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RCS AGE ID: IDENTIFY FAKE IDS IN SECONDS

SPECIAL BEVERAGE EDITION

DESTINATION MARKETING IS CHANGING EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT TIPS INSIDE SUMMER 2018 | FRLA.ORG


contents S U M M E R 2 0 18 | F R L A .O R G

DEPARTMENTS

4  Leadership Reports 8  In Memoriam Elizabeth Sheffield Roberts 12  Chefs That Sizzle Henry Christian, Smokin’ Tuna Saloon 14  Path to Power John Horne, Anna Maria Oyster Bar 16  Destination Marketing How Destination Marketing Will Change

8

in the Next Five Years

19 Young Operator Ignacio Garcia-Menocal, Grove Bay Hospitality Group 26  Hospitality Happenings Glance at the Happenings Around the State 41  Business Matters Heartland Testimonial, Employee vs. Independent Contractor and Specialty Insurance Agency

47 Support CORE Educational Foundation ProStart and HTMP Competition Results 50  Be Friendlier Is Your Property Welcoming Families with Special Needs? 52  Pets Living the Dream Preparing for Two and Four-legged Evacuees During 53  Hurricane Season

54  Great Florida Events Don’t Miss Out on the Fun 56  Movers and Shakers 57  FRLA’s Corporate Calendar

28

SPECIAL FEATURES 11

VISIT FLORIDA — FRLA’s Tourism Partner

Big Tourism Numbers are the Lifeblood of Our State's Economy

Emergency Management 22 

Emergency Readiness and Recovery

28

FRLA’s Special Beverage Section

From Tea to Wine, Find Out About What’s Happening in the Beverage World, Including Some Updates from Rcs Training

A La Carte 48 

Industry Information You Need to Know

51 FRL A .org

On the Cover: Cover photo credit for Bama Breeze served at LuLu's Destin is by Sara Essex. Table of Contents beverage photo is courtesy of Island Oasis.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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LEADERSHIP REPORT

Savoring Summer in the Sunshine State As we all know, beverages take center stage in the summer sunshine, and this summer our industry is revitalizing old flavors and welcoming new ones. We’re celebrating with FR&L Magazine’s Beverage Edition. Fresh drink recipes, menu strategies and insights into new beverage laws empower your business to taste new heights. Take a seat and a sip of your favorite drink while we discover beverage trends perfect for the Sunshine State and review important developments in alcohol safety resources and education. In that discovery, it’s vitally important that we continue to keep our guests safe. I am proud to announce FRLA’s RCS Training has a new program — Age ID®, with authentication technology that makes it easier to reduce the risk of underage drinking in your business. Read more about this revolutionary program and all of their compliance training offerings on pages 30-34. I am also incredibly grateful to be a part of a hospitality industry that steps up in times of need. Our industry showed its dedication to the local community during a difficult 2017 hurricane season by feeding thousands, welcoming evacuees and first responders, donating money and vol-

unteering time. As the new season approaches, a large part of our ability to help involves our own hurricane preparedness. As the state’s No. 1 industry, we are in a unique position where reopening quickly can make a real difference for our employees, their families and those in need. FRLA’s own Emergency Coordinating Officer, Geoff Luebkemann, and other emergency management leaders review important planning information and resources on pages 22-25. I have seen our industry’s resiliency time and time again. With careful planning and commitment, hospitality will always have a bright future in our state. The FRLA Educational Foundation (FRLAEF) is taking an active role in the future of hospitality by supporting hospitality education in high schools across the state. More than 50 schools participated in the annual Florida ProStart Competition and Hospitality & Tourism Management Competition (HTMP) in Orlando. The winning schools from the culinary and management competitions went on to place in the top 10 at the National ProStart Invitational. Read more about these incredible future leaders on pages 50-51.

I look forward to seeing our members continue to shape the future of their industry and the beautiful state we live in. Take the opportunity to get involved at FRLA’s upcoming events on page 57. On a somber note, FRLA recently lost a true cornerstone of our association to a valiant fight against cancer. Elizabeth “Liz” Roberts Sheffield, Director of Operations for our Education & Training department, spent 21 years as part of the FRLA family. Her story is memorialized on page 8. Sincerely,

Carol B. Dover Carol B. Dover FRLA President & CEO

FRLA is the Voice of Florida’s Hospitality Industry

Cheers! Salud! Proost! Welcome to the annual beverage edition of FR&L Magazine. Beverages have united cultures for centuries, from ancient Romans to Buddhist monks, and there are many reasons to tip a glass to one another this year. In particular, we should all toast Florida’s record-setting 2017 tourism numbers. A whopping 116.5 million visitors spent $300 million per day in our fabulous Sunshine State. Furthermore, Florida’s hospitality industry can celebrate an end to the 2018 legislative 4  SU M M ER

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session. This year’s session included several successes, including the continuation of VISIT FLORIDA funding, which will continue to promote our state as the globally preeminent beach and resort destination. Speaking of funding, for the first time in 40 years, state legislators passed modifications to the Tourist Development Tax (bed taxes). Please actively monitor your local initiatives and be aware of dialogue in your area that may steer industry marketing funds away from their intended purpose. As Florida’s voice of the hospitality industry, the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association continues to advocate for fair, reasonable and balanced legislation that encourages continued growth for our industry and the state. I want to personally thank each of you who engaged with local or state officials to champion the legislative priorities that have positive benefits to our industry. Also, a huge thank you for those who attended Tourism Day in Tallahassee. If you haven’t had a chance to attend this event, it’s an excellent way to educate elected officials on the impact tourism has on our state’s economy, and I encourage you to go next year.

Over the past few months, we have seen FRLA continue to grow, unite and strengthen through several recent partnerships, whereby state and local organizations have combined memberships in a show of unity. Congratulations to Palm Beach County, Lee County and, soon (I hope for all members), the chapters of Collier County. By combining resources, we can create a more efficient and effective organization while providing even more value to our members. Much has been accomplished, but so much work remains. It’s incumbent upon all of us to remain steadfast stewards of our industry, actively engage our state officials and continue protecting our future. To move the needle in accomplishing our goals, we will continue to have high-level discussions about strategic ways to improve our industry. Sincerely,

Kevin Speidel Kevin Speidel 2018 Chairman of the Board

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Attract More Visitors with a VISIT FLORIDA Marketing Partnership Learn more by contacting the Industry Relations Team at (877) 435-2872 or Partner@VISITFLORIDA.org.


2018 CHAIRMAN

Kevin Speidel

Hilton Grand Vacations, Orlando VICE CHAIRMAN

Alan Palmieri

Marlow’s Tavern, Orlando 2018 SECRETARY 2017–18 LODGING DIRECTOR

Sheldon Suga

Hawks Cay Resort, Duck Key 2018–19 RESTAURANT DIRECTOR

Jim Shirley

Great Southern Café, Santa Rosa Beach 2018–19 LODGING DIRECTOR

Olivia Hoblit

Seaside Amelia Inn, Amelia Island

Or visit us at: www.WorksiteEmployee.com

2018 LODGING DIRECTOR

Cathie Koch

Bloomin’ Brands Inc., Tampa IMMEDIATE PAST CHAIRMAN

Don Fox

Firehouse of America, LLC, Jacksonville MANAGING EDITOR

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Susie R. McKinley Email: Editor@frla.org PUBLISHED BY

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MAGAZINE Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine is the official publication of the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association, Inc. (FRLA). FRLA reserves the right to accept, modify or reject any and all content submitted for publication, whether paid or otherwise, solely at its discretion. Unless otherwise expressly indicated, FRLA does not endorse or warrant any products or services contained herein. In addition, unless otherwise expressly noted, the opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and not necessarily those of FRLA, its directors, officers, members or staff. Content submissions may be made to the Publisher’s Office by regular mail or by email. Please note that submitted materials will not be returned. FRLA Headquarters 230 S. Adams St. Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/224-2250 Fax: 850/224-9213

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Ad rates and submission guidelines at www.FRLA.org Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine (USPS 002-629; ISSN 1044-03640) is published quarterly. FRLA members receive this publication as part of their membership dues. Non-members receive it as a marketing and promotion effort to inform the Florida foodservice and lodging industry of efforts made on its behalf by FRLA. Printing and mailing services: Publisher’s Press, Inc., Lebanon Junction, KY.

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2018

Address changes may be sent to: FRLA, 230 South Adams St., Tallahassee, FL 32301 or via email to susana@frla.org. Send subscription address changes to susana@frla.org.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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IN MEMORIAM

Elizabeth Roberts Sheffield Oct. 22, 1970 – May 12, 2018

S

aturday, May 12, 2018, marked the passing of veteran and indispensable Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association colleague Elizabeth “Liz” Roberts Sheffield, after a years-long valiant fight with cancer. She was 47. Liz is survived by her devoted husband Tommy Sheffield, mother Mary Elizabeth Roberts (Siesta Key), sisters Kimberly Ann Roberts (Englewood), and Stacey Beth Roberts (Sarasota), and brothers Dale Edward Roberts (Englewood), William Joseph Roberts (Bradenton), and David Burton Roberts (Tallahassee). Elizabeth, known to many simply as Liz, joined FRLA in 1997 and was most recently Director of Operations for the Education & Training department, a position she held for over 12 years. Prior to that, Liz worked in numerous positions in every department of the Association. During Liz and her the course of her 21 husband, Tommy year career at FRLA, Liz touched innumerable lives and mentored many young colleagues as they grew into larger roles with the Association, or were prepared by their experience under her guidance for promotional opportunities beyond FRLA. In her last and most impactful role, Liz anchored the Education & Training team through a period of unprecedented growth, and invaluable service to members and the industry at large. No task was too great or small, no detail overlooked, and no effort too burdensome. She was frequently the one turning out the lights after a long day, and her unwavering commitment to service and quality are the hallmark of her career. Liz, always focused on business and a very private person, shared little about her personal life. She preferred always to make whoever she was speaking with feel they were the most important person in the room. Born in Greenwich, CT, Liz became a Floridian at age two when her family moved to Siesta Key. This began a lifelong love of bathing suits, flip flops and anywhere on or near the water. She loved the outdoors, boating, fishing, and especially camping at Salt Spring – where husband Tommy notes there is no cell service and he was able to pry her away from work, at least temporarily. Not many knew, but Liz was also very handy with a pistol. As a recent Florida State University marketing grad, she met her future husband Tommy 24 years ago at Tallahassee’s Riverfront Saloon, on Liz’s first trip to a country bar. Tommy, celebrating the birth of his little 8  SU M M ER

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sister Kayla, was immediately smitten and asked her on a proper date to Stetson’s, another country venue, and they were inseparable afterward. He noted that it would be months before he introduced her to his roommates, for fear of creating the wrong impression. They shared much love, but also a rivalry in supporting their respective schools - whoever’s team came out on top got to fly their school flag above the other at their home for the year. Tommy, a Gator, ruefully acknowledges it’s been Noles on top for some time now. Another of Liz’s favorite activities was piloting her purple and grey Honda Ace Shadow 750 – the same one she and Tommy rode away on after their 2003 wedding – and cruising with Tommy and other motorcycle friends. Liz was a member of Chrome Divas, an all-female motorcycle club and breast cancer philanthropy. Liz leaves behind countless friends, colleagues, and organizations that are far better off for having had her in their lives. Her legacy is one of dedication, professionalism, and compassion. It is impossible in these few brief words to truly characterize the immense impact she brought to the growth and success of the Association. Suffice it to say: an organization’s identity and future are built upon the values, efforts, and commitment of its people. Elizabeth “Liz” Sheffield was and will always be a cornerstone of this organization that she loved – and that loved her. She will be missed beyond measure.

Liz's Family

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SAVE THE DATE OCTOBER 18, 2018

C HAMPIONSGATE GOLF C LUB

I N PA R T N E R S H I P W I T H T H E F R L A C E N T R A L F L O R I D A C H A P T E R

2018 GOLF CHAIRS ROBIN SORENSEN

RALPH SCATENA

Co-Founder, Firehouse Subs

General Manager, Orlando World Center Marriott

Chief Operating Office, World of Beer

Founder, Another Broken Egg

DAVE REID

RON GREEN 

2018 JEFF GRAYSON COMMITTEE JASON EMMETT

CHRIS FRAWLEY

Duffy’s Sports Grill

Miller’s Ale House Restaurants

Tommy Bahama Restaurant

Gulf Region Wyndham Vacation Rentals

DON DONLEY

SHELDON SUGA

LINO MALDONADO

CATHY SABOFF Outback Steakhouse

JEFF JABOT

Salt Life Food Shack

JOHN HORNE

Hawks Cay Resort

GREG OHLEMACHER

Ana Maria Oyster Bar

Southeastern Laundry Equipment Sales, Inc.

