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Stories • Activities • Artwork • Poetry • More! Spring 2008 flyingship.org

Children’s Photography Exhibit Inside! SPORTS STORIES WANTED! See page 12 for details

Publishing work by Upper Valley Residents! See page 15 for submission guidelines.


Publisher’s Note

In this issue...

Dear Readers,

Fun Stuff

The contributors to this issue of Flying Ship have been thinking of spring for quite some time. As you read this, perhaps the writing and images you see here will be mirrored by the weather outside! Several young photographers sent us some beautiful images to show in our photography exhibition in this issue. Send us more, please, for future issues! We also received some outstanding poetry and narrative writing. Thank you, teachers, for sending us your class submissions! Keep them coming! The theme for the next issue of Flying Ship is “Fun and Games.” Your submissions don't need to correspond to this topic to be published, but here are some ideas for work you could send us during the coming month:

Picture Puzzler ..........................................................7 Spring Wordfind ......................................................8 Code Breaker ..........................................................10 Special Sections “Where I’m From” Poems By 4th Graders at Seminary Hill School .................. 14 Artwork & poetry throughout! Fun and Games submission details ........................12 Subscribe to Flying Ship Magazine ........................15 Submit your work for publication..........................15

Sports stories Photography and artwork about sports Favorite games or rules to games you invent Reports on sports and games from this country or other countries, or from history (what sort of games do you think children played in ancient Egypt?) Be creative! There are lots of things that can be considered “Fun and Games.” Popular sports that people play today are great. Also think about: games you play at camp, fishing or hunting, games for rainy days, word games, theater games, riddle games, board games... Do you ever play games with your pets? What sort of games did they play in the middle ages? What do you think someone from the 1800s would think if they saw an Xbox or a Wii?

Keely Doyle, Age 14

Flying Ship’s mission is to encourage kids to be creative and use their imaginations. We believe there is nothing more important to becoming a healthy, productive and active individual than developing your imagination, whether you become a carpenter, a scientist, an artist or the next president! Your ideas and suggestions are always welcome, no matter what your age.

We would also like more submissions of games and activities, such as those on pages 8 & 10, to print here in Flying Ship. Have you invented your own board game? Send it in! Try creating your own mazes, crossword puzzles, word searches, hidden picture drawings, or other games or puzzles you enjoy.

To see more great writing and artwork check out FLYINGSHIP.ORG!

We can’t wait to see what you send us. Keep up the good work!

SUPPORT FLYING SHIP! Your generosity keeps us afloat! We rely on your donations to meet our significant production costs. Please consider making a contribution with the form on page 15 or online at flyingship.org. Thank you!

The deadline for all submissions for the June 2008 issue is May 9! Submission info on page 15

Flying Ship

TM

Flying Ship Magazine, PO Box 1159, Norwich, VT 05055 www.flyingship.org • (603) 398-2080 • info@flyingship.org Publisher: Mathew Doyle • Editor: Nikki Kendall Producer: Kathy Hardy Flying Ship Magazine is produced by Flying Ship Productions, Inc. All stories and artwork ©2007 by the author/artist unless otherwise noted. All rights reserved. Except for one-time personal use, no part of any issue or online content may be reproduced by any mechanical, photographic or electronic process, nor may it be stored in a retrieval system, transmitted or otherwise copied for public or private use without written permission of the copyright owner.


Spring 2008

As Spring Begins By Ella Farrell-Starr 2nd Grade class of Regina Smith Thetford Elementary School

As the birds come back the world awakens from its long winter nap, and yawns like a dragon roaring its fiery breath. As the sun rises over the horizons, the children awaken to see the first signs of spring.

