Page 1

DISFAGIA DESPUES DE LA EXTUBACION Versión en inglés

Versión en español

Research Postextubation dysphagia is persistent and associated with poor outcomes in survivors of critical illness Madison Macht1*, Tim Wimbish2, Brendan J Clark1, Alexander B Benson1, Ellen L Burnham1, André Williams3 and Marc Moss1 *Corresponding author: Madison Macht madison.macht@ucdenver.edu Author Affiliations 1 Division of Pulmonary Sciences and Critical Care Medicine, University of Colorado Denver, 12700 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA 2 Rehabilitation Therapy, University of Colorado Hospital, 12700 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, USA 3 Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, Denver, CO 80206, USA For all author emails, please log on.

Critical Care 2011, 15:R231 doi:10.1186/cc10472 This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Abstract Introduction Dysphagia is common among survivors of critical illness who required mechanical ventilation during treatment. The risk factors associated with the development of postextubation dysphagia, and the effects of dysphagia on patient outcomes, have been relatively unexplored. Methods We conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study from 2008 to 2010 of all patients over 17 years of age admitted to a university hospital ICU who required mechanical ventilation and subsequently received a bedside swallow evaluation (BSE) by a speech pathologist. Results A BSE was performed after mechanical ventilation in 25% (630 of 2,484) of all patients. After we excluded patients with stroke and/or neuromuscular disease, our study sample size was 446 patients. We found that dysphagia was present in 84% of patients ( n = 374) and


classified dysphagia as absent, mild, moderate or severe in 16% ( n = 72), 44% (n = 195), 23% (n = 103) and 17% (n = 76), respectively. In univariate analyses, we found that statistically significant risk factors for severe dysphagia included long duration of mechanical ventilation and reintubation. In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age, gender and severity of illness, we found that mechanical ventilation for more than seven days remained independently associated with moderate or severe dysphagia (adjusted odds ratio (AOR) = 2.84 [interquartile range (IQR) = 1.78 to 4.56]; P < 0.01). The presence of severe postextubation dysphagia was significantly associated with poor patient outcomes, including pneumonia, reintubation, in-hospital mortality, hospital length of stay, discharge status and surgical placement of feeding tubes. In multivariate analysis, we found that the presence of moderate or severe dysphagia was independently associated with the composite outcome of pneumonia, reintubation and death (AOR = 3.31 [IQR = 1.89 to 5.90]; P < 0.01). Conclusions In a large cohort of critically ill patients, long duration of mechanical ventilation was independently associated with postextubation dysphagia, and the development of postextubation dysphagia was independently associated with poor patient outcomes. Introduction Acute respiratory failure (ARF) is a heterogeneous disorder that frequently requires admission to an ICU and the initiation of mechanical ventilation. The annual incidence of US patients who require mechanical ventilation is approximately 300,000 [1]. On the basis of an ARF case fatality rate of 27%, there are an estimated 220,000 survivors of mechanical ventilation each year [2]. These patients have a median duration of survival of more than 5 years and suffer from pulmonary dysfunction, cognitive impairment and decreased quality of life [3-6]. Recently, increasing attention has been focused on the debilitating effects of neuromuscular dysfunction among ARF survivors [7,8]. Although peripheral muscle weakness is one form of neuromuscular dysfunction that has been independently associated with mortality [9], an underrecognized form is swallowing dysfunction. Also known as "dysphagia," swallowing dysfunction is the inability to effectively transfer food and liquid from the mouth into the stomach. The consequences of dysphagia in non-critically ill, neurologically impaired patients include aspiration, pneumonia, malnutrition, placement of feeding tubes, decreased quality of life, increased institutional care and increased mortality [10-12]. The development of dysphagia has been reported to be common among ARF survivors, with estimates ranging from 3% to 62% in a recent meta-analysis [13]. Although known risk factors for dysphagia in non-critically ill patients include stroke and neuromuscular dysfunction, the risk factors for the development of postextubation dysphagia have been relatively unexplored[12,14-16]. The duration of mechanical ventilation was associated with dysphagia in two studies[17,18]; however, other work has shown these characteristics to be unrelated [19-21]. In addition, the effects of swallowing dysfunction on hospital outcomes such as length of stay, pneumonia and reintubation are also relatively unknown. Therefore, we sought to identify specific risk factors associated with dysphagia in these patients and to define the effects of postextubation dysphagia on outcomes in ARF patients. Materials and methods


Study design Using the University of Colorado Hospital medical records system, we conducted a retrospective, observational cohort study of ICU survivors who had undergone a bedside swallow evaluation (BSE) by a speech pathologist. Patients were eligible if they met all of the following criteria: (1) admission to any ICU during the two-year period from April 2008 to April 2010, (2) mechanical ventilation for any duration, (3) BSE by a speech pathologist and (4) older than 17 years of age. We included patients who received short-duration mechanical ventilation (less than 48 hours), as previous authors have suggested that even short-term endotracheal intubation may cause swallowing dysfunction [22,23]. The decision to consult a speech pathologist was left to the discretion of the primary treating physicians. Patients were excluded if they (1) had an acute or preexisting diagnosis of either a neuromuscular disease or a cerebrovascular accident (CVA) or (2) received their first BSE prior to the initiation of mechanical ventilation. The Colorado Multiple Institutional Review Board approved both the study protocol and a waiver of informed consent. Data collection Patients who had been assessed using a BSE were identified in a speech-language pathology database. Data were abstracted from various components of the medical records, including admission and progress notes, discharge summaries, ICU flow sheets, laboratory and radiological data and internal diagnostic coding. Data analysis Our first analysis was to determine the risk factors for the presence of swallowing dysfunction. In this analysis, the primary independent variable of interest was the duration of mechanical ventilation, and secondary variables of interest included reintubation, endotracheal tube size and severity of illness. Duration of mechanical ventilation was calculated using the hospital database. Endotracheal tube size was recorded from a respiratory therapy database and corresponded to the internal diameter of the endotracheal tube in millimeters. Severity of illness was measured using the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA) score and was calculated at the time of admission to the ICU. The partial pressure of arterial oxygen to fraction of inspired oxygen (PaO2/FiO2) ratio was corrected for the altitude and mean atmospheric pressure in Denver (PaO 2/FiO2 SOFA score = (PaO2/FiO2 Denver) รท 0.826). We omitted the component of the SOFA score corresponding to the Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score, as these data were not routinely available. When examining reintubation, we recorded the timing of reintubation in relation to the initial BSE. Our primary outcome variable for this analysis was the presence of swallowing dysfunction as determined by certified speech pathologists. BSEs consisted of (1) patient history; (2) examination of oral, laryngeal and vocal cord swallowing exercises; (3) swallowing trials with different food and liquid consistencies; and (4) assessment of swallowing function with various compensatory techniques. Speech pathologists used the Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale (DOSS), which has been reported to correlate with findings on videofluoroscopic studies of swallowing (VFSS) [24]. "Normal swallowing" was defined as the absence of supraglottic penetration or aspiration (DOSS score = 7), "mild dysphagia" was defined as intermittent evidence of a trace of supraglottic penetration (DOSS score = 5 or 6), "moderate dysphagia" was defined as two or fewer instances of supraglottic penetration with a single food or liquid consistency (DOSS score 3 or 4) and "severe dysphagia" was defined as frank aspiration of more than one food or liquid consistency (DOSS score 1 or 2). The food and liquid consistencies used by the speech pathologists were consistent with published diets


described by the American Dietetics Association National Dysphagia Diet Task Force [25]. The decision to perform a VFSS was made by either the speech pathologist or the treating physician. When performed, VFSS were interpreted primarily by radiologists and dysphagia severity was judged by treating speech pathologists, on the basis of the eight-point Penetration-Aspiration Scale [26]. For patients who were assessed on the basis of both a BSE and a VFSS, the VFSS score was used to determine dysphagia severity. In our study, a Penetration-Aspiration Scale score of 1 indicated normal swallowing, 2 or 3 indicated mild dysphagia, 4 or 5 indicated moderate dysphagia and 6 to 8 indicated severe dysphagia. Given some interobserver variability for moderate and severe dysphagia in the initial study validating the DOSS [24] and the lack of validation of these scores in ICU patients, we combined moderate and severe dysphagia into one category for subsequent analyses. In our second analysis, we attempted to determine the effect of the presence of swallowing dysfunction on a variety of outcome variables, including the need for reintubation, the development of hospital-acquired pneumonia (HAP), hospital length of stay, surgical placement of a feeding tube and in-hospital mortality. For this analysis, our primary independent variable of interest was the presence of swallowing dysfunction as defined above. Our outcome variables were defined using the following criteria. "Reintubation" was defined as the placement of an endotracheal tube for any reason after the initial endotracheal tube was removed. The diagnosis of HAP required the presence of criteria defined in the American Thoracic Society/Infectious Diseases Society of America guidelines [27] as well as the decision of the treating physician to administer antimicrobial treatment. For hospital length of stay, we recorded both total hospital days and the time spent in the hospital after the initial BSE. "Feeding tube placement" was defined as the surgical placement of a gastric or jejunal tube by a surgeon, gastroenterologist or interventional radiologist. We predetermined that the most clinically relevant outcomes were (1) the development of pneumonia, (2) the need for reintubation and (3) in-hospital mortality. In addition to analyzing each variable separately, we created a composite outcome of these three variables. We recorded the existence of the composite outcome if any one of these three variables was present. For the purposes of our analyses, patients with the presence of only one outcome were treated the same as patients with the presence of two or three outcomes. Statistical analysis Data that were not normally distributed are reported as medians [25th to 75th interquartile ranges]. Univariate comparisons were evaluated using the Ď&#x2021;2 test or Kruskal-Wallis test as appropriate. Nonparametric tests were used when data were not normally distributed. Backward logistic regression models were used to determine the effect of the duration of mechanical ventilation on the presence of dysphagia and the effect of dysphagia on patient outcomes. Because of the known strong effects of tracheostomy on swallowing function and a potential interaction between tracheostomy and duration of mechanical ventilation in the models we used to examine the effect of the duration of mechanical ventilation on the presence of dysphagia, we prespecified that we would perform separate multivariate analyses for patients with or without tracheostomy. SAS version 9.1 software (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC, USA) was used for all analyses, and P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Confidence intervals (95%) for adjusted odds ratios (AORs) and 25th to 75th interquartile ranges [IQRs] for median values are recorded in square brackets. The Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons was performed were appropriate.


