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FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

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Lifestyle and sustainability.

Award Winning Home E-Bay Beach House

McLaren Vale township Rediscovered

Kaleidoscopic KI AU $8.95 WINTER 2015 WINTER 2015

Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments of 550-950 sqm from $160,000 SA’s most sustainable and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 or email adam@beyondtoday.com.au.

Self drive tour of discovery

Coriole

An evolving garden

McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island


South Australia’s premium lifestyle magazine with a focus on the Fleurieu. BUY IT · READ IT · BE IN THE KNOW. Available at newsagents, cafés, restaurants, cellar doors and Qantas Club Lounges.

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‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

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T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

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Lifestyle and sustainability. Lifestyle and su stai

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AZINE FLEURIEU LIVING MAG

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

O ISLAND AND KANGARO EU PENINSULA A L I A’ S F L E U R I SOUTH AUSTR F O T S E B E H T

Award Winning Home E-Bay Beach House

McLaren Vale township Rediscovered

Kaleidoscopic KI Self drive tour of discovery

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Coriole

An evolving garden

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Key Personnel Petra de Mooy Petra is a publisher, an interior designer, a furniture maker and a devotee of good food, good design and good stories. After three years of producing FLM, Petra is grateful to everyone who has helped make the publication a part of this great community. Jason Porter Jason has worked as a graphic designer and creative director both locally and overseas for more than twenty five years. When not in the office, he can usually be found in the garage tweaking some kind of rare hi-fi component.

Featured Contributors Stephanie Johnston Stephanie Johnston is a former book publisher turned town and country planner who writes for a number of publications including a+u, Historic Environment, Australian Garden History, The Adelaide Review, SA Life and FLM. She is interested in how good planning and inspirational design can harness and enhance the ‘core drivers’ of a community – culture and commerce.

Leonie Porter-Nocella After spending decades as a university editor, paid by one, pimped out to others – refining papers from Health, and Wound Management to Wine Marketing and – well, everything. Here the aim is to impart/increase style while decreasing errors and ambiguities.

Those interests are reflected in her involvement with the Mount Lofty Ranges World Heritage Bid, Adelaide Park Lands Authority and Friends of Port Willunga. She loves the beach and the Fleurieu and is currently walking the Heysen Trail.

Perscia Maung After years of moonlighting as a blues singer and keeping rather anti-social hours, Perscia now enjoys her day job at FLM. This allows her to not only walk her Great Dane on the beach, but to properly take in the region she so adores.

Ainsley Roscrow Ainsley was born in Adelaide, South Australia, but spent her childhood and teen years in California, where she completed her education. She and partner Damon live in Willunga with their four children and are both passionate about the local community. After completing her Bachelor of Education and Advanced Diploma of Montessori Studies she worked in Montessori Preschool settings. Her interest and dedication to the Montessori Method of Education has its beginnings in her own pre-school and early primary school years. She has been involved in education for the past eighteen years, and has been managing director of the Montessori Children’s Centre, McLaren Vale for over five years. She is a passionate advocate for high quality early childhood education, with a strong belief that the early years of a child’s life are the most important ones, laying the foundation for all of the rest.

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Publisher Information Richard Souter Richard Souter is a wine marketing consultant with a passion for working with small to medium wineries. Resuming his marketing business in November 2014 after a short stint of ‘early retirement’, he enjoys the luxury of choosing to consult for likeminded wineries. Richard also believes that not being totally immersed in all aspects of the business allows a consultant to bring a unique perspective to the project. The opportunity to achieve client success in what is a very competitive industry is a challenge he relishes.

PUBLISHER Fleurieu Living Magazine is published four times a year by Fleurieu Living Pty Ltd. ISSN 2200-4033 PUBLISHING EDITOR AND MANAGING DIRECTOR Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au EDITOR Leonie Porter-Nocella leonie@fleurieuliving.com.au ADVERTISING SALES Perscia Maung perscia@fleurieuliving.com.au ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Cathy Phillips GRAPHIC DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Jason Porter jason@fleurieuliving.com.au

Other contributing writers and photographers

PRINTER Graphic Print Group

Pip Forrester, Robert Geh, James Howe, Heidi Linehan, Angela Lisman, Mike Lucas, Greg Mackie, Winnie Pelz, James Potter, Jasper Savage and Merenia Vince.

SUBSCRIPTIONS www.isubscribe.com.au

DISTRIBUTION Integrated Publication Solutions

ALL ENQUIRIES Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 111, Aldinga, South Australia 5173. ONLINE fleurieuliving.com.au facebook.com/FleurieuLivingMagazine twitter.com/FleurieuLiving instagram.com/fleurieulivingmagazine/ COPYRIGHT All content copyright Fleurieu Living Magazine Pty Ltd unless otherwise stated. While Fleurieu Living Magazine takes every care to ensure the accuracy of information in this publication, the publisher accepts no liability for errors in editorial or advertising copy. The views of the contributors are not necessarily endorsed by Fleurieu Living Magazine. Printed on paper from well managed forests using environmentally friendly vegetable-based inks.

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Contents

50 FEATURED HOME: E-Bay Beach House Encounter Bay. FRONT COVER PHOTO: by Robert Geh.

FOOD & WINE

58 FEATURED ARTIST: Tom O’Callaghan – A painter’s progress.

LIVING GREEN

49 Rare Fizz at Oxenberry.

85 James Potter dishes up The Dirt.

22 Kay Brothers 125 celebrations. th

56 Settlers Gin. 70 Winey Kids of McLaren Vale – Kid friendly ways to enjoy the spoils of our region. 64 Cooks and Chefs – Thomas Dörre from Serafino and Bree May: Winner of My Kitchen Rules 2014. 80 Taste the Season – Fennel ... or Foeniculum vulgare. 76 Wine Tastings – and you can WIN WINE in our competition! 6

MARKETS & EVENTS 10 Get out there and enjoy the Winter festivities.


16 TRAVEL FEATURE: Kaleidoscopic Kangaroo Island – Self-drive tour of discovery.

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TOWN FEATURE: McLaren Vale rediscovered.

FEATURED GARDEN: Coriole – An evolving garden.