By Isabelle Tuggle, Age 10, Norwich, Vermont

By Keely Doyle, Age 14, Strafford, Vermont 3


Flying Ship Magazine

The dark night wanders By Kimberly Chadwell, Age 14, The Sharon Academy, Sharon, Vermont The dark night wanders, The red-rimmed skies The Cat’s eyes widen The Yew tree dies

The dark becomes the day While red and gold colors flitter As the dark night comes Ever hither

The coals awaken Ever burning ashes While the dark night roams Inhaling madness

The reservoir of all warm memories fills with ice All grow numb with frigid tremors Here comes the dark night of long December

The fire bird perishes As Daughters of Venus flicker While the dark night groans The sky dims to Irish liquor

Photo by Keely Doyle, Age 14, Strafford, Vermont

The Night Train By Rebekah Lamb Age 8, Newton School, Strafford, Vermont

T'was the middle of the night when I woke up To the sound of the train on the tracks I walked to my window and looked out I saw the train It blew its horn once, twice, the third time It blew a puff of smoke and ventured off Into the dark woods night sky I watched it as the moon glowed Until the train was out of sight in the dark woods And a wolf howled at the midnight moon

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Spring 2008

Finding Home By Julie Calandrella, Grade 4 class of Eloise Ginty, Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont WSHHHHHHHHH! THE AIR rushed past me as I fell. Down, down, down I fell and landed on what I soon learned was a tile floor in Lisa’s house. Grapes can jump so I jumped up and up, over and over again to get a good look at my surroundings. Suddenly, I lost control and went flying! BANG! Something closed behind me. “Hi, my name is Orange. I am an orange,” said something that I landed next to. “Hi, I am a grape. Well, I think I am a grape. My name is Plum,” I said. “Oh. Um, a grape. Very nice,” Orange said uncertainly. “I have a few questions,” I said. “What is a grape?” I asked. “Um, Well I, ah, don’t know,” Orange sputtered. “Oh,” I said, sort of disappointedly. “Well then, when I fell, what did I land on?” “You probably landed on Lisa’s kitchen floor. It’s tile,” Orange said. “Lisa? Who’s that?” I asked. “She’s a human, a little girl about

five years old. I don’t know her parents’ names.” “Oh,” I said. “I know how you can find out what a grape is!” Orange shouted excitedly. “Ask other fruits! Look around the fridge! First try my cousins! The grapefruits!” “OK, bye!” I said. I guess this is the fridge, I thought. Suddenly, I bumped into something. “Hi.” I knew it was a grapefruit because of how it sounded and looked. “Hi,” I said back. “I’m a grape. My name is plum. Am I a grapefruit?” “A little small, and not the right color, but we’d love it if you stayed,” the grapefruit said. “No thanks.” And I was on my way. I wanted to be with other grapes. “Hey, what are you doing here? This is the plums’ place.” “My name is plum!” I said. “That doesn’t mean you’re a plum!” So I left. Something came running after me. “Hey! Wait! My name is Grape. Want to look for grapes together?” it asked.

“Sure,” I said. “I’m Plum.” Suddenly a wall opened and we came tumbling out, right next to Lisa! We hung on to each other and rolled and rolled out into the sunshine. For a moment we just sat in the grass. “Help!” The call came from above me. “Help!” Grape yelled again. But it was to late. Swoosh! A bird grabbed me, we grabbed each other. We didn’t want to separate. We went soaring through the sky. The bird’s talons hurt and I was glad that at least Grape wasn’t getting hurt. I was holding onto Grape, not the bird. After a while we saw purple dots. “Look!” I shouted, even though Grape saw too. I wiggled and wiggled and finally we dropped. Grape quickly let go of me and we fell through the air. As we passed the grapes, we each desperately grabbed a vine. “What are we?” we asked eagerly at the same time. “You’re grapes just like us,” one grape said. “We didn’t even introduce ourselves,” I said. “I’m Plum, he’s Grape, and we’re home!”