Results The study enrollment process is outlined in Figure 1. Of the 2,484 patients who met the inclusion criteria, 407 died prior to extubation. Of the remaining patients, 67% (1,400 of 2,077) had not been assessed by BSE. A physician's order to perform a BSE was most common for patients on a neurological service (45%), followed a medical service (34%) and a surgical service (17%) (P < 0.001). Compared to patients who were not assessed by BSE, patients who were assessed by BSE were more likely to have had a tracheostomy (44% vs 25%; P < 0.001), a longer duration of mechanical ventilation (7 days [3 to 14] vs 2 days [1 to 5]; P < 0.001) and a longer ICU stay (10 days [5 to 19] vs 3 days [2 to 7]; P < 0.001). Of the remaining 677 patients who were assessed by BSE during their hospital stay, 47 were excluded because the initial BSE had been done prior to intubation and 184 were excluded because they had a diagnosis of CVA or neuromuscular disease. The remaining 446 patients were included in our final analysis. Exactly half of these patients were cared for in a medical ICU, 34% received care in a surgical ICU, 9% were treated in a neurologic ICU and 7% were cared for in a cardiac ICU. Approximately two-thirds of these patients had an underlying medical disease. Some degree of dysphagia was present in 84% (374 of 446) of those patients selected to be assessed by BSE, in 18% (374 of 2,077) of the total population of ARF survivors and in 15% (374 of 2,484) of all patients admitted to the ICU during the study period. Among the 446 patients included in the study, dysphagia severity was mild in 44% (n = 195), moderate in 23% (n = 103) and severe in 17% (n = 76). In-hospital mortality in this selected cohort of ARF survivors was 7.6%. Only 11 (2.5%) of the 446 study patients received a modified barium swallow in addition to a BSE.

Figure 1. Flowchart detailing enrollment of subjects. BSE = bedside swallow evaluation; CVA = cerebrovascular accident. Univariate analyses performed to evaluate patient characteristics associated with the presence of postextubation dysphagia are described in Table 1. Statistically significant risk factors for severe dysphagia included long duration of mechanical ventilation, reintubation, tracheostomy and male gender. In multivariate analysis, owing to an interaction between tracheostomy and duration of mechanical ventilation, we performed two separate analyses for those patients with versus without tracheostomy. In the analysis of patients without tracheostomy, after adjusting for age, gender and severity of illness, mechanical ventilation for more than seven days remained independently associated with moderate or severe dysphagia (AOR 2.84 [1.78 to 4.56]; P < 0.01). In the analysis of patients with tracheostomy, mechanical ventilation for more than seven days was not independently associated with moderate or severe dysphagia. Table 1. Univariate analysis of risk factors for postextubation dysphagia Among the 243 patients whose dysphagia resolved while they were in the hospital, the median duration of dysphagia was 3 days [2 to 6 days] for those with mild dysphagia ( n = 162) and 6 days [4 to 12 days] for those with moderate or severe dysphagia ( n = 81). At the time of hospital discharge, dysphagia was present in more patients with moderate or severe


dysphagia compared to those with mild dysphagia (55% (98 of 179) vs 17% (33 of 195); P < 0.0001). Univariate analyses performed to evaluate associations between the presence and severity of dysphagia and hospital outcomes are shown in Table 2 and Figure 2. The presence of dysphagia was significantly associated with the number of hospital days after the initial BSE, discharge status, no oral intake (NPO) status, surgical placement of a feeding tube and composite outcome of pneumonia, reintubation or in-hospital mortality (Table 2). Dysphagia was also independently and significantly associated with pneumonia, reintubation and inhospital mortality (Figure 2). In multivariate analysis, after adjusting for age and severity of illness, the presence of moderate or severe dysphagia was independently associated with the composite outcome of pneumonia, reintubation or death (AOR 3.31 [1.89 to 5.90]; P < 0.01). Table 2. Univariate analysis of patient outcomes by severity of dysphagia

Figure 2. Association between dysphagia severity and pneumonia, reintubation and mortality. Discussion In a large group of critically ill patients, we have demonstrated that, among patients who were not assessed by BSE, both longer duration of mechanical ventilation and repeat intubation were associated with the development of dysphagia. In addition, we found that postextubation dysphagia often persists at the time of discharge and is associated with poor outcomes. Specifically, moderate or severe dysphagia is associated with an increased risk of reintubation, development of pneumonia, longer hospital stay, reduced dietary intake, placement of feeding tubes, discharge to a nursing home and increased risk of death. The exact frequency of postextubation dysphagia among all medical and surgical ICU patients remains unknown. The primarily limitations on understanding this frequency are (1) the absence of a widely accepted diagnostic standard for dysphagia and (2) the relatively small populations represented in the existing studies. Barker and colleagues [17] conducted a retrospective chart review of 254 patients (including those with CVA) who required mechanical ventilation for more than 48 hours following cardiac surgery and found evidence of dysphagia in 130 patients (51%) on the basis of BSE. El Solh and colleagues [21] performed a fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing (FEES) in 84 consecutive extubated medical ICU patients who did not have preexisting dysphagia, CVA or neuromuscular disease. In their study, aspiration occurred in 37 (44%) of 84 patients and was silent (that is, not associated with cough or patient discomfort and thus undetectable on BSE) in 11 of those 37 patients (13% of the total population). In a small study comparing FEES to BSE, Barquist et al. [19] randomized 70 recently extubated trauma surgery patients to receive either FEES or BSE and found evidence of aspiration in 5 (13.5%) of 37 in the FEES group and 2 (6%) of 33 in the BSE group. Ajemian and colleagues [28] performed FEES in 51 consecutive extubated surgical and medical ICU patients without a previous swallowing disorder and found aspiration in 27 (56%) of 48 patients, in 12 of whom it occurred silently


(25% of the total). Importantly, over two-thirds of the patients in our initial cohort did not undergo an evaluation for dysphagia, thus the true incidence of dysphagia among the patients in our study is uncertain. However, postextubation dysphagia was present in 84% (374 of 446) of those patients selected to undergo a BSE, representing 18% (374 of 2,077) of the total population of ARF survivors, and 15% (374 of 2,484) of all ICU admissions. Further research, including prospective observational studies, is necessary to determine the true frequency of postextubation dysphagia. The association between intubation duration and severity of dysphagia is supported by Barker et al.'s review [17] as well as by two studies in which patients intubated for cardiopulmonary bypass were examined [18,29]. However, this association has not been reported in other analyses[19,21,28,30]. Many factors could account for this discrepancy, namely, differences in sample size, event rate and intubation duration. While this association is plausible based on the likely increased degree of oral, pharyngeal and laryngeal damage in patients intubated for long periods, it also remains possible that short intubation duration is sufficient to cause dysphagia. The association between intubation duration and dysphagia, as well as the neuromotor and sensory mechanisms underlying swallowing dysfunction in newly extubated patients, needs to be further explored. Our study and that by Barker et al. [17] are the first to suggest that reintubation may be associated with the development of dysphagia, an association with potentially important applications for future dysphagia studies. A recent review of the National Hospital Discharge Survey showed a significant association between dysphagia and both hospital length of stay and mortality [31], but few studies have examined the association between patient outcome and dysphagia severity among extubated medical and surgical ICU patients without CVA or neuromuscular disease. Both El Solh et al. [21] and Ajemian et al. [28] found neither postextubation aspiration pneumonia nor any deaths in their studies. In contrast, 14% of the patients with moderate or severe dysphagia in our cohort had aspiration pneumonia, and 13% died while in the hospital, suggesting that either our cohort had a higher severity of illness or the FEES-based diet modifications used in these studies prevented these complications. Barker et al. [17] showed an association between dysphagia and reintubation, longer hospital stay, NPO and the presence of feeding tubes, although they did not record data on mortality. Our study has several limitations. Sixty-seven percent of patients who survived to be extubated in our study were not assessed by BSE. We could study only those patients who had been assessed by BSE. Second, inherent in the design of our single-center, retrospective, observational cohort study is an inability to draw conclusions about causation. Similarly, some very important variables were inconsistently charted or not charted at all, and thus were not available for our analysis. For example, we were unable to obtain (1) GCS data to include in the SOFA score, (2) a reliable marker of sedation at the time of swallow evaluation, (3) height data to calculate both body mass index and height/endotracheal tube diameter ratio [32] and (4) reliable data on alcohol and tobacco use. Additionally, investigators in one previous study of postextubation dysphagia were able to obtain information on preadmission functional status, such as activities of daily living and preadmission swallowing dysfunction [21]. Although we attempted to control for this with admission severity of illness as well as exclusion of all patients with a history of CVA or neuromuscular dysfunction, we were not able to reliably obtain this information and thus omitted it from our analysis. Similarly, because we did not have data on the presence of preexisting swallowing dysfunction, we were not able to exclude these patients from our analysis. This could have