BOOKS & WORDS

PENINSULA PEOPLE

BEING SOCIAL

62 Mike Lucas offers a WInter rerading list.

75 Chris Royans – Green Lips at sea. 78 Sandi of Hunted Hats. 34 Kim and Darren McFarlane create a modern salon in Old Noarlunga 26 Dr Richard Glatz – Entomologist.

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COMPETITIONS 44 Fleurieu Four Seasons Art Prize – The winning entries. 76 We announce a new competition – which could win you some wine!

FLM gets out to see who was at the following events: · Woodstock Fringe Event · Homeless Grapes · Gemtree Second Anniversary · Red Poles Tenth Anniversary · Magic in the Moonlight: Penny’s Hill.

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ACKNOWLEDGES

A special thanks to the advertising partners that have made a long term commitment to FLM. GOLD PARTNERS

SOUTH COAST

SILVER PARTNERS

BRONZE PARTNERS

Fleurieu Renewables COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR SPECIALISTS

THE BLUFF R E SO R T APAR T ME NTS

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Welcome to FLM Welcome to issue thirteen!

Letters to the Editor

As we wrote that we had a moment where we thought ‘Aaah, that would explain a few things.’ Omens aside, we would like to talk about what we really loved about creating issue thirteen (maybe if we say it often enough it’ll weaken the curse?)

It was terrific. Thanks Petra – and I have just bought 5 copies! I must say, our bedroom looks surprisingly alluring on your front cover!! All the best to you and for FLM and thanks again. Chris and Skye PS: Winnie and, later, your crew were a delight to deal with. Chris Rann

If you have been a follower of FLM we think that by now you will have noticed that we love Kangaroo Island. The epic tour from last summer is still reaping content rewards with our self-drive extravaganza, as well as our visit to entomologist Dr Richard Glatz, who has the very distinctive credit of finding a previously undiscovered moth, ‘Aenigmatinea glatzella’. (Love a little Latin.) We also finally made it over to the ‘Hunted Hats’ house to photograph Scott and Sandi wearing her fantastic creations. But why does Scott look as though that hat actually grew on his head? We met the hyper-energetic Bree May and tasted her sublime dessert. We learned that manners are still alive and well with chef Thomas Dörre at Serafino. And the list goes on: visits to an award winning home at Encounter Bay; a renovated heritage building at Old Noarlunga and an artist‘s studio at Victor ... as well as a fishery at Cape Jervis. We do get around. As Becky at Winey Kids says, ‘It’s all about getting out and about, exploring where you live, providing some light humour and reducing the isolation of parenthood.’ Check out the diary dates for info on our third anniversary party. You’re all invited!! Without you we wouldn’t even be here. There is no Plan B. Be there and be counted. Cheers! The FLM Team.

That’s awesome, I love it. Thanks so much Leonie. x Bree May Hello Perscia Compliments to you and your team. I have just enjoyed your latest edition from cover to cover. A lovely read. xxx Karen Hello Leonie The profile is great made me and my partner laugh. Thanks so very much. (Nelly is a nick name that was bestowed on me by my best friends back in the U.K. because I can be a bit of a Nelly at times.)  Peace and love Neil (Nelly) McGlew, Head Chef, The Kitchen, Penny’s Hill Winery  Hi Leonie, Thanks again for our wonderful write up in Fleurieu Living Mag. Kind regards, Emma Craig Manager: Marketing & Communications Hi Leonie, Hope all is good. Looking forward to cook for you. Thomas Doerre (Serafino’s) Have a great week. Hi, we are avid readers of FLM and would like to complete our library of issues. The four we are missing are: Winter 2012, Summer 2012, Autumn 2013, and Spring 2013. Can you tell me how we can purchase these? As well, we would like to commence subscription from and including Winter 2015. Rob Seidel

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MARKETS & EVENTS

Winter Diary Dates LOCAL MARKETS: Aldinga, McLaren Vale and Willunga Aldinga Bay Art, Craft and Produce Market On the 4th Sunday of every month at the Aldinga Institute Show Hall from 8 - 1. Arts and crafts from local artisans, as well as fresh local produce. Willunga Farmers’ Market In the Willunga Town Square every Saturday from 8 - 12.30.  You must go just for the Summer Fruits! Cherries, peaches, nectarines, blueberries – the freshest you’ll find! Don’t forget to buy a membership and receive discounts on all the fabulous local food! Willunga Quarry Market Adjacent to the Willunga Oval, every 2nd Saturday of each month, rain or shine! Come and browse an eclectic mix of everything, ranging from second hand tools to plants to craft.  Always something new to see. 

Market of Earthly Delights Held from 1 - 4 at the Encounter Centre in Victor Harbor on the 1st Sunday of each month. Bring and swap your surplus produce with other like-minded growers. Think home-grown fruit, vegetables, seedlings, flowers, honey, sauces, recipes, kindling, compost and more!

COUNTRY MARKETS: Kangaroo Island Farmers’ and Community Markets Lloyd Collins Reserve by the beach at Penneshaw – first Sunday of the month from 9.30 - 1.00 – with Kangaroo Island’s top food producers selling a range of fresh local produce in a great village atmosphere. For special SeaLink Ferry fares, visit sealink.com.au Meadows Country Market Meadows Community Hall on the second Sunday of the month from 9.00 - 3.00. Local produce, crafts, collectibles, plants and bric-abrac. A true country market.

Willunga Artisans’ Market In the Willunga Show Hall (opposite the Willunga Farmers’ Market) on the second Saturday of each month. Local art and craft, with a little bit of something for everyone. A great place to buy a unique handmade gift!

Myponga Markets In the old Myponga Cheese Factory every Saturday, Sunday, and public holiday from 10 - 4. Enjoy browsing over 100 stalls offering produce, books, toys, Balinese imports, musical instruments, vintage collectibles and much more.

The Vale Market Held from 9am to 1pm at the McLaren Vale & Fleurieu Visitor Information Centre on the 1st and 3rd Sunday of each month. The market features locally-made produce and products, wine, art and craft as well as hand-made souvenirs. The Vale Market is family friendly and features buskers and local acts.

Strathalbyn Markets In Lions Park, South Terrace, Strathalbyn. On the 3rd Sunday of the month from 8 - 2. Bric-a-brac, produce, coffee, pies, apples, plants, soaps, jewellery and much more in wonderfully historic Strathalbyn.