The Magic Never Empty Sugar Jar By Sam Strohbehn, Grade 4 class of Santa was in his candy factory making candy canes to decorate the tree and was about to add the sugar when he noticed he did not have his sugar jar. He asked his elf where it was, but he did not know where the jar was. He ran to his two best elves, Toth and Firr, and told them about his problem. They found out who stole it immediately. Grack! Toth and Firr thought

Mrs. Keogh, Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont

together. Grack was a werewolfy kind of animal who did not have very good eyesight and was very greedy. Because he was so greedy, he and his workers would go into kids’ houses and steal the toys that they got from Santa. Then he would sell them to toy stores for a lot of money. Santa asked if they could get it back, but they didn’t want to. Then they talked about it to Santa and 5

thought it might be fun. It took a while to get ready, but then when they finally got ready Santa didn’t want them to leave. But he said goodbye and they left to get it. They had to bring a lot on their trip, like sleeping bags to sleep, a tent, food, and water. They found Grack’s castle two days after they had left from Santa’s factory. Toth and Firr didn’t see any way into Grack’s castle. When Firr


Flying Ship Magazine

explored the back of the castle, she found a big stone door. She yelled, “Toth, I found a door.” It wasn’t locked, but it was hard to open. Inside the castle, it was very warm compared to the cold outside. They entered a huge workshop with a big chair in the middle. Grack was sitting in the chair, counting his stolen toys. He asked, “Who are you?” Toth thought quickly and said, “Two of your new elves.” Since Grack had poor eyesight, he did not recognize them and went back to counting his toys. Then he told them, “Go get me my Magic Sugar Jar.” Toth and Firr could not believe that he asked them to get exactly what they came for. “Oh, Master, this is our first day working, so please tell us where you keep the jar.” Grack gave

them a map of the castle which had an “X” where the jar was kept. He also gave them keys for the cupboard. They followed the map until they found the cupboard. There were more than 50 keys on the key chain, but only one had gold on it. The key matched the cupboard. When Firr tried the key, the lock clicked and the door swung open. Toth pocketed the sugar jar. They remembered that if this magic sugar was mixed with juice and drunk, it would turn people to stone. So they mixed together a potion that looked like tea, because Grack loved tea. They returned to the workshop and offered Grack the cup of “tea.” The whole room fell silent as Grack looked suspiciously at the tea, but he drank it anyway. “After them!” he shouted to his elves when he realized it wasn’t tea. All of a sudden, he

started to turn to cold stone. Toth and Firr ran as fast as they could, out the back door and into the snowy forest. The elves stopped chasing them since they could not be out in the cold weather. With Grack’s castle behind them and the Magic Sugar Jar in their pocket, they felt overjoyed. Santa was thrilled to see them home safely and glad to hear that Grack would no longer be stealing toys. And since Santa had a sweet tooth and he loved candy, he was glad to see his Magic Sugar Jar again.

By Deryk Doyle, Age 12, Strafford, Vermont

By Isabelle Tuggle, Age 10, Norwich, Vermont 6


Spring 2008

Picture Puzzler Can you find all the hidden items in this picture? When you’re done, color everything in. Visit flyingship.org to see if there is anything you missed!

Illustration © 2008 by Jonathan G. Cook

Hidden Items: ❍ light switch ❍ wrench

❍ comb ❍ water faucet

❍ snowman ❍ snail

❍ peppermint candy 7

❍ butterfly ❍ flag

❍ baseball bat ❍ ruler

❍ heart ❍ dinosaur

❍ star ❍ pencil


Flying Ship Magazine

Spring Word Find See if you can find all the words! They can be up, down, backwards, forwards, or diagonal. S M S B A K A R B S I S I S F A C B H D C

