for Bucks, is just one alternative to the candy-and-gift wrap sales that so many communities hold when school fundraising efforts resume each fall. Some PTAs are going high-tech, using online platforms to solicit and process donations, selling digital images of kids’ artwork on coffee mugs or magnets, and hosting scavenger hunts where clues are collected with cellphone photos. And a few school groups have stopped selling products altogether, instead encouraging parents to simply write checks.

BED SHEETS AND GREENRAISING But others, like Hendrickson, are experimenting with sales of unusual products. The garbage bags were such a hit that when a company called Amadora approached Hendrickson about selling bed sheets, she gave it a try. The first year, the school sold about $16,000 worth of sheets to fund new classroom technology. Last year, sheet sales dropped to $9,000

food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

DIRECT DONATIONS Some schools have done away with catalog sales altogether, instead asking parents to make direct donations. Alison Oleson, former president of the Sleepy Hollow PTA in Falls Church, Va., said with both parents working in so many families, people just don’t have time “to go out and get their kids to sell things. And schools can’t get the volunteers to sit there and sort the wrapping paper and candy when it comes in.” Another reason to drop catalog sales is that schools only keep a portion of what they sell — 42 percent on average, according to the Association of Fund-Raising Distributors and Suppliers. A letter to Sleepy Hollow parents explaining the switch noted that “the exciting part of this fundraising program is that 100 percent of your donation goes to support PTA programs (not 50 percent, as before) and it is tax deductible!”

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco


Continued from page 4 But there’s one line of products Oleson hopes schools keep selling: mugs, T-shirts, bags and trivets bearing images of kids’ artwork. “I like that because it has sentimental value,” Oleson said. “They do it right before Mother’s Day, and the kids can feel proud of it.”

ONLINE PLATFORMS Some parent organizations now accept donations online. But that involves third-party sites that charge fees to process the funds, which raises the question: If supporters can click on a link in an email to donate by credit card, will more people give because it’s easier than writing a check? Or will the fees hurt the bottom line? Michael Nilsen, spokesman for the Association of Fundraising Professionals, says there’s no clear answer, but the best approach is probably “a mix,” such as a letter physically sent home with an option to mail back, followed by an email reminder with an online payment option. He added that because online sites charge different fees for various services, the right one depends on the group’s needs. For example, PayPal takes a 2.2 percentage fee for donations to registered charities, plus a 30-cent transaction fee, so if a parent donates $100, the PTA gets $97.50. Razoo.com charges 4.9 percent, so the PTA only gets $95.10 from $100, but Razoo also provides easily customized websites, social media integration, video thank-yous and email confirmations for tax-deductible donations. Melissa Panszi-Riebe, former PTA president of Burroughs Community School in Minneapolis, said Razoo helped the school raise $90,000 by making it easy for the 800 kids to send out invitations and thank-yous for read-a-thon pledges. “People knew that a percentage was being taken out and asked why should we do online giving if we can give a straight check?” Panszi-Riebe recalled. “We said you can still give a check if you’re more comfortable doing it.” But because there were out-of-state givers like grandparents, she thinks more people donated online than would have if they’d had to “write a check, find a stamp and mail it.”

EVENTS Many schools host tried-and-true fundraising events throughout the year — bake sales and raffles any time there’s a crowd in school, whether for Election Day, concerts or parent-teacher night. Other events are more labor intensive: Carnivals require volunteers to run games and activities. Auctions need committees to solicit donations, track bids and arrange delivery and payment. In San Francisco, the Alvarado Elementary School’s annual scavenger hunt has a high-tech spin: Teams get lists of clues, then use cellphones to photograph answers as they scour their neighborhoods. Teams pay to participate but most money raised comes from corporate sponsors making donations in exchange for having their names attached to the event. Beth Sperber has organized a variety of fundraisers for the three Manhattan public schools her son has attended — everything from sales of donated used books and CDs, to bake sales and talent shows, to sales of “spirit wear” — bags, hoodies, T-shirts and other apparel bearing the school name. She’s also hosted jewelry sales in her home where designers come in person to offer unique items, priced $20 to $200, then give the school 35 percent or more of their sales. Judy Antell of Brooklyn, N.Y., has hosted three or four “house parties” for the high school her three daughters attended. Since parents of teens spend very little time at kids’ schools, the parties were conceived partly as a way for parents to socialize. Tickets were $25 to $50, with parties hosted in neighborhoods around the city on different nights. Lorraine Esposito helps organize an annual “Night of Rock” event to fund a teen center in Scarsdale, N.Y. A number of parents there happen to work in the entertainment industry and put on a first-class show at a local bar with a stage. Esposito says it’s important to find a theme that’s a good fit, whether it’s a 4H-style fair in a rural area or a ski night in a mountain town. And as with most fundraisers, Esposito said, the money raised is only part of it: “It’s really about building community.”