MORIAH MURPHY 

Oasis Outsourcing

JASON DOWNEY LEIGH DOYLE

Ellie Lou’s Brews & BBQ

JASON FIALKOFF VGM Client Rewards

JAN GAUTAM

IHRMC and AAHOA

DAVE HADELMAN

La Cima Restaurant LLC/Twin Peaks Restaurants

HARRY PRICE

Coca-Cola North America

Ecolab

UnitedHealth Group

STEVE KEUP

Florida Region Hersha Hospitality

CRAIG LEICESTER

Aloft Orlando Downtown

DAWN MOLITERNO 

Wyndham Vacation Rentals

DANEEN TYSON MIKE VINIK 

BJ’s Restaurants

TOBY SULLIVAN

Caspers Service Company

FRANK ZUMBO

Marriott Miami Airport

ADAM COREY

ALAN PALMIERI

Tallahassee Hospitality Group, LLC

JONATHAN RAZ

The Oneida Group

Marlow’s Tavern

Waldorf Astoria Orlando & Hilton Bonnet Creek

TIM JARRETT 

B RION PR I CE PHOTOGR APHY

S D AV I S @ F R L A . O R G F O R S P O N S O R S H I P S , T E A M S & M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N


VISIT FLORIDA

Big Tourism Numbers are the Lifeblood of Our State's Economy

W

hen it comes to tourism, Florida continues to be on a roll. In 2017, Florida welcomed 116.5 million visitors to our state, representing a 3.6 percent increase over 2016’s figure of 112.4 million. Domestic visitors continue to make up the majority of travelers, accounting for 88 percent, with overseas visitors at 9 percent and Canadian visitors at 3 percent. Last year, following an aggressive new Canadian marketing program, we saw Canadian visitation rise for the first time in three years — by 4 percent! As our largest international market, this is great news for our state that we’ll continue to build on and replicate in other markets. The numbers on the lodging side are also very positive. In 2017, the average daily rate (ADR) for hotel rooms increased 2.6 percent, and rooms sold were up 4.6 percent. That represents nearly 5.2 million more hotel and motel rooms sold in Florida last year, which is fantastic news. This increase — coupled with hotel pipeline data that VISIT FLORIDA released earlier this year showing 109 hotels and 14,525 rooms

FRL A .org

are under construction across the state and an additional 307 hotels and 48,103 hotel rooms are expected to break ground in the next 12-24 months — shows that Florida’s lodging industry is booming. It goes without saying that tourism is the lifeblood of our state’s economy. Recent figures from the Office of Economic and Demographic Research shows sales tax attributable to tourists grew by 9 percent in 2017. And for a state like ours that is dependent on sales tax as a source of revenue generation, that’s a really big deal. When we bring in more visitors to our state, we’re able to build more roads, improve our schools and protect our environment. If our state is an economic engine, our visitors are the fuel — and the more we can attract, the farther we can go as a state. For every 78 visitors we attract to our state, we create an additional job — which is so important to our industry that supports 1.4 million across the state. And many of these jobs are held by the wonderful, welcoming and talented employees in our hospitality industry. At VISIT FLORIDA, we are working every

day to develop innovative and eye-catching creative marketing content that showcases Florida’s sunshine and diverse destinations to the rest of the world. As we do that, we are supporting and growing these jobs, while at the same time highlighting the smiling faces and sterling service across our state. As we look to 2018 visitation and beyond, there are certainly challenges that we must face as an industry. Global competition, overtourism, virtual and augmented reality are just a few of them. But they are also opportunities for us to take the next step, to create dynamic marketing solutions, to collectively rise together and ensure that we not only keep those 116.5 million coming back, but also continue to increase our visitation by an even larger margin. If we can do that, we’ll continue to ensure that Florida is not just the best place to live and work, but is the best destination for travel in the world.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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Chefs That Sizzle

Henry Christian CHEF, SMOKIN’ TUNA SALOON

Chef Henry Christian found his love of food early in life, with his first great food memories being in Massachusetts — sitting in the garden with his grandfather eating tomatoes off the vine and waking up to warm zucchini bread baking in his grandmother’s oven. He began to cook professionally in New York’s Italian restaurants before attending the Culinary Institute of America to earn a degree in Baking and Pastry Arts. Chef Henry has honed his skills in kitchens from coast to coast and in resorts such as The Ritz-Carlton, Hawks Cay, Sorrel River and Zion Mountain Ranch. He moved to Key West in 2016. Describe your role as a chef with Smokin’ Tuna. My role as a chef at the

Smokin’ Tuna is a simple but not-so-simple answer. It involves the usual answers of raising standards, improving quality, cost controls, training, ordering and managing the daily tasks of the culinary operation at the Tuna. The not-so-simple part comes into play when you have the chef physically work a station, place that station in the dining room and put it behind the bar in front of everyone. It creates the unique opportunity for me to interact with our guests, cooking for them right in front of their eyes. I gain people’s trust every day as I make non-oyster eaters into oyster fanatics. Having the ability to walk each guest through their dining experience gives them a better understanding into how things work and why we do things the way we do. It truly creates a unique and intimate dining experience.

What inspires your menus? Life. It’s that simple. I hear people say, “enjoy life” all the time. To me, life is everything; it’s way more complicated than waking up and having fun every day. To say that life inspires my menus is to understand the circle of things: looking forward to the first asparagus shoots in the spring, early radishes, over-wintered garlic shoots; waiting for zucchini blossoms, cucumbers; getting excited about the first tomato of the year just as I am

Hot Chef? Are You Considered Among Florida’s Hottest Chefs? 12  SU M M ER

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thinking about the last green tomato of the year; having mouth watering thoughts as apple season approaches, with winter braises and root vegetables not far behind. This is what inspires my menus and keeps my passion growing. Knowing that everything has a season, some longer than others, and respecting the circle enough to know that when it’s gone, it’s gone, but something else just as wonderful is here and I’ll look forward to next season. Let’s talk about your raw bar! What started out as a chef shucking oysters behind a bar with cocktail sauce and horseradish, while I sought to hire a permanent shucker, has over the course of two months turned into Key West’s first and only craft raw bar. Every day, I bring something new to the bar from plates, infused vinegars, expanding from one cooler to four full of items I can add to your experience. For the 10 seats in front of me, I have no menu. Items range from clams, scallops, local black fin tuna, oyster chowder, house ramen, six varieties of oysters and 60-some creations I can pull from to make the experience tailored for your tastes. Please describe some of your most popular menu items. As the raw bar

is gaining momentum and attracting most of the attention, there are some things you can’t forget about. The Smokin’ Tuna has developed a great following for its Smokin’ Tuna dip, white bean tuna chili, conch fritters and burgers, all great favorites on the menu.

What is your “sizzle” nature items, unique tations, or new ideas using? Literal sizzle —

— your sigfood presenthat you are

the blow torch sitting behind the raw bar. At night, every time I pick up a torch and put it to scallops or oysters, I have at least two customers stand up and start taking pictures or video. It is 100 percent an attention grabber, and everyone asks what I am doing. As crazy as it sounds … it works great, and people love it. It just strengthens the awareness towards our approach on the nontraditional raw bar — making craft oysters to order. To what do you attribute your success as a chef? Three months ago,

I don’t think I would have been able to answer this question. Today, I can confidently say my success as a chef is due to the fact that I always want to know more, learn more and grow. Success for me isn’t one overall accomplishment, it’s every little thing in my career I have accomplished or experienced to give me the tools to overcome all obstacles and keep me moving forward while I set new goals and evolve my aim and purpose in this industry.

Know a chef who is creating a buzz with innovative cuisine, exceptional presentation or fresh new ideas? FRLA wants to tell the state about them in a quarterly feature in FR&L Magazine. Submit your favorite chef du jour to editor@frla.org. Please include a brief explanation of why your submission should be considered one of the hottest chefs in Florida. Be sure to include restaurant and contact information. Submissions will be featured in FR&L Magazine as Chefs That Sizzle!

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


NOMINATIONS

Simple Technology and Tools We offer an array of e-business tools—from online ordering and payment to inventory and recipe management—developed to make running your operation easier. Which means you can spend less time managing your orders, and get back to what’s important to you.

2018 FRLA HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY AWARDS

DON’T MISS YOUR CHANCE TO NOMINATE YOUR FAVORITE HOTEL OR RESTAURANT EMPLOYEE FOR THE 2018 FRLA HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY AWARDS!

FRLA is receiving nominations through July 20 for the following award categories: • Restaurant General Manager of the Year • Hotel General Manager of the Year • Restaurant Employee of the Year • Hotel Employee of the Year • Chef of the Year

A panel of judges consisting of restaurateurs, hoteliers and allied members will select the top three nominees in each category. Following the judging process, FRLA will notify the nominators and the top three nominees in each category. The winners will be announced at the Hospitality Stars of the Industry Gala on September 6, 2018, held in conjunction with the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show.

Nomination form is available on frla.org Connect with us at gfs.com

JOIN YOUR PEERS AT THE

SHOW PARTY!

PHOTO BY BRION PRICE

Join FRLA’s Central Florida Chapter, the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine and your peers at the SHOW PARTY on Friday, September 7, 2018, and be transported to Old Havana at the Cuba Libre Restaurant & Rum Bar. The party starts after the trade show floor closes at 5:30 p.m. and runs through 7:30 p.m. Enjoy two-time James Beard Award-winning chef Guillermo Pernot’s menu, entertainment by Latin musicians and an energy-packed party while you network with show exhibitors and attendees — including some of the top names in the hospitality industry. A portion of the proceeds from this event will benefit the FRLA Educational Foundation, which provides culinary and hospitality training programs, equipment and scholarships to Florida high school students. Proceeds will also support Central Florida college-level educational hospitality programs. Sponsorships available! Contact Marjorie Stone at 850-524-1747 or mstone@frla.org.

Tickets are $35 each until July 27, $45 each until September 5 and $55 at the door. FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

13


PAT H T O P O W E R

John Horne W ANNA MARIA OYSTER BAR

ith nearly 40 years in the hospitality industry to his credit, John Horne began his career as a bus boy working for a small chain of restaurants on Anna Maria Island. In 1996, after 10 years of working his way up the ladder, he took the leap and opened the first of his four restaurants. At all of the Anna Maria Oyster Bars, you will find a fun, friendly place with great staff serving the freshest food at reasonable prices in a family-friendly atmosphere. John and his 325 co-workers have received many accolades over the years, including Small Business of the Year awards from both the Manatee and Sarasota chambers, over 70 People’s Choice Favorites as well as community, volunteer and tourism awards culminating in the 2018 Restaurant Neighbor Award, presented by the National Restaurant Association Educational Foundation. John is very passionate about education and helping his community, but life is not all about work. Along with his wife, Amanda, John enjoys traveling anywhere where there’s a cooking class with wine involved!

How did you get started in the hospitality industry? I started as a busboy for a summer job on Anna Maria Island in 1981 … it’s been a great summer job since then.

Early in your career what was the most valuable lesson you learned? People are the most important part of our job, customers obviously, but our staff more importantly. They have to have same passion for our guests as I do to keep everyone happy and returning.

Do you have any mentors who were instrumental in helping you achieve your goals? Several, and in so many capacities, good and bad. I’ve learned what to do from good mentors and what not to do from bad mentors/bosses. You can always learn from both, and with so many retirees in our market/state, there is unlimited knowledge to harvest from former executives.

What is the single greatest factor in the success of your career? Surrounding myself with the best people possible. 14  SU M M ER

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How have your philanthropies and giving back to the community affected your business decisions? With great frequency, guests comment on how

much we do in our community for education, for this club, for this event and that, teaching second graders to love to read, reading on Dr. Seuss’ birthday to elementary students and more. We’ve been incredibly honored for volunteerism and our grade-level reading programs over the years, and it has helped get our name and our giving spirit out in our community. People love to shop and dine where they know it is being paid back and staying to help build our communities.

Is there anything you would like to share with Florida’s hospitality industry members? Our staff

gets more out of our community outreach than we do sometimes. We just partnered with the Early Learning Coalition in our town and installed book nooks for our young guests, so they can read a book while dining with us instead of coloring a kids’ menu or playing on their iPad. And they get to take the book home to finish reading if they want. Parents love it, the kids love it and our staff thinks it is awesome that we’re helping bring literacy to our community. It’s such a simple idea that we can all take on and grow. Try it. We’ve heard that the kids beg to come back to the “Oyster Bar Book Store!” F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


#FRLACFL PRESENTS

THE SHOW PARTY

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 7 5:30 - 7:30 PM CUBA LIBRE RESTAURANT & RUM BAR 9101 INTERNATIONAL DRIVE REGISTER: www.frla.org/event/show-party $35 until July 27. $45 until Sept 5. $55 at the door

Inspiration. Creativity. Passion.

Your fascination with food. Your creativity. Your love of people. Your talent for nourishing their bodies and their souls. Imagine 3 days in the heart of Orlando — one of the world’s most vibrant cities — where you can focus on all the magic and mystery that attracted you to food in the first place. Give yourself the gift of learning! From the art of ancient grains to the latest in lighting for Instagram, from the fine points of fermentation to designing smart kitchens, from veggie-centric dining to the prospect of delivery by drone. Spark your creative appetite and turn your passion for the industry into a sustainable business. The Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show September 6-8, 2018 at the Orange County Convention Center.

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Access it all with just one badge. Register online with your FRLA member number to take advantage of your 3 free tickets. EDUCATION | DEMOS | TASTINGS | EXHIBITS

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

15


How Destination Marketing Will Change in the Next 5 Years By WILL SECCOMBE

B

ob Dylan said it best: “The times, they are a-changin’.” And they are changing fast. For destination marketers, what’s worked for the past 20-plus years won’t be effective in the next five. As CMO.com reported, “We are undergoing a massive change in the way that the world works.” At the heart of this shift are the exponential growth of technology and a serious crisis in confidence. Gallup polls show only 35 percent of the American public have confidence in established institutions. Big business (21 percent) and internet news (16 percent) are among the least-trusted, right alongside government and marketers. Conversely, small business maintains the confidence of 70 percent of Gallup responders. What does that tell us? Consumers prefer to do business with people and organizations they know and trust. This isn’t a new phenomenon, but it does present real challenges to traditional destination marketing efforts when the public is wary of the media channels and messages that we historically have relied upon. Destination marketers must thread the needle of using rapidly evolving technology — considered invasive by some — to spread messages that resonate and add value to skeptical audiences. Personalization is key. 16  SU M M ER

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Marketers stuck with traditional targeting of large demographic and geographic audiences with mass marketing messages will lose out to those that deliver personalized information that adds real value to individual customers. It won’t be easy. Consider that Deloitte LLP predicts 40 percent of today’s Fortune 500 companies won’t exist in five years. But it can be done.

“If you don’t like change, you’re going to like irrelevance even less.” — retired Army Gen. Eric Shinseki

How destination markets hone their skills with these six key technologies will dictate their fate.