resulted in a falsely elevated number of patients classified as having postextubation dysphagia. A second important limitation in this area of research is the lack of a firm diagnostic test to determine the presence or absence of dysphagia. Although the DOSS has been validated to correlate with dysphagia severity on the basis of VFSS [24], the score is ultimately based on the judgment of the treating speech pathologist. We acknowledge that this evaluation is inherently subjective. On the basis of studies in outpatients, FEES is likely a more sensitive measure of aspiration than either BSE or videofluoroscopy [33-35]. Relatively few patients in our cohort were assessed by VFSS, and no patients were assessed by FEES. Further studies are necessary to explore the diagnosis, causes and complications of postextubation dysphagia. Conclusions We have demonstrated that in a large group of survivors of mechanical ventilation, the development of postextubation dysphagia is associated with poor outcomes, including pneumonia, reintubation and death. Additionally, long duration of mechanical ventilation and prior reintubation are associated with the development of postextubation dysphagia. Understanding the mechanisms that contribute to postextubation dysphagia and developing methods to further address this disorder might decrease morbidity among a significant percentage of these critically ill patients. Key messages ♦ Swallowing dysfunction that occurs after mechanical ventilation, also known as "postextubation dysphagia," is likely common in a large population of medical and surgical ICU patients without preexisting neuromuscular disease. ♦ The results of this study suggest an independent association between postextubation dysphagia and poor patient outcomes, including pneumonia, reintubation and death. ♦ This study is the largest, and one of the first, to show that long duration of mechanical ventilation is associated with the development of postextubation dysphagia. ♦ Postextubation dysphagia persists at the time of discharge in a large portion of patients (131 (29%) of 446 patients in our study). ♦ Postextubation dysphagia is an underrecognized and potentially costly form of impairment in survivors of critical illness. Further research into this disorder is needed to identify its epidemiology and pathophysiology as well as to develop diagnostic strategies and treatments. Abbreviations AOR: adjusted odds ratio; ARF: acute respiratory failure; BMI: body mass index; BSE: bedside swallow evaluation; CVA: cerebrovascular accident; DOSS: Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale; ED: emergency department; FEES: flexible endoscopic evaluation of swallowing; GCS:


Glasgow Coma Scale; SOFA: Sequential Organ Failure Assessment; VFSS: videofluoroscopic studies of swallowing. Competing interests The authors declare that they have no competing interests. Authors' contributions MM conceived the study and contributed to data analysis, data collection and manuscript preparation. MM conceived the study and contributed to the data analysis and manuscript preparation. TW participated in the study design and contributed to the data collection. BJC, ABB and ELB contributed to the study design, analysis and manuscript preparation. AW contributed to the statistical analysis and manuscript preparation. All authors read and approved the final manuscript. Acknowledgements This work was supported by National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute grant K24 089223 from the National Institutes of Health (Bethesda, MD, USA). We are grateful to Vivienne Smith, MS, RN, and Allen Wentworth, MEd, RRT (University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, USA), for their assistance with data collection in this study. References 1. Behrendt CE: Acute respiratory failure in the United States: incidence and 31day survival. Chest 2000, 118:1100-1105. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 2. Esteban A, Anzueto A, Frutos F, Alía I, Brochard L, Stewart TE, Benito S, Epstein SK, Apezteguía C, Nightingale P, Arroliga AC, Tobin MJ, for the Mechanical Ventilation International Study Group: Characteristics and outcomes in adult patients receiving mechanical ventilation: a 28-day international study. JAMA 2002, 287:345-355. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 3. Garland A, Dawson NV, Altmann I, Thomas CL, Phillips RS, Tsevat J, Desbiens NA, Bellamy PE, Knaus WA, Connors AF Jr, for the SUPPORT Investigators: Outcomes up to 5 years after severe, acute respiratory failure. Chest 2004, 126:1897-1904. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 4. Myhren H, Ekeberg Ø, Stokland O: Health-related quality of life and return to work after critical illness in general intensive care unit patients: a 1-year follow-up study. Crit Care Med 2010, 38:1554-1561. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text


5. Orme JF Jr, Romney JS, Hopkins RO, Pope D, Chan KJ, Thomsen G, Crapo RO, Weaver LK: Pulmonary function and health-related quality of life in survivors of acute respiratory distress syndrome. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2003, 167:690694. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 6. Hopkins RO, Weaver LK, Collingridge D, Parkinson RB, Chan KJ, Orme JF Jr: Twoyear cognitive, emotional, and quality-of-life outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2005, 171:340347. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 7. De Jonghe B, Sharshar T, Lefaucheur JP, Authier FJ, Durand-Zaleski I, Boussarsar M, Cerf C, Renaud E, Mesrati F, Carlet J, Raphaël JC, Outin H, Bastuji-Garin S, Groupe de Réflexion et d'Etude des Neuromyopathies en Réanimation: Paresis acquired in the intensive care unit: a prospective multicenter study. JAMA 2002, 288: 2859-2867 . PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 8. Herridge MS, Tansey CM, Matté A, Tomlinson G, Diaz-Granados N, Cooper A, Guest CB, Mazer CD, Mehta S, Stewart TE, Kudlow P, Cook D, Slutsky AS, Cheung AM, Canadian Critical Care Trials Group: Functional disability 5 years after acute respiratory distress syndrome. N Engl J Med 2011, 364:1293-1304. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 9. Ali NA, O'Brien JM Jr, Hoffmann SP, Phillips G, Garland A, Finley JC, Almoosa K, Hejal R, Wolf KM, Lemeshow S, Connors AF Jr, Marsh CB, Midwest Critical Care Consortium:Acquired weakness, handgrip strength, and mortality in critically ill patients. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2008, 178:261268. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 10. Ekberg O, Hamdy S, Woisard V, Wuttge-Hannig A, Ortega P: Social and psychological burden of dysphagia: its impact on diagnosis and treatment. Dysphagia 2002, 17:139-146. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 11. Marik PE: Aspiration pneumonitis and aspiration pneumonia. N Engl J Med 2001, 344:665-671. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 12. Martino R, Foley N, Bhogal S, Diamant N, Speechley M, Teasell R: Dysphagia after stroke: incidence, diagnosis, and pulmonary complications. Stroke 2005, 36: 2756-2763 . PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text


13. Skoretz SA, Flowers HL, Martino R: The incidence of dysphagia following endotracheal intubation: a systematic review. Chest 2010, 137:665-673. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 14. Herrera LJ, Correa AM, Vaporciyan AA, Hofstetter WL, Rice DC, Swisher SG, Walsh GL, Roth JA, Mehran RJ: Increased risk of aspiration and pulmonary complications after lung resection in head and neck cancer patients. Ann Thorac Surg 2006, 82:1982-1988. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 15. Smith-Hammond CA, New KC, Pietrobon R, Curtis DJ, Scharver CH, Turner DA:Prospective analysis of incidence and risk factors of dysphagia in spine surgery patients: comparison of anterior cervical, posterior cervical, and lumbar procedures. Spine (Phila Pa 1976) 2004, 29:1441-1446. Publisher Full Text 16. Ward EC, Bishop B, Frisby J, Stevens M: Swallowing outcomes following laryngectomy and pharyngolaryngectomy. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2002, 128:181186. PubMed Abstract |Publisher Full Text 17. Barker J, Martino R, Reichardt B, Hickey EJ, Ralph-Edwards A: Incidence and impact of dysphagia in patients receiving prolonged endotracheal intubation after cardiac surgery. Can J Surg 2009, 52:119124. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text |PubMed Central Full Text 18. Rousou JA, Tighe DA, Garb JL, Krasner H, Engelman RM, Flack JE, Deaton DW: Risk of dysphagia after transesophageal echocardiography during cardiac operations. Ann Thorac Surg 2000, 69:486-490. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 19. Barquist E, Brown M, Cohn S, Lundy D, Jackowski J: Postextubation fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing after prolonged endotracheal intubation: a randomized, prospective trial. Crit Care Med 2001, 29:1710-1713. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 20. de Larminat V, Montravers P, Dureuil B, Desmonts JM: Alteration in swallowing reflex after extubation in intensive care unit patients. Crit Care Med 1995, 23:486-490. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 21. El Solh A, Okada M, Bhat A, Pietrantoni C: Swallowing disorders post orotracheal intubation in the elderly. Intensive Care Med 2003, 29:1451-1455. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text


