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The Official Publication Of The Florida Pharmacy Association APRIL 2011


Florida Pharmacy Association Oasis of the Seas

Day

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Fort Lauderdale

Sun

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Labadee, Haiti

8:00 am

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Falmouth, Jamaica

10:00 am

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Weds

At Sea

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Cozumel, Mexico

8:00 am

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September 17 - 24, 2011 10 Hours of Continuing Education

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Central Park Neighborhood featuring onboard gardens and sidewalk cafĂŠs Boardwalk Neighborhood featuring outdoor Aqua Theatre and Carousel Onboard Zip line Inside Stateroom: from $759* pp Two Surfing Parks Ocean View Stateroom: from $879* pp Two Rock-climbing Walls Balcony Stateroom: from $979* pp 20 different options for eating Central Park Balcony Stateroom: from $1009* pp Boardwalk Balcony Stateroom: from $1079* pp CE Registration Member Fee: $135 CE Registration Non-Member Fee: $175

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*rates are per person, double occupancy and includes port charges Airfare, taxes and transfers are extra.

The Florida Pharmacy Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council Pharmacy Education as a provider of Continuing Pharmacy Education. ACPE Universal Program Numbers are provided under each program. Up to 10 contact hours are available upon successful completion of the program (i.e., participation through attendance and submission of completed attendance forms). Statements of continuing pharmacy education will be mailed four to six weeks after the program.


florida PHARMACY TODAY Departments 4 Calendar 4 Advertisers 5 President’s Viewpoint 7 Executive Insight 12 Pharmacy Time Capsule 30 Letter to the Editor 32 Buyer’s Guide

VOL. 74 | NO. 4 APRIL 2011 the official publication of the florida pharmacy association

Features

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APRIL is National Child Abuse Prevention Month

Safe and Healthy Travel for Seniors

Second Report of the FPA Speaker of the House

APRIL 2011

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FPA Calendar 2011

April 22

Good Friday, FPA Office Closed MAY

1-3

Pharmacist Mutual Leadership Conference

6

Legislative Session Ends

14

Law and Regulatory Continuing Education Jacksonville

23-25 NCPA Legislative Conference Washington, DC 30

of the Florida Pharmacy Today Journal June

7-8

Board of Pharmacy Meeting Ft. Lauderdale

22 - 26 FPA Annual Meeting and Convention Aventura, Florida July 4

Independence Day FPA Office Closed

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Legislative Committee Meeting Orlando, Florida AUGUST

Memorial Day, FPA Office Closed 7-8

Mission Statements:

28th Annual Southeastern Gatherin

16-17 Florida Board of Pharmacy Meeting Orlando 27-28 FPA Committee and Council Meetings

The Florida Pharmacy Today Journal is a peer reviewed journal which serves as a medium through which the Florida Pharmacy Association can communicate with the profession on advances in the sciences of pharmacy, socio-economic issues bearing on pharmacy and newsworthy items of interest to the profession. As a self-supported journal, it solicits and accepts advertising congruent with its expressed mission.

of the Florida Pharmacy Today Board of Directors

The mission of the Florida Pharmacy Today Board of Directors is to serve in an advisory capacity to the managing editor and executive editor of the Florida Pharmacy Today Journal in the establishment and interpretation of the Journal’s policies and the management of the Journal’s fiscal responsibilities. The Board of Directors also serves to motivate the Florida Pharmacy Association members to secure appropriate advertising to assist the

Journal in its goal of self-support.

For a complete calendar of events go to www.pharmview.com CE CREDITS (CE cycle) The Florida Board of Pharmacy requires 10 hours LIVE Continuing Education as part of the required 30 hours general education needed every license renewal period. Pharmacists should have satisfied all continuing education requirements for this biennial period by September 30, 2011 or prior to licensure renewal. *For Pharmacy Technician Certification Board Application, Exam Information and Study materials, please contact Ranada Simmons in the FPA office. For More Information on CE Programs or Events: Contact the Florida Pharmacy Association at (850) 222-2400 or visit our Web site at www. pharmview.com

Advertisers Healthcare consultants........................ 3 Kahan ◆ SHIR, P.L.......................................... 17 PPSC...................................................................... 9 Rx RElief.......................................................... 17

CONTACTS FPA — Michael Jackson (850) 222-2400 FSHP — Michael McQuone (850) 906-9333 U/F — Dan Robinson (352) 273-6240 FAMU — Leola Cleveland (850) 599-3301 NSU — Carsten Evans (954) 262-1300 DISCLAIMER Articles in this publication are designed to provide accurate and authoritative information with respect to the subject matter covered. This information is provided with the understanding that neither Florida Pharmacy Today nor the Florida Pharmacy Association are engaged in rendering legal or other professional services through this publication. If expert assistance or legal advice is required, the services of a competent professional should be sought. The use of all medications or other pharmaceutical products should be used according to the recommendations of the manufacturers. Information provided by the maker of the product should always be consulted before use.

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E-mail your suggestions/ideas to dave@fiorecommunications.com


The President’s Viewpoint Guest Columnist Suzanne Kelley, BPharm, CPh

A

Legislative Battles In Progress at State Capitol

s I write this article, the Florida Legislature is in session. I would like to commend the efforts of our lobbyist team, Prieguez and Weems, and our very own watchdog, Michael Jackson. They are always monitoring the actions of the Legislature and how their actions may affect our pharmacy profession. An example of this is House Bill 7095. This bill was originally intended to stop the “pill mills.” Now, because of the strikeall amendments that were added, it is affecting our pharmacy profession. Amendments were added that say: Expressly prohibits community pharmacies from dispensing schedule II and III controlled substances unless they are publicly traded or have more than $100 million in taxable business assets. Our lobbyist team got the word out, and Michael met with a lot of independent owners, and several of them testified before a House committee on how this would affect their business. Several phone calls were made to many legislators, and we received a request to offer suggested language that would be more appealing to our profession. We sent the originator of the bill our suggested language and waited for the last committee meeting to see what language would come out of that meeting. None of our suggested language was used, but other language was added. Now, there is an exemption for the dispensing of C-IIs and C-IIs if the pharmacy has had a permit for at least 10 years. With this exemption, businesses that meet this criterion can continue as before. But, this will affect the value of their pharmacy. If they want to sell

their business, the new owners will not be able to dispense C-II or C-III medications. The last committee that heard this bill was the Appropriations Committee, and it was found unanimously favorable by the committee members with the following language:

As I write this article, the Florida Legislature is in session. I would like to commend the efforts of our lobbyist team, Prieguez and Weems, and our very own watchdog, Michael Jackson. They are always monitoring the actions of the Legislature and how their actions may affect our pharmacy profession.

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Restrictions on physicians dispensing of C-IIs and C-IIIs Credentialing requirements for pain management physicians Comprehensive recordkeeping requirements for pain physicians expanded Creates a state buyback program for C-II and C-III controlled substance inventory of pain physicians who

Humberto Martinez, 2010-2011 FPA President

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would not be allowed to dispense. (Proposed to budget from general revenue $3 million) Retention of the prescription drug monitoring program Creates an unlawful act for pharmacists to fail to report within 24 hours fraudulent prescriptions to the county sheriff. Defines what has to be reported to the sheriff’s office. Defines authority for the Department to deny a license to pharmacists who commits dispensing or DUR related errors. Starting January 1, 2012, pharmacies may not dispense schedule II or schedule III drugs unless they are: • Wholly owned publicly traded corporation • Wholly owned corporation having $100 million in Florida business taxable assets • Owned or operated by a licensed hospice, nursing facility or proAPRIL 2011

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vides services to hospices, hospital or nursing facilities • Has been continuously permitted for at least 10 years • Received or renewed a permit under the defined sections in this proposed bill* Community pharmacies must make dispensing records available to DOH or law enforcement upon request. Pharmacies must be prepared to produce policies and procedures on preventing controlled substance dispensing based on fraudulent representations or questionable practitioner-patient relationships (permits could be denied). Permits could be denied based upon prior violations of certain Florida and Federal laws Requires a permit holder to notify the Department of a change in prescription department manager Defines prescription department manager responsibilities Requires wholesalers to report distributions of controlled substances to the Department of Health Prohibits manufacturers from funding the prescription drug monitoring program Restricts wholesalers from shipping 5,000 dosage units each of hydrocodone, morphine, oxycodone, methadone or any benzodiazepine or derivative of benzodiazepine to any retail pharmacy in any given month.

What stood out to me is that a pharmacist can now be denied a license if they commit a dispensing or DUR error. What pharmacist can tell me that they have never made a mistake? We are all extremely careful at our jobs, but we are human and humans make mistakes. And now we can be denied our livelihood if we make a mistake that goes before the Board of Pharmacy. Also, this new language will affect large businesses. With the 5,000 dosage unit limit, this means that only about 84 patients will be able to receive that medication a month from your store. Some of the larger stores see more than 84 patients a month for a particular medication. With this limit, we will not be able 6 |

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to meet the requirements for our legitimate patients in the state. And what of the visitors to our state? They will not be able to get any of these medications because they are reserved for the citizens of the state of Florida. As you can see, there are many things wrong with the language of this bill. The next stop for this bill is the floor of the House for a vote. If you disagree with any of this language, then call your representative and voice your opinion on how this will affect your business. There is no companion bill from the Senate as of yet, and we are monitoring this daily. Do you see how a simple bill can affect our profession of pharmacy and what may happen if this becomes law? Every pharmacist should be a member of the Florida Pharmacy Association, and we will be stronger with our numbers. With our representation of less than 10 percent of the licensed pharmacists in the state, our voice is not heard loud enough in the Legislature. We need the numbers to truly represent the pharmacist in the state of Florida. Remember the theme for this year, “A strong foundation for positive outcomes.” We can achieve this with more membership. Every member should be talking to a non-member and tell them the benefits of being a member. Just our advocacy efforts alone, on behalf of our profession, is well worth the membership. Other professionals in the state have more members in their professional associations and do not let legislation get passed that adversely affect them. Their professional association was there with the members to stand up for them and make sure that their voice was heard. Most pharmacists are politically naïve and do not know what to do to keep our profession from being over-regulated. Just call our office, and we can tell you how you can help. Phone calls to your representatives are very helpful, and we can give you talking points on the issues. Another thing is a personal appearance at the Capitol during the legislative session. This year, we are trying to have a pharmacist at the Capitol every week during the legislative session. If you can help and be there dur-

ing any given week, then please call our office and let us know. One of these personal meetings could make a difference in how our profession is perceived by the Legislature. Another membership benefit is our email network. We can keep you up to date on all the issues happening in the Legislature. We can also let you know how you can help our profession. A little over two months left of my presidency and most of the major meetings that I have attended on your behalf are now over. Our next meeting will be the leadership retreat, so let me know your ideas for our officers to consider for next year. We listen to our members, and your ideas are always helpful for us when we consider our budget for next year. Also the annual convention at the Turnberry Isle Resort in Adventura is coming up. For those of you who are delegates, please look at the schedule and take note that the House of Delegates will be on Thursday this year. I have been talking to some delegates and they are assuming that it will be as before and are not making plans to be there at the right time. Make your plans accordingly and I will see you there. Thank you for the opportunity to represent the FPA, and as always I am here to serve. n

Journal Correction In the article, “The Pros and Cons of Immunization Registries and the Impact on Providers and Patients,” which was published in the March issue of Florida Pharmacy Today, there was an incorrect statistic comparing benefits and limitation. The correct information is that there are over 4 000 practitioners registered in the state of Florida and 12 million patients enrolled in the database called Florida SHOTS.