1

BIG DATA

Savvy consumers know that they are being tracked at every step, from their email opens to their Facebook clicks — and they don’t like it. But at the same time, the data in the cloud is the key to unlocking people’s trust, and in turn, their wallets. What

websites consumers visit, who their social media contacts are, where they live and where they’ve been are tools to predict their next trips, purchases and plans. The ability to accurately predict those future steps adds value to the consumer. Destination marketers can’t rely on humans alone to look ahead. This leads us to …

2

ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE (AI)

3

DIGITAL INTERFACE

AI allows marketers to use all that big data. It is creating a shift from targeting consumers based on their demographics and how much they spend to predicting their trends based on purchase history and other factors, such as location. Currently, about 20 percent of advertising is through automation. By 2023, that number will be closer to 80 percent. By using a consumer’s history and preferences, marketing messaging will be far more effective. Big data and AI are going to reshape how marketers do their jobs. For almost 150 years — since the typewriter was invented in Milwaukee in 1868 — we’ve relied on a keyboard in some ways to communicate. With the rise and fall of the BlackBerry and ubiquitous smartphones with touchscreens, the board has shrunk at about the same rate as conF LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


D E S T I N AT I O N M A R K E T I N G

sumer confidence. Soon, keyboards may be non-existent. Already, 20 percent of mobile searches are using these chatbots. NYC & Company, the tourism arm of New York City, is piloting the launch of Chute’s chatbot designed specifically for destinations. “Travelers are no longer just going to one resource or turning to visitor guides alone to research and plan. With so many outlets, it’s vital for destinations to be at the ready and reach travelers wherever they are,” says Fred Dixon, NYC & Company president and CEO. ComScore estimates by 2020 about 50 percent of mobile searches will be done via chatbots like Alexa, Siri, Cortana and Jarvis. In 2025, 95 percent of consumers’ interaction with their devices, and homes for that matter, could be done through voice. What does that mean for marketers? Just consider the pages of results a Google search brings back and compare that to the one or two options Alexa offers up instead. Are you beginning to understand why you need to know what a consumer is looking for before they even know?

4

INTERNET OF THINGS (IOT)

5

VIRTUAL REALITY/AUGMENTED REALITY (VR/AR)

6

BLOCKCHAIN

Gartner Tech Research says 8.3 billion things are connected to the internet in 2017 — up 31 percent from last year. It predicts that number to jump to more than 20 billion in 2020. When you combine IOT with digital interface, the pace of how you rely on AI and voice search picks up significantly. IOT is reshaping habits we have had for generations, such as walking into the house and turning on the lights (remember the Clapper?) — now you can tell your phone to go ahead and turn those on for you.

content on your website that offers robust answers in natural language. Buzzwords and stiff language are things of the past. »» Building circles of trust. Identify the brands, whether they are small businesses with a cult following or bigger players like Amazon, that people trust — and partner with them. Again, these partnerships provide value to your customers with services or information that they need or want. Remember, consumers work with who they know and trust. »» Authenticity and specificity in your messaging. Communicate to your customers how your destinations are truly different. Blah language like “shopping, dining and fun for the whole family” won’t get you anywhere anymore. Get to the heart of the community values and deliver authentic messages. Will Seccombe is the President of Connect Travel connecting marketers with the products, services, people and ideas necessary to thrive in a rapidly evolving and highly competitive global marketplace. Connect Travel hosts the Connect Travel Marketplace, a gathering of top international tour operators and North American suppliers, and the Marketing Leadership Summit for tourism marketers to focus on the trends and technologies that will disrupt the marketing landscape in the next three-to-five years. Both events will be held in Orlando from Feb. 20–22, 2019.

AR has already arrived. If we weren’t quite sure of that fact, the Pokémon Go craze certainly proved it. New phones are coming out that are pre-programmed to support AR. Apps are coming out almost daily with AR uses. Now that we know the technology exists and can be mass produced, it’s only a matter of a time before AR goes fully mainstream. VR is also here, but it is still a burgeoning technology that has yet to be used by marketers on a universal scale. Blockchain technology is decentralized data (it’s the technology that Bitcoin is built on), and it lives in so many places that it can’t be changed or hacked, as what happened to Equifax customers recently. In the future, instead of companies, such as credit bureaus and social media outlets, owning your data and monetizing it, consumers will own their own data and allow businesses to have it in exchange for products and services. This ties back into the trust issues at the very heart of destination marketing. THE KEYS TO FUTURE MARKETING SUCCESS

So, what can destination marketers do about the “trust crisis” and technology that seems impossible to keep up with? Among the tips that will be discussed at Connect’s Marketing Leadership Summit, Feb. 20–22, 2019, in Orlando, Florida, are: »» Make offerings hyper-personal and providing real value adds for customers. Instead of focusing on pushing out your message to get consumers to act, focus on what you are providing them with that will enrich their lives. »» Your voice search strategy. How do you get your brand to be relevant in a voice-search world? Start building quality Q&A FRL A .org

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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FRLA InsuRAnce councIL FRLA scoured the state, vetted the players and found the group that is best in class to handle FRLA member insurance needs. We encourage you to let them to provide an expert opinion on your insurance needs. Our insurance council consists of several hand-selected agencies with over 200 years of individual brokerage experience and over $100,000,000 in premiums in the hospitality industry.

Our Trusted Agency Advisors Acentria

PC

PC

Caton Hosey Insurance

H

John Hosey

Kevin Dover

Property and Casualty insurance

H Health insurance provider PC

Leading Edge Benefit Advisors

H

Kerri Sisson

Destin, Florida 850-502-4690

Port Orange, Florida 386-767-3161

Fort Myers, Florida

Atlas Insurance

Heartland Payroll & Payment Solutions

M. E. Wilson Insurance

PC

Robert Brown

Randy Pumputis

Sarasota, Florida 941-552-4114

Atlas Insurance Jennifer Dibert Sarasota, Florida 941-922-7998

Barnes Insurance & Financial Services H Dennis Barnes

Pensacola, Florida 850-473-1500

Benefit Advisors, Inc. H Joey Janssen

Jacksonville, Florida 904-332-9084

Besnard & Associates PC

Adam Besnard Tampa, Florida 813-287-1790

Besnard & Associates PC Rob Barnes

Tampa, Florida

813-287-1721

Erwin Insurance

PC

Brett McMillian

H

UnitedHealthcare 301-524-9962

H

HR Benefits Services Mario Roiz

World Insurance Associates PC H Tampa, Florida

813-600-8375

H

The Enterprise Team at Sihle Insurance Group H Terry Singleton

Miami, Florida 305-969-7670 H

Joe Mowery

Altamonte Springs, Florida 407-900-8484

ProvInsure

H

Lake Mary, Florida 407-215-2225

Brad Levine

Insurance Office of America PC

Restaurant Programs of America PC

Orlando, Florida 407-370-0776

Brett C. Bradley, CPIA Longwood, Florida 407-920-2586

James F. Tullis & Associates PC

Tony Davenport

Palm Beach Gardens, Florida 561-262-4240 H

Jimmy Tullis, Jr.

Jacksonville, Florida 904-874-9341

Hub International Insurance Services, Inc. William H. Shea Clearwater, Florida 727-450-6060

Our Company Partners

Kimberlee Vandervoorn

PC

Joel Williams

Jacksonville, Florida 904-371-6526

Hylant Group

Cindy Buttrill

Tampa, Florida 813-984-3614

Palm Beach, Florida 585-622-2993 H

239-433-1184

Zenith Insurance Todd Cicero 941-906-5581

Zenith Insurance Angela Borthwick 941-906-5437

H


Y O U N G O P E R AT O R S

Ignacio Garcia-Menocal GROVE BAY HOSPITALITY GROUP, CO-FOUNDER/CEO

I

gnacio founded Grove Bay Hospitality Group in 2014 and is a co-founder and the CEO. The group has successfully launched an array of chef-driven restaurants in partnership with celebrity chefs such as Jeremy Ford, Marcus Saumelsson, Jeff McInnis, Janine Booth and Giorgio Rapicavoli. Currently, the company owns and operates nine restaurants in Miami and is working to launch five more by the end of 2019. Ignacio launched his career as an Audit Manager at the “Big Four” firm Deloitte & Touche, where he helped make a positive impact for clients such as Direct TV, Perry Ellis, Florida Power & Light, Elizabeth Arden, Baptist Health System and the Miami Dolphins. After leaving Deloitte & Touche, he worked at MasterCard as the Director of Accounting for the Latin America Region. Upon making the leap into the hospitality industry, Ignacio was at Shula’s Steak Houses for five years as vice president of finance and was instrumental to the company’s sustained financial success. From 2011-14, he was the executive vice president and chief financial officer for 50 Eggs Restaurant Group, where he managed all business functions of the 400-employee company, including negotiating and closing the $24-million sale of its Lime Fresh Mexican Grill division to Ruby Tuesday. Just prior to joining Grove Bay Hospitality, Ignacio was recognized by South Florida Business Leader Magazine as

FRL A .org

Favorite social media outlet? Instagram. Favorite type of restaurant? Cuban food, I have to stick wth my heritage. What podcast are you listening to? “Restaurant Unstoppable” and “How I Build This.” Describe the culture of your business in 20 words or less: A culture where employees, management and ownership respects, trusts and takes care of each other. Where are you going on your next vacation? Sarasota, yearly family vacation. Favorite app? American harvest, our new app for our fast casual concept. We order lunch using the app almost every day. Cause you believe in? Any cause that helps youth, especially underprivileged youth.

one of its “Top Movers and Shakers” in 2012, reflecting a career both diverse and successful at every milestone. Ignacio holds a Bachelor of Science in Accounting from the University of Florida, a Master of Accounting from Florida International University and a Certificate of Foodservice Management from Cornell University. He also serves as a board member for the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association. Ignacio and his wife, Jennifer, are raising two sons in Miami, are very involved in youth sports and enjoy exploring Miami’s culinary scene.

If you are planning a dinner, who would you invite to represent Florida’s hospitality industry? Carol Dover, nobody is more plugged in to the issues facing our industry than she is. How did you get into the hospitality industry? By sheer luck. I was working in the financial services industry at the time, when I received a call from Dave Shula one day asking if I wanted to meet with his dad and he to discuss their open CFO position … the rest is history.

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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F L O R I D A R E S TA U R A N T & L O D G I N G A S S O C I AT I O N HOSPITALITY STARS OF THE INDUSTRY CELEBRATION AT T H E 2 0 1 8 T R A D E S H O W

Save The Date SEPTEMBER 6, 2018 HYATT REGENCY ORLANDO

6:00 PM Welcome Reception 7:00 PM Installation and Awards Dinner www.frla.org/event/hospitality-celebration

FRL A .org

Sponsorships Available, please contact Sally Davis at sdavis@frla.org or 850-224-2250 ext. 258

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

Emergency Readiness By GEOFF LUEBKEMANN

T

he very active 2017 storm season was a stark reminder that a little planning goes a long way. Whether a grizzled veteran of storms too many to count, or a freshly relocated Floridian, there are excellent resources and a short list of things to do to ensure you, your teammates and your business are as ready as possible for the 2018 season, whatever it may bring. 1. Don’t wait — prioritize this NOW! Visit the official Florida Division of Emergency Management website, especially the excellent Get A Plan and Business & Industry sections. There you’ll find detailed preparation info for businesses, individuals and persons with special needs. 2. This is not just about hurricanes — be sure you plan for any hazard, natural or human caused, that could disrupt your business and endanger you and your team. 3. Focus on your team — develop and test your procedure to communicate with them before and after an emergency. This can be as simple as a “call tree,” or sophisticated as a dedicated webpage. If they aren’t prepared or able to quickly recover, they won’t be able to help get business back to normal and keep the paychecks flowing. 4. Reach out to local emergency managers. FRLA is on the State Emergency Response Team, which in many cases does not activate for an event that is significant but localized. During “blue skies,” contact the director of emergency management in your county to introduce yourself and discuss how you can best be prepared and support your community before and after an emergency event. Larger counties have a designated business liaison. 5. Consider what you, your team, and your business can do to assist your community in readiness, response and recovery. Due to the large scope of last year’s events, responders at the local and state levels were stretched to 22  SU M M ER

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capacity, and our industry provided critical support in the form of meals and lodging (even ballroom space with cots) that made a tremendous difference. 6. After an event, use FloridaDisaster.biz to report your closed/open status and what obstacles prevent you from getting back to normal. State emergency managers use this information to make decisions and direct resources — your input is critical. Browse it now. 7. If you and your team are able to volunteer, donate goods or services, or offer paid help, do not do anything until you confirm there is a need. To do this, rely on the local emergency contact you made from item 4 above or call FRLA’s Geoff Luebkemann at 850-879-2581 before, during or after an event. After several years of little to no emergency activity, 2017 definitely shook out the cobwebs and reminded us how dangerous complacency can be. The success — yours and that of our communities and state — in overcoming any emergency is rooted deeply in the preparation and planning you do right NOW! Geoff Luebkemann, is the FRLA Emergency Coordinating Officer and the FRLA Senior Vice President of Education and Training.

RECOMMENDED POST-EMERGENCY BEST PRACTICE REMINDERS from Department of Business and Professional Regulation Secretary Jonathan Zachem

Five keys for safer food in areas hit by disasters: 1 Keep hands, food

and equipment clean.

 eparate raw and 2 S cooked food. 3 Cook foods thoroughly. 4 Keep foods at safe

temperatures.

5 Use only safe water

and food.

Resources Florida Division of Emergency Management floridadisaster.org Get A Plan! archive.floridadisaster.org/getaplan

WHEN IN DOUBT, THROW IT OUT. Plan and prepare. For information about disaster preparedness and recovery, visit the Florida Division of Emergency Management’s website at floridadisaster.org.