22. Heffner JE: Swallowing complications after endotracheal moving from "whether" to "how.". Chest 2010, 137:509-510. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text

extubation:

23. Stauffer JL, Olson DE, Petty TL: Complications and consequences of endotracheal intubation and tracheotomy: a prospective study of 150 critically ill adult patients. Am J Med 1981, 70:65-76. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 24. O'Neil KH, Purdy M, Falk J, Gallo L: The Dysphagia Outcome and Severity Scale. Dysphagia 1999, 14:139-145. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 25. National Dysphagia Diet Task Force: The National Dysphagia Diet: Standardization for Optimal Care. Chicago: National Dysphagia Diet Task Force; 2002. 26. Rosenbek JC, Robbins JA, Roecker EB, Coyle JL, Wood JL: A penetrationaspiration scale. Dysphagia 1996, 11:93-98. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 27. American Thoracic Society; Infectious Diseases Society of America: Guidelines for the management of adults with hospital-acquired, ventilator-associated, and healthcare-associated pneumonia. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2005, 171:388416. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 28. Ajemian MS, Nirmul GB, Anderson MT, Zirlen DM, Kwasnik EM: Routine fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing following prolonged intubation: implications for management. Arch Surg 2001, 136:434-437. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 29. Hogue CW Jr, Lappas GD, Creswell LL, Ferguson TB, Sample M, Pugh D, Balfe D, Cox JL, Lappas DG: Swallowing dysfunction after cardiac operations: associated adverse outcomes and risk factors including intraoperative transesophageal echocardiography. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1995, 110:517-522. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 30. Romero CM, Marambio A, Larrondo J, Walker K, Lira MT, Tobar E, Cornejo R, Ruiz M:Swallowing dysfunction in nonneurologic critically ill patients who require percutaneous dilatational tracheostomy. Chest 2010, 137:1278-1282. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text


31. Altman KW, Yu GP, Schaefer SD: Consequence of dysphagia in the hospitalized patient: impact on prognosis and hospital resources. Arch Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg 2010, 136:784789. PubMed Abstract |Publisher Full Text 32. François B, Bellissant E, Gissot V, Desachy A, Normand S, Boulain T, Brenet O, Preux PM, Vignon P, Association des Réanimateurs du Centre-Ouest (ARCO): 12-h pretreatment with methylprednisolone versus placebo for prevention of postextubation laryngeal oedema: a randomised double-blind trial. Lancet 2007, 369:1083-1089. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 33. Kelly AM, Drinnan MJ, Leslie P: Assessing penetration and aspiration: how do videofluoroscopy and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing compare? Laryngoscope 2007, 117:1723-1727. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 34. Kelly AM, Leslie P, Beale T, Payten C, Drinnan MJ: Fibreoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing and videofluoroscopy: does examination type influence perception of pharyngeal residue severity? Clin Otolaryngol 2006, 31:425-432. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text 35. Leder SB, Espinosa JF: Aspiration risk after acute stroke: comparison of clinical examination and fiberoptic endoscopic evaluation of swallowing. Dysphagia 2002, 17:214-218. PubMed Abstract | Publisher Full Text ESPAÑOL

Posterior a la extubación disfagia es persistente y se asocia con malos resultados en los sobrevivientes de la enfermedad crítica Madison Macht 1 * , Tim Wimbish 2 , Brendan J Clark 1 , Alexander B Benson 1 , Ellen L Burnham 1 , André Williams 3 y Marc Moss 1 *Autor para la correspondencia: Madison Macht madison.macht @ ucdenver.edu Afiliaciones de los autores 1División de Ciencias Pulmonar y Medicina de Cuidados Críticos, de la Universidad de Colorado en Denver, 12700 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, EE.UU. 2La terapia de rehabilitación, University of Colorado Hospital, 12700 East 19th Avenue, Aurora, CO 80045, EE.UU. 3División de Bioestadística y Bioinformática, National Jewish Health, 1400 Jackson Street, Denver, CO 80206, EE.UU. Para todos los correos electrónicos autor, por favor, inicie sesión .


Critical Care 2011, 15 : R231 doi: 10.1186/cc10472 Este es un artículo de acceso abierto distribuido bajo los términos de la licencia Creative Commons License ( http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0 ), que permite el uso irrestricto, la distribución y reproducción en cualquier medio, siempre que la obra original es debidamente citados. Abstracto Introducción La disfagia es común entre los sobrevivientes de la enfermedad grave que requirieron ventilación mecánica durante el tratamiento. Los factores de riesgo asociados con el desarrollo posterior a la extubación de la disfagia, y los efectos de la disfagia en los resultados del paciente, han sido poco explorados. Métodos Se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, observacional de cohortes 2008 a 2010 de todos los pacientes mayores de 17 años de edad ingresados en una unidad de cuidados intensivos del hospital universitario que requirieron ventilación mecánica y, posteriormente, recibió una evaluación tragar lado de la cama (EEB) por un patólogo del habla. Resultados A la EEB se realizó después de la ventilación mecánica en el 25% (630 de 2.484) de todos los pacientes. Después se excluyeron los pacientes con ictus y / o enfermedad neuromuscular, el tamaño de nuestra muestra de estudio fue de 446 pacientes. Hemos encontrado que la disfagia estuvo presente en el 84% de los pacientes ( n = 374) y la disfagia clasificados como ausente, leve, moderada o severa en el 16% ( n = 72), el 44% ( n = 195), el 23% ( n = 103 ) y el 17% (n = 76), respectivamente. En el análisis univariado, se encontró que los factores de riesgo estadísticamente significativos para la disfagia severa incluye larga duración de la ventilación mecánica y la reintubación. En el análisis multivariado, tras ajustar por edad, sexo y gravedad de la enfermedad, se encontró que la ventilación mecánica durante más de siete días se mantuvo independiente asociado con disfagia moderada o grave (odds ratio ajustado (AOR) = 2,84 rango [intercuartil (IQR) = 1,78 a 4,56]; P <0,01). La presencia de disfagia severa posterior a la extubación se asoció significativamente con la evolución de los pacientes pobres, incluyendo la neumonía, la reintubación, la mortalidad hospitalaria, la estancia hospitalaria, el estado de la descarga y colocación quirúrgica de los tubos de alimentación. En el análisis multivariado, se encontró que la presencia de disfagia moderada o severa se asoció independientemente con el resultado compuesto de la neumonía, la reintubación y la muerte (AOR = 3,31 [RIC = 1,89 a 5,90]; P <0,01). Conclusiones En una gran cohorte de pacientes en estado crítico, la larga duración de la ventilación mecánica se asoció independientemente con disfagia posterior a la extubación, y el desarrollo de la disfagia posterior a la extubación se asoció independientemente con resultados de los pacientes pobres. Introducción Insuficiencia respiratoria aguda (IRA) es un trastorno heterogéneo que frecuentemente requiere la admisión a la UCI y el inicio de la ventilación mecánica. La incidencia anual de pacientes de EE.UU. que requieren ventilación mecánica es de aproximadamente