Executive Insight By Michael Jackson, FPA Executive by michael jackson,Vice RPhPresident/CEO

FPA Members Weigh in on Public Policy

T

he past few months have been a harbinger of policy-making activity. This year we are seeing the effects of a Florida Lgislature with very little experience attempting to write Florida laws designed to manage our state’s resources as well as to define what health care in our state will be over the next few years. Your Association has been active on the ground monitoring and weighing in on various proposals that may benefit or harm our profession and business models. Remember that there are no pharmacists serving in the Florida House or Senate. This means that much of the policy making that affects pharmacy is being driven by both advocacy organizations and legislative staff. To some extent, our call for support of the Florida Pharmacy Political Action Committee of Continuous Existence (FP-PACCE) has been phenomenal. Consider that in recent weeks, many of you have poured thousands of dollars into our campaign account. Decisions and laws are made that determine how you will practice your profession of pharmacy, run your pharmacy business, and care for your patients, as well as how health care costs affect state budgets. Your contributions have a direct impact on these elected officials who represent you and make decisions affecting the future of your profession. FP-PACCE is a means for us all to “pool” our resources and have a greater reach to political candidates who have or will have an understanding of what’s best for the practice of pharmacy and each aspect of patient care. As the Legislature is currently in session, we are prohibited from making contributions at this time. When

the session is over this will give us all an opportunity to support those campaigns that are friendly to pharmacy issues. So far in calendar year 2011, the PACCE has raised over $9,000. Much of that has come in within the last 30 days in response to some very onerous decisions under consideration here in Tallahassee. The PACCE Board extends many thanks to those of you who are supporting this fundraising campaign. It is not hard to do. Just think of it as making an investment in your profession. A bottle of water may cost around $1.00. If you buy two each week, that will add up to about $100 per year. Just imagine if all 25,000 Florida licensed pharmacists match what they pay for bottled water as a PACCE contribution. We would have a war chest of over $2.5 million which could bring a tremendous amount of pharmacy political muscle to our state’s Capitol. It would be difficult for those in policy making to ignore the challenges that you face in providing patient care services. Some of these challenges include abuses by pharmacy benefit manager auditors, outdated practice act standards that restrict you from providing the care that you have been trained for and the pressure to increase volume driven by declining pharmacy reimbursements. Here are the issues that we are monitoring on your behalf. HB 7095 (Restriction on Pharmacist Dispensing) The Florida House is reviewing House bill 7095. The original bill, which increased in size count from 31 pages to 86 pages, was designed to restrict pharmacist dispensing of controlled drugs

Michael Jackson, B.Pharm

under certain circumstances. There were some minor modifications to the pharmacy provisions that were applied in a House Appropriations Committee. While the bill passed unanimously, several members of the committee expressed concern with the pharmacy provisions. A number of independent pharmacy owners testified on the issues found in the original version of the bill. The approved version of CS/HB7095 include the following: ■■ Restrictions on physician dispensing of C-IIs and C-IIIs ■■ Credentialing requirements for pain management physicians ■■ Comprehensive recordkeeping requirements for pain physicians expanded ■■ Creates a state buyback program for C-II and C-III controlled substance inventory of pain physicians who would not be allowed to dispense. (The bill includes a budget from general revenue of about $3 million APRIL 2011 |

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FPA Staff Executive Vice President/CEO Michael Jackson (850) 222-2400, ext. 200

Director of Continuing Education Tian Merren-Owens, ext. 120 Controller Wanda Hall , ext. 211

Membership Coordinator Ranada Simmons , ext. 110

Educational Services Office Assistant Stacey Brooks , ext. 210 Florida Pharmacy Today Board Chair..................................Betty Harris, Lighthouse Point Vice Chair.................................. Jennifer Pytlarz, Brandon Treasurer...............................Stephen Grabowski, Tampa Secretary.........................Stuart Ulrich, Boynton Beach Member................. Don Bergemann, don@bceinfo.com Member..................................... Joseph Koptowsky, Miami Executive Editor.........Michael Jackson, Tallahassee Managing Editor.........................Dave Fiore, Tallahassee

This is a peer reviewed publication. ©2011, FLORIDA PHARMACY JOURNAL, INC. ARTICLE ACCEPTANCE: The Florida Pharmacy Today is a publication that welcomes articles that have a direct pertinence to the current practice of pharmacy. All articles are subject to review by the Publication Review Committee, editors and other outside referees. Submitted articles are received with the understanding that they are not being considered by another publication. All articles become the property of the Florida Pharmacy Today and may not be published without written permission from both the author and the Florida Pharmacy Today. The Florida Pharmacy Association assumes no responsibility for the statements and opinions made by the authors to the Florida Pharmacy Today. The Journal of the Florida Pharmacy Association does not accept for publication articles or letters concerning religion, politics or any other subject the editors/ publishers deem unsuitable for the readership of this journal. In addition, The Journal does not accept advertising material from persons who are running for office in the association. The editors reserve the right to edit all materials submitted for publication. Letters and materials submitted for consideration for publication may be subject to review by the Editorial Review Board. FLORIDA PHARMACY TODAY, Annual subscription - United States and foreign, Individual $36; Institution $70/year; $5.00 single copies. Florida residents add 7% sales tax. Florida Pharmacy Association

610 N. Adams St. • Tallahassee, FL 32301 850/222-2400 • FAX 850/561-6758 Web Address: http://www.pharmview.com 8 |

Flori d a P h ar m a c y To d aY

to buy back these prescription drugs from physicians) ■■ Retention of the prescription drug monitoring program ■■ Creates an unlawful act for pharmacists who fail to report within 24 hours fraudulent prescriptions to the county sheriff. ■■ Defines what has to be reported to the sheriff’s office. ■■ Defines authority for the Department to deny a license to pharmacists who commit dispensing or DUR related errors. ■■ Starting January 1, 2012 pharmacies may not dispense schedule II or schedule III drugs unless they are ■■ Wholly owned publicly traded corporation or ■■ Wholly owned corporation having $100 million in Florida business taxable assets or ■■ Owned or operated by a licensed hospice, nursing facility or provides services to hospices, hospital or nursing facilities or ■■ Has been continuously permitted for at least 10 years or ■■ Received or renewed a permit under the defined sections in this proposed bill ■■ Community pharmacies must make dispensing records available to DOH or law enforcement upon request. ■■ Pharmacies must be prepared to produce policies and procedures on preventing controlled substance dispensing based on fraudulent representations or questionable practitioner-patient relationships (permits could be denied). ■■ Permits could be denied based upon prior violations of certain Florida and Federal laws ■■ Requires permittee to notify the Department of a change in prescription department managers ■■ Defines prescription department manager responsibilities ■■ Requires wholesalers to report distributions of controlled substances to the Department of Health ■■ Prohibits manufacturers from funding the prescription drug monitoring program ■■ Restricts wholesalers from shipping

5,000 dosage units each of hydrocodone, morphine, oxycodone, methadone or any benzodiazepine or derivative of benzodiazepine to any retail pharmacy in any given month. At press time this bill is being debated on the floor of the House where a number of FPA supported amendments are being introduced to correct some of the problems with the legislation. The FPA has also been working with the Florida Attorney General’s office, which is also interested in this legislation. Members with concerns should continue to reach out to members of the Florida House of Representatives. We are hearing that the Senate may not be supportive of the House’s position on this legislation. HB585, SB1268 (Pharmacist Immunization Services) This legislation would authorize pharmacy interns to administer the vaccines under certain circumstances. The bill also grants authority for pharmacists and pharmacy interns to administer an epinephrine auto injection under certain circumstances. This bill passed one committee in the Senate but was defeated by one vote in the House Health and Human Services Quality Subcommittee meeting on Wednesday, April 6th. Testifying before the committee was Tallahassee immunizing pharmacist Jonathan Hickman. Jon provided the committee with extensive and comprehensive testimony on the benefits of these services provided by pharmacists and how his practice has helped patients. You can see the video of his testimony through this link. When you enter the link advance the slide bar to 27.00 where you will see the HB585 being introduced and debated. SB2000 (Senate Appropriations) Includes a mail order program for chronically diseased Medicaid patients. The bill also has language that allows any Medicaid pharmacy provider to fill a 90 day supply of prescription drugs and receive 1.5 times the dispensing fee of a 30 day supply. This language should equal the playing field between mail order and retail pharmacies. The


dispensing fee is being reduced to $3.23 from $3.73. There is also an ingredient cost reduction proposed saving the state (and costing pharmacy providers) close to $30 million. SB818 (Controlled Substances) At a minimum, this bill would require a pharmacist or any other person working under a pharmacist’s supervision to report to the local county sheriff information concerning persons attempting to obtain prescriptions by fraudulent means. The bill also allows changes to the prescription drug monitoring program database (PDMP) and reduces the time allowed for the reporting of dispensed controlled substances to 7 days. Physicians will have to perform a “medical examination” rather than a “physical examination” the same day that they prescribe or dispense a controlled substance. There is also a provision in the bill that appears to allow the Department to request pharmacist licensure candidates or licensed pharmacists who are renewing produce evidence of having completed

a 1 hour CE course on the prescription drug monitoring program. Pharmacists may need to ensure that prescriptions for controlled substances that are prescribed differently from what the manufacturers recommend must have that deviation noted on the prescription and also on the label of the dispensed product. SB2102 (State Employee Prescription Plan) This bill removes language that directs the state employee prescription plan to allow any pharmacy to participate in the network. The bill also gives the Department of Management services the ability to contract with select retail pharmacies that can dispense a 90 day supply of prescription drugs. The bill will make the dispensing fee now negotiable according to best industry practices. SB1972, SB1226 (Medicaid Reform) This bill, if signed into law, directs the Agency for Health Care Adminis-

Increase Profits Independent…But Not Alone. PPSC is Your Partner for Success

tration to evaluate the utilization of prescription drugs in the Medicaid program and requires managed care plans to cover prescription drugs. The bill also permits blood establishments to wholesale prescription drugs under certain circumstances. There is a provision that disallows payment for psychotropic medications prescribed for children under a certain age that is not approved by the FDA. There are over 70 amendments floating around this bill at press time. One of the amendments seeks to exempt unlicensed personnel in physician dispensing offices from having to register as pharmacy technicians. If the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services does not approve the managed care waiver for Florida Medicaid, the state will withdraw from the Medicaid program. There is also a section in the bill with similar language in SB1226 that attempts to try fix previous law that prevented licensees and pharmacy technician registrants from receiving or renewing their licenses due to disqualifying offenses such as violation of certain state or federal laws.