New Rules Aim to Rid Schools of Junk Foods By MARY CLARE JALONICK, Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — High-calorie sports drinks and candy bars will be removed from school vending machines and cafeteria lines as soon as next year, replaced with diet drinks, granola bars and other healthier items. The Agriculture Department said Thursday that for the first time it will make sure that all foods sold in the nation’s 100,000 schools are healthier by expanding fat, calorie,

food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

sugar and sodium limits to almost everything sold during the school day. That includes snacks sold around the school and foods on the “a la carte” line in cafeterias, which never have been regulated before. The new rules, proposed in February and made final this week, also would allow states to regulate student bake sales.

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco


Continued from page 5 The rules, required under a child nutrition law passed by Congress in 2010, are part of the government’s effort to combat childhood obesity. The rules have the potential to transform what many children eat at school. While some schools already have made improvements in their lunch menus and vending machine choices, others still are selling high-fat, high-calorie foods. Standards put into place at the beginning of the 2012 school year already regulate the nutritional content of free and low-cost school breakfasts and lunches that are subsidized by the federal government. However most lunchrooms also have the “a la carte” lines that sell other foods — often greasy foods like mozzarella sticks and nachos. Under the rules, those lines could offer healthier pizzas, low-fat hamburgers, fruit cups or yogurt, among other foods that meet the standards. One of the biggest changes under the rules will be a nearban on high-calorie sports drinks, which many beverage companies added to school vending machines to replace high-calorie sodas that they pulled in response to criticism from the public health community. The rule would only allow sales in high schools of sodas and sports drinks that contain 60 calories or less in a 12-ounce serving, banning the highest-calorie versions of those beverages. Many companies already have developed low-calorie sports drinks — Gatorade’s G2, for example — and many diet teas and diet sodas are also available for sale. Elementary and middle schools could sell only water, carbonated water, 100 percent fruit or vegetable juice, and low fat and fat-free milk, including nonfat flavored milks. First lady Michelle Obama, an advocate for healthy eating and efforts to reduce childhood obesity, pointed out that many working parents don’t have control over what their kids eat when they’re not at home. “That’s why as a mom myself, I am so excited that schools will now be offering healthier choices to students and reinforcing the work we do at home to help our kids stay healthy,” Mrs. Obama said in a statement. At a congressional hearing, a school nutritionist said Thursday that schools have had difficulty adjusting to the 2012 changes, and the new “a la carte” standards could also be a hardship. Sandra Ford, president of the School Nutrition Association and director of food and nutrition services for a school district in Bradenton, Fla., said in prepared testimony that the healthier foods have been expensive and participation has declined since the standards went into effect. She also predicted that her school district could lose $975,000 a year under the new “a la carte” guidelines because they would have to eliminate many of the foods they currently sell. “The new meal pattern requirements have significantly

food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

increased the expense of preparing school meals, at a time when food costs were already on the rise,” she said. Ford called on the USDA to permanently do away with the limits on grains and proteins, saying they hampered her school district’s ability to serve sandwiches and salads with chicken on top that had proved popular with students. The Government Accountability Office said it visited eight districts around the country and found that in most districts students were having trouble adjusting to some of the new foods, leading to increased food waste and decreased participation in the school lunch program. However, the agency said in a report that most students spoke positively about eating healthier foods and predicted they will get used to the changes over time. One principle of the new rules is not just to cut down on unhealthy foods but to increase the number of healthier foods sold. The standards encourage more whole grains, low-fat dairy, fruits, vegetables and lean proteins. “It’s not enough for it to be low in problem nutrients, it also has to provide positive nutritional benefits,” says Margo Wootan, a nutrition lobbyist for the Center for Science in the Public Interest who has lobbied for the new rules. “There has to be some food in the food.” The new rules are the latest in a long list of changes designed to make foods served in schools more healthful and accessible. Nutritional guidelines for the subsidized lunches were revised last year and put in place last fall. The 2010 child nutrition law also provided more money for schools to serve free and reduced-cost lunches and required more meals to be served to hungry kids. Last year’s rules making main lunch fare more nutritious faced criticism from some conservatives, including some Republicans in Congress, who said the government shouldn’t be telling kids what to eat. Mindful of that backlash, the Agriculture Department left one of the more controversial parts of the rule, the regulation of in-school fundraisers like bake sales, up to the states. The new guidelines also would not apply to after-school concessions at school games or theater events, goodies brought from home for classroom celebrations, or anything students bring for their own personal consumption. The USDA so far has shown a willingness to work with schools to resolve complaints that some new requirements are hard to meet. Last year, for example, the government temporarily relaxed some limits on meats and grains in subsidized lunches after school nutritionists said they weren’t working. The food industry has been onboard with many of the changes, and several companies worked with Congress on the child nutrition law three years ago.

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco


several minutes out of every hour. For example, do you keep your Instant Messaging program open in your task bar and it beeps when someone sends you a message? Do you stop what you’re doing to read and answer the message? A better solution would be to keep it turned off until you have a block of time for messaging.