P U T R C I I T R H C M C P L A R U A G T

E E A E O H A B E Y I E U A Y R E N P R R

R T R A L T T D E M A L I D I V T N P I M

L P A Y L O U A S B L I N U N O O Y U P A

P F I F T B S D E R O O T C G R B E G V R

O L N P B T S A T I V L R L S K W R R D C

L O C S E A B V W K A S E O H R U R U R H

E P O R W C D Y U S B O I V I U E A S Y S

M P A L O D H N I U U K A E P M L W S H R

O O T I N C A S L L R S S R H M O V O I G

S Q X O U U V H D L I U T R A R S E A L Y

R R E S A R R O V P B R U I H U E G V T F

Q R A Q H M R W I Y L V P G A K V F E V B

U A S U C F S E T A O R R A R K J O R S T

M I T A E M H R D M A Y I N C Y T O R T H

F S R P R P C S D T K S N U E C D L S L D

A T E R P D I A I R T T X M S A F S H E Y

E E F I E Y O R Y A O U A P G N R B A M H

F F Q N L P Z G N I R P S I I D R O M E F

U F U S F S B B U K A O I G B Y D O R G G

T O A L L E R B M U S G B U D S H D O Y K

M O P B R I M C O M H G Y V E L I R C U I

P O S F I N T A B B U L L O R O A I K J I

Wordfind designed by Danielle Mansfield-Marcoux

Invent a Game! Make up a game and send it in to us. It can be a word game, a board game, a riddle game, a game to play outdoors, a new sport... Explain how it is played and list the rules. Include any images or diagrams that will help us understand how it works.

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R Q T F L A R B O R P I S R J Q A P O S O

■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

MARCH CLOVER SHAMROCK LEPRECHAUN EASTER BUNNY ARBOR APRIL SHOWERS FOOLS BUDS SPRING MELTS CANDY MAY FLOWERS POLE UMBRELLA RAINCOAT MUD


Spring 2008

My Dog By Peter Huizenga, Grade 4 class of

Eloise Ginty, Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont

It was a cool summer morning. I was sitting on the couch wrapped up in a blanket playing video games. My dog was lying next to me staring blankly outside. I could feel his warm breath on my leg. I decided to go play with him outside because I knew that was what

he wanted. I put on my sweatshirt and grabbed a tennis ball. He eagerly ran through the open door right behind me. Outside there was a slight breeze against my face. I could clearly smell fall coming as I threw the tennis ball through the air and he was off,

lips back, drool dripping down his face. When he retrieved it he dropped it at my feet. He jumped up and licked my face. I could feel his slobbery tongue run down my face as I scratched him behind the ears. I had a really awesome time playing with MY DOG!

Finding Rosalita By Lilly E. Cadow, Grade 4 class of

Eloise Ginty, Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont

It was Sunday. My family and I were in France. I was as happy as a bee. We were driving along the road when my daddy stopped the car. He told my brother and sister to get out of the car to see what the furry lump on the side of the road was. They got out of the car. Ten seconds later, they got back into the car with a very small kitten in their hands. She was about the size of a very, very, very, very small baby bottle. My stomach went into my throat when I saw it actually was a kit-

ten. She was meowing as loud as a fog horn. It was so horrible, I couldn’t think. Mreow. I felt horrible. I knew that I hadn’t done anything bad to her, but I just couldn’t help it. She was so so cold. I was worried. Her claws were as sharp as sewing needles being pricked into your skin. I shuddered. She had crusts over her eyes, from infections, that looked like they hurt. We were heading into the village. Madame Sanz was there. We asked her what to do. I was afraid that she

9

wouldn’t have any advice. Thankfully, she told us what to do. She told us to boil rose petals in water till they were warm and wet. Then we should pour them into a bowl with some water and keep on rubbing them over her eyes. After that, we decided to call the little kitten Rosalita. We also call her other things that sound like Rosalita (but I won’t mention that). We prayed. Luckily, she is still with us now. Hopefully, she will be with us much, much, much, much longer.


Flying Ship Magazine

Come Home Pencils

CODE BREAKER

By Kassie McCurley Age 10, Grantham, New Hampshire

Come, come little pencils, Come running home to me. I need you to write, (and to bite), Come running home to me.

Crack the code to reveal the answer to the riddle! What do you call a know-it-all duck?

On your little erasers come bouncing home, Come bouncing back to me. Come bouncing with all your might, Whether you’re short and stubby, Or tall and chubby, I need you tonight, little pencils, tonight.

Answer: _ ____ N SFW J _______ XTNLDJV

You came, you came, Little pencils you came, Came running back to me. You gave me a fright, When I lost you last night, But now you’re back home with me.