Every day, pharmacies depend on PPSC to simplify purchasing, reduce costs and identify new revenue sources – making a significant impact on their bottom line. PPSC can help you: EXPAND use of high-profit generics CREATE effective store layout ENHANCE third-party profits CAPTuRE MTM revenue EsTAblisH new business niches INCREASE your overall margins

For more on how PPSC can maximize the potential of your independent pharmacy, visit www.ppsconline.com or call toll-free 888-778-9909.

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HB7107 (Medicaid Reform) This bill shifts all Medicaid patients to managed care and defines the benefits. The bill also includes FPA supported language that prohibits the health plans from using mail order exclusively as a tool to meet network access standards. SB1386 (Controlled Substances) Requires that pharmacies who receive a patient advisory report through Florida’s proposed prescription drug monitoring program that this report be reviewed prior to dispensing a controlled substance to any patient. The bill also expands the 72 hour dispensing restriction on physicians to 30 days. HB39 & SB204 (Regulation of Controlled Substances) This bill seeks to add synthetic cannabinoids “K2” or “Spice” to the list of controlled substances in schedule 1 in Florida. Possession would be a 3rd degree felony. HB119 (Billing of 340B Drugs) In addition to the number of other issues in this proposed legislation there is a section that requires 340B drugs to be billed at actual acquisition costs to the Medicaid program. The claims must also contain the NDC code and also meet the requirements of the Deficit Reduction Act of 2005 in order for the State of Florida to get rebates. The bill also adds language that requires the Agency for Health Care Administration to accept electronic requests from pharmacists and physicians for any drug re-

quiring prior authorization. SB336 (Revision of Controlled Substance Act) This bill seeks to schedule certain chemicals as controlled substances. The bill also provides that Schedule III listed stimulants and depressants include their salts, isomers, and salts of isomers whenever the existence of such salts, isomers is possible within the specific chemical designation. This language, which is not currently included in Schedule III, appears in federal scheduling laws. See chart below for a list of chemical. HB445, SB1522 (Wellness Programs) This bill allows insurance plans to offer voluntary health and wellness programs and encourage or reward participation in the program by offering incentives. HB487, SB1156 (Regulating the Sale of Dextromethorphan) This proposed legislation prohibits obtaining or delivering to individual in retail sale any nonprescription compound, mixture, or preparation containing dextromethorphan or related compounds in excess of specified amounts. The bill regulates retail display of products containing dextromethorphan or related compounds and requires training of retail employees similar to the requirements for ephedrine products There are also requirements for persons who purchases or otherwise acquires nonprescription compound, mixture,

SB750, HB527 (Any Willing Provider) This bill requires health plans to authorize licensed pharmacists & permitted pharmacies to serve as participating pharmacy services providers for any of plan’s participants. HB7107 (Medicaid Managed Care) Designates AHCA as single state agency to administer Medicaid program; establishes Medicaid program as statewide, integrated managed care program for all covered services; authorizes agency to apply for & implement waivers; provides requirements for eligible plans that provide services in Medicaid managed care program; establishes provider service network requirements for eligible plans; establishes eight regions for separate procurement of plans. Summary These are just a few of the many health care bills that the Association is monitoring or providing active input on. At press time it is unknown whether the proposed bills will make it to the governor’s desk. Some may but others will not. A full report will be presented at the FPA’s annual meeting in Aventura, Florida in June. Come and see how our practice and business will change with these public policy revisions.

Schedule I:

Schedule II:

Schedule III:

Schedule V:

Alpha-Methyltryptamine.

Dihydroetorphine.

Embutramide.

Pregabalin.

Remifentanil.

Zopiclone.

1- (1-Phenylcyclohexyl) pyrrolidine.

2, 5-Dimethoxy-4- (n) -Propylthiophenethylamine.

Lisdexamfetamine.

5-Methoxy-N, N-Diisopropyltryptamine. N-Benzylpiperazine.

Schedule IV: Zaleplon.

Zolpidem.

Modafinil.

Petrichloral.

Sibutramine.

Dichloralphenazone.

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or preparation containing any detectable quantity of dextromethorphan or related compounds to meet specified requirements.

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Not more than 0.5 milligrams of Difenoxin and not less than 25 micrograms of Atropine sulfate per dosage unit.


APRIL is National Child Abuse Prevention Month Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Safe, stable, and nurturing relationships (SSNRs) between children and adults are a buffer against maltreatment and other adverse exposures occurring during childhood that compromise long-term health. The Issue Unfortunately, not all children are exposed to these positive relationships. Child maltreatment is a significant public health problem in the United States. In 2009, Child Protective Services confirmed more than 700,000 children were abused or neglected. These confirmed cases, however, represent only a fraction of the true magnitude of the problem. Most cases are not reported and child maltreatment remains a largely hidden problem. Some studies estimate that one in 8 U.S. children experience some form of child maltreatment. The Burden There is overwhelming scientific evidence that child maltreatment can lead to a broad range of physical and emotional health problems. Short-term physical injuries include cuts, bruises, burns, and broken bones. Abuse can also lead to permanent disabilities including visual, motor, and cognitive impairments. Prolonged maltreatment causes extreme or “toxic” stress that can disrupt early brain development and impair the functioning of the nervous and immune systems, leaving children vulnerable to chronic diseases later in life. For example, maltreatment has been associated with heart, lung, and liver disease in adulthood. Not all injuries that result from child maltreatment are visible. Abuse and neglect can have a lasting emotional impact as well. Victims may suffer from anxiety or depression. They may be wary, distrustful of others, and have difficulty establishing relationships. Some even think about or attempt suicide.

In 2009, Child Protective Services confirmed more than 700,000 children were abused or neglected. Safe, Stable and Nurturing Relationships The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) works to stop maltreatment, including abuse and neglect, before it initially occurs. In doing this, CDC promotes the development of safe, stable, and nurturing relationships between children and their parents or caregivers. Children’s experiences are defined through their relationships with parents, teachers, and other caregivers. Healthy relationships act as a buffer against adverse childhood experiences. They are necessary to ensure the long-term physical and emotional well-being of children.

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Pharmacy Time Capsule 2011 ■■ ■■

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1986

1936

Twenty-five years ago:

Seventy-five year ago

Reye’s syndrome warning required to be added to all aspirin labels. The American Association of Pharmaceutical Scientists (AAPS) was formed with almost 3,000 charter members. Human Genome Project launched with the object to understand the human genome and therefore provide the continuing progress of medicine

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The use of radiopharmaceuticals began when John Lawrence administered a radioactive isotope of phosphorus-32 to treat chronic leukemia.

1961

1911

Fifty years ago

One hundred years ago

President Kennedy signed Public Law 87-319 designating the third week in March as National Poison Prevention Week.

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The US Supreme Court ruled against Dr. Miles Medical Co., which had sued a distributor for selling its products at cut rate prices.

By: Dennis B. Worthen Lloyd Scholar, Lloyd Library and Museum, Cincinnati, OH One of a series contributed by the American Institute of the History of Pharmacy, a unique non-profit society dedicated to assuring that the contributions of your profession endure as a part of America’s history.  Membership offers the satisfaction of helping continue this work on behalf of pharmacy, and brings five or more historical publications to your door each year. To learn more, check out: www.aihp.org

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Safe and Healthy Travel for Seniors Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The retirement years can be an exciting time to see the world, and travel is easier and safer than ever before for seniors. With a little planning and some caution, seniors can safely visit almost any destination. All travelers, including seniors, should see a doctor for a pre-travel visit, ideally 4–6 weeks before they travel, although even a last-minute visit can be helpful. The doctor should be told about illnesses the traveler has and medicines he or she is taking, since this will influence medical decisions. In addition to providing vaccines, medicine, and advice for keeping healthy, a doctor can conduct a physical exam to assess a senior’s fitness for travel. Seniors should consider their physical limitations when planning a trip. Seniors with heart disease, for example, might choose an itinerary that does not involve strenuous activities. Seniors may also have a hard time recovering from jet lag and motion sickness, so they should take these factors into account when planning a trip. Before travel, seniors should have information about their destination that could affect their health, such as the altitude and climate. They should be aware of whether the destination is prone to natural disasters, such as earthquakes and hurricanes, since seniors may have more problems in those extreme situations. Vaccines Before travel, seniors should be upto-date on routine vaccines, such as measles/mumps/rubella and seasonal flu. Some of these may be considered “childhood” vaccines, but their protective effect decreases over time, and the diseases they protect against are often more common in other countries than in the United States. More than half of tetanus cases are in people over 65, so seniors should consider getting a tetanus booster before they travel.

Seniors should also receive other vaccines recommended for the countries they are visiting. These may include vaccines for hepatitis, typhoid, polio, or yellow fever. Recommended vaccines are listed by country on CDC’s destination pages. Use of some vaccines may be restricted on the basis of age or chronic illnesses. Yellow fever vaccine, for example, should be given cautiously to people older than 60 years, and it should not be given at all to people with certain immune-suppressing conditions. Seniors should discuss their detailed travel plans with their doctors and, if necessary, alternatives to vaccination. Medication A doctor may prescribe medicine for malaria, altitude illness, or travelers’ diarrhea; seniors should make sure the doctor knows any other medications they take, to watch out for possible drug interactions. Travelers’ diarrhea is common and may be more serious in seniors, so seniors should also follow food and water precautions. In addition to medicine prescribed specifically for travel, seniors are likely to take other medicines regularly, such as medicines for high blood pressure, diabetes, or arthritis. They should plan to pack enough medicine for the duration of the trip, plus a few days’ extra in case of travel delays. Counterfeit drugs may be common overseas, so seniors should take only medicine they bring from the United States. Prescription medicine should always be carried in its original container, along with a copy of the prescription, and all medicine should be packed in carry-on luggage, in case checked luggage gets lost.

Injury Prevention Although exotic infections make the headlines, injury is the most common cause of preventable death among travelers. Seniors can minimize their risk of serious injury by following these guidelines: ■■ Always wear a seatbelt. ■■ Don’t ride in cars after dark in developing countries. ■■ Avoid small, local planes. ■■ Don’t travel at night in questionable areas. In addition, seniors should consider purchasing supplemental travel health insurance in case of injury or illness overseas. Many health plans, including Medicare, will not pay for services received outside the United States. Seniors who are planning travel to remote areas should consider purchasing evacuation insurance, which will pay for emergency transportation to a qualified hospital. For more information on healthy travel, visit www.cdc.gov/travel.