Florida Virtual Business Emergency Operations Center flvbeoc.org American Red Cross Ready Rating Program readyrating.org/The-Red-Cross-ReadyRating-Program Volunteer Florida volunteerflorida.org F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

INDUSTRY BULLETIN

for Florida’s Food Industry

SUBJECT: BOIL WATER NOTICE GUIDELINES

June, 2014

BOIL WATER NOTICE, By Authority of Section 381.006 and 403.855-857, Florida Statutes These procedures must be observed while a “BOIL WATER NOTICE” is in effect: TAP WATER ♦ Do not serve water from faucets until local health authorities advise the water is safe for consumption. Use only bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled tap water. Boil water at a rolling boil for one minute to kill infectious organisms.

♦ An alternative method for areas without power is to mix 8 drops (1/8 teaspoon) of unscented household bleach per gallon of water and allow to

stand for 30 minutes. If the water is cloudy in appearance, add 16 drops (1/4 teaspoon) and let stand for 30 minutes. (Water will not be toxic, but may have a chlorine odor and taste.) Note: Using bleach will not kill parasites that may be present, however boiling will kill parasites.

ICE, ICE-MAKING, BEVERAGE & WATER VENDING ♦ Ice bagged or made prior to the issuance of the boil water notice may be used. ♦ Ice produced in ice machines after the issuance of a boil water notice must be discarded and machines not restarted until the water supply is deemed safe by local health authority. Sanitize the interior of the ice machine, ice trays and built-in ice-makers

♦ with two teaspoons (100+ ppm) of household bleach in one gallon of water prior to restarting the ice machine or ice-maker. ♦ Disconnect or turn off water vending machines, drinking fountains, misters, ice-making units and soda machines and prevent their use. ♦ Filters in water lines should be replaced if the water supplier detected bacteria in the water samples or if debris accumulation is observed in the filter(s). Information regarding the presence of bacteria will be provided by your water supplier or through the news media.

HAND-WASHING ♦ Do not use tap water for hand-washing. Use only bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled (and safely cooled) tap water. After

proper hand-washing, use a sanitizing solution on the hands. This may be accomplished by using a commercial hand sanitizing lotion that requires no rinse or a chlorine bleach solution of two teaspoons of household bleach in one gallon of water. Single-use gloves may be used to provide additional protection after proper hand-washing.

♦ No bare hand contact with ready-to-eat food is allowed while boil water notice is in effect. COOKING & CLEANING ♦ Food equipment and utensils and food-contact surfaces that must be cleaned in place (does not fit into a three-compartment sink), may

be cleaned with steam with no additives, a sanitizing mix of bottled or boiled water and bleach (50-100 ppm) or other approved sanitizing solution.

♦ Do not use tap water for food processing or food preparation until the BOIL WATER NOTICE is lifted by local authorities. Use only bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled tap water for these purposes.

DISHWASHING/WAREWASHING ♦ Manually wash, rinse and sanitize dishes, food equipment and utensils with bottled water from an approved source and/or boiled tap water utilizing a three-compartment sink in the approved manner. Use single-service articles when possible.

♦ Mechanical dishwashers may be used only to remove food residue and debris, if followed by a manual wash, rinse, and sanitization as described above.

RESCINDING THE BOIL WATER NOTICE ♦ You will be advised by the local Health Department directly or through the news media when a “BOIL WATER NOTICE” has been rescinded

(lifted). AFTER the “BOIL WATER NOTICE” is lifted, allow water to run for five minutes at each tap to flush the lines with safe water. Remember to include misters, drinking fountains, ice makers (discard the first binful), soda machines, etc., when flushing the lines.

If you require further information, please contact your local water supplier. If you have questions about the Boil Water Notice Guidelines, please contact your licensing agency. Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services: 850.245.5520 Florida Department of Business and Professional Regulation: 850.487.1395 Florida Department of Health: Local County Health Department

Rick Scott, Governor www.FreshFromFlorida.com FRL A .org

www.MyFloridaLicense.com/DBPR/ hotels-restaurants/

www.FloridaHealth.gov F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

INDUSTRY BULLETIN

for Florida’s Foodservice Industry SUBJECT: EMERGENCY RECOVERY GUIDELINES

Bulletin 2018-01

March 26, 2018

The Division of Hotels and Restaurants urges all state food service operators to take special measures during power or water outages and other emergency conditions. All public food service establishments must take action after these events to offset the effects of loss of electricity, flooding, compromised potable water supplies or damage sufficient to contaminate stored food. 5 Keys for Safer Food in Areas Hit by Disasters: 1) Keep hands, food and equipment clean; 2) Separate raw and cooked food; 3) Cook foods thoroughly; 4) Keep foods at safe temperatures; and 5) Use only safe water and food. FOOD SAFETY AND PROTECTION Food poses the greatest threat of causing a foodborne illness if it has warmed due to lack of refrigeration or has been contaminated by floodwater, storm debris or other contaminants. When these circumstances occur, public food service establishments must consider the following precautions:

• Add bags of ice or dry ice to refrigerators and freezers prior to the emergency if notice is given and loss of power for an extended time is expected.

• Do not operate if your establishment has no safe water supply or electrical power (or generators) to run essential equipment. • Do not operate if your establishment has no roof or is not structurally sound. • While power is off, keep the doors to freezers and coolers closed in order to maintain temperature as long as possible. • When power is restored, identify all time/temperature control for safety foods (TCS) that may have been above 41°F or below

135°F for more than four hours. TCS foods that have been out of temperature for more than 4 hours must be properly discarded.

• You can safely re-freeze thawed foods that still contain ice crystals and are 41°F or less. • Discard any food that has been contaminated or come in contact with floodwater, sewage, smoke, fumes, chemicals, or other liquid contaminants

• Discard vulnerable containers of food such as those containing peel-off covers, scored pop tops, waxed cardboard, cork or screw tops or paraffin seals such as glass or plastic containers of catsup, dressing, milk, mayonnaise, soda, beer, sauces, etc., if the containers have been exposed to contamination.

• Discard foods packaged in soft, porous containers like cardboard boxes, paper, foil, plastic and cellophane such as boxes or bags of food, cereal, flour, sugar, rice, salt, etc., if the packages have been exposed to contamination.

• Discard shell eggs exposed to any contamination – the shell is porous; and do not use swollen, leaking or damaged canned goods.

• Smoke damage to food is difficult to assess. Insoluble tars and plastics and their byproducts suspended in smoke are a major concern. Discard all foods exposed to smoke.

• Undamaged, commercially prepared foods in all-metal cans can be saved if you remove labels that can come off, thoroughly wash the cans, rinse them, and then disinfect them with a sanitizing solution consisting of 1 tablespoon of bleach per gallon of potable water. Finally, re-label the containers with a marker.

• Maintain hot foods at temperatures of 135°F or above and cold foods at temperatures of 41°F or below. • Use single-service articles whenever possible. Discard single-service items such as paper or plastic plates, cups, plastic utensils, lids, straws, etc., if the items have been exposed to contamination.

• Keep food covered and protected from dust, dirt, insects, vermin and other contaminants. Minimize handling of foods before, during and after preparation. Wash hands with potable or boiled water.

• WHEN IN DOUBT, THROW IT OUT. FOOD EQUIPMENT

• If the establishment was exposed to contamination, clean and sanitize all equipment and food-contact surfaces with potable or boiled water. Do not operate until the entire establishment has been thoroughly cleaned and sanitized or disinfected.

• All water filters on equipment should be removed and replaced if not designed to be cleaned in place. BOIL WATER NOTICE If a Boil Water Notice is issued by the local health authorities, it means the water supply may have been contaminated. Do not serve water in any form. Disconnect or turn off water vending machines, drinking fountains, misters, ice-making units and post-mix beverage machines and prevent their use until advised by the local County Health Department directly or through the news media that the Boil Water Notice has been rescinded (lifted). AFTER the Boil Water Notice is lifted, allow water to run for five minutes at each tap to flush the lines with safe water. Refer to the Boil Water Notice for more information concerning proper equipment decontamination and water purification.

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF BUSINESS AND PROFESSIONAL REGULATION Rick Scott, Governor

Division of Hotels and Restaurants www.MyFloridaLicense.com/DBPR/hotels-restaurants/

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Jonathan Zachem, Secretary

Phone: 850.487.1395 F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT

VISITFLORIDA.org Your One-Stop Resource for Hurricane Preparedness

L

ast year, the state of Florida suffered significant damage from Hurricane Irma, resulting in an estimated loss of 1.8 million visitors and $1.5 billion in visitor spending. From the first day that Florida appeared in the five-day forecast cone for Hurricane Irma, VISIT FLORIDA activated and continually updated its homepage banner and Florida Now page on VISITFLORIDA.com to provide weather alerts, evacuation notices, curfews, traffic updates, power outages, gas availability and other timely resources travelers needed. Through partnerships with Expedia and Facebook, VISIT FLORIDA was able to share real-time accommodations, rental car and flight availability — reaching 280,000 domestic and international visitors who were currently in the state — with a targeted message informing visitors about the storm and providing them with resources. In the days just after the storm, VISIT FLORIDA held conference calls with local destination marketing organizations to hear firsthand how they fared, what their immediate needs were and to determine what level of marketing assistance they would need. VISIT FLORIDA then launched an aggressive, multi-phased, $5 million marketing campaign highlighting the Sunshine State. Hurricane Irma is just one example of the many kinds of situations that have the potential to negatively impact the perception of Florida as a desirable vacation

destination, as well as impede travel to and within the state. VISIT FLORIDA takes steps to prepare for all potential crisis situations, and it is VISIT FLORIDA’s hope that these efforts will allow our visitors to make the most informed travel-planning decisions possible in preparation for any threat that might impact the state. Each spring, VISIT FLORIDA’s crisis management response team reviews their Hurricane Crisis Preparedness Plan, updating it as needed and ensuring it is ready to implement. Additional steps taken in advance of this year’s hurricane season include: »» Working closely with the Florida Division of Emergency Management to align VISIT FLORIDA’s response steps; »» Testing the consumer messaging response efforts on VISITFLORIDA. com, including the Travel Alert and supporting Travel Advisory page, mapped links to live Twitter feeds from DMOs, webcam feeds from tourism destinations, and consumer social media posts using #FloridaNow; »» Testing the page, Expedia.com Florida, which allows VISIT FLORIDA and Expedia to provide real-time statewide accommodations availability should a widespread evacuation order be declared;

»» Hosting an industry webinar to share the details of the VISIT FLORIDA Hurricane Response Plan; »» Updating the Hurricane Information page on VISITFLORIDA.org which contains a link to the 2018 Hurricane Crisis Management webinar, helpful FAQs, and resources for communicating with key audiences in times of crisis; »» Verifying information for all local tourism contacts should VISIT FLORIDA need to mobilize the industry. In the event that a crisis situation arises, VISIT FLORIDA remains in regular contact with state emergency officials and tourism industry representatives to ensure the very latest updates are shared on the consumer website, Florida Now, and through the staff at the five Official Florida Welcome Centers. Visitors looking for the latest weather or travel updates will find that information on the VISITFLORIDA.com home page in an alert box activated at the top of the screen. From there, a link takes users to a page with many more resources, including: »» Details on the latest official weather or storm alerts. »» Links to the Florida Emergency Information 24-hour Hotline and Florida 511 road closure information. »» Links to the National Hurricane Center and Florida Division of Emergency Management websites. »» Live local updates from our Destination Marketing Organization partners via Twitter. »» Live webcam feeds from tourism destinations around the state. »» Videos created by VISIT FLORIDA’s content team featuring first nonimpacted areas and later impacted areas once recovered. »» An aggregated feed of social media posts using #FloridaNow. VISIT FLORIDA has assembled a host of hurricane-related materials to assist tourism entities throughout Florida. We encourage you to review these materials prior to a potential crisis to ensure you and our visitors have the resources needed to stay safe in the Sunshine State. For more information, visit visitflorida.org/resources/ crisis-preparation/hurricane-information/.

FRL A .org

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H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

The FRLA Palm Beach Chapter delivered $14,000 in scholarships to culinary and hospitality students.

Kevin Speidel, FRLA Chairman, attended the Pinellas Chapter Breakfast with a Purpose. Kevin and host John Gilbertson, GM, Hilton Carrillon, are shown here at the Hilton Carrillon.

Beard in Baldwin was a new event that the Central Florida Chapter sponsored.

FRLA Palm Beach Chapter wins Bronze Medal as Business Partner of the Year for the Palm Beach County District Schools.

Broward Chapter Members participate in Broward Technical College's annual “Jersey and Jeans” event, raising money for student scholarships. 26  SU M M ER

2018

We are proud to highlight the latest happenings in hospitality. This section is designed to serve as an update on our industry and provide a snapshot of what we’re accomplishing together. If you would like to share something significant that’s happening in your area, feel free to submit your story to editor@frla.org.

DigiPro Media spoke to the EscaRosa Chapter about ADA compliance.

Paradise Coast Chapter Legislative Reception – FGCU students, Ray and June Singer, Fred Hirschovits. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


H O S P I TA L I T Y H A P P E N I N G S

Matt Phillips celebrated his ROSE Award win in the Maintenance Full Service Hotel category.

FRLA member restaurant, 21 Spices, supported first responders during Hurricane Irma at the First Responder Luncheon.

Rose Award nominees and winners from Ponte Vedra Resorts.

Taste of Winter Park was a successful Great Florida Event held this spring. Photo by Brion Price. FRL A .org

Kerry Morrissey, Laura Radler, Representative Bob Rommel and FRLA Regional Director Lois Croft spent some time together at the Edgewater Beach Hotel recently to discuss the hospitality/ tourism industry.

Lee Chapter Tourism Luncheon, with guest speaker Ken Lawson, VISIT FLORIDA President and CEO.