Goolwa, Port Elliot and Victor Harbor Goolwa Wharf Market The 1st and 3rd Sunday of every month from 9 - 3.30. With around 80 stalls there is a myriad of goods on offer. Bric-a-brac, collectibles, plants, books both new and old, and hand-crafted goods. Port Elliot Market At Lakala Reserve Port Elliot, on the 1st and 3rd Saturday of each month. A typical country market with plenty of fresh local produce on offer as well as a good mix of other goods, such as bric-a-brac, books, fishing gear – even a $2 stall! There is sure to be something for everyone. Victor Farmers’ Market At the Grosvenor Gardens, Victor Harbor every Saturday morning from 8 - 12.30. Over 32 stalls, with locally caught seafood, organic vegetables, seasonal fruit, local honey, mushrooms, fresh flowers, Fleurieu regional wines and much more. Well worth the visit. 10

Yankalilla Market In the Agricultural Hall, Main South Road, Yankalilla on the 3rd Saturday of each month. Craft and produce market featuring goods from the local area. You’ll be surprised at what you may find!


FESTIVALS AND EVENTS: JUNE Bank SA Sea & Vines Festival (Events shown in blue) Various venues around McLaren Vale. For ticket information: www.seaandvines.com.au June 5 - 8 De Lisio Wines June 5 (opening 7:00pm) The Most Unique Label Launch You’ve Ever Seen Every De Lisio Wine label has a story. Be part of the next chapter at our unique label launch – the first event of the 2015 Sea & Vines Festival! Enjoy a fun and relaxed three-course dinner by Chef Robert Yates of Decant Restaurant in Adelaide. The specially designed and exclusively sourced menu will be matched to a selection of our premium boutique wines, and Fleurieu beers. Be guided through a tasting of the new release wine, meet the Fleurieu artist designing the De Lisio labels, and discover some surprises in the label art process. Tickets include a six-pack of the new release wine. Andre’s Cucina & Polenta Bar@ Angove Sunday June 7, 12 - 4pm Superstar Adelaide Chef Andre Ursini joins us again for 2015 to create another awesome culinary experience. Indulge in Andre’s passion and flair for Italian food with a fantastic four-course feast cooked in style with a touch of theatre. Immerse yourself in our trophy-winning Warboys Vineyard and its wines. Savour the sounds of Adelaide’s Redline Duo. Bookings essential. Tickets $75pp via seaandvines.com.au or book directly through our cellar door on 08 8323 6900. Pizza & Paella Day Where: Woodstock Wine Estate When: Saturday 6th June 2015 Time: Lunch and Dinner Cost: $40 for adults and $30 for kids Price includes Paella to start with, a selection of Seafood Pizzas plus something sweet to finish. Book your spot for lunch or dinner on 08 8383 0156. The Ocean and Beyond – Where: Red Poles When: May 30 to July 19 An exploration in textiles by Wendy Redden and Denise Lithgow.

Fleurieu Living Magazine’s THIRD ANNIVERSARY Party A Solstice Soiree Where: Penny’s Hill When: June 19, 6 - late Cost: $35 We will celebrate our third anniversary in style at Penny’s Hill. Featuring the cool sounds of DJ Musical Sherpa. It will be informal and fun. Music, canapés and drinks. Kids will be welcome too. Check out our Facebook page for ticket information: Part proceeds to go to the Young Farmers’ Scholarship Fund. Fleurieu Festival for Performing Arts Where: Port Noarlunga Arts Centre, 22 Gawler St, Port Noarlunga When: 19 - 21 June. Check the Festival’s Facebook page for details. Dancing, orchestras, bands, choirs, musical comedy and soloists join to make different sessions of entertainment. Come and support the multitude of talent from our very own Fleurieu area.

JULY 44th Willunga Almond Blossom Festival Where: Willunga Oval and Town Halls When: July 21 - August 1 Every year the Willunga Almond Blossom Festival takes over the town to raise money for their Recreation Park facilities. There’s entertainment galore for all ages, including show rides, food stalls, markets and so much more. Don’t miss the opening night Fireworks Spectacular!!! www.almondblossomfestival.com.au www.onkaparingacity.com Four Legs Where: Red Poles When: July 25 to September 6 A group mixed media exhibition as part of SALA.

AUGUST SALA Festival Where: Various venues across SA When: August : 1 - 31 Come along to one of the many events of the SALA Festival, established in 1998, and immerse yourself in the artistic talent of visual artists in South Australia. www.salainc.com.au >

Image at left: Auraria Antiques at Strathalbyn. Photo courtesy Heidi Linehan.

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FESTIVALS AND EVENTS continued: 6th How Do We Love Thee? Let us count the ways ... Where: National Wine Centre – Vines Function area When: July 30 - August 30 Time: Daily 10 - 5 | Launch 2pm - Sunday August 2 Cost: Free Fine Art Kangaroo Island’s annual exposé of new work by awardwinning, established and exciting emerging artists combining art, environment and the community. Interconnected by an extraordinary sense of place, 22 artists reveal the obscure delights of funghi. www.fineartkangarooisland.com.au Strathalbyn Collectors, Hobbies & Antiques Fair Where: Various venues around Strathalbyn. When: August 15, 16 Time: 10am – 4pm The Strathalbyn Collectors’ Fair takes advantage of the town’s heritage buildings and scenic views and brings together exhibits of china, glass, antique jewellery, linen, lace, silver, toys and much more.

ONGOING: Red Poles - Live Music Where: 190 McMurtrie Road, McLaren Vale. When: Every Sunday 12:30 - 3:30 Woodstock Wine Estate - Wood Oven Pizza Nights with Live Entertainment Where: Woodstock Wine Estate When: Every Friday Night Time: 6pm onwards Cost: $35 for adults and $20 for kids Join us for a little starter, selection of wood oven pizzas and something sweet to finish.

Image at right: The opening night fireworks spectacular at The Willunga Almond Blossom Festival is always a must-see event! 12


Petra de Mooy takes a three day self-drive tour across

Kaleidoscopic KI Photographs by Jasper Savage.