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Second Report of the FPA Speaker of the House Greetings Members of the Florida Pharmacy Association: The 121st Annual Meeting of the Association is fast approaching with a number of exciting issues that will be debated in Aventura, Florida. This year, the House has a rather unique “out of the box” meeting schedule and agenda plan. Pay very close attention as academic Deans generally have a high expectation of stakeholder understanding and a low threshold for tolerance of folks who become confused when instructions are painfully and dreadfully clear. It has been traditional for the House to meet over a two-day period. In the past, those meetings have been scheduled for Friday and Saturday afternoons of the convention week. Pay close attention to the following information as there will be an examination to measure competency here. To pass the test, all you have to do is show up on time for the House session as published on the FPA website, in the January 2011 issue of Florida Pharmacy Today and in the convention brochure mailed to the membership, and be ready to go to work. To fail the examination, simply show up at the meeting at the “traditionally” scheduled time rather than read the convention schedule. Why has the schedule changed? In part, this has been due to feedback from you the members requesting a modification of the convention schedule to allow for more networking and interconnectivity with colleagues. After all, the history of past FPA conventions reveals that the House at one time did conduct its business on one day. The House will have its first session beginning at 11:00 a.m. (EST) on Thursday, June 23, 2011, at the Turnberry Resort. That first session of the House will run for two hours and will include a brief recess to facilitate the FPA’s annual business meeting. Don’t forget the keynote address that afternoon by American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy CEO Lucinda Maine. I am confident that you will find her remarks on patient-centered health homes interesting. The second and final session of the House will begin the same day (Thursday, June 23, 2011) running from 3:00 until 5:00 p.m. At that time, all House business should be concluded and new policy adopted. FPA policies on various pharmacy practice and business issues are formulated through the House. When members ask what the FPA’s position is on issues that affect our profession and our business, those policies are formed though dialog by practice site and geographic stakeholders. Participation through the Unit Associations is critical as the message of grassroots pharmacists is delivered in healthy debate during these meetings. Each invited and affiliated pharmacy organization is entitled to send representatives to the FPA convention to review and consider position statements on submitted resolutions from stakeholder groups and the membership at large. Resolutions are designed to direct the FPA to: ■■ Support something ■■ Not support something ■■ Oppose something ■■ Not oppose something ■■ Take action on something ■■ Not action on something and ■■ Have the wisdom to know the difference While new items can be added to the agenda, please be aware that it may take considerable effort to get them added to the House’s preplanned agenda. This will be explained at the meeting. Remember that we facilitated a call for resolutions as published in the Journal. That call ended on March 15, 2011. Are you interested in where the FPA currently is on last year’s resolutions? Read further for the most updated information. A final report will be available at the annual meeting.

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10-01 (Dade County Pharmacy Association) Pharmacist-only responsibilities BE IT RESOLVED that the Florida Pharmacy Association review and expand the definition of the Pharmacists’ role in health care, looking toward expansion of pharmacist-only responsibilities. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that regular and periodic progress reports be given to the leadership of the Florida Pharmacy Association with the understanding that the purpose would be to retain pharmacists’ privileges and to attempt to gain ground, legislatively, to solidify these privileges under the control of the pharmacist only. STATUS: Professional Affairs Council members Eric Alvarez and Kathy Petsos appeared before the Florida Board of Pharmacy in October of 2010 asking that consideration is given to the revision of rules related to drug therapy management. The Council is also proposing that a set of “Pharmacist Only” duties be linked to the National Provider Identifier number (NPI) of individual pharmacists.

10-02 (Dade County Pharmacy Association) - Minor Infractions’ statute of limitations and expunging of infractions. BE IT RESOLVED that the Florida Pharmacy Association introduce legislation that allows the Board of Pharmacy to establish time limits (i.e. statute of limitations) for minor infractions of the Rules and Regulations pertaining to the practice of pharmacy and that do not cause patient harm, to a set time period such that a pharmacist or technician can request that their licensure record can be expunged of these minor infractions. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Florida Pharmacy Association supports Board of Pharmacy efforts to categorize pharmacist infractions into Minor and Major Categories, and that infractions in the Minor Category do not cause patient harm. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Florida Pharmacy Association supports a statute of limitations on Minor infractions such that they can be expunged from the public pharmacists’ or technician’s record upon request. The ability to expunge should be allowed to be requested for any minor infractions cited prior to this process. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Florida Pharmacy Association support the ability of the pharmacist or pharmacy technician to petition the state board of

pharmacy to apply the statute of limitation on any citation received for a minor infractions and that they can have their record expunged. STATUS: This issue was referred to Legislative Committee who discussed the resolution at their July 2010 meeting in Orlando. There was a recommendation to the Board of Directors as part of the 2011 legislative advocacy program to look for opportunities to expunge disciplinary records for minor violations through relying on the FPA lobbyist to assess the viability of successful advocacy of this program. The FPA legislative consultant has advised that such a campaign would be challenging as Florida is considered an open records state and operates in the sunshine. Consumers will take issue with efforts to seal disciplinary records. This issue was also referred to the Professional Affairs Council, however a report is not available at press time. Currently there have been no legislative bills that an amendment could be applied to for this year’s legislative session. The Association will continue to look for opportunities.

10-03 (Broward County Pharmacist Association) Freedom of Choice and Standardized Reimbursement BE IT RESOLVED that the FPA work to support and endorse H.R. 4199 sponsored by Representative Butterfield tagged in the House of Representatives as the Pharmacy Bill. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that FPA shall address in their legislative committee to find a receptive members of the Florida House and Senate to create compatible Florida bills mimicking the Federal proposed bill H.R. 4199 STATUS: This resolution was referred to the Legislative Committee who discussed this issue at their July 2010 meeting. The Committee is recommending that the FPA advocate for PBM transparency which is part of the provisions in H.R. 4199. Bills were filed during the 2010 legislative session, however neither had been placed on the agenda for hearing most likely due to strong objections from the managed care industry. H.R. 4199, which is a congressional bill did not become law. A provision related to patient choice has been included in SB1972, which is currently under review during the Florida 2011 session. Final passage of the bill has not been completed as of press time of this journal. 10-06 (Pasco-Hernando Pharmacy Association) Revise Resolution Format BE IT RESOLVED that a Fiscal Impact

Statement be added to the required House of Delegates resolution format as listed below. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the fiscal impact statement should be projected by the House of Delegates Board of Directors when the resolution is reviewed prior to the House of Delegates. The impact statement should address the anticipated costs and benefits that will be derived should the resolution be passed. STATUS: This policy statement has been placed on House of Delegates March meeting agenda where House Board members applied fiscal statements to new resolutions to be considered at the 121st annual meeting and convention this summer. This will be a standard procedure at all March meetings of the House Board of Directors.

10-07 (APhA-ASP Nova Southeastern University) Advocating for Student Immunizing BE IT RESOLVED that the FPA supports the necessary legislative and regulatory changes to permit student intern pharmacists to provide immunization services supervised by certified immunizing pharmacists. STATUS: This resolution was referred to the Legislative Affairs Committee who discussed this issue at their July 2010 meeting. The committee recommended to the FPA Board of Directors that this issue be placed as the primary advocacy goal for 2011. The FPA Board of Directors met in August and approved the plan as the number one priority for the 2011 legislative session. Bills have been filed in both the 2011 House and Senate. These bills however were slow to move and met with considerable resistance from the legislators friendly to the medical associations. The Senate bill passed one committee, however the House version was defeated in a Health Committee. It is likely that this legislation will not pass this year.

10-10 (Broward County Pharmacy Association) Pharmacist Authority to Prescribe Vitamins BE IT RESOLVED that the FPA see legislative authorization to broaden the pharmacist prescribing act to include vitamins, minerals, homeopathic, antioxidants, amino acids, medicinal foods and whole food supplements. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the FPA support legislation to broaden the role of the pharmacist to provide nutritional APRIL 2011

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Employer Based Technician Training Program for all Florida Pharmacies The FPA has made it easy for you to file for approval for your employer based training program with the Board for approval. Once approved you can enroll your technicians in the comprehensive modules.

training

The cost per

technician

is

$290.

Technicians who join the FPA as members only pay $250.

It should take

about 160 hours for your technician

to

complete

the program.

The Florida Pharmacy Association, partnering with PassAssured of Orange, Texas is pleased to present a web based employer based technician training program for Florida pharmacies. Florida Statutes 465.014 requires pharmacy technicians to register with the Florida Department of Health. To be eligible for registration technicians must complete a Board approved training program as defined under rule 64B16-26.351.

This program is designed to supplement your on-site training program for pharmacy technicians.

All employer based technician training programs must be approved by the Florida Board of Pharmacy. The FPA is offering assistance to pharmacies in their efforts to get their training programs approved. Simply follow the steps published on the FPA web site in the “Shopping” menu item under “Pharmacy Resource Materials” where the program’s information is published. There is no cost to apply to the Board. Send us your contact information and we will be glad to help you. Name _______________________________ Address _________________________________

610 North Adams Street Tallahassee, Florida Phone: (850) 222-2400 Fax: (850) 561-6758 E-mail: fpa@pharmview.com

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City _________________________ State _______________ Zip Code ____________________ E-mail address ________________________________________________________________ Phone ______________________________ Fax _____________________________________ Name of Pharmacy _____________________________________________________________


counseling. STATUS: This issue was referred to the Legislative Committee who discussed this at their July 2010 meeting. The Committee recommended to the FPA Board of Directors that we should monitor for opportunities to revise the self care consultant act which would allow the prescribing of vitamins, minerals etc. by pharmacists if the federal laws change. The Committee is also recommending that the Association work with the naturopathic associations. The Board of Directors is recommending that we monitor this issue for opportunities. Action on this issue will depend upon how quickly other more pressing issues can be resolved. To date, there have been no related bills filed that would allow for revisions to the pharmacist self care consultant act.

10-11 (FPA Professional Affairs Council) Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience (IPPE) Standard Competencies BE IT RESOLVED by the House of Delegates of FPA that this collaborative effort will be accomplished through an FPA -mediated panel consisting

of FPA facilitators (one from the Professional Affairs Council and one from the Educational Affairs Council), experiential faculty member and dean (or representative) from each college of pharmacy, two preceptors from different practice settings and three student pharmacists. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that these competencies should reflect the professional knowledge and skills necessary for entry into advanced pharmacy practice experiences (APPEs). STATUS: This resolution was referred to the Professional Affairs Council. The council recommends that letters be sent by the FPA requesting IPPE goals and objectives from each of the schools of pharmacy in Florida. The Professional Affairs Council is also recommending that the Educational Affairs Council should review and assess whether the goals and objectives reflect the professional knowledge and skills needed for students to enter into the advanced practice experiences.