The FRLA Central Florida Chapter held its Spring Sip ‘n Savor networking event at the Loews Sapphire Falls Resort at Universal Orlando. Attendees enjoyed complimentary drinks, conversation and a legislative update by FRLA President and CEO Carol Dover. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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E H T H

ere’s to Summer 2018! Hope you enjoy this issue of Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine. We’ve put together some great beverage topics for you! From tropical cocktails, your favorite margarita and to those made with tea, this edition will provide you with some interesting reading about trends and things happening in the world of beverages! Remember, a great beverage offering can add more to your bottom line. Creative and delicious cocktails, wine or beer can set the vibe for your restaurant and bar. Teas and lemonades are a vibrant component in beverage sales these days. Don’t miss an opportunity to please your guests with 28  SU M M ER

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E U ISS some unique beverage options. This Edition of FR&L also provides a good deal of material about RCS Training, which provides alcohol compliance training to help you maintain your alcoholic beverage license. Also read about the new program that RCS Training is offering — AGE ID. This amazing technology was developed to assist in reducing the risks posed by underage drinking in your operation. RCS Training can help you with all of your training needs, so don’t miss this information. Our beverage edition contributors and advertisers have made every effort to inspire and appeal to your senses. Cheers! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N

PHOTO COURTESY ISLAND OASIS

E G A R E V BE


ISLAND OASIS

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TAKE FLIGHT Island Oasis® Margarita Mix & DaVinci Gourmet® Syrups BY KIM O’MALLEY KURTH

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s a crowd-pleasing and familiar drink, a margarita is a happy hour favorite. In fact, 23 percent of margaritas are sold during this time of day, according to NPD Crest, Total Casual Dining Segment. With operators’ desire to increase foot traffic and consumers’ demand for crafted beverages and unique flavor profiles, adding some pizzazz to a traditional margarita is a great way to draw a crowd and increase revenue. Island Oasis margarita mix, made with natural ingredients, has a perfectly balanced blend of lemon, lime and orange with a sweet touch of real cane sugar. It provides an ideal foundation to build crafted concoctions to please the avid margarita fan and those looking to explore new flavors. There are so many ways to enhance a margarita offering, one of our favorites is a flight of margaritas!

CRAFTING A MARGARITA FLIGHT

»» Flights of beer are familiar to the consumer, but flights of cocktails are really taking off. It is noteworthy that 44 percent of millennials enjoy ordering drink flights. More importantly, 61 percent of consumers want the ability to customize their alcoholic beverage away from home, according to Mintel’s On Premise Alcohol Trends. By offering a margarita flight, you are allowing customers to participate in the beverage-making experience. »» DaVinci Gourmet Syrups are the perfect complement to enable customization. With dynamic flavors such as Peach Chipotle, Habanero, Blackberry Blood Orange and Agave, you can change a traditional margarita into something extraordinary with just a few pumps. It’s exciting for the customer and simple to execute for the bartender.

KEEP IT SIMPLE

»» Prebatch your margarita mix and provide customers a list of flavored DaVinci Gourmet syrups from which to choose. The bartender simply fills the flight glasses with margarita, tops with the chosen syrups and garnishes. Use a pre-printed flavor mat for the customer to keep track of the exciting flavors or deck it out with a margarita flight paddle and mini-margarita glasses found at most restaurant supply stores.

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MAKE MORE MONEY »» What makes this great is that a margarita is a low-cost drink, and flavored syrups cost less than flavored alcohol — so your beverage costs are low, but your profits can be high. »» It is best to pick one flight size (e.g. 6 oz. sample glasses), and it is customary to add a $2 up charge for a flight. For example, the price of a single 16 oz. margarita could be $8.99 and the price of a Margarita flight could be $10.99* for the same amount of margarita mix! When your margarita flight offering takes off, add more options, such as a flight of spiked Island Oasis Lemonade or Moscow Mule. However you choose to make your flight, you will be sure to delight your customers and keep them coming back for more. *Information from NPD Crest, YE Dec’17, Total Casual Dining Segment On Premise Alcohol Trends: US, May 2016 (Mintel) Kim O’Malley Kurth is the Senior Brand Manager for Island Oasis. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

C O C K TA I L R E C I P E

<- BAMA

BREEZE BY LUCY BUFFET

Makes 1 Drink

My brother Jimmy’s recording of “The Bama Breeze” was his homage to coastal dives, particularly the famous Flora-Bama on the beach at the Alabama–Florida state line. He sent me a little love, both when he changed the lyrics to call the bar owner “LuLu” and when he asked me if I wanted to play the bar owner in the video. I mused for just a second, thinking … hmm … a woman who owns a bar, drinking a beer, jumps up on the stage and sings with the band. It wasn’t much of a stretch! I had crazy fun shooting the video, but I’m glad I have my day job! Now I enjoy this drink at my own “Bama Breeze” bar on the beach at LuLu’s. INGREDIENTS • 2 ounces Absolut® Citron vodka • 1 ounce coconut rum • Juice of ½ fresh lime • ½ ounce simple syrup * • 2-3 ounces cranberry juice INSTRUCTIONS 1. Fill tall glass with crushed ice 2. Add vodka and rum 3. Squeeze lime juice into glass 4. Fill with cranberry juice 5. Add simple syrup to desired sweetness 6. Stir 7. Garnish with fresh lime slice * LuLu Clue: To make your own simple syrup — In a small saucepan, bring ½ cup water and ½ cup sugar to a boil. Remove from heat and cool to room temperature, then cool, pour syrup liquid into a storage container. Refrigerated, this will keep for a long time.

About Lucy Buffett

Creative chef, businesswoman, author and story teller, Lucy Buffett is more than a sibling of famous troubadour Jimmy, just as her business, LuLu’s, is more than a restaurant. As creator of the LuLu’s brand, Lucy has taken her initial dream, LuLu’s at Gulf Shores, to become a destination in itself, and she opened her second LuLu’s location in Destin in the summer of 2015. A third LuLu’s location will open in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, in spring of 2018. From restaurants to clothing lines, cookbooks, Bloody Mary mix, seasonings and sauces, a children’s book and Crazy Sista Honey Ale beer, Lucy Buffett combines true Southern graciousness and authenticity with the nerve of a successful entrepreneur. Known as Crazy Sista for good reason, Lucy marches to the beat of her own drum; she plays nice, but usually by rules she has bent, broken or reinvented. To learn more about Lucy Buffett, visit lucybuffett.com.

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BEVERAGE LAW HIGHLIGHTS

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CLOSING TIME AT THE FLORIDA CAPITOL 2018 Alcohol Legislation and the Hospitality Industry BY TONY GLOVER AND TAWANNA FRANKLIN, Glover Law LLC

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uring another busy session in Tallahassee, the legislature passed alcoholic beverage legislation that might affect your operations. The governor signed both bills, with the changes slated to take effect later in the year.

FREE BEER GLASSES FOR RESTAURANTS AND BARS HB 961, championed by Rep. Joe Gruters and Sen. Rob Bradley, allows alcoholic beverage retailers to accept free beer glasses from distributors. Of course, it wouldn’t be the Beverage Law unless there was a set of conditions attached. The glassware must prominently and permanently advertise the brand name. The distributor may not give any retailer more than 10 cases per calendar year, per licensed location. Each case may not exceed 24 glasses. The retailer may not sell the glassware or return it for cash, credit or replacement. All parties, including the retailer, must keep records relating to the sale or gift of glassware for three years. Manufacturers and importers must provide a no-charge invoice when glassware is given to a distributor. Any free glassware given by a distributor must have also been provided to them at no charge. As you are probably aware, current law is much more restrictive. Section 561.42 of the Florida Statutes limits beer manufacturers, distributors, importers or brand registrants to selling “expendable retailer advertising specialties” (e.g., trays, coasters, napkins, glasses, etc.) to retailers at the product’s actual cost or higher. The new law will take effect on October 1, 2018.

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ONLINE ALCOHOL ORDERING IS FORMALLY LEGALIZED HB 667, championed by Rep. Daniel Perez and Sen. Dana Young, will allow certain alcohol retailers to take orders through the internet and mobile applications. Additionally, the bill will permit certain retailers to make deliveries in vehicles owned and operated by contracted third parties. This is important legislation for the food and beverage delivery sector, which is growing rapidly in Florida. Please note that not all retailers will be allowed to deliver under this new structure. The retailer must be licensed to sell alcohol in sealed containers for off-premises consumption. In the hospitality context, 2COP (beer and wine), 4COP quota (beer, wine, and liquor) and most special hotel/motel licensees will benefit from this change. Under already existing law, SFS (special food service establishment) and 13CT (catering) licensees are specifically prohibited from offering package sales. The bill also specifically prohibits section 561.221(2) licensees (breweries with retail licenses) from delivering to end users. Alcohol delivery services have faced a questionable regulatory environment in Florida. The relevant statute does not clearly allow the ordering of alcoholic beverages on the internet. In addition, the law contains a challenging requirement that the delivery vehicles be leased or owned by the licensed retailer. This bill provides much needed certainty for operators and regulators. The new law becomes effective on July 1, 2018. This article was written by Tony Glover and Tawanna Franklin of Glover Law LLC, which represents bars, restaurants, and hotels on issues relating to alcoholic beverages and state licensure. They can be reached at 850-895-1228 and contact@gloverlaw.net.

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THE RAGE BEVEISSUE

COCA-COLA

COCA-COLA USA A Total Beverage Company With Local Roots BY JAY MOYE

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ommunities across America are getting to know their Coca-Cola neighbors in a whole new way. Through storytelling that reaffirms its longstanding commitment to refreshing and strengthening local communities, Coca-Cola USA is reintroducing itself as far more than the maker of the world’s best-known beverage. The storytelling effort launched in late-August in local communities, local newspapers and on Coca-Cola Journey, and it is now rolling out more broadly via national advertising and social media. It brings to life the people, products and character of Coca-Cola through the voices and faces of employees from every corner of the country — from a bottler in Kansas City, to a delivery driver in Anchorage, to a plant manager in Tampa, to a Coca-Cola Scholar in Dallas. The reintroduction comes at a pivotal point for Coca-Cola, which, by the end of this year, plans to wrap up a decade-long process to return ownership of local bottling and distribution operations to independent company partners across America. Coke also is accelerating its strategic evolution to become a total beverage company by giving people more of the drinks they want. “We’re getting back to our roots by returning the local part of our business to where it truly belongs and where it will best perform,” said Stuart Kronauge, senior vice president of marketing and president of USA operations for Coca-Cola North America. “And the increasingly local nature of our bottling system positions us to make an even bigger impact on the communities where we live, work and play. This is the perfect time to reintroduce ourselves as a leading employer and supplier and communicate the breadth of who we are, what we stand for and what we make and sell.” The Coca-Cola Company and its family of 68 independently owned bottlers in the U.S. collectively employ more than 90,000 people across every corner of the country, and those people passionately serve and bring economic value to the local communities they call home. But company research shows that most Americans are unaware of the work Coca-Cola does to create jobs, empower local economies, preserve the environment and foster inclusion. And they want and expect Coca-Cola to share these hyper-local stories of social commitment. “Community impact has always been part of our DNA, but it’s a story that has largely gone untold,” said Caren Pasquale Seckler, vice president of social commitment for Coca-Cola North America. “Most people don’t know who we really are when it comes to our values and our actions — for instance, that we are the first Fortune 500 company to replenish all the water we use globally back into the environment or that we have provided more than $100 million in scholarships over the last 29 years. Historically, we’ve been about doing good anonymously, but our consumers and in many cases, our employees, are telling us they want to hear more of our story.” The storytelling also highlights the company’s extensive offering of drinks by reminding the public that it’s “Coca-Cola and so much more.” Most Americans are unaware that Coke produces more than 800 beverages in the U.S. across 100 brands — from smartwater and ZICO coconut water, to Odwalla juices and Honest Tea. “When people hear our story, our business benefits,” Seckler said. “And when we benefit, we can do even more for our consumers and customers and make an even bigger impact on our communities. It’s a virtuous cycle.” Jay Moye is Editor, Coca-Cola Journey.

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HERMAN FERNANDEZ

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HERMAN FERNANDEZ JR. Vice President, Operations Corporate Accounts & National Accounts, Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits, Florida

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erman Fernandez Jr. is retiring from Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits after 44 happy and productive years with the company. SGWS has experienced steady growth and expansion and is currently in 40 states. Herman has been essential in helping to develop working relationships with numerous national accounts across the country. His extensive knowledge of wine and spirits, coupled with his experience working with both on- and off-premise accounts, has been instrumental to the market leaders he has collaborated with. Herman and his wife, Tanya, will be retiring to the beach and are looking forward to fun-filled days of biking, fishing, tennis, golf and travel. He held positions at Southern Glazer’s Wine and Spirits as wine salesman, liquor salesman, area district manager, vice president general sales manager, and vice president of national accounts. Herman is a native Floridian and graduated from the University of South Florida in Tampa with a degree in history and political science. In 2014, Herman was named the Supplier of the Year, Hall of Fame award winner, honored by the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association for his long-standing commitment to Florida’s hospitality industry.

“My time with SGWS has been rewarding, many of my business associates and colleagues have become lifelong friends … that has been the secret to my success for a joyous, fulfilled life. I thank each of you for the part that you have played.” — Herman Fernandez Jr. FRL A .org

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T E AT U L I A

BREWING A CRAVEABLE, PROFITABLE BEVERAGE PROGRAM

W ↑Courtesy Sweet Tea Cocktail of Teatulia A dash of bourbon yields a grown-up version of this Southern classic. Created for Teatulia by teafoodie.com. Makes 2 cocktails. INGREDIENTS • 8 oz. boiling water • 2 tea bags Teatulia Organic Black Tea • 1 tablespoon sugar • 2 thick slices orange, halved • 1 sprig tarragon • 2 oz. bourbon Pour boiling water over tea bags and steep for 3 minutes. Remove tea bags, add sugar and stir until dissolved. Cool to room temperature. Place 2 half orange slices and half a tarragon sprig into a pint glass. Use the handle of a wooden spoon to muddle orange and tarragon for 30 seconds. Fill glass halfway with ice. Add bourbon and cooled tea. Stir a few times, then strain into two cocktail glasses. Add ice cubes to each glass and garnish with remaining orange slices and tarragon leaves.