Key: A=N B=M C=L D=K E=J F=I G=H H=G I=F J=E K=D L=C M=B N=A O=Z P=Y Q=X R=V S=W T=U U=T V=R W=S X=Q Y=P Z=O

Now sleep little pencils, Sleep a deep sleep, You have a long day ahead. For when you do wake, Guess what you'll make? Words, little pencils, words.

Did you know? Even though people sometimes call them “lead” pencils, pencils have never actually been made with the element lead. The first pencils were made in England during the 1800s from wood and graphite, which are still the principle components of most pencils today. At that time, people mistakenly believed graphite to be a kind of lead, which is how the term “lead pencil” came to be used.

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Spring 2008

By Keely Doyle, Age 14, Strafford, Vermont

Fishing By Julie Calandrella Grade 4 Class of Eloise Ginty, Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont

“Wow,” I thought. “I thought this was gonna be easier.” It was my first time fishing at the lake this summer. The past few years I had only caught sunfish, and I didn’t remember them being this heavy. The tip of my rod bent over and the thought of a big trout reached my mind. I struggled to pull the fish up as the fish struggled to get free. My arms ached and I felt like they would break if the line didn’t. I

could hear the fish splashing through the water. My daddy came beside me and helped me pull, because the fish was too heavy for me to real it in. The head of a hornpout popped to the surface of the water like a cork. I hadn’t known hornpout lived under the dock. All I had ever seen under there was sunfish, seaweed, sand, and water. I wondered if I was going to catch any more big fish this summer.

Did you know? The hornpout (also know as the brown bullhead) is a catfish that lives in lakes and ponds throughout North America. These fish have sharp spines on their fins, so if you catch one, be careful!

Walking Through the River Water Addiena Marie Luke-Currier Age 7, Randolph Center, Vermont

Walking on the rocks rushing through the river water we dance upon stones we pass. Twirling and spinning and leaping about this dream is so great and exciting. 11


Flying Ship Magazine

Fun & Games The theme of the next issue of Flying Ship is “Fun & Games.” Here are some submission ideas: • Sports stories • Photography and artwork about sports • Favorite games or rules to games you invent • Reports on sports and games from this country or other countries, or from history (what sort of games do you think children played in ancient Egypt?) Be creative! There are lots of things that can be considered “Fun and Games.” Popular sports that people play today are great. Also think about: games you play at camp, fishing or hunting, horseback riding, word games, theater games, riddle games, board games... Do you ever play games with your pets? What sort of games did they play in the middle ages? What do you think someone from the 1800s would think if they saw an Xbox or a Wii? See page 15 for submission guidelines. The deadline for the June issue is May 9.

“Upside Down” - By Katie Robinson, Age 10, Sharon, Vermont 12


Spring 2008

The Amazing Goal By Asa Berolzheimer, 4th Grade class of Eloise Ginty, Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont I was dribbling the ball down the field. My heart was pounding my ears. I got past one defender and deaked out another and kept going! Jamie’s loud voice called: “Asa, I’m open!” I saw him, but he was heavily guarded by defenders. I knew I could not pass to him because the other team would get the ball.

Time was almost up, 10 seconds. Jamie broke free of his defenders. He called, “Asa!” I saw him. I crossed the ball towards him. I saw the ball sail through the air. Time slowed down. The ball sailed to Jamie, he headed the ball

into the goal! Goal! My face glowed as bright as a light with happiness. We had won the game! I shouted and ran over to where Jamie was, we slapped hands. He was smiling, his face lit up with pride. We won the game and went on to go undefeated in our season!