10-13 (Bob Parrado, Representative of Nigerian Pharmacy Association) Jurisdiction & Regulation of

Pharmacies, Pharmacists & Pharmaceuticals under the Florida Department of Health BE IT RESOLVED by the House Of Delegates of the FPA that the FPA advocate for and support the regulation and oversight of pharmacists, pharmacies, dispensing practitioners and prescription drugs by the Florida Department of Health. STATUS: This resolution was referred to the Legislative Committee. Considerable dialog has occurred at the Florida Capitol suggesting a massive revamping of the Florida Department of Health. One proposal sought to create a massive Florida Department of Health and Human Services housing a number of Florida public health agencies. A large number of divisions with the Department are being eliminated or merged with other areas. We are continuing to monitor these efforts. Laws passed by a previous Legislature moves oversight of Florida Statutes 499 issues away from the Department of Health and over to the Department of Business and Professional Regulation. That transition will take place in October of this year.

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2011 Summer Conferences Registration Information

Florida Pharmacy Association

A Solid Foundation for Positive Outcomes An outcome is the result or consequence of an event, a disease, a drug, a treatment, etc. Pharmacists have a vital role in the healthcare delivery system and are in the best position for patients to have positive outcomes throughout the healthcare process. Pharmacists have been trained for decades on key issues surrounding the safe and effective use of medications. It is for this reason that pharmacists are called medication experts. Over the years, patient care has evolved to become what is now called Medication Therapy Management (MTM). In order to continue to deliver optimal patient care, pharmacists must go back to the basic foundation to see the future positive outcomes. Florida Pharmacy Association’s mission is to “serve, represent and assist pharmacists and pharmacy technicians to advance the profession and practice of pharmacy.” This year’s convention will offer a variety of subjects that will be applicable to your practice setting. We are offering consultant and general continuing education courses. In addition, there will be a pre-convention certificate program entitled, Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services in the Community. Join us in our effort as we continue to build a solid foundation for positive outcomes at FPA’s 121st Annual Meeting Convention! 18 | and Flori d a P h ar m a c y To d aY

121st Annual Meeting and Convention June 22 - 26, 2011 The Fairmont Turnberry Isle Resort & Club Aventura, FL


FPA 121st Annual Meeting and Convention Schedule June 22-26, 2011 • Schedule is subject to change.

Wednesday, June 22, 2011 8 hrs GCE/TECH 7:00am

Registration/Check-in

7:45am

Welcome and Introductory Remarks

8:00am-5:00pm Education: 8 hrs GCE Delivering Medication Therapy Requires separate registration Management Services in the Community is an innovative and interactive certificate training program that explores the pharmacist’s role in providing MTM services to patients. Pharmacists have a tremendous opportunity to receive reimbursement for monitoring and improving medication use in patients with complex medication regimens. This practice-based activity teaches pharmacists the essential skills necessary to become a successful MTM practitioner. The certificate training program will enhance pharmacists’ clinical expertise in evaluating complicated medication regimens, identifying medicationrelated problems, and making recommendations to patients, caregivers, and health care professionals. This program is conducted in three parts: Self-study activity and pre-seminar exercise (10 hours); Live interactive training seminar (8 hours); Post-seminar exercise (3 hours). Live Seminar Description and Learning Objectives The second part of the certificate training program is an active learning seminar focusing on pharmacy practice implementation; it is based on the experience of practitioners involved with the development and delivery of MTM services. The live seminar reinforces and expands on the self-study activity. Participants will practice a variety of communication techniques to elicit a patient’s medication experience and identify medication-related problems. Participants also will gain experience in prioritizing medication-related problems, developing interventions, and documenting activities. Strategies for implementing an MTM service will be explored. Presenters: Lisa Clayville, PharmD, Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Florida College of Pharmacy; Karen Whalen, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, Consultant Track

2

CODE KEY:

GCE = General Continuing Education

Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, UF College of Pharmacy Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Explain how to overcome communication barriers and employ active listening when interviewing a patient; Conduct a thorough medication therapy review; Complete a personal medication record (PMR); Develop a medicationrelated action plan (MAP); Perform the following tasks, given a patient case including one or more medications: Assess patient-specific data and issues, and interpret these findings to identify the patient’s medication-related problems; Account for pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic changes when reviewing an elderly person’s medication regimen; Develop a list of the patient’s drug therapy problems; Establish goals of therapy for each medical condition and medication-related problem identified; Make recommendations for resolving situations in which a patient’s medications are potentially inappropriate; Document services in a manner appropriate for evaluating patient progress, sufficient for billing purposes, and that facilitates tracking clinical and financial outcomes; Discuss the elements of an effective recommendation to another health care practitioner; Describe the medication use concerns and adverse drug events that affect senior patients; Explain how to bill for MTM services using the appropriate CPT code(s). 4:00pm-5:00pm HOD Board of Directors Meeting 5:00pm-6:00pm Florida Pharmacy PACCE Meeting 6:00pm-7:00pm Budget & Finance Committee Meeting 6:00pm-8:00pm Florida Pharmacy Foundation Annual Meeting 7:30pm-9:00pm Officer’s Dinner

Thursday, June 23, 2011 6 hrs of GCE/TECH or 3 hrs RC Consultant Track: Alternative Medicine 7:00am

RC = Recertification Consultant

TECH = Technician

Registration Desk Open STC = Student Continuing Education APRIL 2011

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7:45am-9:15am Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Nutrient Depletions from Prescription Drugs — Incorporating Necessary Supplements Goar Alvarez, PharmD, FASCP, Director of Pharmacy Services and Assistant Professor of Pharmacy, NOVA Southeastern University Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Identify common pharmaceuticals that may deplete vitamins and micronutrients; Discuss mechanism and/or biochemical processes of how some of these nutrients may be depleted; Discuss which nutrients are likely to be depleted by which drug or drug categories and the potential adverse effects this may have on the body if these are not replaced/replenished. UAN: 0165-0000-11-036-L04-P* Upon completion technicians will be able to: List common medications that may deplete vitamins; Recognize how the nutrients are depleted from the body; List some of the nutrients that are depleted from prescription drugs. UAN: 0165-0000-11-036-L04-T* 8:00am-10:00am Delegate Registration 9:00am-10:30am CE Provider Workshop for Florida Department of Health Providers Carl “Fritz” Hayes, RPh, Florida Board of Pharmacy Member Marcia Mann, CE Broker Representative Upon completion participants should be familiar with and understand rules and regulatory updates regarding: Continuing education for Florida licensed Pharmacists; Continuing education for Florida registered Technicians; Approved provider program administrator responsibilities; Provider audit and record keeping requirements 9:20am-10:50am Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Regenerative and Functional Medicine, An Opportunity for Pharmacists as Clinicians Joseph Rizo, PharmD, MBA, ABAAHP, Clinical Director, Rejuvenesse Integrative Medical Institute Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Explain to pharmacists how the opportunity to use clinical knowledge can make a huge difference in patients’ health by using the functional and regenerative approach; Describe the core prob-

lems at the cell level; Discuss how to correct the nutrient and vitamin needs; Discuss what and how to eat; Discuss proper exercise techniques. UAN: 0165-0000-11-035-L04-P* Upon completion technicians will be able to: Define regenerative and functional medicine; List nutrients and vitamins depleted; Recognize the importance of healthy eating and proper exercise. UAN: 0165-0000-11-035-L04-T* 11:00am-1:00pm FPA House of Delegates and Annual Business Meeting 1:00pm-2:00pm Lunch (Attendees on their own) 2:00pm-3:00pm Education: 1 hr GCE/TECH/STC Keynote Address A Solid Foundation: Is There A Pharmacist in this (Health) Home? Lucinda Maine, PhD, RPh, Executive Vice President and CEO, American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Describe the care delivery model of patient-centered health homes; Articulate the roles pharmacists play in team-delivered primary care; Communicate the essential value of medication management services in a reformed health delivery system. UAN: 0165-0000-11-014-L04-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Recognize the care delivery model of patient-centered health homes; Identify the roles technicians play in team delivered primary care; Recognize the value of medication management services. UAN: 0165-0000-11-014-L04-T* 3:00pm-5:00pm House of Delegates Reconvenes 5:00pm-7:00pm Education: 2 hrs GCE/TECH 12 Step Recovery Program (Open to all attendees and spouses) David Templeman, PharmD, Clinical Pharmacist, Bertfish Sponsor: Recovering Pharmacists Network of Florida Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Identify the disease state of addiction with a brief overview of the topic; Describe the signs and symptoms of chemical dependency, intervention, treatment and monitoring; Evaluate an educational example of a 12 step recovery and explain how it works, 12 steps of AA and 12 traditions of AA. UAN: 0165-0000-11-015-L01-P**

Consultant Track CODE KEY: 20

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GCE = General Continuing Education Flori d a P h ar m a c y To d aY

RC = Recertification Consultant

TECH = Technician

STC = Student Continuing Education

3


Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Recognize the disease state as an addiction; List the signs and symptoms of dependency; Recognize the 12 steps of the recovery process. UAN: 0165-0000-11-015-L01-T** 7:00pm-8:00pm Adopt-A-Student and Mentor Social 7:00pm-10:00pm Foundation Social: CASINO NIGHT FUNDRAISER Cost: $50 per person Cost Includes: 1,000 Playing Chips, Cash Bar, Hors d’oeuvres, Prizes

Friday, June 24, 2011 6 hrs of GCE/TECH/ RC Consultant Track: Pain Management 7:00am

Registration Desk Open

7:00am-8:00am Christian Pharmacist Fellowship International Breakfast 7:45am-9:15am

Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Opioids: Review of the New Kids on the Block and Key Concepts Robin Moorman Li, Pharm.D, Clinical Assistant ProfessorJacksonville Campus, University of Florida, College of Pharmacy, Shands Jacksonville Medical Center Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Identify the chemical classes of commonly used opioids and apply this knowledge when considering allergy issues; Explain key differences between oxymorphone, tapentadol, and extended release hydromorphone; Perform equianalgesic calculations between various opioid formulations. UAN: 0165-0000-11-016-L01-P** Upon completion technicians will be able to: Define opiod; Recognize the difference between an opiod and non-opiod; List examples of opiod products. UAN: 0165-0000-11-016-L01-T**