300.000[ 1 ]. Sobre la base de una tasa de mortalidad de IRA caso del 27%, se estima que hay 220.000 supervivientes de la ventilación mecánica cada año[ 2 ]. Estos pacientes tienen una duración mediana de supervivencia de más de 5 años y sufre de disfunción pulmonar deterioro, cognitivo y disminución de la calidad de vida[ 3 - 6 ]. Recientemente, cada vez más atención se ha centrado en los efectos debilitantes de la disfunción neuromuscular entre los sobrevivientes de la IRA [ 7 , 8 ]. Aunque la debilidad muscular periférica es una forma de disfunción neuromuscular que ha sido asociados de forma independiente con la mortalidad[ 9 ], una forma poco reconocida es la disfunción de la ingestión. También conocido como "disfagia" tragar disfunción es la incapacidad para transferir eficazmente los alimentos y los líquidos desde la boca hasta el estómago. Las consecuencias de la disfagia en no críticamente enfermos, los pacientes con daño neurológico incluye la aspiración, la neumonía, la desnutrición, la colocación de los tubos de alimentación, disminución de la calidad de vida, el aumento de la atención institucional y aumento de la mortalidad [ 10 - 12 ]. El desarrollo de la disfagia se ha informado que es común entre los sobrevivientes de la IRA, con estimaciones que van del 3% al 62% en un reciente meta-análisis [ 13 ]. A pesar de factores de riesgo conocidos para la disfagia en no pacientes críticamente enfermos incluyen la disfunción neuromuscular y accidente cerebrovascular, los factores de riesgo para el desarrollo de la disfagia posterior a la extubación se han mantenido relativamente inexplorado[ 12 , 14 - 16 ]. La duración de la ventilación mecánica se asocia con disfagia en dos estudios [ 17 , 18 ], sin embargo, otros trabajos han demostrado estas características que no guardan relación[ 19 - 21 ].Además, los efectos de ingerir una disfunción en los resultados del hospital, tales como la duración de la estancia, la neumonía y la reintubación son también relativamente desconocido.Por lo tanto, hemos tratado de identificar factores de riesgo específicos asociados a la disfagia en estos pacientes y para definir los efectos de la disfagia posterior a la extubación en los resultados en los pacientes con IRA. Materiales y métodos Diseño del estudio Uso de la Universidad de Colorado, el sistema médico del Hospital de registros, se realizó un estudio retrospectivo, observacional de cohortes de los sobrevivientes de la UCI que se habían sometido a una evaluación tragar junto a la cama (EEB) por un patólogo del habla. Los pacientes fueron elegibles si cumplen todos los criterios siguientes: (1) la admisión a cualquier unidad de cuidados intensivos durante el período de dos años desde abril de 2008 a abril de 2010 (2) ventilación mecánica durante cualquier período de tiempo, (3) la EEB por un patólogo del habla y (4) mayores de 17 años de edad. Se incluyeron los pacientes que recibieron de corta duración de ventilación mecánica (menos de 48 horas), en calidad de autores anteriores han sugerido que incluso a corto plazo la intubación endotraqueal puede causar disfunción para tragar[ 22 , 23 ]. La decisión de consultar a un patólogo del habla y se deja a la discreción de los médicos que lo está atendiendo. Los pacientes fueron excluidos si (1) tuvieron un diagnóstico grave o preexistente, bien de una enfermedad neuromuscular o un accidente cerebrovascular (ACV) o (2) recibieron su primer EEB antes de la iniciación de la ventilación mecánica. El Colorado múltiples Junta de Revisión Institucional aprobado el protocolo de estudio y una omisión del consentimiento informado. Recopilación de datos Los pacientes que habían sido evaluados utilizando una encefalopatía espongiforme bovina fueron identificados en una base de datos de patología del habla. Los datos se extrajeron de


los distintos componentes de la historia clínica, incluyendo notas de ingreso y de progreso, informes de alta, las hojas de flujo de la UCI, datos de laboratorio y radiológicos y de diagnóstico de codificación interna. Análisis de datos Nuestro primer análisis fue determinar los factores de riesgo para la presencia de disfunción para tragar. En este análisis, la variable independiente primaria de interés fue la duración de la ventilación mecánica, y las variables secundarias de interés incluían reintubación, el tamaño del tubo endotraqueal y la gravedad de la enfermedad. Duración de la ventilación mecánica se calculó utilizando la base de datos del hospital. Tamaño del tubo endotraqueal se registró a partir de una base de datos de terapia respiratoria y corresponde al diámetro interno del tubo endotraqueal en milímetros. Gravedad de la enfermedad se midió utilizando la Evaluación de Fallo Orgánico Secuencial (SOFA) Resultado y se calculó en el momento del ingreso en la UCI. La presión parcial de oxígeno arterial con la fracción inspirada de oxígeno (PaO 2 / FiO 2 ) la relación fue corregida por la altitud y la presión atmosférica en Denver (PaO 2 / FiO 2 SOFA = (PaO 2 / FiO 2 Denver) ÷ 0.826) . Hemos omitido el componente de la puntuación SOFA correspondiente a la Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) cuenta, ya que estos datos no estaban disponibles de forma rutinaria. Al examinar la reintubación, registramos el momento de reintubación en relación con la inicial de la EEB. La variable principal de resultados de este análisis fue la presencia de disfunción para tragar según lo determinado por patólogos del habla certificado. BSE consistió en la historia del paciente (1), (2) examen de la médula oral, laringe y vocal tragar ejercicios, (3) ensayos para tragar los alimentos con diferentes consistencias y líquido, y (4) evaluación de la función de tragar con diversas técnicas de compensación. Los patólogos del habla utiliza el Documento Final de la disfagia y la Escala de Gravedad (DOSS), que se ha informado que se correlacionan con los hallazgos en los estudios videofluoroscopia de la deglución (VFSS)[ 24 ]. "Normal tragar" se definió como la ausencia de penetración supraglótica o aspiración (DOSS puntuación = 7), "leve disfagia" se definió como evidencia intermitente de un rastro de penetración supraglótica (DOSS puntuación = 5 o 6), "moderado disfagia" se se define como dos o menos casos de penetración supraglótica con un solo alimento o líquido de consistencia (DOSS puntuación de 3 o 4) y "severa disfagia" se definió como la aspiración sincera de más de un alimento o líquido de consistencia (puntuación DOSS 1 ó 2). La consistencia de alimentos y líquidos utilizados por los patólogos del habla y son compatibles con las dietas publicada descrita por el Dietética Americana Asociación de la Fuerza Nacional de Tareas disfagia dieta [ 25 ]. La decisión de realizar una VFSS se hizo tanto por el patólogo del habla o el médico tratante. Cuando se realiza, VFSS fueron interpretados principalmente por los radiólogos y la gravedad de la disfagia fue juzgado por el tratamiento de los patólogos del habla, sobre la base de los ocho puntos de penetración-aspiración Escala[ 26 ]. Para los pacientes que fueron evaluados sobre la base tanto de la EEB y una VFSS, la puntuación VFSS se utilizó para determinar la gravedad de la disfagia. En nuestro estudio, una puntuación en la escala de intrusión aspiración de 1 indica la deglución normal, 2 ó 3 se indica leve disfagia, 4 o 5 indican disfagia moderada y 6 a 8 se indica disfagia severa. Dada cierta variabilidad interobservador para la disfagia moderada y severa en el estudio inicial de validación del DOSS[ 24 ] y la falta de validación de estos resultados en pacientes de UCI, que combina la disfagia moderada y grave en una sola categoría para su posterior análisis. En nuestro segundo análisis, se intentó determinar el efecto de la presencia de disfunción para tragar en una variedad de variables de resultado, incluyendo la necesidad de


reintubación, el desarrollo de neumonía nosocomial (HAP), la duración de la estancia hospitalaria, la colocación quirúrgica de un alimentación por sonda y la mortalidad en el hospital. Para este análisis, la variable independiente primaria de interés fue la presencia de disfunción para tragar como se definió anteriormente. Las variables de resultado fueron definidos según los siguientes criterios."Reintubación" se definió como la colocación de un tubo endotraqueal por cualquier razón después de que el tubo endotraqueal inicial fue eliminado. El diagnóstico de HAP requiere la presencia de criterios definidos en la American Thoracic Society / Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas de América directrices [ 27 ], así como la decisión del médico para administrar el tratamiento antimicrobiano. Por duración de la hospitalización, se registraron dos días de hospitalización total y el tiempo de permanencia en el hospital después de la inicial de la EEB. "La colocación del tubo de alimentación" se definió como la colocación quirúrgica de un tubo gástrico o yeyunal por un cirujano, un gastroenterólogo o radiólogo intervencionista. Hemos determinado que la mayoría de los resultados clínicamente relevantes (1) el desarrollo de neumonía, (2) la necesidad de reintubación y (3) la mortalidad hospitalaria. Además de analizar cada variable por separado, hemos creado un resultado combinado de estas tres variables. Se registró la existencia de la variable compuesta, si cualquiera de estas tres variables se presentan. A los efectos de nuestro análisis, los pacientes con la presencia de un solo resultado fueron tratados igual que los pacientes con la presencia de dos o tres resultados. El análisis estadístico Datos que no se distribuyen normalmente se presentan como medianas [25a a 75a rango intercuartílico]. Comparaciones univariadas se evaluó mediante la χ 2 o prueba de KruskalWallis, según corresponda. Las pruebas no paramétricas se utilizaron cuando los datos no se distribuyen normalmente. Modelos de regresión logística hacia atrás se utilizaron para determinar el efecto de la duración de la ventilación mecánica en la presencia de disfagia y el efecto de la disfagia en los pacientes. Debido a los conocidos efectos fuertes de la traqueotomía en función de la deglución y una posible interacción entre la traqueotomía y la duración de la ventilación mecánica en los modelos que utiliza para examinar el efecto de la duración de la ventilación mecánica en la presencia de disfagia, que pre-especificados que se realizan por separado análisis multivariado para los pacientes con o sin traqueotomía. SAS versión 9.1 del software (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, NC, EE.UU.) se utilizó para todos los análisis, y P <0,05 fue considerado estadísticamente significativo. Los intervalos de confianza (95%) de las odds ratio ajustadas (RPA) y 25o-75ta rango intercuartílico [IQRs] de los valores medios se registran entre corchetes.La corrección de Bonferroni para comparaciones múltiples se llevó a cabo fueron las adecuadas. Resultados El proceso de inscripción en el estudio se describe en la figura 1 . De los 2.484 pacientes que cumplían los criterios de inclusión, 407 murieron antes de la extubación. De los pacientes restantes, el 67% (1.400 de 2.077) no habían sido evaluados por la EEB. Orden de un médico para realizar una encefalopatía espongiforme bovina fue más común en los pacientes en un servicio neurológico (45%), seguido de un servicio médico (34%) y un servicio de cirugía (17%) (P <0,001). En comparación con los pacientes que no fueron evaluados por la EEB, los pacientes que fueron evaluados por la EEB fueron más propensos a haber tenido una traqueotomía (44% vs 25%; P <0,001), una mayor duración de la ventilación mecánica (7 días [3-14] frente a 2 días [1 a 5], P <0,001) y una estancia más larga en la UCI (10 días [519] frente a 3 días [2-7], P<0,001). De los restantes 677 pacientes que fueron evaluados por