State Tournament By Kelly Brigham 4th Grade class of Eloise Ginty, Marion Cross School, Norwich, Vermont

Beeeeeeeeeep! I slapped my stick on the ice. The other team had just scored a goal. My line was starting the third period, the score 1-0, them. The reff dropped the puck. Our center, Ben, won the face off. He passed to Jake, then Jake passed to me. One of the other players raced over to me and tripped me. Tweeeeeet. The reff blew his whistle. There was a penalty for the other team. We had a another face off. Ben won again. He passed to me, I passed to Jake. Jake shot but missed. Ben raced over for the rebound and SCORE! Jake and I raced over and tackled him. It was the other line’s turn to play. On the other line were these people: Parker, Sarah, and Chris. It was the first face off, but the other team won it. They went past Sarah, dashed past Parker and zoomed past Chris. So the only By Keely Doyle, Age 14, Strafford, Vermont

13

people to stop them were the defense. The dee was Jack and Emma. They passed to Emma so the only person that was left was Jack. The other person that was on the other team was about to shoot, but out of nowhere, Chris stole the puck! He passed to Parker so now Parker was on a break away. He shot and SCORE! Now the score was 2-1, us. It was still their turn so they kept on playing. Again Parker scored on another break away. Now the score was 3-1. There was 1:02 left. Then the team started to count down: 59, 58, 57, 56, 55, and on and on and on, then Beeeeeeeeeeeep! It was the end of the third period and we won. The team raced over to the goalee and jumped on him and all yelled, “WE’RE GOING TO THE STATE TOURNAMENT!”


Flying Ship Magazine

Where I’m From Poems By the 4th Grade class of Jennifer Northrup, Seminary Hill School, Lebanon, New Hampshire

Kayla Girdwood

Tiffany D'cruze

I'm from a mud pit and a front yard climbing tree.

I'm from a cherry wood dining table, with a long beaded runner dangling from the table and from a room with unique fairies surrounding me.

I'm from warm, slippery meat, spicy orange cheese, cold salad, tacos. I'm from Christmas in Maine, presents bulging under the tree. I'm from Nakey Baby doll who is afraid of just about everything.

I'm from succulent tandori chicken made from my dad. I'm from Christmas Eve laying out cookies and milk for Santa, anxiously waiting for him to arrive to leave presents and clues for us. I'm from a tremendous library filled with books, trying to decide which one I will choose next.

I'm from camping in a camper and a tent. I'm from tea parties with cousin Emma.

I'm from a family who goes to the beach, splashes water at each other and squishes feet in the sparkling sand.

I'm from a grandmother who makes crispy cookies. I'm from dance recitals with creative costumes. I'm from tubing, splashing water and somersaulting in the air. Austin Colson

I'm from wonders of the world, gazing upon the falls and mist falling on me. I'm from a mom and dad who loves my sister and I more than anything. I'm from Indian dresses and a whole bunch of parties. I'm from luscious fruit trees, in my backyard just waiting to be picked.

I'm from a stained house with an apple tree on the lawn and a garden. I'm from greasy fried potatoes and they look like fried pork in squares that my great grammy makes for me. I'm from Christmas at my grammy's house where we had a warm delicious supper. I'm from my binkie that was so squishy and my two teddy bears that made wonderful noises. I'm from trips to the light sandy beach and crystal light water, with a wave that was 5 feet tall that I thought was 50 feet tall.

Mikala Wentworth I'm from a tree in the backyard. I'm from banana bread. It smelled like bananas. It tasted and looked superior. I'm from going to my Aunt Pam's house for Christmas and Easter. I'm from my pink and soft stuffed dolly.

I'm from great stories at my great grammy and grandpa's and crying the first time I saw a cow. I'm from a mom who cares so much about me and a great grammy and grandpa who does a lot of stuff for me. I'm from room 202 which my baby sister was born in. 14

I'm from going to Maine, collecting sea shells and walking on the beach together. I'm from remembering a special uncle I lost when I was six. I'm from a grandma who made me a poncho. I'm from a dad who goes to the dump on weekends.


Spring 2008

PUBLISH YOUR WORK!

HOW DO WE SELECT WHICH SUBMISSIONS TO PUBLISH?