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ith soda sales declining and complementary tap water booming, operators are left wondering how to get those dollars back. Teatulia Organic Teas says fresh-brewed tea is the answer. But it’s not just any tea. The forward-thinking brand is committed to cultivating clean, pesticide-free tea that’s sustainably sourced from its own organic garden. Teatulia challenges its customers, “Do you know where your tea comes from?” “The entire Teatulia brand comes from our garden,” explains CEO and co-founder Linda Appel Lipsius. “It came from this idea to do things differently. We weren’t like, ‘Let’s start a tea brand and create really pretty blends.’ We actually went the other way. We started with the agriculture, the land, and then we built the business, the brand, out of that.” Started as a social enterprise to create jobs in an impoverished and barren region of Northern Bangladesh, Teatulia is now one of the largest organic tea gardens in the world. In two decades, Teatulia’s garden has restored thousands of acres of the ecosystem to fertile land teeming with wildlife. The fair trade garden’s farming co-op has lifted thousands of Bangladeshi families out of poverty by offering living wage jobs, organic farming training and education programs. Teatulia helps foodservice companies — Linda Appel Lipsius, build profitable tea programs to meet cusCEO and co-founder, Teatulia tomer demand for healthy, organic and sustainable menu choices. Teatulia Organic Teas wins awards for its fresh, full-flavored teas available in multiple formats: fresh-brewed iced teas, individually wrapped single-serve hot teas, economical bulk tea bags and retail canisters. Teatulia is also making a big splash in tea cocktails. Chefs and mixologists around the country are using Teatulia Organic Teas to create signature cocktails for seasonal menus and special events. It’s just one more way Teatulia is inspiring the industry to make tea more craveable and profitable.

“We started with the agriculture, the land, and then we built the business, the brand, out of that.”

Looking to refresh your beverage menu? Contact foodservice@teatulia.com. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


FLORIDA WINERIES

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FLORIDA’S WINE BY STELLA QUINTERO

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nspired by a recent visit to a vineyard and winery in North Carolina, I wanted to explore and learn about different wineries in Florida — after all, eating “local” and drinking “local” are always best. To my surprise, Florida has 30 certified farm wineries and vineyards located throughout the state. The Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services (FDACS) may qualify a winery as a tourist attraction only if it is registered with and certified with the FDACS as a “Florida Farm Winery.” Among other requirements for the certification, a Florida Farm Winery must produce and sell less than 250,000 gallons of wine annually, of which 60 percent of the wine produced is made from state agricultural products. The winery must also maintain an operating vineyard with a minimum of five acres of owned or managed land in Florida that produces commodities used in the production of wine, and they must be open to the public for tours, tastings and sales at least 30 hours each week. What is planted in Florida vineyards? It turns out that Florida, among its many treasures, has the native grape muscadine (vitis rotundofolia), native to the southeastern United States and described by some as the “superfruit of the South.” Muscadine is also the grape from which the first wine in America was ever made, and research has shown that muscadines are rich in total phenolic compounds, ellagic acids and antioxidants — all of which carry wonderful health benefits, such as lowering bad cholesterol, boosting the immune system and preventing manganese deficiencies. Muscadine wines are a bit misunderstood, though their popularity is growing. These wines are made in a sweet style, yet nearly dry styles can also be found. The tasting profile of Muscadine wines exhibits high fruit notes, medium body and low alcohol. They must be drunk young because they oxidize easily, and they should be served and stored chilled. Although muscadines grow wild in Florida, there are close to 500 acres of commercial muscadine vineyards. Of the 30 certified farm wineries

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and vineyards, one of the most notable wineries in Florida is Lakeridge Winery and Vineyards, located 25 miles west of downtown Orlando. Lakeridge ranks as Florida’s largest premier winery and remains a pioneer in the development of wines from the native muscadine. Founded in 1989, Lakeridge winery sits on a 127-acre estate and has more than 80 acres of planted muscadine vineyards. Another important winery to note is Schnebly Redland’s Winery and Brewery, where wines from exotic fruits such as mango, avocado, lychee and passionfruit are made. You will not find any muscadine or grapes at Schnebly, but you will definitely find unique and specialty wines. These two wineries are the most notable in terms of their traditionalism and eccentricity, respectively, but remember that there are 28 more wineries to discover! My exploration of Florida wines will continue. I hope to soon find some of the Florida wines on restaurant menus in all kinds of forms (a Florida muscadine wine granita in the summer?). Besides being an exciting tourism attraction to our millions of visitors each year, Florida wines and vineyards are a very special way of using local ingredients and products. Cheers! Stella Quintero is the Instructor/Special Programs for the Hospitality Management Program at Florida Atlantic University.

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Sexual harassment and workplace discrimination lawsuits are on the rise. Just one of these costly lawsuits can put you out of business. That is why it is so important that you, your managers, and your employees know how to deal with these issues. Our full-service Anti-Harassment Training addresses common types of sexual harassment and/or discrimination and precautionary measures businesses should take in order to prevent a sexual harassment and/or discrimination lawsuit in the workplace.

The RCS Anti-Harassment Training: • • • •

On site, live training Local training manager Employee grievance process paperwork Recordkeeping/documentation

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To learn more about the RCS Anti-Harassment Training, go to www.rcstraining.com or call 800.537.9863. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

A Partnership That Works Both Ways By JODI CROSS, FRLA, Palm Beach Regional Director

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ecently, on a busy Thursday in-season here in South Florida, I received a call from a desperate restaurant operator who was in a bind. She couldn’t print checks, her system was crashing, servers were walking off the job and she didn’t know who else to call. A FRLA member gave her my number and thought we might be able to help. I listened carefully and could hear the anxiety in her voice as she explained the situation. She had just put in a new POS system and contracted a company to do wiring, but nothing was communicating properly. I told her that I would do my best to find somebody to help her with her emergency and would call her back. I am by no means a technology guru, but the first person who popped into my mind was Jud Vanderlaag from Heartland. He is a problem solver and someone you can

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trust to figure things out. I placed a call to him and explained the situation. Within an hour or so, he was headed to Singer Island to see if he could be of assistance. The business, Johnny Longboats, was not a FRLA member or a Heartland customer, so for Jud to spend his time to assist the restaurant was above and beyond the call of duty. After spending several hours at the site, he was able to sort out a partial fix and get things running to carry her through a busy weekend. When I checked in with the restaurant later that day, she was thrilled. I was sure to sing Heartland’s praises and

told her that Jud would like to earn her business, and she responded, “He just did.” This is a great testament to the partnership between FRLA and Heartland. In the end, Johnny Longboats joined FRLA as a member, and Heartland earned a new client. Jud certainly knows how to create raving fans. His knowledge, commitment and dedication haven’t gone unnoticed, and I certainly appreciate teaming up with him for any client project. We now jokingly call him, “The Restaurant Whisperer.” Great job, Jud, thanks for always delivering excellent results!

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

Employee vs. Independent Contractor How This Classification is Bringing Legal Challenges to the Gig Economy By SUZANNE SINGER, ssinger@rumberger.com and SALLY R. CULLEY, sculley@rumberger.com

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he gig economy is a labor market characterized by temporary positions or freelance work with independent workers for short-term engagements as opposed to permanent jobs. Think Uber, Delivery Dudes, Taskrabbit and Upwork. This business model relies upon matching labor supply with demand without the traditional responsibilities — and costs — of an employer/employee ­ relationship. Workers are, instead, classified as independent contractors. However, businesses are finding that the gig-economy is moving faster than traditional employment and labor laws, creating uncertainty and an uptick in expensive misclassification litigation. As discussed further below, many on-demand businesses have had to fight claims, often asserted as class action lawsuits, that workers were misclassified as independent contractors when, in fact, they were employees.

Employees vs. Independent Contractors

By classifying workers as independent contractors, companies avoid paying for brick and mortar offices, training and employee benefits, which reduces their overall costs and risks associated with hiring full-time employees. And the independent contractor loses the protection that an “employee” would be entitled to under various state and federal laws, including the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA), which provides minimum wage and overtime pay protection for employees. The general test used by courts to determine whether a worker is an “employee” or an “independent contractor” traditionally comes down to what is known as the “economic realities test.” Under this test, courts generally apply a number of factors as guides when making a determination as to whether a particular worker is an independent contractor or employee. No factor is more important than another. Rather, courts look at the totality of the working relationship. The factors considered by the courts include: »» The nature and degree of control by the employer (including who sets the pay amount, work hours, and how workers perform). »» The relative investment in facilities and equipment by the worker and 42  SU M M ER

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the employer to see whether they appear to be sharing the risk of loss). »» The permanency of the worker’s relationship with the employer. »» The extent to which the work performed is an integral part of the employer’s business. »» Whether the worker’s managerial skills affect his/her opportunity for profit and loss. »» The worker’s skill and initiative and whether he/she exercises independent business judgment.

Misclassification Can Lead to Lawsuits Many on-demand companies have been sued by workers claiming that they were misclassified as independent contractors when they, in fact, were employees. Uber, DoorDash, Delivery Dudes and GrubHub are just a few that have had to defend such claims. Some misclassification claims can be settled quickly for relatively small amounts, but other classaction claims have been quite successful and lucrative for the plaintiffs — and their attorneys, who would be entitled to the recovery of attorneys’ fees from the employer on successful claims. For example, in 2016, Uber agreed to a $100 million settlement of two class-action lawsuits brought by its drivers (this settlement, however, was not approved by the court). Also, Lyft settled for $27 million a misclassification lawsuit brought by its drivers in California, and DoorDash has likewise agreed to settle a similar lawsuit for $5 million (under both agreements, the companies will continue to classify its drivers as independent contractors).

Perhaps the most significant misclassification case right now is Lawson v. GrubHub, Inc., currently pending in the Northern District of California. Though class-action treatment was denied by the court, meaning the outcome will directly affect only the named plaintiff (who is seeking less than $600 in damages), there will be indirect effects felt throughout the gig economy. At issue in that case is whether the plaintiff, who was a delivery driver for GrubHub, was improperly classified as an independent contractor rather than as an employee. The trial of the Lawson v. GrubHub, Inc. case was held before a Magistrate Judge from Sept. 5–12, 2017. In an attempt to demonstrate GrubHub’s control over Lawson and other delivery drivers, Lawson introduced evidence of his required attendance at training and meetings, scheduling of “blocks” of time in which drivers were to be available to accept deliveries, incentives for drivers to wear GrubHub shirts and hats and additional incentives for drivers to accept more deliveries. GrubHub, on the other hand, introduced evidence that Lawson was free to work for other businesses (and did, in fact), that Lawson was free to sign up for accepting deliveries during particular times – or not, and that its delivery services were not part of GrubHub’s core business. No ruling is expected from the GrubHub trial until Oct. 30 at the earliest. That is the date on which the judge has scheduled closing arguments, after which the case will be ready for a final ruling from the judge. The case is being closely watched by other on-demand companies, as a ruling that the plaintiff should have been classified as an employee will certainly be used by other workers to bolster similar misclassification claims.

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B U S I N E S S M AT T E R S

WHAT TO DO?

Because of uncertainty related to worker classification, the only way to avoid increased litigation expenses and potentially large settlements or judgments is to classify all workers as “employees.” This was the course taken by on-demand companies Munchery and Instacart. In doing so, companies may see benefits that outweigh the costs of reclassification. These benefits potentially include: • Certainty. • Avoidance of expensive misclassification lawsuits. • Increased quality through control. • Potential workforce reduction. • Improvement of brand image by attracting quality workers. In the event the costs to reclassify are too great, companies must be prepared to fully support their decisions to classify workers as independent contractors. The following tips may assist with that: • Have a written contract that sets out the expectations of the parties, the specific type of work to be performed, who will provide the tools and equipment and how payment will be made. Though not

determinative, it does not hurt to define the worker as an independent contractor. Also, any additional factors that would help to support a finding of an independent contractor relationship should be included, e.g., that the worker can also work elsewhere, even for a competitor; that the worker may hire others to do the work; that the worker is not required to work a particular schedule, etc. • Utilize a method of compensation that is not an hourly wage. Though an hourly wage may not be enough, in and of itself, to destroy an independent contractor relationship, if there are other methods of payment that would work (like payment for the job to be performed), those would be better. • Take a large step back in controlling the method or manner in which the worker completes his or her work. Designating how the worker is supposed to dress, the schedule in which he or she is supposed to work, what tools and equipment are to be used, etc., will work against an independent contractor finding. • Draw a big line between the company’s employees and independent contractors. They should be treated very

differently, such that it would be clear to anyone what the differences are. Traditional legal classifications of an employment relationship do not fall squarely into the traditional models of “employee” or “independent contractor” when weighing factors presented by the gig economy. Given the uncertainties that arise from abrogation of these traditional roles, we likely will see misclassification lawsuits continue to rise until there have been some definitive judicial rulings or, perhaps, legislative action to more clearly define the classification of the on-demand workforce. Rumberger, Kirk & Caldwell provides litigation and counseling services in a wide range of civil practice areas including labor and employment law, product liability, commercial litigation, construction, real estate, intellectual property litigation, securities litigation, bankruptcy, insurance coverage, professional liability and administrative law. Offices are located in Orlando, Tampa, Miami, Tallahassee and Birmingham, Alabama. For more information, please visit rumberger.com.