9:00am-10:30am Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/STC NASPA/NMA Game Show Tian Merren Owens, PharmD, MS, Director of Continuing Education, Florida Pharmacy Association Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Identify and explain aspects of the effective and safe practice of pharmacy self care treatments through a process of answering a selected group of questions similar to a national board exam; Analyze the usage and effectiveness of overthe-counter medications; Classify different groups of over-the-counter medications based on drug treatment classes. UAN: 0165-0000-11-017-L04-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Identify the use of over-the-counter medications; List the classes of various OTC products; Identify proper storage and handling techniques of OTC products. UAN: 0165-0000-11-017-L04-T* 9:00am-11:00am Journal Board Meeting 9:20am-10:50am Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC “The Others”: Adjunctive Treatment For Pain Joseph Cammilleri , Pharm.D, Clinical Pharmacist, Pain Management, UF& Shands Jacksonville Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Describe the role of opioid adjuvant medications in patients with chronic pain; Explain the mechanism of action of adjuvant medications and why they are effective in management of various chronic pain conditions; Review adjuvant medications dosing and selection considerations when treating patients; Discuss the common side effects associated with the use of adjuvant medications. UAN: 0165-0000-11-018-L01-P** Upon completion technicians will be able to: Define adjunctive treatment; Identify the difference between acute pain and chronic pain; List some medications used for chronic pain conditions. UAN: 0165-0000-11-018-L01-T** 11:00am-1:00pm Exhibit Hall Grand Opening 11:00am-1:00pm Student Poster Presentations 1:15pm-4:15pm Student Patient Counseling Competition

Consultant Track

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1:00pm-2:30pm

Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC A Review on the Pharmacological Management of Chronic Pain Syndromes: Focus on Maintenance Treatments for Fibromyalgia, Diabetic Neuropathic Pain, and Migraine Headache Jose Rey, MS, PharmD, BCPP, Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nova Southeastern University – College of Pharmacy Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Discuss the FDA-approved treatment options for the analgesic management of the specified chronic pain syndromes focusing on maintenance treatment; Recommend alternative treatments that are historically effective for the management of Fibromyalgia, Diabetic Neuropathic Pain, and Migraine Headache, even if not FDA-approved for such use; Compare and contrast the benefits and risks of the various medications used for these specific chronic pain syndromes and make recommendations for use given patient-specific information. UAN: 0165-0000-11-019-L01-P** Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Define fibromyalgia; Recognize the pattern of a migraine headache; List medications used to treat chronic pain syndromes. UAN: 0165-0000-11-019-L01-T** 1:00pm-2:30pm Education: 1.5 hrs STC/TECH Pharmacy Calculation: A Review Carmen Aceves, BPharm, MS, FASCP, FAPhA, Director of Pharmacy, Sister Emmanuel Hospital for Continuing Care Upon completion of this activity, students will be able to Identify and solve problems related to mEq and mOsm; Discuss the importance of the sodium chloride equivalent value of medications in adjusting to isotonicity; Describe the various intravenous routes and content of solutions for IV administration; Describe the content of a typical parenteral nutrition formula and the caloric conversion for each ingredient; Solve pH and buffer problems without the aid of a calculator; Readily calculate dosages based on patient specific parameters such as weight and BSA; Solve dilution problems using C1V1=C2V2. Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Describe the various intravenous routes; Define isotonicity, mEq and mOsm; List the contents included in a typical parenteral nutrition. UAN: 0165-0000-11-020-L04-T*

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1:00pm-3:00pm Local Unit Leaders Meeting 1:15pm-4:15pm Student Patient Counseling Competition 1:30pm-2:00pm Golf Tournament Practice 2:00pm

PACCE Golf Tournament

2:35pm-4:05pm

Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Cyber Health: Friend or Foe? Bob Parrado, BPharm, Prescription Department Manager, AmeriDrug Pharmacy, Past Florida Board of Pharmacy Member Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Describe the differences between a mail order pharmacy and an internet pharmacy; Discuss the current state of prescription drug abuse and the oxycodone dilemma; Identify the legal definition of a valid prescription - What is right? and What is not?; Discuss the Ryan Haight Act & its impact on Internet Dispensing of Controlled Substances; Identify the unintended consequences of the Prescription Drug Monitoring Program. UAN: 0165-0000-11-021-L04-P* Upon completion technicians will be able to: Recognize the difference between a mail order pharmacy and an internet pharmacy; List the medications abused in the state of Florida; and List the items that should be on a prescription. UAN: 0165-0000-11-021-L04-T* 2:35pm-4:05pm Education: 1.5 hrs STC/TECH Preparing Yourself for a Pharmacy Career: A Focus on Interviewing Skills and Resume Development Jennifer Pytlarz, PharmD, Publix Inc. Clinical Coordinator Upon completion of this activity, students and technicians will be able to: Describe different job search strategies; Explain the difference between a resume and CV; Provide tips on how to build a resume and CV; Discuss how to prepare for an interview; Review the interview process including questions to ask and questions to be prepared to answer. UAN: 0165-0000-11-022-L04-T 6:00pm-7:30pm PACCE Wine and Cheese Reception 7:30pm-9:00pm University Alumni Receptions

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Saturday, June 25, 2011 6 hrs of GCE/TECH/RC Consultant Track: Diabetes Management 7:00am

Registration Desk Open

Diabetes Program We have all heard the news about the growing epidemic of diabetes in this country and the world. Most of us already know how this will affect healthcare costs, productivity and the practice of medicine and pharmacy now and into the future. In addition with the severe shortage of endocrinologists, and the lack of funding for traditional education programs new methods for managing diabetes will have to be developed. These new methods will be delivered by multiple medical professionals, and pharmacists are in a perfect position to be the leaders in diabetes care. This multisession CE program will focus on giving pharmacists the knowledge of methods, techniques and procedures to successfully communicate with diabetes patients, manage diabetes therapy, and maximize reimbursement opportunities for the delivery of diabetes care. 7:45am-9:15am Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Part 1: The Basics of Diabetes Speaking to Patients at Their Level David Joffe, BSPharm, CDE, FACA, Diabetes in Control Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Describe how the body’s energy system works; Explain to a patient how diabetes develops; List the complications of diabetes; Explain the value of glucose monitoring and how to interpret results; Outline food choices and detail how this affects glucose levels; Encourage physical activity and medication adherence; Explain in lay language how medications for diabetes work. UAN: 0165-0000-11-023-L01-P** Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Define diabetes; Recognize ideal food choices for diabetes patients; Identify the importance of physical activity. UAN: 0165-0000-11-023-L01-T** 7:45am-9:15am Education 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH Small Businesses Don’t Die, They Commit Suicide! Tom Shay, CSP, Profit Plus Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Outline the aspects of pharmacy business management that lead in inefficiency; Identify priorities for business management; Recognize aspects of a pharmacy business that require close observation.

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UAN: 0165-0000-11-024-L04-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: List the aspects of a business that lead to inefficiency; Recognize priorities that will lead to a successful business; Identify the areas of a pharmacy business that requires close observation. UAN: 0165-0000-11-024-L04-T* 9:00am-11:00am Education: 2 hrs GCE/TECH/STC Pharmacy Career Forum Jim Powers, BPharm-Facilitator. Presenters: Theresa Tolle, BPharm-Independent Pharmacy; Steven Nelson, BPharm-Adult Living Facilities; Robert McKenzie, BPharm-Radio Isotopes; Gil Weise, Sr., BPharmAlternative Therapies for Wellness; Bob Fishman, BPharmPain Management Practice Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Recognize various practices of pharmacy and opportunities available to pharmacists; Describe the practice setting that best suit the individual skills and abilities; Identify personal strengths and weaknesses to consider when contemplating career choices. UAN: 0165-0000-11-025-L04-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Recognize various practices of pharmacy; Identify the practice setting that best suit the individual needs and abilities; Identify personal strengths and weaknesses to consider when contemplating career choices. UAN: 0165-0000-11-025-L04-T* 9:20am-10:50am Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Part 2 – Type 2 Diabetes Making the Most of Medications Karen Whalen, PharmD, BCPS, CDE, Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, UF College of Pharmacy Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Differentiate the mechanism of action of various oral medications for diabetes; Review the treatment algorithm for the management of Type 2 diabetes; Develop a drug therapy plan for the management of Type 2 diabetes using evidence-based principles; Recommend pharmacotherapy to reduce the complications of diabetes. UAN: 0165-0000-11-026-L01-P** Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: List the types of diabetes; Recognize the difference between Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes; List medications used to treat diabetes. UAN: 0165-0000-11-026-L01-T**

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9:20am-10:50am Education 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH Can You Get More From the Investment You Have In Your Pharmacy Business? Tom Shay, CSP, Profit Plus Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Explain the importance of understanding financial management; Use an online tool for quick evaluation of financial statements; Demonstrate how to effectively monitor components of financial statements. UAN: 0165-0000-11-027-L04-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Recognize the components of a financial statement; Identify the importance of using financial statements; List the disadvantages of not properly monitoring financial statements. UAN: 0165-0000-11-027-L04-T* 11:00am-1:00pm Exhibit Hall Open 12:00pm

Golf Winners Announced

1:00pm-2:30pm Student Luncheon 1:00pm-2: 30pm Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Part 3: Insulin Management for Type 1 and Type 2 Patients David Joffe, BSPharm, CDE, FACA, Diabetes in Control Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Compare and contrast insulin management for Type 1 and Type 2 patients; Outline dosing algorithms for basal, bolus and mixed insulins; Develop basal dosing, sensitivity and carb ratios and targets for intensive management of diabetes; Explain the use of devices for the improved insulin management of patients; Recommend methods to treat hypoglycemia, ketones and DKA in the insulinusing patient. UAN: 0165-0000-11-028-L01-P** Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: List the different types of insulin; Define hypoglycemia; Define ketones. UAN: 0165-0000-11-028-L01-T** 1:00pm-2:30pm Education 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH Team UP for Success! Tom Shay, CSP, Profits Plus Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Discuss a technique for in-house education of technicians and support staff; Illustrate to technicians and support staff the importance of working together in efficiency by continued education; Provide tools for creating operations guide for technicians and support staff. UAN: 0165-0000-11-029-L04-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able to: Define the importance of team work; List ways to create a positive work environment; 24

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Recognize the importance of customer service. UAN: 0165-0000-11-029-L04-T* 2:35pm-4:05pm Education: 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/RC Part 4: Putting It All to Work: Cases, PCMHs, SMAs, and Wellness David Joffe, BSPharm, CDE, FACA, Diabetes in Control and Karen Whalen, PharmD, BCPS, CDE Clinical Associate Professor, Department of Pharmacotherapy and Translational Research, UF College of Pharmacy Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Apply principles of diabetes management to solve real patient cases; Utilize proven communication methods to speak to patients; Describe how to become part of Patient Centered Medical Homes; Realize opportunities for reimbursement with shared medical appointments and wellness programs. UAN: 0165-0000-11-030-L01-P** Upon completion of this activity, technicians will be able: Recognize the importance of proper communication to patients; Identify Patient Centered Medical Homes in your community; Identify the role of the technician in reimbursement opportunities. UAN: 0165-0000-11-030-L01-T** 2:35pm-4:05pm