Previous page: Provisions for the Cape De Couedic lighthouse keepers and their families were brought over by boat and hauled up by a flying fox winching system originally powered by a pair of horses. Top: Cute little penguins at Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park. Above left: Seals can be found resting in the dunes after being at sea hunting for days on end. Above right: Kangaroo Island Wildlife Park owner Dana Mitchell with Alfie the koala.

Earlier this year we had the good fortune to undertake an epic and thorough selfdrive tour of one of our greatest South Australian assets – Kangaroo Island (KI). To make it easier for our readers who may be thinking of taking a quick trip: the top nature spots on KI are Seal Bay, Remarkable Rocks and Admirals Arch. These are the most visited and photographed destinations on the island and are worth every gig of digital download. Achievable at a really bristling clip in one day! However ... having been on numerous short trips previously we were spoiled for choice and scope with a longer stay that included some lounging and relaxing as well as getting to some yet unexplored corners of this vast and diverse landscape. A truly awe-inspiring time. The rugged and untouched nature of the island is best experienced with plenty of time and a well-stocked petrol tank, cooler, water bottle and thermos full as it is can be challenging to find a roadside stop for provisions between destinations.

After a short drive along Hog Bay Road we reach the wildly beautiful Pennington Bay. This is truly a remarkable spot with sweeping views, an azure sea and ancient gnarly rocks. Although we were not game to get into untried waters that may have serious rips and ‘creatures’, Pennington is purported to have some sensational surf as well, ‘best on the island’. It always amazes me that despite the time of year you are often the only one on the beach – as was the case on day one of our adventure. If you are looking to get a workout on your gluteus Maximus and simultaneously rewarded by 360-degree views, make a stop at Prospect Hill and take the steep 512-step walk up to the top, where an amazing vista stretching from American River and Pelican Lagoon on one side and the rugged shores of the South Coast on the other will await you. Hog Bay Road ends at the Playford Highway, which will take you one of two directions. If you are hungry, thirsty or low on fuel it may be best to head north to Kingscote, the main town on the island, where you will find restaurants, cafes, petrol and groceries as well as one of the best art galleries in South Australia: Fine Art Kangaroo Island. > 15


Previous page: The elevated walkways at Seal Bay. Top left: Off-road quad bike adventures and top right; a giant sculpture of an eagle, both at Kangaroo Island Outdoor Action. Above: The smooth and magnificent rock formations at Remarkable Rocks.

We usually head to the South Coast Road and straight over to Seal Bay Conservation Park. The resources that have been poured into this place ensure that the experience is accessible and educational, while remaining respectful to one of the last remaining colonies of the Australian Sea Lion. The views, sustainable design and carefully planned walkways at Seal Bay are world class and visitors are offered the option of a paid excursion onto the beach to get up close to the colony, or for a smaller fee a self-guided tour can be just as rewarding. Again, the rugged waters and coastline of the Southern Ocean are breathtaking. As every traveller will have a different style it may, for some, be enough in one day. We often take detours and check out little side roads and go off the beaten track. There are all sorts of experiences that you may want to check out: a eucalyptus distillery, a honey farm, or the increasingly popular Kangaroo Island Spirits’ distillery and cellar door. Here I am going to be honest. The island is big and there is no real central point to kind of branch out from, so your itinerary really depends on how many days you have, what you like, and how far you are willing to drive in one day.

As our trip was unfettered by time constraints, we were able to call it a day after my top priority road stop at Vivonne Bay for one of their deservedly famous Whiting Burgers. Yum. Accommodation locations are dotted all over the island, ranging from camp-sites to five-star, with loads of self-contained holiday homes on offer. Vivonne Bay has a character-filled neighbourhood in the dunes with the added bonus of great access to Flinders Chase and some action-adventure offerings. The dunes at Little Sahara are owned by Brenton Davis of Kangaroo Island Outdoor Action. Brenton meets up with us on Day Two to give us a tour and show us the fantastic structure of the Max Pritchard-designed building they are working on. Embedded in the side of the dune with beautiful stone features, this will be yet another great asset to the growing adventure-tour business on the island. Families have long been talking about great days spent at Little Sahara surfing the dunes, but now the older folks can take a break in the viewing area of this new offering and watch the offspring burn off steam. However, it is well worth the climb to the top just to marvel at the expanse of white sand and the ocean beyond. > 17


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Brett also owns a quad-bike tour business down the road, and invites us over to give that a go as well. A short trip in the car to the test track and we are good to go. Thinking I’d opt for a cup of tea and a lie down instead, once I get on the quad bike I am hooked. Great to get off-road into the wilds and on track, spotting kangaroos, koalas, a goanna, mallee scrub and the most spectacular yaccas ever, make for a great little jaunt. Phew. After some lower-key ambling, our next stop is the Kelly Hill Caves. What an amazing phenomenon this is ... and again, very sensitively planned to be respectful of this fantastic natural endowment. You have to see it to believe it. Now I really do need a cup of tea and a lie down. Day Three is going to be the epic Flinders Chase day. Kangaroo Island again delivers, with the well-planned orientation of the roads and buildings within the park maximising views, yet observing and balancing with the eco system that thrives in the native bush, coastal dunes and waters. At the Western-most tip of KI is one of the best coastal walks in the world ... that culminates under the rocks of Admirals Arch. The craggy black granite rocks and pulsating Southern Ocean on this exposed corner of the island is a geological landmark with the giant, eroded-rock arch forming a perfect frame for a playful colony of fur seals and the great blue ocean beyond the smoothly carved rocks below. >

Previous page top: The dry limestone caves at Kelly Hill and their amazing sculptural stalactites. Previous page bottom: The Dunes at Little Sahara. This page top: One of the homes in the character-filled community around Vivonne Bay. Above right: If you are lucky The Rockpool Cafe at Stokes Bay will be open.

Kangaroo Island again delivers, with the well-planned orientation of the roads and buildings within the park maximising views, yet observing and balancing with the eco system that thrives in the native bush, coastal dunes and waters.

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Above: Gnarly old rocks at Pennington Bay.