Florida Restaurants And Taverns Become A Haven For Plaintiff Attorneys By BARRY MOFFETT

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s one of the largest and longest insurers of restaurants and taverns in Florida, Specialty Insurance Agency has seen a disturbing growth of frivolous and fraudulent claims filed by an abundance of attorneys in Florida, unlike any other state where we operate. The plaintiff mills advertise on billboards and other media, seeking unjustified damages for incidents involving no negligence on the part of the establishments and, in some cases, even appearing to fabricate claims. In one recent case, a woman standing at the front desk lost her balance and began to fall yet didn’t, according to an eyewitnesses employed at the restaurant. Soon after, she retained an attorney, and the story suddenly transformed into an unsafe floor where she actually fell. In another case, a patron put too much meatloaf in his mouth and began to choke. Prior to retaining an attorney, the

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only negligence we can determine is the restaurant did not have someone sitting at the table monitoring the size of his bites. Attorneys take these cases in an attempt to intimidate insurance companies. Although they threaten to file declaratory motions against the insurance companies for failure to respond with reasonable settlement figures within a certain time, there is no obligation for companies to settle claims within that window. Specialty Insurance Agency provides defense coverage for our clients, and we have a keen insight into this growing problem. We’re not intimidated by frivolous claims and do not fold on unjustified demands under the threat of lawsuits. We feel Florida has one of the best defense litigation environments in the country. For example, Florida does not hold liquor licensees responsible for serving someone who is visibly intoxicated. The licensees’ only culpability arises from serving

a known habitual offender or minor. Another example: The state’s slip and fall statute puts the burden of proof on the claimant to prove the insured knew of a dangerous condition and did not correct it in a timely manner. In the abundance of slip-and-fall cases filed annually, if held more than 50 percent liable under comparative negligence, the claimant cannot prevail at all. Many cases are merely fishing expeditions in an attempt to settle under the threat of lawsuits. Our philosophy of not settling these cases has proven successful and prevents our clients from having unjustified losses on their claims records, which would consequently result in higher premiums. Most of the specious claims we receive just go away. When claims are filed, we often settle justifiable claims for reasonable amounts. Barry Moffett, LLB, is the President/CEO of Specialty Insurance. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


GIVING BACK

Support

T

he food and beverage service industry is like one big family. But while those employees are taking care of everyone else, who’s taking care of them in times of need? Enter CORE — a nonprofit dedicated to supporting the children and families of food and beverage service industry employees navigating life-altering circumstances. With families in more than 30 states to date, CORE provides grants to support them through everything from natural disasters, to illness, accidents and death. The organization is able to provide hands-on support and continue spreading the word about the work they’re doing across the country through their Ambassador Program. This passionate group of volunteers is tasked with sharing CORE’s mission, assisting with fundraising events, advocating for the organization, meeting new families and supporting existing families in their areas. As an extension of the CORE team, the ambassadors help the Nashville-based nonprofit expand their reach, raising even more awareness for the organization and giving CORE families a truly personal experience during their toughest times. More than 60 ambassadors are serving CORE across the U.S. to date. Anyone can apply to be a part of supporting these special families and spreading awareness for the unique organization. So, what does being a CORE Ambassador entail? » A training session to teach them the ins and outs of the organization. » Utilizing their social and professional networks to share all about the nonprofit. » Identifying and facilitating donation opportunities whenever available. » Spreading CORE’s mission and sharing materials within their communities. » Encouraging new ambassadors to become a part of the CORE family. » Hosting or volunteering at CORE events and fundraisers. FRL A .org

“CORE impacts so many families in the restaurant community. I want to continue to drive awareness of this cause to get more involvement from those who have not yet heard the CORE story.”— LEAH MULVEY, CORE Ambassador

Each CORE Ambassador receives their very own “Corey,” the CORE bear, as well as business cards and additional promotional materials aimed at helping them achieve their goals and raise awareness and support for CORE. “Being a CORE Ambassador means a lot to me, because I have always wanted to spread the word about CORE to a larger audience,” ambassador Leah Mulvey said. “CORE impacts so many families in the restaurant community. I want to continue to drive awareness of this cause to get more involvement from those who have not yet heard the CORE story. I also think that there are so many more fundraising opportunities out there. I believe that every industry event has an opportunity for a CORE fundraising component or out-

reach to a family in need.” Throughout 2018, CORE Ambassadors are being challenged to raise $500-plus for the organization, 100 percent of which will go directly toward helping even more families through extremely difficult circumstances this year. The top ambassadors will be recognized and honored by the organization. With more than $3 million raised and over 350 families supported in more than 30 states to date, CORE is aiming to expand into all 50 states in 2018. Want more information on how to get involved as an ambassador and why you should help? Visit coregives.org or contact Kristen@COREgives.com directly! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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A LA CARTE

WALMART Walmart Stores Inc. recently announced that it will spend approximately $200 million in the next year to build, remodel and add technology to stores across Florida. New stores will come to Central Florida, Jacksonville and Miami-Fort Lauderdale. A new distribution center is coming to the city of Cocoa, and there will be remodels in Central Florida, the Panhandle, Tampa Bay, West Palm Beach and other parts of the state. Walmart will also analyze opportunities to expand online grocery pickup, Mobile Express Scan & Go and Walmart Pickup Towers.

FPL RATES ARE GOING DOWN! FPL recently announced that the majority of business customers will see an annual decrease of 2 to 4 percent, and typical business customer bills will continue to be among the lowest in the state and nation. Already among the lowest in the nation, FPL’s typical residential customer bill will be approximately 30 percent below the latest national average. The latest decrease is due primarily to the completion of a temporary surcharge for Hurricane Matthew restoration and savings generated by the closure of a major coal plant. FPL’s successful strategy of investing in affordable clean energy and enhancing its infrastructure continues to deliver tangible benefits for customers. Earlier this year, FPL also announced plans to apply federal tax savings toward the $1.3 billion cost of Hurricane Irma restoration to prevent an increase in customer rates. The ability to leverage the federal tax savings to cover restoration costs in this way is afforded by FPL’s current base rate agreement. FPL may be able to use future federal tax savings to continue operating under the rate agreement and potentially avoid a general base rate increase for customers for at least another year beyond 2020. 48  SU M M ER

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TOP TRENDS ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 1. Culinary cocktails 2. Locally produced spirits/wine/beer 3. Craft/artisan spirits 4. Onsite barrel-aged drinks 5. Regional signature cocktails

NON-ALCOHOLIC BEVERAGES 1. House-made/artisan soft drinks 2. Cold-brew coffee 3. Gourmet lemonade 4. Locally/house roasted coffee 5. Specialty iced tea

Source: National Restaurant Association ~ What’s HOT 2018 Culinary Forecast Restaurant.,org/FoodTrends 2018 F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


A LA CARTE

Deerlake Middle School

CORE Celebrates 14th Anniversary! Swift Creek Middle School

Tallahassee Chapter donates $500 to Deerlake Middle School and Swift Creek Middle School culinary programs

Children of Restaurant Employees (CORE) (see Page 47) has raised over $3.5 million and granted support to more than 350 families in the food and beverage service industry. On May 25, CORE is celebrating 14 years of supporting families during some of the hardest times of their lives. Congrats to CORE! Want to know more about CORE? Visit coregives.org.

The Tallahassee Chapter of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association donated $500 to culinary programs at both Deerlake Middle School and Swift Creek Middle School. These programs give students the ability to explore careers in the culinary arts, basic food safety training and hands-on experiences.

FAU is in the Top 25 Florida Atlantic University was recently named among the 25 Best Online Master's in Hospitality Management Degrees. Be certain to visit collegechoice.net for more information.

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P R O S TA R T C O M P E T I T I O N

$1 Million in Scholarships Awarded to Florida High School Students Participating in Florida ProStart Competition Overall Competition Winners

The Art Institute Management Competition Winners

First Place East Ridge High School Instructors: Ken Pitts and Christopher Dwyer

Participating teams demonstrated their knowledge of the restaurant and foodservice industry by developing a business proposal for a new restaurant concept. The business proposal consisted of a defined restaurant concept, supporting menu and supporting marketing plan. Teams prepared a comprehensive written proposal, verbal presentation and visual display.

Second Place Tarpon Springs High School Instructor: Cathleen Ryan Third Place John A. Ferguson High School Instructors: Janett Toledo, Jorge Garcia and Jebel Cordoba Fourth Place Northeast High School Instructor: John Beck and Curtis Serata

Congratulationss to the East Ridge High School students that earned a spot to compete in the National ProStart Invitational.

T

he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association Educational Foundation (FRLAEF) is proud to congratulate the winners of the 18th Annual Florida ProStart Competition that was recently held at the Rosen Plaza Hotel in Orlando. More than 50 schools participated in the competition, with 15 schools winning top awards throughout the day. More than $1 million in scholarships was distributed to the winning schools. All winners and participants are a part of Florida’s ProStart program, a career technical education program where high school students learn from an industry-derived curriculum that teaches culinary techniques and restaurant management skills. More than 20,000 students from across the state are enrolled in the program. The four main event competitions included: the Johnson & Wales University Culinary Competition, The Art Institute Management Competition, the Keiser University Edible Centerpiece Competition and the Waiters Relay Competition. East Ridge High School in Clermont won first place in the overall competition. Tarpon Springs High School took home second place and John A. Ferguson High School in Miami placed third. “These talented students represent the future of Florida’s hospitality industry, and we are extremely proud to help support their education by awarding more than $1 million in scholarships. We are passionate about investing in these inspiring, young leaders of the trade and are thrilled to celebrate their incredible talents and pursuit of successful careers,” said Carol Dover, President & CEO of the FRLA. UNIVERSAL SPONSOR

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Fifth Place Leto High School Instructor: Debra Hladky

Johnson & Wales University Culinary Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their creative abilities during the competition through the preparation of a meal consisting of: starter (such as soup, salad or appetizer), protein (such as meat, fish or fowl), starch, vegetable and dessert. First Place Leto High School Instructor: Debra Hladky Second Place Eastside High School Instructors: Pam Bedford and Sarah Waters Third Place Eastridge High School Instructor: Ken Pitts Fourth Place Tarpon Springs High School Instructors: Cathleen Ryan, Tony DeVincenzo and Vincent Pesce Fifth Place John A. Ferguson High School Instructors: Janett Toledo, Jorge Garcia and Jebel Cordoba

First Place Eastridge High School Instructors: Ken Pitts and Christopher Dwyer Second Place Northeast High School Instructors: John Beck and Curtis Serata Third Place John A. Ferguson High School Instructors: Janett Toledo, Jorge Garcia and Jebel Cordoba Fourth Place Holmes County High School Instructor: April Coe Fifth Place Tarpon Springs High School Instructor: Cathleen Ryan

Florida’s ProStart management team finished eighth, and the culinary team finished 10th in the National ProStart Student Invitational. Congratulations!

GLOBAL SPONSORS

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


HTMP COMPETITION

Keiser University Edible Centerpiece Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their creative ability during the competition through the preparation of an edible centerpiece consisting of fruits and vegetables. Contestants explained nutritional information, product availability and preparation techniques.

Miami Beach Senior High students present a Food and Beverage case study to the judges.

First Place Tarpon Springs High School Instructor: Cathleen Ryan Second Place Estero High School Instructor: Jeremy Jasper Third Place Eustis High School Instructor: Nicole Austin Fourth Place Northeast High School Instructors: John Beck and Curtis Serata Fifth Place Mainland High School Instructors: Jason Kester and Troy Logan

Waiters Relay Competition Winners

Congratulations to the 2018 HTMP Competition winners!

T

he Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association Educational Foundation (FRLAEF) is proud to congratulate the winners of the 15th annual Hospitality and Tourism Management Program Competition (HTMP) that was held recently at the Rosen Plaza Hotel in Orlando. Eleven schools participated in the competition, with three schools winning top awards throughout the day. Scholarships from Johnson & Wales University, as well as the FRLAEF, were distributed to winning schools. All winners and participants are a part of Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s HTMP program, the official industry-recognized curriculum to prepare students for roles in the hotel industry and beyond. More than 2,000 students from across the state are enrolled in the program. The three main event competitions included: the Hotel Operations Competition, Hospitality Project Competition and Knowledge Bowl Competition. Miami Beach Senior High School won first place in the overall competition. Winter Park High School took home second place in the overall competition, with Osceola High School placing third.

Participating teams demonstrated their ability to duplicate a table setting while racing against the clock.

Overall Competition Winners

First Place South Lake High School Instructors: Candy Huxhold and John Thunberg

Second Place Winter Park High School Instructor: Meg Pietkiewicz

Second Place Leon High School Instructors: Christine Beam and Karen Stribling Third Place John A. Ferguson High School Instructors: Janett Toledo, Jorge Garcia and Jebel Cordoba Fourth Place St. Lucie West Centennial High School Instructors: Calvin Lewis and Christina GedkeBalaschak Fifth Place Lake Minneola High School Instructors: Nick Sandora and Lance Bowles FRL A .org

First Place Miami Beach Senior High School Instructor: Patricia Gregory

Third Place Osceola High School Instructor: Valerie Woodring

Hotel Operations Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their hospitality knowledge in three key topics relating to hotel operations: night audit/hotel accounting, food and beverage and guest service.

Hospitality Project Competition Winners First Place Miami Beach Senior High School Instructor: Patricia Gregory Second Place Winter Park High School Instructor: Meg Pietkiewicz Third Place Miami Sunset High School Instructor: Milagros Perez

Knowledge Bowl Competition Winners Participating teams demonstrated their knowledge of the hospitality and tourism industry during this Jeopardy-style question and answer event.

First Place Osceola High School Instructor: Valerie Woodring

First Place Miami Beach Senior High School Instructor: Patricia Gregory

Second Place Winter Park High School Instructor: Meg Pietkiewicz

Second Place Oakridge High School Instructor: Vanessa Zameza

Third Place Miami Beach Senior High School Instructor: Patricia Gregory

Third Place Gainesville High School Instructor: Dawn Bekaert

F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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A C C E P TA N C E

Is Your Property Welcoming Families with Special Needs?