Education 1.5 hrs GCE/TECH/STC How To Open A Pharmacy Jim Springer, Regional Vice President Rx Ownership, McKesson Corporation Upon completion of this activity, participants will be able to: Describe the requirements and process of opening a new pharmacy from the ground up; Discuss financial obligations in opening a pharmacy; Discuss the importance of location; Discuss marketing techniques. This program will cover a variety of topics ranging from how to get started, how to finance the project, what things are necessary, design, marketing, etc. Am I the right person for this? How much money will I need and how will I finance it? What business relationships do I need? Why is location selection important? Do I need to have a corporation? What are the licensing requirements? How do I design a footprint for the pharmacy? UAN: 0165-0000-11-031-L04-P* UAN: 0165-0000-11-031-L04-T* 5:00pm-6:30pm Past Presidents Reception (Invitation Only) 7:00pm-10:00pm Awards Ceremony Reception THEME: Moon Over Miami Attire: Black and White Semi Formal

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Sunday, June 26, 2011 4 hrs of GCE/TECH 7:00am

Registration Desk Open

7:00am-8:30am President’s Breakfast and Installation of Officers 8:45am-9:45am Education: 1 hr GCE/TECH/STC State of The ART in 2011 Sami Shafiq, PharmD, CPh, AAHIVE, Lead HIV/AIDS Clinical Pharmacist, Miami Market, Walgreens Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice for Nova Southeastern University/Palm Beach Atlantic University Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists will be able to: Review epidemiology of HIV/AIDS; Review Florida Law; Discuss modes of HIV transmission; Review HIV diagnosis and monitoring; Discuss clinical management of HIV/AIDS: Indication for starting therapy, Review antiretroviral medications, Review adverse effects and drug interactions, Discuss management of virologic failure, Discuss the importance on adherence and management of opportunistic infections (OIs) UAN: 0165-0000-11-032-L02-P* Upon completion technicians will be able to: Define HIV/AIDS; Identify Florida laws; List modes of transmission; List some medications used to treat HIV/AIDS. UAN: 0165-0000-11-032-L02-T* 9:50am-11:50am Education: 2 hrs GCE/TECH Reducing Medication Errors through Implementing a Continuous Quality Improvement Program Michael Jackson, BPharm, CPh, Florida Pharmacy Association Executive Vice President and CEO Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists should be able to: Define elements of a Continuous Quality Improvement (CQI) Program; Restructure a pharmacy practice to address quality related events; Analyze some common causes of quality related events; Implement an action plan to address quality of care in pharmacies with a goal towards error reduction and prevention; Recite quality improvement regulations for Florida pharmacies. UAN: 0165-0000-11-033-L05-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians should be able to: Define CQI; List most common medication errors; Employ techniques to reduce medication errors by using CQI. UAN: 0165-0000-11-033-L05-T*

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11:50am-12:00pm Break 12:00pm-1:00pm Education: 1 hr GCE/TECH Florida Board of Pharmacy Update Carl “Fritz” Hayes, RPh, Quality Manager, CVS/Caremark, Florida Board of Pharmacy Member Upon completion of this activity, pharmacists should be able to: Describe the purpose of the Board of Pharmacy; Recognize recent changes to administrative rules affecting the practice of pharmacy; Identify the most common activities incurring disciplinary action; Identify proposed rules changes and other influences that can affect the practice of pharmacy in Florida. UAN: 0165-0000-11-034-L03-P* Upon completion of this activity, technicians should be able to: Describe the purpose of the Florida Board of Pharmacy; Recognize recent changes in the Board of Pharmacy that affect the profession of pharmacy; Recognize changes in the Board that affect pharmacy technicians. UAN: 0165-0000-11-034-L03-T*

The Florida Pharmacy Association, The University of Florida, the American Pharmacists Association and the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists are accredited by the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education as providers of continuing pharmacy education. Medication Therapy Management Program The self-study learning portion of the Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services in the Community certificate training program is approved for 10 hours (1.0 CEU) of continuing pharmacy education credit (UAN 202-999-09-006-H04-P). The live training seminar is approved for 8 hours (0.8 CEU) of continuing pharmacy education credit (UAN 202-999-09-005-L04-P). The post-seminar exercise is approved for 3 hours (0.3 CEU) of continuing pharmacy education credit (UAN 202-999-09-007-H04-P). CPN: 202-0012. Initial Release Date: March 1, 2009; Expiration Date: March 1, 2012 Activity Type: Practice-based; Target Audience: Pharmacists in all practice settings Completion Information: A Certificate of Achievement is awarded to participants who successfully complete all activity requirements, which include the self-study activity and pre-seminar exercises, the self-study examination, the live training seminar, and the post-seminar patient interviews. Successful completion is defined as a submission of the pre-work and post-work, a self-study examination score of 70% or better, and attendance at the live seminar. **Delivering Medication Therapy Management Services in the Community, developed by the American Pharmacists Association and the American Society of Consultant Pharmacists, was originally supported in part by independent educational grants from Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Eisai Pharmaceuticals, Eli Lilly and Company, JanssenPharmaceuticals, Ortho-McNeil Janssen Pharmaceuticals, sanofi-aventis Pharmaceuticals, and Wyeth Pharmaceuticals. The Florida Pharmacy is also a Florida Department of Health approved provider of continuing education for pharmacists. Up to 22 contact hours are available upon successful completion of the program on Thursday-Sunday through attendance and submission of completed attendance forms. Statements of continuing pharmacy education will be mailed six weeks after the meeting. This is an ACPE knowledge based (*) activity and an ACPE application based (**) activity. APRIL 2011

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The Fairmont Turnberry Isle Resort & Club 19999 W. Country Club Dr. Aventura, FL 33180 (305) 932-6200 Room Rate: $129 and up

won rave reviews from guests and food critics alike. We also offer great seasonal and yearlong packages designed perfectly for you to experience every aspect of our resort, all for a great value.

S

ecluded on 300 tropical acres, this stunning Mediterranean-style hideaway begins a new era in luxury travel. Retreat to this gorgeous oasis where you’ll find the essence of elegance and indulgence with 392 spacious guest rooms and suites, two 18-hole Raymond Floyd-redesigned championship golf courses, a private beach front Ocean Club right on the Atlantic, the exclusive award-winning Willow Stream Spa and fitness center, a tennis facility with four clay HydroCourts, three pools including a new lagoonstyle pool featuring a waterslide, lazy river, private cabanas and poolside dining, a supervised children’s program and an array of recreational activities. With a diverse selection of restaurants ranging from American contemporary cuisine at nationallyacclaimed Chef Michael Mina’s new BOURBON STEAK restaurant to seaside casual and regional flavors at Cascata Grille, dining at the resort has

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A private membership club featuring three distinguished categories presents guests with the ideal way to turn their stay into a permanent vacation. Worldclass shopping in the Aventura Mall is just steps away. Take a stroll or hop on one of our complimentary shuttles to and from the mall and dive into over 250 specialty shops and stores including Bloomingdale’s, Macy’s and Nordstrom’s. With all this and more, it’s no wonder The Fairmont Turnberry Isle was named one of the “World’s Best” in 2009 by Travel + Leisure magazine and received the Mobil Four Star Hotel & Mobil Four Star Spa Award, along with Meetings & Conventions Gold Key Award in 2008. The Miami resort is conveniently located between the two major international airports and seaports of Miami and Fort Lauderdale and nearby elite shopping venues, exciting nightlife and a multitude of cultural and sporting events. The Fairmont Turnberry Isle, located just minutes from North Miami Beach and South Beach, is a member of ‘Leading Hotels of the World’.

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General Information Room Rates Room Rates: $129 for The Fairmont; $169 for The Deluxe Golf View; $329 for One Bedroom Suite. Room rate based upon single/double occupancy. There will be no charge for children up to and including the age of 18 years who share with their parents. Each extra person above two adults sharing a room will be charged an additional $50 per night. The room reservaton deadline is Friday, June 10, 2011. Thereafter, reservations will be taken on a space or rate availability basis. Please be sure to ask for the Florida Pharmacy Association group rate. The check-in time is after 4:00pm and the checkout time is before 12:00 noon. Room reservations can be made by calling (800) 327-7739 or (866) 840-8067. Valet parking is $20 per car per day. Guest self parking is complimentary at Aventura Mall.

Keynote Speaker Lucinda Maine, PhD, RPh, is the Executive Vice President and CEO – American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy. She has served this position since May 2002. Prior to her current position, she has worked in various capacities over a ten year period at the American Pharmaceutical Association (APhA). Dr. Maine received her Doctor of Philosophy from the University of Minnesota, Kellogg Pharmaceutical Clinical Scientist Program, Department of Social and Administrative Pharmacy in January 1985. She received her Bachelor of Science from Auburn University School of Pharmacy in 1980.

General Education Track

Thursday - Sunday

The general education track will offer courses designed to educate pharmacists on a wide variety of important topics pertaining to the profession of pharmacy practice. Specific courses being offered are Board approved Reducing Medication Errors, Board approved HIV/AIDS, and the Florida Board of Pharmacy Update.

Consultant Education Track Thursday- Saturday

The consultant education track will provide pharmacists with the most current information available on various disease states. The specific therapeutic topics being offered include Alternative Medicine, Pain Management, and Diabetes Management. There are 15 hours available for consultant pharmacists.

Student and Technician Track Thursday – Sunday

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Students and Technicians will benefit from interacting with practicing pharmacists and attending student and technician focused continuing education programs. The technician track offers several hours of continuing education on a variety of topics, including the required courses for initial registration renewal: Medication Errors, HIV/AIDS, and Pharmacy Law. The student track consists of several hours of fun and exciting continuing education, such as The Career Forum and the NASPA/NMA Game Show. Students will also have an opportunity to participate in the Patient Counseling Competition and showcase their Poster Presentations.

Pre-Convention Education Wednesday Only

Our traditional Wednesday program will be a certificate program in Medication Therapy Management (MTM). This outstanding MTM Program will offer 21 hours of continuing education credit. Register for this program and walk away with valuable information for your pharmacy practice on how to deliver MTM services in your community. A separate registration fee is required for the pre-convention program. The program is co-sponsored with the University of Florida.

Special Events Exhibits: Participate in our grand opening reception in the exhibit hall! Poster Presentations: Browse submissions from students. Contact Tian Merren Owens in the FPA office for more information if you would like to submit a poster presentation. Awards Ceremony Reception entitled, Moon Over Miami: Honor outstanding practitioners during the awards presentation. The attire is semi formal, black and/ or white. President’s Breakfast: Attend the Sunday morning installation of new officers. Receptions: Enjoy catching up with your colleagues as the Universities entertain their alumni and friends, and as the FPA Foundation thank their supporters at a reception. Also participate in the Foundation’s casino night fund raiser. House of Delegates: Be a delegate or observer and see how important member participation is to the direction of the Association. Student Events: Students will benefit from interacting with practicing pharmacists, attending student focused continuing education programs and learning first hand about the FPA and how involvement can improve their chosen profession. Call the FPA office and offer to mentor or sponsor a student. PharmPACCE Wine and Cheese Reception: Purchase a ticket to this reception to support your Political Action Committee. PACCE Golf Tournament: Join us Friday afternoon for the PACCE Golf Tournament. Please register early to save your space.