There is much to see and do here at Flinders Chase, but for the daytripper another must-see is the world famous Remarkable Rocks. A relative who visited some time back declared that they had driven so far to see them that they were going to feel ripped off if they were not so ‘remarkable’. Never disappointing, the rocks provide a fantastic backdrop for any amateur or professional photographer. After some meandering down a few side roads to capture just a little bit more of the striking natural environment, we head over to the North Coast for the next day of ambling, detours and destinations. The recently reinvigorated Kangaroo Island Wilderness Park is stop number one. Owner-managers Dana and Chris Mitchell are passionate wildlife advocates, and this park, which had fallen into a bit of disrepair is now, under its new stewards, a great place to bring tourists, kids and animal-lovers alike. The casual and open style of the park provides ample opportunity to get up close and personal with the beasts, birds and reptiles. If you only go to one beach on the island, make it Stokes Bay. If you are lucky, the lovely Rockpool Café will be open, but either way, a very romantic walk through the rocks and onto the pristine beach will be enough to make this a worthwhile side-trip. The island is so full of great natural beauty, but it is also full of passionate characters with a story to tell and a bit of advice to give. There is great family history ... and after young adults leave the island for a bit of time in the city or overseas, many choose to settle back on the island when they start families and become entrepreneurs like their pioneering ancestors – but for a new age.

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If you only go to one beach on the island, make it Stokes Bay. If you are lucky the lovely Rockpool Café will be open, but either way, a very romantic walk through the rocks and onto the pristine beach will be enough to make this a worthwhile side-trip.


Kangaroo Island is less than a one-hour ferry ride from the mainland yet here you’ll feel a million miles away. This unspoilt sanctuary is a haven for flora and fauna and souls in need of respite. But it’s not all rest and relaxation. From wineries to wildlife encounters, seafood to seafaring adventures, there’s plenty to make your island escape unforgettable. All aboard! The magic’s on your doorstep.

5 DAY/4 NIGHT SELF-DRIVE HOLIDAY FROM $300PP* Includes ferry travel with your car and accommodation, plus a bonus discount voucher booklet! Call 13 13 01 or visit sealink.com.au/ads *Valid for travel from 15 May to 15 September 2015 staying at Emu Bay Holiday Homes. Other accommodation options available. For terms & conditions visit sealink.com.au


Pip Forrester takes her place at a

High Tea to celebrate 125 years of winemaking. Photographs by Angela Lisman.


Previous page: The old homestead sits up on the hill behind the winery and is a grand old building of some 100-plus years. Above: Delightful desserts from the Fleurieu Kitchen and delicious canapes were served in celebration.

An invitation to high tea. What a pleasure. Furthermore, it was a celebratory high tea: the Kay family were celebrating 125 years of family history in the South Australian wine industry. The occasion was to give us an opportunity to honour the family and their achievements and to gain a glimpse of another world. Friends and family gathered on the lawn beside the homestead to be treated to a high tea, a sparkling Shiraz, tours of the winery and homestead, accompanied by the sounds of JC Jazz. The high tea was served on tiered cake-stands laden with both sweet and savoury treats, crowned with dried fruits in recognition of the role that the fruit played in the early years of the family business. The sparkling Shiraz, carefully nurtured especially for the day, was a delicious accompaniment – one of those wines that makes you smile while awaiting more. The afternoon also offered us an opportunity to be taken on a tour of the Kay homestead by Alice Kay, and a tour of the heritage-listed winery by Colin Kay – both representatives of the third generation of this McLaren Vale winemaking family. A peek into the world that so strongly reflects the commitment, enjoyment and hard work of several generations of one family is a rare experience in our part of the world. The Kay family story began in 1891 when two young men, both in their early twenties, and their two sisters, Rose and Kate, bought land in the Seaview area of McLaren Vale. They named it Amery and within four years the brothers, Herbert and Frederick, had planted a vineyard and built a winery. The tours of the homestead and winery served to put flesh on the bones that form the base of this family’s story. The tour of the

winery, speedily built by the two brothers, underlines the hard work and determination they applied to their endeavours. Although innovation has been introduced over the past 125 years of operation, many of the original buildings and processes are still in use. A tour of a winery – the smells, the alchemy that takes place in these cool spaces – is fascinating, more particularly so with a winery steeped in such history. The fermenting tanks, the barrel halls, the basket press and remnants of old crushing facilities – originally operated by hand and then by horses – all take us back to another time while still engaging us in an understanding of this timeless industry as it is conducted in the twenty-first century. The Kay brothers certainly made the establishment of the winery and vineyards their first priority, but they also, in a reasonably short period of time, put their efforts into their domestic requirements. The property they had purchased in 1891 had a modest homestead built in the 1850s by the Alderseys. Twelve years after their arrival, the Kays added a kitchen to the existing building, followed a year later by a cellar. The final addition, referred to by the family as ‘the Grand Extension’ was completed in 1908. This extension created the homestead we see today, and which Alice Kay guided us through. It sits on a hill behind the winery with spectacular easterly views to the Mount Lofty ranges and the Gulf St Vincent. The house also includes a generous verandah facing south and east, taking advantage of those views and providing shade > 23


Top: Guests enjoying the festivities. Above left and right: The interior of the homestead has an interesting mix of antique furniture and collectibles.

in the heat of the summer … and it’s easy to envisage the family enjoying cool evenings there also. A prominent feature of the house is the tower in the centre of the building, which is, in fact, a very clever skylight. This structure, as Alice explained, allows light into the centre of the house. The rooms in this section of the house have internal windows. The tour of the homestead allowed us to peek into the key rooms; the hallway and the drawing and dining rooms. As we went through the house Alice conveyed what I am sure was just a mere glimpse into the family history. Our first stop was the hallway where we were introduced to Sarah Kay, the mother of Frederick and Herbert. Sarah was a botanic artist of some note, who, although a mother of eleven children was amazingly prolific. Several of her paintings hang in 24

the hallway together with a volume of her works, entitled ‘Flowers gathered in Our Wanderings’, which were painted while she was travelling in Europe in 1878. Sarah produced eight of these volumes, one for each of the surviving children. As was explained by a family member in our tour group, these volumes are still passed down to subsequent generations; but one family has chosen to pass on their album in a broken down form, so that all the family members are able to enjoy them. From the hallway we entered the drawing room on the southwest corner of the homestead. The room is populated with family treasures furniture, paintings and carpets – all acquired over the generations. Some of the furniture evokes the times when evenings were spent in conversation, reading or sewing. More recent family