la encefalopatía espongiforme bovina durante su estancia en el hospital, 47 fueron excluidos por la inicial de EEB se había hecho antes de la intubación y 184 fueron excluidos porque no tenían un diagnóstico de la enfermedad de ACV o neuromuscular. Los restantes 446 pacientes fueron incluidos en el análisis final.Exactamente la mitad de estos pacientes fueron atendidos en una UCI médica, el 34% recibió atención en una UCI quirúrgica, el 9% fueron tratados en una unidad de cuidados intensivos neurológicos y el 7% fueron atendidos en una unidad de cuidados intensivos cardiacos.Aproximadamente dos tercios de estos pacientes tenían una enfermedad médica subyacente.Algún grado de disfagia estuvo presente en el 84% (374 de 446) de los pacientes seleccionados para ser evaluados por la EEB, en el 18% (374 de 2077) de la población total de los sobrevivientes de la IRA y en el 15% (374 de 2.484) de todos los pacientes ingresados en la UCI durante el período de estudio. Entre los 446 pacientes incluidos en el estudio, la gravedad de la disfagia fue leve en 44% ( n = 195), moderada en 23% ( n = 103) y severa en el 17% ( n = 76).La mortalidad hospitalaria en este grupo seleccionado de supervivientes IRA fue de 7,6%. Sólo 11 (2,5%) de los 446 pacientes del estudio recibieron un trago de bario modificado, además de una encefalopatía espongiforme bovina.

Figura 1. Diagrama de flujo que detalla la inscripción de los sujetos . EEB = evaluación tragar noche, CVA = accidente cerebrovascular. Análisis univariado a cabo para evaluar las características del paciente asociadas a la presencia de disfagia posterior a la extubación se describen en la Tabla 1 . Factores de riesgo estadísticamente significativos para la disfagia severa incluye larga duración de la ventilación mecánica, reintubación, traqueotomía y el sexo masculino. En el análisis multivariado, debido a una interacción entre la traqueotomía y la duración de la ventilación mecánica, hemos realizado dos análisis separados para los pacientes con versus sin traqueotomía. En el análisis de los pacientes sin la traqueotomía, tras ajustar por edad, sexo y gravedad de la enfermedad, la ventilación mecánica durante más de siete días se mantuvo independiente asociado con disfagia moderada o severa (AOR 2,84 [1,78 a 4,56]; P <0,01). En el análisis de los pacientes con traqueotomía, ventilación mecánica durante más de siete días no se asociaron independientemente con disfagia moderada o severa. Tabla 1. Análisis univariado de factores de riesgo de disfagia posterior a la extubación Entre los 243 pacientes con disfagia resuelto mientras se encontraban en el hospital, la duración media de la disfagia fue de 3 días [2 a 6 días] para las personas con disfagia leve ( n = 162) y 6 días [4 a 12 días] para las personas con disfagia moderada o severa ( n = 81). En el momento del alta hospitalaria, la disfagia estuvo presente en el mayor número de pacientes con disfagia moderada o severa en comparación con aquellos con insuficiencia renal leve disfagia (55% (98 de 179) frente al 17% (33 de 195), P <0,0001). Análisis univariado realizado para evaluar las asociaciones entre la presencia y severidad de la disfagia y resultados del hospital se muestran en la Tabla 2 y Figura2 . La presencia de disfagia se asocia significativamente con el número de días de hospitalización después de la inicial de la EEB, el estado de descarga, no hay estado de la ingesta oral (NPO), la colocación quirúrgica de un tubo de alimentación y el resultado combinado de la neumonía, la


reintubación o la mortalidad hospitalaria (Tabla2 ). La disfagia fue también independiente y significativamente asociado con la neumonía, la reintubación y la mortalidad hospitalaria (Figura2 ). En el análisis multivariado, tras ajustar por edad y gravedad de la enfermedad, la presencia de disfagia moderada o severa se asoció independientemente con el resultado compuesto de la neumonía, la reintubación o la muerte (AOR 3,31 [1,89 a 5,90]; P <0,01). Tabla 2. Análisis univariado de los resultados del paciente según la gravedad de la disfagia

Figura 2. asociación entre la gravedad de la disfagia y la neumonía, la reintubación y la mortalidad . Discusión En un grupo grande de pacientes en estado crítico, hemos demostrado que, entre los pacientes que no fueron evaluados por la EEB, tanto una mayor duración de la ventilación mecánica e intubación repetición se asociaron con el desarrollo de la disfagia. Además, encontramos que la disfagia posterior a la extubación a menudo persiste en el momento del alta y se asocia con resultados pobres. En concreto, la disfagia moderada o severa se asocia con un mayor riesgo de reintubación, el desarrollo de la neumonía, la estancia hospitalaria más prolongada, disminución de la ingesta, la colocación de los tubos de alimentación, la evacuación a un hogar de ancianos y un mayor riesgo de muerte. La frecuencia exacta de la disfagia posterior a la extubación entre todos los pacientes de la UCI médica y quirúrgica sigue siendo desconocido. Las limitaciones sobre todo en la comprensión de esta frecuencia son (1) la ausencia de un estándar ampliamente aceptado para el diagnóstico de la disfagia y (2) de la población relativamente pequeña representados en los estudios existentes.Barker y sus colegas [ 17 ] llevó a cabo una revisión retrospectiva de 254 pacientes (incluyendo aquellos con ACV) que requirieron ventilación mecánica durante más de 48 horas después de la cirugía cardíaca y encontraron evidencia de la disfagia en 130 pacientes (51%) sobre la base de la EEB. El Solh y sus colegas[ 21 ] llevaron a cabo una evaluación endoscópica con fibra óptica de la deglución (FEES) en 84 pacientes consecutivos extubado UCI médica que no tenían disfagia preexistentes, ACV o enfermedad neuromuscular. En su estudio, la aspiración se produjo en 37 (44%) de 84 pacientes y se quedó en silencio (es decir, no asociadas con la tos o malestar del paciente y por lo tanto no detectable en la EEB) en 11 de los 37 pacientes (13% de la población total). En un estudio pequeño que comparó CUOTAS a la EEB, Barquist et al .[ 19 ] al azar 70 recién extubados los pacientes de cirugía trauma para recibir CUOTAS o encefalopatía espongiforme bovina y encontró pruebas de la aspiración de cada 5 (13,5%) de los 37 en el grupo FEES y 2 (6%) de 33 en el grupo de la EEB. Ajemian y sus colegas[ 28 ] llevaron a cabo en 51 CUOTAS consecutivos extubados los pacientes en la UCI médicas y quirúrgicas sin un trastorno de la deglución y la anterior aspiración encontrado en 27 (56%) de 48 pacientes, en 12 de los cuales se produjo en silencio (25% del total). Es importante destacar que más de dos tercios de los pacientes de nuestra cohorte no se sometieron a una evaluación de la disfagia, con lo que la verdadera incidencia de disfagia en los pacientes de nuestro estudio es incierto. Sin embargo, posterior a la extubación disfagia estuvo presente en el 84% (374 de 446) de los pacientes seleccionados para someterse a una encefalopatía espongiforme bovina, que