Waiver of Liability Each individual attending FPA’s Annual Meeting assumes all risks associated with his/her attendance and participation in all on-and off-site activities that occur during this time. By registering for this meeting, you agree to indemnify and hold harmless, FPA and its governing bodies, officers and employees from all loss, damage or liability arising out of or related to your attendance and participation at FPA’s Annual Meeting.

Cancellation Policy If cancellation is made in writing 30 days prior to the program a refund will be made less a $10 service charge. If cancellation is made 29-10 days prior to the program, a refund will be made, less a $50 service charge. Cancellation requested in writing after that date will result in credit for another FPA CE program or service valid for one year. APRIL 2011

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Florida Pharmacy Association 610 North Adams Street Tallahassee, FL 32301

PRSRT STD US Postage PAID Tallahassee, FL Permit #801

121st Annual Meeting and Convention June 22 - 26, 2011 The Fairmont Turnberry Isle Resort & Club Aventura, FL

2011 Summer Conferences WHO SHOULD ATTEND • Community Pharmacists • Hospital Pharmacists • Consultant Pharmacists • Long Term Care Pharmacists • Pharmacy Students • Pharmacy Technicians • Mail Service Pharmacists • Managed Care Pharmacists

Florida Pharmacy Association

A Solid Foundation for Positive Outcomes


LETTER TO THE EDITOR Hi Michael! We are lucky indeed to have you in Tallahassee, Mr. Jackson! The dissention within our own ranks and disciplines within our profession is disheartening! I got a good first-hand view of the apathy and misunderstanding as to the value that our political action committees service to our pharmacy profession. While we understand that the legislative day activities in March went very well I am disappointed that our local pharmacy organization was unable to send a representative to Tallahassee. My apologies to the FPA sir! I promise I will work harder to have a delegation from our area in support of FPA initiatives on our behalf next year. It will be my top priority as I work behind the scenes and turn the leadership of our local organization over to our very capable vice president and FPA member, Joy Wright, who like FPA Chairman of the Board, Karen Whalen, is extremely dedicated and committed to the advancement of best practices throughout our profession. I promise to be more involved in Tallahassee from this point forward and pledge to the members of the Florida Pharmacy Association my support to help in any way possible! Too many of us stand on the sidelines expecting someone else will step up to help and serve. In my opinion we need more volunteer and stakeholder involvement. It’s also time to let the next generation in on “our dirty little secret in the profession of pharmacy”! Maybe they will be the catalyst to change. I’ve been asked to speak at one of our state pharmacy schools, specifically, to the Student Association of APhA and in the past and have had to decline. But not this year! I will do my small part to at least inform, should I get the chance to amplify the FPA’s message in the comments below and challenge these bright young minds to get involved and to get involved often! They are our only hope that things will indeed change! I’m forwarding this to all my interns, pharmacy friends, colleagues and acquaintances who have heard me speak mistakenly in the past against pharmacists in the community providing immunizations! Was I ever wrong!!! I’m the one with all those trite little expressions I like to throw around like: “Not everything we look at can be changed...but, NOTHING can be changed until we’re willing to look at it!” All I had to hear was just that one little old lady say to me: “I probably wouldn’t have got my Flu shot this year if you hadn’t been offering them here at your pharmacy. It’s just too hard for me to get out and I get tired easily. I didn’t get one last year and I damn near died from the flu I caught and wound up in the hospital with pneumonia. It’s a lot easier to get it (a Flu shot) now that the bus from our Senior Center drops me off here anyway to shop for my groceries. Now I have run out of excuses not to get my flu shot. Thank you for offering this important service to us old folks who can’t get around!” Wow, what an impact! This is like a freight train 30

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coming straight at me! With regards to the comments you made below when you state the poignant and brutally honest comment: “The objections from within our own professional ranks to take on any new risk or responsibility”. You can use me as an example if you’d like, of the dinosaur I vowed I’d NEVER become when I came fresh out of pharmacy school full of optimism and fought with those “old dinosaurs” in another state where I used to live when I was appointed to the leadership committees in that state. It was interesting to witness firsthand the resistance to proposed new Continuing Education requirements, preferring the “fat dumb and happy” approach to any new idea that....God Forbid.... might enhance their knowledge or value to the community or hospital or whatever discipline in which my colleagues practiced! The same Industrial Psychologist and Motivational Speaker, Jamie Weinstein, PhD, who gave me the “change” quote I mentioned above also gave me this little ditty at the same seminar in April of 1983 that I’ve used frequently with my interns over the years: “We grew up learning to fear failure more than we learned to risk new ideas!” FPA leadership must sometimes feel like they are fighting a forest fire with a squirt gun when they run up against pharmacists across the State of Florida with my old myopic view! How in the world did we get to this point? What is needed to make a change? Let me know what I can do from my little corner of the world! I’ll be honest, it took me a little while, but I’ve finally embraced our new role with regards to immunizations after that encounter with one of our loyal, older pharmacy customers and see the value. After all, I’ve done only a few immunizations, pale by comparison to my partner, Chris Fuller who’s in the top 5 or 10 in number of immunizations within the entire corporate organization...and we only do influenza shots in Florida. As you know other states are allowed the full complement of immunization opportunities! I actually now look forward to the day our role is expanded along with medication therapy management (MTM) services which Karen Whalen, PharmD., did such a superb job presenting at our January county association meeting. Anyone who doesn’t see Medication Therapy Management as the savior of retail pharmacy needs to have their heads examined. Had to listen to a little of my own advice when I quote that old colloquialism from time to time: “What does a mind and a parachute have in common? They both work best when they are fully open!!!!!!” My partner, Chris Fuller has helped me to “open my mind” in recent months and given me a new view and a deeper sense of purpose, and specifically, the genuine and unique added value we truly have at the retail level serving in this expanded role as immunizers. Don’t get me wrong, I always knew the value we have which is the main reason we, like many of our colleagues, chose to enter this profession


right from the start. Furthermore, I’m proud to say that even I, the dinosaur, have had “a few” loyal followers (customers) over the years, whose trust I’ve “earned”. They have followed me from store to store as the chain(s) moved me and others around in my early years as needs changed for various and sundry reasons. I learned early on as a new district manager for a pharmacy chain to never move a well established and trusted retail community pharmacist without causing a stir and barrage of hate mail from customers that were forced to change their shopping habits and store to follow a transplanted pharmacist they trusted with filling their Rx’s! If you don’t know my partner, Chris Fuller, you need to meet him someday. Chris has been and currently is the only one in the area for our pharmacy chain doing BMD’s and Diabetic Screenings. He’s a leader in the pharmacy community, has been for years! It is hard working opposite him. Our customers only want to talk to Chris! It’s a humbling experience in a good way! He also speaks for a drug manufacturer from time to time as well as filling in at our local hospital and other stores within our chain. I have to say I’m as equally impressed with Professor Karen Whalen, PharmD., and feel so fortunate to have her as an active member of our local society. What a Tiger (or is that Tigress?)! Like Joy Wright, she gets things done! We’re blessed to have them both in our community and as well as serving important leadership roles within our profession! Keep up the great work you do for us and the FPA. We’re indeed blessed to have you in Tallahassee and the leadership of the FPA! Thanks for your usual insightful comments!

JOIN TODAY! Florida Pharmacy Association

Best Regards, Jack Armstrong, BPharm FPA Member

EDITOR’S NOTE: The letter from FPA Member Jack Armstrong above was received in this office from our email exchange back and forth on the April 1, 2011 issue of Stat News on the pharmacist role in accountable care organizations. In our discussions I revealed the challenges that our association faces when advocating for changes to the pharmacy practice act to advance the profession into patient care services. Not all within our community agree that this is something their professional organizations should be doing. I found Jack’s comments interesting enough to share with the readers of this magazine.

APRIL 2011

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Buyer’s Guide florida PHARMACY TODAY

ADVERTISERS: This is a special section designed to give your company more exposure and to act as an easy reference for the pharmacist.

PHARMACY RESOURCES

PHarmaceutical WHOLESALER

PPSC Retail Pharmacy Purchasing Program (888) 778-9909

McKesson Drug Company Jim Springer (800) 804-4590 FAX: (863) 616-2953

PHARMACY CONSULTANTS HCC Pharmacy Business Solutions Dean Pedalino (800) 642-1652 Mobile: (727) 460-1855

TEMPORARY PHARMACISTs – STAFFING

INSURANCE

Medical Staffing Network (800) 359-1234

Meadowbrook Workers Comp Insurance Endorsed by FPA (800) 825-9489

HealthCare Consultants Pharmacy Staffing Bob Miller (800) 642-1652

Rx Relief (800) RXRELIEF

LEGAL ASSISTANCE Kahan ◆ Shir, P.L. Brian A. Kahan, R.Ph., and Attorney at Law (561) 999-5999

FREQUENTLY CALLED NUMBERS AHCA MEDICAID PHARMACY SERVICES 2727 Mahan Drive Tallahassee, FL 32308 (850) 487-4441 www.fdhc.state.fl.us/medicaid/ pharmacy AMERICAN PHARMACISTS ASSOCIATION (APhA) Washington, D.C. (800) 237-2742 www.pharmacist.com AMERICAN SOCIETY OF HEALTH SYSTEM PHARMACISTS Bethesda, MD (301) 657-3000 www.ashp.com/main.htm Drug Information Center Palm Beach Atlantic University (561) 803-2728 druginfocenter@pba.edu FLORIDA BOARD OF PHARMACY 4052 Bald Cypress Way Bin #C04 Tallahassee, FL 32399-3254 (850) 245-4292 www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa FLORIDA POISON INFORMATION CENTER NETWORK (800) 222-1222 www.fpicn.org National Community Pharmacists Association 100 Daingerfield Road Alexandria, VA 22314 703.683.8200 703.683.3619 fax info@ncpanet.org Recovering Pharmacists Network of Florida (407) 257-6606 “Pharmacists Helping Pharmacists”

Advertising in Florida Pharmacy Today Display Advertising: please call (850) 264-5111 for a media kit and rate sheet. Buyers’ Guide: A signed insertion of at least 3X per year, 1/3 page or larger display ad, earns a placement in the Buyers’ Guide. A screened ad is furnished at additional cost to the advertiser. Professional Referral Ads: FPA Members: $50 per 50 words; Non‑members: $100 per 50 words; No discounts for advertising agencies. All Professional Referral ads must be paid in advance, at the time of ad receipt. 32

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April 2011 Florida Pharmacy Journal  

April 2011 Florida Pharmacy Journal