Top: The home features a light well and gorgeous verandas. Above: Locally quarried Ironstone was used for some of the original building.

members have evidently added more furnishings, such as the carpets, which had been a wedding present for Cud and Barb. A couch of more recent times sits comfortably with a piano from an earlier period. The ‘crows’ nest’ in the southwest corner of the room must have been an appealing place to eat a meal, read, or as on this autumn afternoon a place to talk. As Alice suggested, it could have been where many an evening of cards was played – a delightful space for any epoch. The dining room, which by the turn of a handle on the central table becomes a billiard room, is evocative of a room that has also witnessed many family gatherings. Details in the room suggest these may have been meals eaten with monogrammed cutlery and wine drunk from glasses still to be found in the bespoke sideboard – a

true focal point of the room. Or the family may have gathered around the billiard table as it miraculously appeared from the dining table. The fireplace, no doubt a drawcard for the families, has a handsome mantelpiece serving as a depository of family mementos – including a photograph of the Kay family in the 1930s. So, now we’re back to the present enjoying high tea after our journey into the past. It was time to imbibe the pride and pleasure of the Kay clan in the presence of twenty first-century jazz. We indulged in a little more of the luscious sparkling Shiraz, finished off the cupcakes, muffins, macaron and dried fruits, and enjoyed a very warm welcome and a gracious celebratory speech by Colin Kay, who is justly proud of his family’s achievements over the past 125 years. We all raised a glass of sparkling Shiraz to that history. 25


My calling Jason Porter meets entomologist Dr Richard Glatz who enjoys a most enviable lifestyle – wandering through the wilds of KI with partner Janine, both collecting specimens for their respective projects. Photographs by Jasper Savage.


Previous page: Carefully categorised and laid out collections of insects – drawers and drawers and drawers full! Above: Dr Richard Glatz in his home office/lab/specimen storage area on Kangaroo Island.

As a teen, whenever I visited the South Australian Museum on North Terrace, my first (and longest) stop was always their impressive butterfly collection. At that time it was housed in lovely old timber drawers that pulled out to reveal hundreds of specimens mounted in careful rows. The only time I ever recall my attention being diverted from the butterflies (OK, the beetles always held some fascination as well) was when a live tarantula appeared in a glass case in the entomology section. (Apparently confiscated from someone returning from Mexico hoping to impress friends with a new ‘pet’.) I could stand there watching that monster for hours. So when I learned we were to feature a story on entomologist Dr Richard Glatz, I was quick to volunteer to write it. Richard is an entomologist living on Kangaroo Island. These days he works for himself (D’Estrees Entomology) but holds honorary positions at Adelaide University as well as the South Australian Museum. Originally from Loxton, both he and partner Janine Mackintosh were drawn to the Island perhaps due to the similarity – in terms of the biology – it shares with their home town. Janine by the way, is an artist of some repute whose work can be seen in previous issues of FLM. Her work usually involves large quantities of locally sourced specimens of flora, systematically laid out in arrangements not unlike Richard’s insect drawers.    Although Richard has always had an interest in plants and insects, he originally studied Computer Programming at university. However, after realising his IT degree didn’t bring as much satisfaction as he’d hoped, he decided to go back and study entomology. (Technically though, he studied Agricultural Science and specialised in insects.)    Nowadays however, he’s not only doing what he loves, but he’s making headlines in the science world. It seems Richard not only discovered a new species of moth on KI, but actually a new family. This is the first family of moth that’s been discovered anywhere in

the world since the 1970s. ‘Aenigmatinea glatzella’, or the ‘Enigma Moth’, is about the size of a five cent piece. It’s found among the southern cypress pine trees and in the span of a single day they emerge from their cocoons, mate, lay their eggs – and die! Richard’s also given us the scoop on a whole new genus of wasp that he’s discovered lays its eggs within the eggs of the moth, so its young actually feed on the moth larvae! There’s also a butterfly that’s recently been spotted on the island that hasn’t been seen since 1934. Apparently this particular species of butterfly lays its eggs at the entrance to ants’ nests (with the ants taking the eggs down into the nest). It’s not known what the reason for this is yet, whether it feeds on their young, or the ants cater to the butterfly larvae in some way – but it’s certainly being looked into. From what I can deduce Kangaroo Island seems to be an entomological gold mine!   Not surprisingly, Richard has amassed a substantial personal collection of over 35,000 specimens, most literally sourced from his own back yard. Something interesting I learned during our meeting was that he actually owns many of the original timber specimen drawers I used to look through at the museum so many years ago!     Being a Fellow of the Museum, he got first dibs on purchasing the old drawers when they updated to a more sophisticated metal stacking system.    As you can already tell, focussing his research on a geographic location (as opposed to an entomological niche) has already paid dividends. Richard senses that he’s only just scratching the surface: that there’s much more waiting to be discovered. Meanwhile he enjoys an enviable lifestyle, strolling the wilds of KI with Janine, both taking in the natural beauty while collecting specimens for their respective professional projects. If only we could all combine business and pleasure in such a way!

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Ainsley Roscrow rediscovers

McLaren Vale Photographs by Heidi Linehan


Previous page: Hardy’s Tintara on the Main Road is a green oasis filled with old and new world character and great wines! Above left: Piazzi della Valle is a tribute to and celebration of the early Italian settlers to the region. Above right: The Artel is one of many restaurants that can be enjoyed in the Vale.

A stroll down McLaren Vale‘s Main Street uncovers the changing face of this historic winery town. McLaren Vale, the land of plenty, is blessed with luxurious soils – perfect for growing internationally renowned wines – is in close proximity to beautiful beaches, and wonderfully fresh local produce is in abundance. Enjoying a rejuvenation of sorts, the main street, the heart of town, bears testament to this variety and quality, with a collection of shopfronts dedicated to promoting and exhibiting the region’s history and harvest. From the historic façades of Hardy’s Tintara Winery and Oxenberry Farm, to newer gift shops displaying combinations of local hand-crafted creations and imported giftware, McLaren Vale is a favourite destination for locals and interstate travellers alike. The first pioneers in the area grew cereal crops, but by 1838 John Reynell and Thomas Hardy planted grape vines, with the first two operational wineries appearing in 1850. Named Taring by the local Indigenous people, the township of McLaren Vale was renamed in 1923 for David McLaren, the Colonial Manager of the South Australia Company. Many of the vineyards of the early pioneers were situated where the town itself now stands. Nestled between two rows of low hills, its ironstone and chalky rock soil, with its thin covering of clay loam, proved perfect for growing our worldrenowned wines. Pioneer families built local infrastructure – including the flour mill, hotel and homesteads – using locally quarried ironstone, Willunga slate and timber from surrounding bushland.