T

oday, one in six children in the United States are diagnosed with a developmental or intellectual disability such as autism, Down syndrome or cerebral palsy. For these millions of families, something as simple as a vacation is rare. Reality TV star Christopher Laurita is father to 8-year-old Nicholas, who has autism. He’s recently spoken about a visit to the library where his son, along

with his wife, Jacqueline Laurita, was asked to leave simply because the staff member there was uneducated and unaccepting of Nicholas’ diagnosis. In Chris’ open letter to that institution, he wrote, “That’s all we (parents of children with a disability) want. A place our kids can go to be accepted and feel safe.” It seems so simple. Yet, in the hospitality industry, we are failing to meet the needs of these families and not giving them

G N I N R A W

any encouragement to feel welcome to take that vacation. “Be Friendlier” is on a mission to respond to that social responsibility. As the first standardized special needs-friendly designation program solely dedicated to the hospitality industry, they are breaking barriers. Hotels and resorts earn this designation through simple staff training on understanding, awareness and interactions of those with developmental disabilities, along with resources such as safety kits, unique social stories and gluten-free menus. Small but significant changes show these families that they are guests you want at your property. Acknowledging the special needs community is an issue that the hospitality industry needs to take seriously. With the rates of diagnoses increasing rapidly, this designation is not just nice to have, it’s a need to have. Join in a movement that will change the world and urge your property to become special needs friendly today. For more information on becoming a Be Friendlier property, please visit befriendlier.org.

Eat. Drink. Give.

C OHOLI UR ALC TO YO OKED. LEAD V N CAN DED OR RE IO T N IOLA SUSPE TED V L RELA ENSE BEING C LCOHO ONE A EVERAGE LI B

Protect your license with alcohol compliance training! IMPORTANT! If you serve a minor, you can go to jail for up to 60 days and be fined $500! Remember your training! To protect your liquor license, and be in compliance with the Florida Responsible Vendor Act, make sure your staff: 1. Checks the ID of anyone who looks younger than 30 2. Ensures the birthday on the ID is on or before today’s date 1996 3. Asks a manager if they have any questions or concerns about an ID’s validity 4. Does not serve an empty seat or multiple drinks to one person 5. Understands they have the right to refuse service if they are not certain the person is at least 21

CONTACT FRLA’S RCS TRAINING TODAY FOR A FREE TRAINING CONSULTATION

Serving those who serve you since 2004. Help us make a difference in the industry. Learn more at COREgives.org

rcstraining.com • 800-537-9863 • facebook.com/FRLARCSTraining

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PETS LIVING THE DREAM

It’s here — Hurricane Season 2018! Preparing for Two and Four-legged Evacuees By KAREN BARTOSZEK

A

s we enter another hurricane season, it’s important to be prepared. Preparation includes pet safety. Last year was exceptional in many ways — one was seeing hotel properties open their doors to two- and four-legged evacuees. Facing a very stressful situation such as an evacuation, both guests and pets need to know it’s going to be okay. What can you do to prepare? During Hurricane Irma, Gov. Rick Scott urged hotels to waive the rules and welcome pet owners fleeing the storm so that no pets were left behind. The industry not only responded but also embraced the opportunity to welcome pet families. The results were tremendous. Here are a few hints and tips to help with your emergency pet-friendly planning. Karen Bartoszek is a pet-friendly advocate and consultant helping hospitality businesses embrace pet-friendly ways to enhance their brand and profitability. She is also the owner of PetsLivingtheDream.com, the travel and hospitality industry’s partner for fun, pet safe, eco-friendly products needed when welcoming furry guests. Karen can be reached at info@petslivingthedream.com.

WHAT IS YOUR PROPERTY’S EVACUATION PLAN? »» Most importantly ­— will you be open? Pet parent guests who know you are normally pet-friendly will turn to you first. »» If you are open and welcoming pet families, it’s important to get the word out as soon as possible. Communicate boldly on your website, signage and travel connection sites that you use. »» Let emergency management and local shelters know pets are welcome at your property. »» If possible, expand your pet-friendly room availability. »» Consider exceptions to your rules and pet fees during evacuation conditions. With emergency evacuations, pet parents may have more than one furry baby, larger sized pets, birds, etc. If you can make exceptions, it will be much appreciated. PREPARE FOR YOUR EVACUATING GUESTS. »» Pet friendly rooms: are there items that you can add — such as food and water bowls, towels, blankets, pet beds, pet wipes, waste bags, litter boxes or even baby gates to keep pets secure in rooms? »» Designate walking areas — clean, safe, well lit, preferably near your pet rooms. Consider potty pads for rooms. »» Have leashes, collars, temp tags or pet recovery tags on hand to help to ensure all pets have current identification and Mom and/or Dad can be reached, if needed. Companies like PetHub.com have tags with QR codes that link to a

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mobile app that pet parents can update real time. »» Offer meeting rooms for overflow (if needed), where pet parents can stay near their pets. If possible, have pet sitters or walkers available to watch furry and winged loved ones when Mom or Dad need to step away. »» Have pet food, water and treats available. »» Keep first-aid kits on hand. Hopefully they won’t be needed, but safety first. »» Consider things to help take the edge off the anxiety. Ideas can range from the always popular yappy hour to calming distractions like chew toys, white noise devices or even thunder shirts. REMEMBER CLEANUP SUPPLIES. With nerves come accidents. There are several pet-friendly cleaning products for “accidents” while keeping your property clean by removing the scent to deter repeat markings. Standard cleaning materials could be harmful to pets and not remove the source of the markings, compounding the issue. COMPILE A LISTING OF LOCAL SERVICE PROVIDERS. »» Pet emergency clinics and veterinarians. »» Pet walkers and sitters. »» Offer services to go to the local store for forgotten items (if open or when they reopen). »» Local pet-friendly restaurants. »» If you are outside of the storm’s track, provide a list of the local dog parks to burn off some extra energy. A tired pup is a quiet pup. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

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The Great Florida Events Program sponsored by FRLA and VISIT FLORIDA pushes in-state tourism by providing advertising for festivals and events throughout the Sunshine State.

Pink & Swine, held at the beautiful Goodwood Plantation in Tallahassee, was a hit.

Songwriters livened up the Ocala International 3-Day Festival of Eventing at the Florida Horse Park.

The South Walton Wine and Food Festival offered a new Roseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; All Day tasting area. 54â&#x20AC;&#x201A; SU M M ER

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The Roscolusa Songwriters Festival in Nokomis was awesome this year.

The FRLA Pinellas Chapter and FRLA sponsored the Clearwater Beach Chamber of Commerce TasteFest with 26 participating restaurants.

FRLA sponsored the songwriters at the South Walton Wine and Food Festival in April. F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


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MOVERS AND SHAKERS

Movers & Shakers

FRLA Member Elected As Mayor Of Destin Congratulations Caitie and Tony! RCS Training employee Caitie Mook was married on March 31, 2018, to Tony Higginbotham. Best wishes to you both!

Lillian Bell Wins Scholarship from UCF Foundation On behalf of the Central Florida Chapter of the Florida Restaurant and Lodging Association, Marjorie Stone, chapter director, and Dave Hadelman, board member and past president, assisted UCF Rosen College of Hospitality dean Dr. Abraham Pizam in awarding Lillian Bell a scholarship for $1,900. It was Hadelman who established the endowment that has grown to $50,000 with the UCF Foundation that will allow the FRLA to continue to provide scholarships to many more students in the future. 56â&#x20AC;&#x201A; SU M M ER

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Destin restaurateur and president of the Destin Charter Boat Association Gary Jarvis was recently elected mayor of the resort city.

Newest Member of the Family Regional director Nicole Chapman recently gave birth to a little boy, John William. He was born on Feb. 15, 2018, and was 7 pounds and 14 ounces. Congratulations! F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


SAVE THE DATES AUGUST 7 - 8

SEPTEMBER 6 - 8

Marketing + Operations Summit Fort Lauderdale Marriott Harbor Beach Resort & Spa

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Show Orange County Convention Center, Orlando

SEPTEMBER 6 - 7

OCTOBER 18

Fall Board Meeting Orange County Convention Center, Orlando

NRA/FRLA Bob Leonard Golf Classic ChampionsGate Golf Club, Orlando

SEPTEMBER 6 Hospitality Stars of the Industry Celebration Hyatt Regency Orlando

2018 CORPORATE EVENTS

C O N TAC T S DAV I S @ F R L A . O R G F O R S P O N S O R S H I P I N F O R M AT I O N FRL A .org

FRLA.ORG/EVENTS F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G

57


CITY

Jul

Aug

Sep

E D U C AT I O N A N D T R A I N I N G

LOCATION

ALTAMONTE SPRINGS

11

14

12

Hampton Inn

BOCA RATON

25

22

26

Hilton Garden Inn

DAYTONA BEACH

18

22

17

Hampton Inn Daytona Airport

FORT LAUDERDALE

10

14

18

Hyatt Place

FORT MYERS

5

2

13

Hilton Garden Inn

FORT PIERCE

19

16

20

UF Indian River Research

FORT WALTON

-

-

-

FORT WALTON

10

7

11

Wyndham Garden

GAINESVILLE

5

2

6

Best Western Gateway Grand

JACKSONVILLE

26

15

20

Lexington Jacksonville Riverwalk

JACKSONVILLE BEACH

24

21

18

Four Points by Sheraton

KEY WEST

-

-

-

KISSIMMEE

12

15

13

KISSIMMEE

-

-

-

LAKELAND

16

20

17

Courtyard by Marriott

MELBOURNE

10

13

11

Holiday Inn Hotel & Conference Center

MIAMI

19

14

18

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

MIAMI SPANISH

10

2

11

Homewood Suites by Hilton Miami

NAPLES

12

23

20

DoubleTree Suites

OCALA

17

14

18

Homewood Suites Ocala Heathbrooke

ORLANDO

2

7

-

Embassy Suites

ORLANDO - FRLA SHOW

-

-

6

Orange Country Convention Center

PANAMA CITY

18

29

26

Gulf Coast State College

PENSACOLA

24

21

18

Hampton Inn Pensacola Airport

PORT RICHEY

10

2

18

Days Inn & Suites

SARASOTA

12

2& 28

-

Holiday Inn Lakewood Ranch

ST AUGUSTINE

18

15

12

Holiday Inn Express & Suites

ST PETERSBURG

12

7

20

Holiday Inn Express

TALLAHASSEE

26

23

20

Lively Technical Center

TAMPA

9

13

17

Holiday Inn Tampa Westshore

VENICE

-

-

-

16

6

10

WEST PALM BEACH

* Dates are tentative

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Northwest Florida State College

DoubleTree Grand Key Resort Holiday Inn

Dates subject to change without notice. Please see SafeStaff.org for current schedule.

Food Manager Training & Testing Schedule To register, call toll-free (866) 372-SAFE (7233) or visit safestaff.org. DEADLINE FOR REGISTRATION: Register for training at least three business days prior to exam date or 10 business days prior for Test With Confidence Packages.

Comfort Suites Maingate East

Hotel Venezia

ServSafe® Goes Hi-Tech! All ServSafe Food Protection Managers Exam results are being upgraded to complimentary ServSafe® eCertificates. No more waiting for certificates in the mail. Log in and download your certificate as soon as your exam is graded! You can even share it electronically with your company via an email share link. Find out more: ServSafe.com.

Holiday Inn West Palm Beach Airport

safestaff.org F LO R I DA R ESTAU R A N T & LO D G I N G A S SO CI AT I O N


Exclusive health care pricing and solutions for FRLA members. UnitedHealthcare works with the National Restaurant Association and the Florida Restaurant & Lodging Association (FRLA) in a strategic alliance, offering exclusive health care pricing and solutions for every size FRLA member business -including small, midsize and large employers. 4 ways FRLA member businesses can access UnitedHealthcare’s exclusive offerings: 1 For small businesses with 2-99 employees: New Restaurant

& Hospitality Association Benefit Trust option for fully insured hospitality groups.

2 For businesses with 51 or more employees: Up to a 5 percent

discount on manual medical rates for fully insured groups. 3 For large self-funded businesses with 100 or more employees:

An annual invoice credit of up to 5 percent on administrative fees for new ASO medical products. 4 For businesses of all sizes: Up to a 5 percent discount on specialty benefits products (dental, vision,

life, disability, accident and critical illness) for fully insured groups — in addition to all other discounts including bundling benefits programs.

New Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust option for small employers. The new Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust is now available to quote as an option for FRLA hospitality member groups. The RHA Benefit Trust is a new health benefits solution insured and serviced by UnitedHealthcare and focused on small employers with 2-99 eligible employees. This solution can offer FRLA members some of the same advantages of large employers regarding more health plan designs for product and potential pricing flexibility. Available nationally, the new RHA Benefit Trust features a product portfolio with more than 120 health plan designs.

Contact Kimberlee Vandervoorn at kvandervoorn@uhg.com for more information on the hospitality associations alliance program.

Contact your broker or UnitedHealthcare representative to get a UnitedHealthcare quote.

Visit uhctogether.com/frla.

Some restrictions and exclusions apply. Discounts are available only to members of the National Restaurant Association and its state restaurant association partners; and may vary by location and group size. The Restaurant & Hospitality Association Benefit Trust is not available in Minnesota, New York or Vermont. Insurance coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company, UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company of Illinois, Inc. or their affiliates. Administrative services provided by United HealthCare Services, Inc. or their affiliates. Health Plan coverage provided by or through UnitedHealthcare of Florida, Inc. Facebook.com/UnitedHealthcare D30401 5/18

Twitter.com/UHC

©2018 United HealthCare Services, Inc.

Instagram.com/UnitedHealthcare

YouTube.com/UnitedHealthcare


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Call 888.966.8216 or visit www.MSDTaxLaw.com | www.FloridaSalesTax.com

PARTNERS: Joseph C. Moffa, CPA, Esq. | James H. Sutton, Jr., CPA, Esq., LLM Gerald J. Donnini II, Esq., LLM | JerryDonnini@FloridaSalesTax.com OFFICES: Fort Lauderdale, Tampa, Tallahassee

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...

Florida Restaurant & Lodging Magazine  

Florida Restaurant and Lodging Magazine is the trade publication for Florida’s hospitality industry. Content is directed toward our hotel an...