representan el 18% (374 de 2077) de la población total de los sobrevivientes de la IRA, y el 15% (374 de 2.484) de todas las UCI de admisión. Mayor investigación, incluyendo estudios prospectivos observacionales, es necesario determinar la verdadera frecuencia de la disfagia posterior a la extubación. La asociación entre la duración de la intubación y la gravedad de la disfagia es apoyado por Barker et al . 's de revisión[ 17 ], así como por dos estudios en los que los pacientes intubados durante la circulación extracorpórea fueron examinados[ 18 , 29 ]. Sin embargo, esta asociación no ha sido reportado en otros análisis[ 19 , 21 , 28 , 30 ]. Muchos factores podrían explicar esta discrepancia, es decir, las diferencias en el tamaño de la muestra, la tasa de eventos y la duración de la intubación. Aunque esta asociación es plausible en función del grado probable aumento de los daños oral, faringe y laringe en pacientes intubados por largos períodos de tiempo, sino que también sigue siendo posible que la duración de la intubación corto es suficiente para causar disfagia. La asociación entre la duración de la intubación y la disfagia, así como los mecanismos neuromotores y sensoriales de la disfunción de la deglución en los pacientes recién extubados, debe estudiarse más a fondo. Nuestro estudio y que por Barker et al .[ 17 ] son los primeros en sugerir que la reintubación puede estar asociada con el desarrollo de la disfagia, una asociación con aplicaciones potencialmente importantes para el futuro de los estudios de la disfagia. Una revisión reciente de la Encuesta Nacional de Altas Hospitalarias mostró una asociación significativa entre la disfagia y tanto la duración de la estancia hospitalaria y la mortalidad [ 31 ], pero pocos estudios han examinado la asociación entre la evolución del paciente y la gravedad de la disfagia entre los pacientes de la UCI extubados médicas y quirúrgicas sin ACV o enfermedad neuromuscular. Tanto El Solh et al .[ 21 ] y Ajemian et al .[ 28 ] no encontraron ni la neumonía por aspiración posterior a la extubación, ni ninguna muerte en sus estudios. En contraste, el 14% de los pacientes con disfagia moderada o grave en nuestra cohorte tenía una neumonía por aspiración, y el 13% murió en el hospital, lo que sugiere que sea nuestra cohorte tuvo una mayor gravedad de la enfermedad o la modificación de la dieta basada en CUOTAS utilizados en estos estudios impidió que estas complicaciones. Barker et al .[ 17 ] demostraron una asociación entre la disfagia y la reintubación, mayor estancia hospitalaria, en ayunas y la presencia de sondas de alimentación, aunque no registró datos sobre la mortalidad. Nuestro estudio tiene varias limitaciones. Sesenta y siete por ciento de los pacientes que sobrevivieron a la extubación en nuestro estudio no se evaluaron por la EEB. Podríamos estudiar sólo los pacientes que habían sido evaluados por la EEB. En segundo lugar, inherente en el diseño de nuestro centro único, estudio retrospectivo, observacional de cohortes es la incapacidad para sacar conclusiones sobre causalidad. Del mismo modo, algunas variables muy importantes trazado irregular o no planeado en todo, y por lo tanto no estaban disponibles para el análisis.Por ejemplo, no hemos podido obtener (1) los datos de GCS para incluir en el SOFA, (2) un marcador fiable de la sedación en el momento de la evaluación de tragar, (3) los datos de altura para calcular tanto el índice de masa corporal y la altura / endotraqueal tubo de relación de diámetro[ 32 ] y (4) datos fiables sobre el consumo de alcohol y tabaco. Además, los investigadores en un estudio previo de la disfagia posterior a la extubación fueron capaces de obtener información sobre el estado de preadmisión funcionales, tales como las actividades de la vida diaria y la preadmisión para tragar disfunción[ 21 ]. A pesar de que intentaron controlar esta con la gravedad de la admisión de la enfermedad, así como la exclusión de todos los pacientes con antecedentes de ACV o la


disfunción neuromuscular, que no fueron capaces de obtener de manera fiable esta información y por lo tanto, se omite de nuestro análisis. Del mismo modo, porque no tenemos datos sobre la presencia de disfunción preexistente para tragar, no fuimos capaces de excluir a estos pacientes a partir de nuestro análisis. Esto podría haber resultado en una serie falsamente elevados de los pacientes clasificados con disfagia posterior a la extubación. Una segunda limitación importante en esta área de investigación es la falta de una prueba firme de diagnóstico para determinar la presencia o ausencia de la disfagia. Aunque el DOSS ha sido validado en correlación con la gravedad de la disfagia en la base de VFSS[ 24 ], la puntuación es en última instancia, sobre la base de la sentencia dictada por el patólogo del habla y el tratamiento. Somos conscientes de que esta evaluación es intrínsecamente subjetivo. Sobre la base de estudios realizados en pacientes ambulatorios, HONORARIOS es probable una medida más sensible de la aspiración de que cualquiera de la encefalopatía espongiforme bovina o videofluoroscopia[ 33 - 35 ]. Relativamente pocos pacientes en esta cohorte fueron evaluados por VFSS, y no los pacientes fueron evaluados por las cuotas. Son necesarios más estudios para explorar el diagnóstico, las causas y las complicaciones de la disfagia posterior a la extubación. Conclusiones Hemos demostrado que en un gran grupo de supervivientes de la ventilación mecánica, el desarrollo de la disfagia posterior a la extubación se asocia con resultados pobres, incluyendo la neumonía, la reintubación y la muerte. Además, la larga duración de la ventilación mecánica y la reintubación antes se asocian con el desarrollo de la disfagia posterior a la extubación. Comprensión de los mecanismos que contribuyen a la disfagia posterior a la extubación y el desarrollo de métodos para seguir haciendo frente a este trastorno puede reducir la morbilidad entre un porcentaje significativo de estos pacientes en estado crítico. Mensajes clave ♦ La ingestión disfunción que se produce después de la ventilación mecánica, también conocido como "posterior a la extubación disfagia," es probable comunes en una población grande de pacientes de la UCI médicas y quirúrgicas sin historial de enfermedad neuromuscular. ♦ Los resultados de este estudio sugieren una asociación independiente entre la disfagia posterior a la extubación y los malos resultados del paciente, incluyendo la neumonía, la reintubación y la muerte. ♦ Este estudio es el más grande, y uno de los primeros, para demostrar que la larga duración de la ventilación mecánica se asocia con el desarrollo de la disfagia posterior a la extubación. ♦ posterior a la extubación disfagia persiste en el momento de la descarga de una gran parte de los pacientes (131 (29%) de 446 pacientes en nuestro estudio). ♦ disfagia posterior a la extubación es una forma poco reconocida y potencialmente costosa de discapacidad en los supervivientes de la enfermedad crítica. Nuevas investigaciones sobre este trastorno es necesaria para identificar la epidemiología y la fisiopatología, así como para desarrollar estrategias de diagnóstico y tratamientos. Abreviaturas AOR: razón de probabilidad ajustada, IRA: insuficiencia respiratoria aguda; IMC: índice de masa corporal, la EEB: evaluación tragar lado de la cama; ACV: accidente cerebrovascular; DOSS: Final de la disfagia y la Escala de Gravedad; ED: servicio de urgencias; HONORARIOS:


evaluación flexible endoscópica de la deglución; GCS: Glasgow Coma Scale, SOFA: Evaluación secuencial fallo; VFSS: estudios videofluoroscopia de la deglución. Conflicto de intereses Los autores declaran que no tienen intereses en conflicto. Autores de las contribuciones MM concibe el estudio y ha contribuido al análisis de datos, preparación de la recopilación de datos y el manuscrito. MM concibe el estudio y ha contribuido al análisis de datos y preparación de manuscritos. TW participó en el diseño del estudio y contribuyó a la recopilación de datos.BJC, ABB y ELB contribuido al diseño del estudio, análisis y preparación de manuscritos. AW contribuido al análisis estadístico y la preparación del manuscrito. Todos los autores leído y aprobado el manuscrito final. Agradecimientos Este trabajo fue apoyado por el Instituto Nacional del Corazón, los Pulmones y la Sangre de subvención K24 089.223 de los Institutos Nacionales de Salud (Bethesda, MD, EE.UU.). Estamos muy agradecidos a Vivienne Smith, MS, RN, y Allen Wentworth, MEd, TSR (University of Colorado Hospital, Aurora, CO, EE.UU.), por su ayuda en la recopilación de datos en este estudio. Referencias 1. Behrendt CE: Insuficiencia respiratoria aguda en los Estados Unidos: la incidencia y la supervivencia de 31 días. Pecho de 2000, 118 : 1100-1105. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo editor 2. Esteban A, Anzueto A, F Frutos, Alía I, Brochard L, Stewart TE, Benito S, Epstein SK, Apezteguía C, P Nightingale, Arroliga AC, Tobin MJ, por el Grupo de Estudio Internacional de Ventilación Mecánica: Características y resultados en pacientes adultos que reciben ventilación mecánica: un estudio de 28 días internacionales. JAMA 2002, 287 : . 345-355 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 3. A Garland, NV Dawson, Altmann, CL Thomas, Phillips RS, Tsevat J, Desbiens NA, Bellamy PE, Knaus WA, Connors AF Jr, para los investigadores APOYO: Los resultados de hasta 5 años después de la falla severa, infecciones respiratorias agudas. Pecho de 2004, 126 : 1897-1904. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 4. Myhren H, Ekeberg Ø, Stokland O: Salud relacionados con la calidad de vida y volver al trabajo después de una enfermedad crítica, en general, los pacientes unidad de cuidados intensivos: un 1 año de seguimiento del estudio. Crit Care Med 2010, 38 : 1554-1561. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor


5. Orme JF Jr, JS Romney, RO Hopkins, D Papa, KJ Chan, Thomsen G, Crapo RO, Weaver LK:La función pulmonar y la salud relacionados con la calidad de vida de los sobrevivientes del síndrome de distrés respiratorio agudo. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2003, 167 : . 690-694 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 6. Hopkins RO, LK Weaver, D Collingridge, RB Parkinson, KJ Chan, Orme JF Jr: Dos años cognitivas, emocionales, y la calidad de vida de los resultados en el síndrome de distrés respiratorio agudo. Am J Respir Crit Cuidado Med 2005, 171 : . 340-347 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 7. De Jonghe B, T Sharshar, JP Lefaucheur, Authier FJ, Durand-Zaleski I, Boussarsar M, C Cerf, Renaud E, F Mesrati, Carlet J, Raphaël JC, Outin H, Bastuji Garin-S, Grupo de Reflexión et d ' Etude des Neuromyopathies Reanimación en: Paresia adquiridos en la unidad de cuidados intensivos: un estudio prospectivo y multicéntrico. JAMA 2002, 288 : 2859-2867 . PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 8. Herridge MS, Tansey CM, un mate, Tomlinson G, Díaz-Granados N, A Cooper, Invitado CB, CD Mazer, Mehta S, Stewart TE, Kudlow P, Cook D, Slutsky AS, AM Cheung, Canadá Critical Care Trials Group: discapacidad funcional 5 años después del síndrome de distrés respiratorio agudo. N Engl J Med 2011, 364 : 1293-1304. PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 9. Ali NA, O'Brien JM Jr, Hoffmann SP, G Phillips, Garland A, Finley JC, Almoosa K, Hejal R, Wolf KM, Lemeshow S, Connors AF Jr, Marsh CB, Consorcio del Medio Oeste de Cuidados Críticos: debilidad adquirida, empuñadura de la fuerza , y la mortalidad en pacientes críticamente enfermos. Am J Respir Crit Care Med 2008, 178 : 261-268. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 10. Ekberg O, S Hamdy, V Woisard, A-Wuttge Hanning, Ortega P: carga social y psicológica de la disfagia: su impacto en el diagnóstico y tratamiento. Disfagia 2002, 17 : . 139-146 PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 11. Marik PE: neumonitis por aspiración y neumonía por aspiración. N Engl J Med 2001, 344 : 665-671. PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 12. Martino R, N Foley, S Bhogal, N Diamant, M Speechley, Teasell R: La disfagia después del accidente cerebrovascular: incidencia, diagnóstico y complicaciones pulmonares. Golpe de 2005, 36 : 2756-2763 . PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor


13. Skoretz SA, Flores HL, Martino R: La incidencia de disfagia después de la intubación endotraqueal: una revisión sistemática. Pecho de 2010, 137 : 665-673. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 14. Herrera LJ, AM Correa, AA Vaporciyan, WL Hofstetter, DC Rice, SG Swisher, GL Walsh, Roth JA, Mehran RJ: Aumento del riesgo de aspiración y complicaciones pulmonares después de la resección pulmonar en cabeza y cuello cáncer. Ann Thorac Surg 2006, 82 : . 1982-1988 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 15. Smith-CA Hammond, Nueva KC, R Pietrobon, DJ Curtis, Scharver CH, Turner DA: Análisis prospectivo de incidencia y factores de riesgo de la disfagia en pacientes de cirugía de columna vertebral: comparación de los anteriores procedimientos de cuello uterino, cervical posterior y lumbar. Columna vertebral (Phila Pa 1976) 2004, 29 : . 1441-1446 editor de texto completo 16. Sala de la CE, el obispo B, Frisby J, M Stevens: los resultados después de tragar la laringectomía y pharyngolaryngectomy. Otolaryngol arco de cabeza y cuello Surg 2002, 128 : . 181-186 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 17. Barker J, Martino R, B Reichardt, Hickey EJ, Ralph Edwards-A: La incidencia y el impacto de la disfagia en los pacientes que recibieron intubación endotraqueal prolongada después de la cirugía cardíaca. Can J Surg 2009, 52 : 119-124. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo editor | PubMed Central Texto completo 18. Rousou JA, Tighe DA, Garb JL, Krasner H, RM Engelman, Flack JE, Deaton DW: El riesgo de disfagia después de la ecocardiografía transesofágica en cirugías cardíacas. Ann Thorac Surg 2000, 69 : . 486-490 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 19. Barquist E, M Brown, S Cohn, D Lundy, Jackowski J: posterior a la extubación de fibra óptica la evaluación endoscópica de la deglución después de la intubación endotraqueal prolongada: un estudio aleatorizado, prospectivo. Crit Care Med 2001, 29 : 1710-1713. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 20. de Larminat V, Montravers P, Dureuil B, Desmonts JM: La alteración en el reflejo de tragar después de la extubación en los pacientes de cuidados intensivos unidad. Crit Care Med 1995, 23 : 486-490. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor


21. El Solh A, Okada M, Bhat A, Pietrantoni C: intubación orotraqueal para deglutir después de los trastornos en los ancianos. Cuidados Intensivos Med 2003, 29 : 1451-1455. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 22. Heffner JE: La ingestión de complicaciones después de la extubación endotraqueal: pasar de "si" al "cómo".. Pecho de 2010, 137 : 509-510. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 23. Stauffer JL, Olson DE, Petty TL: Complicaciones y consecuencias de la intubación endotraqueal y traqueotomía: un estudio prospectivo de 150 pacientes adultos en estado crítico. Am J Med 1981, 70 : . 65-76 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 24. O'Neil KH, M Purdy, Falk J, L Gallo: El Documento Final de la disfagia y la Escala de Gravedad. Disfagia 1999, 14 : . 139-145 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 25. Nacional disfagia Grupo de Trabajo Dieta: La dieta nacional Disfagia: Normalización para la atención óptima . Chicago: La disfagia Dieta Nacional del Grupo de Trabajo, 2002. 26. Rosenbek JC, Robbins JA, Roecker EB, Coyle JL, Wood JL: Una escala de la penetración-aspiración. Disfagia 1996, 11 : . 93-98 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 27. American Thoracic Society, Sociedad de Enfermedades Infecciosas de América: Guía para el tratamiento de adultos con nosocomiales, asociada a la ventilación, y la neumonía asociadas a la salud. Am J Respir Crit Cuidado Med 2005, 171 : . 388-416 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 28. Ajemian MS, Nirmul GB, Anderson MT, Zirlen DM, Kwasnik EM: evaluación de rutina de fibra óptica endoscópica de la deglución intubación prolongada siguientes: implicaciones para la gestión. Arco Surg 2001, 136 : . 434-437 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 29. Hogue CW Jr, Lappas GD, Creswell LL, Ferguson TB, la muestra M, D Pugh, Balfe D, Cox JL, Lappas DG: disfunción tragar después de una operación cardíaca: resultados adversos asociados y factores de riesgo como la ecocardiografía transesofágica intraoperatoria. J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg 1995, 110 : . 517-522 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor


30. Romero CM, Marambio A, Larrondo J, K Walker, MT Lira, Tobar E, Cornejo R, Ruiz M:disfunción deglución en los pacientes no neurológicos críticamente enfermos que requieren traqueostomía percutánea por dilatación. Pecho de 2010, 137 : 1278-1282. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 31. Altman KW, Yu GP, Schaefer SD: Consecuencia de la disfagia en el paciente hospitalizado: impacto sobre el pronóstico y los recursos del hospital. Arco Head Neck Surg Otolaryngol 2010, 136 : 784-789. PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor 32. François B, Bellissant E, V Gissot, Desachy A, Normand S, T Boulain, Brenet O, Preux PM, Vignon P, Asociación de Réanimateurs du Centre-Ouest (ARCO): 12 h antes del tratamiento con metilprednisolona versus placebo para la prevención de la extubación edema laríngeo: un estudio aleatorizado doble ciego. Lancet 2007, 369 : . 1083-1089 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 33. Kelly AM, Drinnan MJ, Leslie P: penetración de evaluación y la aspiración: ¿cómo videofluoroscopia y la evaluación endoscópica con fibra óptica de la deglución comparar? Laringoscopio de 2007, 117 : . 1723-1727 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 34. Kelly AM, Leslie P, T Beale, C Payten, MJ Drinnan: evaluación de fibra óptica endoscópica de la deglución y videofluoroscopia: tipo de examen no influyen en la percepción de la gravedad de residuo faríngeo? Clin Otolaryngol 2006, 31 : . 425-432 PubMed Abstract | Full Text Editor 35. Leder SB, Espinosa JF: el riesgo de aspiración después del accidente cerebrovascular agudo: comparación del examen clínico y la evaluación endoscópica con fibra óptica de la deglución. Disfagia 2002, 17 : . 214-218 PubMed Abstract | Texto Completo Autor regresar

extubacion  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you