Some of these stone buildings still stand, offering a variety of cellar door, exhibition and dining spaces. Oxenberry Farm still operates from some of their original buildings on Kangarilla Road. The surviving homestead, ‘Daringa’, was built in 1840 and is located just behind their current cellar door. The Singing Gallery, housed in the original Congregational Church at the top end of the street, also hosts many local events and markets. The space is synonymous with folk and blues concerts showcasing many local musicians, making it yet another of McLaren Vale’s attractions. The Barn, an iconic restaurant and gallery space, has been credited with being the first art gallery in the region. The original restaurant license for the converted Coach House stipulated that in order to trade, the space must operate as a legitimate art gallery. The cottage behind the Barn Bistro was the area’s first school. A short walk leads visitors to The Elbow Room and Shingleback Wine’s modernised, historic McLaren Vale farmhouse. The thick stone walls and exposed beams of these settler buildings provide a contextual history for visitors today, who can enjoy private functions in the intimate garden and cellar space. The historic 19th century well, which provided water to the original property, is still intact and provides a great backdrop to any event. > 29


The Main Street of McLaren Vale is full of cafes, bakeries and gift shops. Top left: Yummy Nuts is full of great local produce. Bottom left: The Elbow Room’s historic cottage is best enjoyed with a glass of wine and some of chef Nigel’s fantastic food offerings. Above right: McLaren UnValed has an eclectic mix of local and imported homeware.

No examination of the historic Main Street of McLaren Vale can be complete without including Hardy’s Tintara Winery complex. In 1876, when the local flour mill fell idle, Thomas Hardy quickly bought the site and set about converting it into a functioning winery. The Mill Cellars was situated on one-hundred-and-eighty acres of land housing a number of original ironstone buildings. The Old Boiler House was originally used to produce steam to run the Mill, although in later years it became the workshop for the winery. The Still House was used to make premium brandy and various liqueur, and the Old Bond Building was the original horse stables. These buildings have been faithfully renovated, retaining their pioneering charm and providing a beautiful setting for weddings, events and exhibitions. The winery skilfully embraces the best of new-age winemaking, while managing to retain much of the original equipment and traditional winemaking methods. The function room and new viewing platform offer the opportunity to enjoy a glimpse of the industrial and scientific side of winemaking, while the interior spaces reveal the pioneering spirit, by way of their solid structures and exposed beams, local ironstone walls and pug construction techniques. The winery space is complemented by gorgeous 19th century gardens, including magnificent Port Jackson and Moreton Bay Fig trees, Norfolk Island Pines and a range of succulents, including Agaves and Aloes. The superb gardens provide a green oasis in a nowdeveloped Main Street. 30

The Main Street isn’t just a place to explore local history, but also plays host to a burgeoning number of cafes, bakeries and boutique gift shops. The contribution of early Italian settlers to McLaren Vale, particularly its viticulture industry, is significant. The descendants of these early pioneers have acknowledged the Italian contribution to McLaren Vale by constructing an Italian-style town square creating a place for the whole community to enjoy. The Piazza della Valle, opened in 2012, provides a wonderful venue for community and private events right in the heart of McLaren Vale, literally providing a Plaza in the Valley to benefit the entire populace. The local community and wineries, in conjunction with the City of Onkaparinga and the South Australian Government, raised funds for the construction of the Piazza, designed to stage open-air community events and to celebrate the contribution of Italian migrants to the McLaren Vale landscape. Today there are more than eighty-eight cellar doors in McLaren Vale, the majority of which are small, family-run operations and boutique wineries.


Above left: The Cottage Bakery has a lovely kid-friendly room complete with toys and art supplies. Above right: Bonny Sixpence has a lovely selection of homewares and can help you create a customised piece to fit as well.

The Main Street isn’t just a place to explore local history, but also plays host to a burgeoning number of cafes, bakeries and boutique gift shops. Visitors can indulge their sweet tooth with handcrafted chocolate at Bracegirdle’s, or visit Medlow Confectionary and experience first-hand how our iconic Fruchocs are made. Yummy Nuts offers a huge range of local dry goods, including Willunga almonds, local olives and oils, as well as bulk flours, nuts, dried fruit and seeds. Hampers for special occasions are available year-round and Yummy Nuts supports local community events and organisations with donations of delightfully packaged local produce. The Cottage Bakery and Fresh Aromas hold a similar communityminded focus, both contributing generously to local events and sharing their artisan breads and delicious sweet and savoury delights with both visitors and locals. The Cottage Bakery holds regular Twilight Delight evenings raising money for local charities, catering for adults and children with live music and free kids’ activities. You can enjoy delicious coffee at either of the bakeries or explore the local coffee shops, like the Almond Train, The Tin Shed or a local institution, Blessed Cheese. Blessed Cheese offers a gallery space for local artists and includes local produce in meals and Fleurieu Milk in their creamy coffee. Providing a unique combination of cheese shop, licensed cafe and provedore, Blessed Cheese stocks a wide variety of local and imported gourmet foods both for sale and in their menu, with emphasis on local and seasonal produce.