We welcome your submissions! If you are between the ages of 6 and 14 you are eligible to have your work published in a future issue of Flying Ship. Our editors will review your work and let you know if there is a place for it in Flying Ship, either in the printed magazine or on the website. Just about any creative work is acceptable. It must be original—created by you and not copied from anywhere else. Here are some suggestions for things to submit: • Short stories — 2000 words or less (about two typed pages). We particularly like illustrated stories! • Poetry • Reviews of your favorite book • Artwork — drawings, paintings, collage, photography, sculpture—you name it! • Jokes or short comic strips • Riddles • Recipes • Games or puzzles • Mazes, crossword puzzles, word searches, hidden pictures drawings • Anything you think would look good in Flying Ship Magazine!

Submission to Flying Ship Magazine is not a contest. Selection of contributions is based on a number of criteria (see flyingship.org/submit), such as available space, the theme of an issue, and similarity of pieces within an issue. It is also important to recognize that we keep all submitters’ work on file. Even if we do not publish certain pieces in the upcoming issue, we may still publish them in a future issue.

Please include a Parental Permission Form and a Submission Form with your work (available at flyingship.org/submit). Mail submissions to: Flying Ship Magazine, PO Box 1159, Norwich, VT 05055 or email to mat@flyingship.org.

If you would like your work returned to you, please include a self-addressed, stamped envelope. BE SURE TO INCLUDE YOUR NAME, AGE, AND TOWN OF RESIDENCE.

SCHOOL CITATION POLICY When we publish an item which was submitted to us by a student’s school or teacher, it is our policy to print the name of the school/teacher along with the student’s name in the publication. If a published item was not submitted by a teacher, we print only the name of the student who created it.

THE DEADLINE FOR THE JUNE ISSUE IS MAY 9, 2008.

Support Flying Ship! Your contribution will help to offset our production costs. Please consider making a donation today! Receive a free gift subscription to Flying Ship as a token of our appreciation!

❑ $15 ❑ $50 ❑ $100

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Name Address Town/City State/Zip Donate online at flyingship.org! Please make checks payable to Flying Ship Media and send to: PO Box 1159, Norwich, VT 05055

Subscribe to Flying Ship Magazine! Flying Ship Magazine is published quarterly in print and online at www.flyingship.org. A one-year subscription (4 issues) delivered to your mailbox is just $12. Subscribe online at flyingship.org! TM

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email Please mail this form with a check or money order payable to Flying Ship Media to: Flying Ship, PO Box 1159, Norwich, VT 05055. Note: Although Flying Ship is distributed for free to local schools, subscribing is a great way to show your support AND get a copy delivered directly to your door! Call or email for more info: (603) 398-2080 or info@flyingship.org.

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FULL SERVICE GRAPHIC & WEB DESIGN

Websites • Brochures • Posters Newsletters • Business Identities Friendly and local! Great rates! Norwich, VT • herongraphicarts.com • (603) 398-2080

By Keely Doyle, Age 14, Strafford, Vermont

CROSSROADS ACADEMY Challenging Minds, Strengthening Hearts Since 1991

Where every day is an adventure… Please call for information – 603.795.3111 Crossroads Academy is an Upper Valley K–8 independent school.

95 DARTMOUTH COLLEGE HWY LYME, NH 03768 䡲 TEL: 603-795-3111 BETSY.WARREN@CROSSROADSACADEMY.ORG WWW.CROSSROADSACADEMY.ORG

Flying Ship Media PO Box 1159 Norwich, VT 05055

ARITHMETIC 䡲 LATIN 䡲 ART 䡲 ALGEBRA 䡲 GRAMMAR 䡲 PE 䡲 ART HISTORY

LITERATURE 䡲 COMPOSITION 䡲 GEOMETRY 䡲 MUSIC 䡲 HISTORY 䡲 DRAMA 䡲

PRE-ALGEBRA 䡲 FRENCH 䡲 PHYSICAL & BIOLOGICAL SCIENCE 䡲

Therese Linehan, Director • (802) 649-1416

KUMON Math and Reading Center of the Upper Valley CLASSES: Wednesdays 2:00 - 6:00 pm Saturdays 9:00 am - Noon Upper Valley Events Center 80 Rte. 5 South, Norwich, Vermont (802) 649-1416 • www.kumon.com

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