Important

Time Management

Suggestions

to MAKE You More Efficient Author: Jason Deter

These days, it’s even more crucial to be able to manage your time effectively than before. We all have busy schedules and need to sort through increasing amounts of information daily. Whether you need help in managing your time at work or at home, the following tips can help you get more done in a more relaxed manner. Every person says that there just isn’t enough time in each day to get everything finished. Nevertheless, if they really analyzed their habits, they would be able to discover many “pockets” of time that they fritter away. Needless to say, you need to take a break from working every so often. You will get even less finished if you become a non-stop working machine - and that’s a proven fact. You will be amazed, however, if you counted up the minutes that get wasted online - searching for a new chicken recipe - or chatting with friends, or even spending more time in the break room at work than we should. All of us have certain ineffective activities that use

food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

It’s been proven over and over that the most productive way to manage your time is to prioritize the tasks you have to complete on a daily basis. Make sure you get immediate tasks done before spending time on activities that are not vitally important. And then, to take this a step further, try to get whatever you dread doing, or don’t like to do, accomplished in the morning so it’s out of your hair. Why keep moaning and groaning, and worrying, something that you know you will need to tackle sometime during the day? Simply get it done! Then, it’s finished and you can quit thinking about it. Focus is another vital skill that you need to develop, especially when doing your crucial tasks. Don’t let your mind, or your attention, take off while working. About a hundred years ago, an industrialist - Charles Schwab - asked an efficiency expert, Ivy Lee, for a few time management tips for his corporate staff. After advising the staff, Mr. Lee told Mr. Schwab that after one month, if he was pleased, he could pay him whatever he thought his advice was worth. A month later, Mr. Schwab sent Mr. Lee a check for $25,000.00 (about $300,000.00 today) since he was so happy about the results of Mr. Lee’s tip. What was that tip: at the end of each day make a list of the top items you have to accomplish the next day and put them in the order of their importance. In the morning, start with the first job on the list and work on it until it’s finished. Then, cross it off the list and start on #2. It’s that simple. Many people have problems delegating work to others, and the idea of outsourcing scares them to death. Nonetheless, both of these practices can save you lots of time. Those who never have enough time are usually people who try and do everything themselves. While it’s true that certain tasks can’t be done by another person, you could very easily assign some of the lesser tasks, or routine tasks, to someone else to take care of for you. It’s easy to find people to help you among your family and friends, by looking at local bulletin boards or chat rooms, or asking a staff for assistance with some of your chores. So, at night, as you make your list for the following day, have a look at each item and see if all, or part, of each task may be delegated to somebody else. As you look at your list, you may decide that the answer to your question is “no”, especially when this is a new mindset for you. Nevertheless, if you can simply start with one task to assign or outsource, and go from there, you will save considerable time in the long run. The above time management tips can help you feel less pressured every day and allow you to get more completed. Even though everyone has the same amount of time every day, you always have several choices on how to make use of your time. One secret to learning how to manage your time much better is to look closely at how you use your time in the present. When you’ve recognized your patterns and habits negative and positive - you can purposely choose which ones to keep, which ones to change, and which ones to get rid of.

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco


Hands-Free Fundraising through

Sell School Branded Apparel & accessories with...

No cost • No Accounting • No labor If you’ve ever gone through the process of organizing, setting up and running a successful school fundraiser, you know that it is task intensive and time consuming. Finding an audience, establishing effective communication, marketing, purchasing inventory, handling orders, fulfilling purchases, collecting money and reporting are no small hurdles. At MySchoolAccount we thought to ourselves, “How can we make fundraising easy and why not make it available 24/7”?

The answer: Hands-Free Fundraising MySchoolAccount.com has partnered with eStoreMoster to bring you a no cost, all-inclusive solution. It’s really simple... 1. MySchoolAccount creates your webstore 2. MySchoolAccount creates your items 3. MySchoolAccount promotes the store, event, club or item 4. MySchoolAccount handles orders, reporting, collection, and fulfillment 5. Your school gets a monthly check!

Your School District

Sound too good to be true? It’s not. Click here for more info. Do your sports teams want to create shirts to raise funds? We can work with the coaches. Does your student store wish to expand its operations online to reach a larger market? We will talk to your store manager. Does your student council wish to help raise funds to complete projects? We will work with the council President and Treasurer. Is your Economics class starting a business for a project? We will work with the teacher and students. Your school can set up as many stores as necessary.

Let MySchoolAccount work for YOU!

Visit http://promo.myschoolaccount.com/fundraising/ for more information. Or contact Marshall at mfoust@myschoolaccount.com to get started today. food service solutions ,Inc.

POS Software

Online Payments

Biometrics

F&R Funding

Foodco

Whatsforlunch vol9  

http://www.foodserve.com/newsletter/whatsforlunch_vol9.pdf

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you