The Artel offers a combination of fine dining with a gallery and giftware experience. Local produce is handcrafted into delicious tapas share-plates, and wood oven pizzas cooked to perfection on-site. The gallery and giftware space is filled with unique, local artworks. Live music and indoor/outdoor dining complete the Artel experience, which is often seen as ‘a loose collective for a group of artists and creatives’. The McLaren Vale Information and Visitors’ Centre provides a unique combination of function and gallery space perfect for any event. Featured local artworks adorn the walls, complemented by displays of local sculpture and textiles. The gift shop offers a wide range of local produce and craft. The building has been constructed using rammed earth walls, hundred-yearold timber, and local stone and slate. The surrounding grounds showcase regional flora and the linear park provides a perfect venue for monthly markets and weekly wood-oven pizza, as well as live music events. Pop into local giftware and home decor shops Bambu, McLaren UnValed and Bonny Sixpence to explore an eclectic mix of local and imported giftware. McLaren UnValed offers knick-knacks and home decor items with a combination of local commission-based items and ‘up-cycled’ antique and auction items. McLaren UnValed sources handicrafts and furniture items from ethical and sustainable providers, with many of the finishing touches completed >

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Above: McLaren Vale Garden Centre offers a huge range of fruiting trees and plants as well as ornamental and native flora.

in the Vale. Unique and special giftware, hampers, jewellery and vintage-chic home accessories fill this great new addition to the Main Street shopping precinct! Just down the road Bonny Sixpence offers another shopping hide-away filled with homewares and contemporary clothing. Up-cycled furniture sourced from trade fairs, with an emphasis on the 1920-40s, Bonny Sixpence supports local artisans and bespoke design services to help create specialty pieces for clients. A walk around the store will inspire, or if you have a piece or design already in mind, Bonny Sixpence can help you finalise that new addition. McLaren Vale Garden Centre provides a great range of giftware, striking pottery and ambient wind chimes. In combination with their giftware range, the Garden Centre offers a huge variety of fruiting trees and plants, as well as ornamental and native flora. First opened in 1976, this family business inhabits the original McLaren Vale Billiard Saloon built in the early 1920s. Fully trained horticultural staff offer free advice on matching plants with design visions, and on plantings that will accommodate our region’s diverse environmental conditions. When visitors to McLaren Vale have sated their taste buds, wined, shopped, explored and engaged in some retail therapy, there‘s a variety of wellness centres to choose from – to pamper their tired bodies. A short stroll from the exquisite cafes and green grounds of McLaren Vale’s open spaces, these body and wellness salons await greater investigation. Apart from the historic buildings and green oases in the heart of the region, McLaren Vale is bursting with passionate locals, all dedicated to the promotion of our high quality produce, wines and cuisine.

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When visitors to McLaren Vale have sated their taste buds, wined, shopped, explored and engaged in some retail therapy, there‘s a variety of wellness centres to choose from – to pamper their tired bodies.


The McLaren Vale Page

BEYOND BEAUTY NAIL & LASER CLINIC Nails, facial, IPL & massage

Homewares and Gifts, Candles and books, New and upcycled furniture ... find that one special piece that makes you smile.

BEYOND BEAUTIFUL STYLE LOUNGE Hair and make up

142 Main Road Mclaren Vale T: 0427 330 908 E: bonnysixpence@gmail.com

135 Main Road McLaren Vale. Ph: 8323 8324 Personalised Care ... Beautiful.

BS

Bonny Sixpence

McLaren Vale

McLaren Vale Garden Centre wants to inspire you to achieve something special in your garden

Gorgeous gifts and homewares Stylish furniture including new and upcycled one off pieces. Proud stockist of high quality brands.

174 Main Road McLaren Vale Phone 8323 8440 www.goodgarden.com.au

122 Main Road McLaren Vale. Ph: 8323 8432

Good hearing is essential for physical and mental wellbeing. Healthy aging is very dependent on good hearing. We risk our social skills if we cannot communicate. A hearing test is simple yet informative. Mary Trowbridge Audiologist 187 Main Rd Mclaren Vale M: 0411 779 916 mary@fleurieuhearing.com.au www.fleurieuhearing.com.au

YUMMY NUTS Experience the historic beauty of the heritage-listed Hardys Tintara Winery

“We have the best nuts on the Fleurieu!�

SOUTHERN VALES

FAMILY CHIROPRACTIC

CELLAR DOOR

telephone (08) 8329 4124 cellardoor@tintara.com.au www.hardys.com.au www.tintara.com.au

Better Health Naturally

Enjoy Hardys responsibly

Open 10am - 4.30pm 7 days for tastings and self guided tours 202 Main Road, McLaren Vale, South Australia

263 Main Road McLaren Vale SA 5171 Phone 8323 8696

Come and see our large selection of gourmet foods and local produce at the Yummy Nuts Market @ 152 Main Road, McLaren Vale. P: 08 8232 8500 E: rebeccan@internode.on.net W: yummynutsmarket.com.au

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Merenia Vince recounts the way Kim McFarlane kindled

New interest in an old town Photographs by Heidi Linehan

Last spring hairdresser Kim McFarlane was out for an early morning walk in her hometown, Old Noarlunga, when she passed an historic cottage newly up for sale in the main street. ‘I was so excited I ran home and told Darren, my husband’. But it wasn’t a home she had in mind, it was to house her hairdressing salon. Having dazzled the residents of the sleepy village five years earlier by establishing a glossy salon in a leased property, the next logical step for business-woman Kim was to own her own premises. And the dilapidated cottage for sale on the other side of Patapinda Road beckoned. ‘I always imagined owning something quaint and quirky in an old town. I’ve worked mostly in little corner shops, one-off places, rather than shopping centres and I like the freedom.’

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Kim and Darren moved fast. They purchased the cottage, embarked on a whirlwind of restoration and in four months had fully restored it, landscaped the garden and were open for business. Done mostly on weekends it was a truly a family affair; with carpenter Darren stepping up, lots of family members pitching in, and of course, Kim giving her own touches. Even her fellow Gallery hairdressers took a turn with the brushes and brooms. Now freshly painted in classic white with charcoal detailing, the ‘new’ Gallery hair and beauty studio is the jewel of historic Old Noarlunga. Kim, a born artist and a natural at decorating, opted for an elegant, timeless look that acknowledges the heritage features of the cottage. The salon is a romantic mix of old and new, maintaining original slate and timber floors, and deeply recessed windows, but offset by ornate mirrors and colourful ceramic tiles. Kim’s grand flourish is a pressed metal ceiling that lends a swirly, feminine touch while still evoking the Victorian era.


Previous page: The shopfront (seen in this archival photo taken around 1920) has seen many incarnations including as the current super stylish Gallery Hair Studio. Above: Now freshly painted in classic white with charcoal detailing, the ‘new’ Gallery Hair and Beauty Studio is the jewel of historic Old Noarlunga. Below: The waiting area is cosy and stylish with tufted slipper chairs and a lovely fireplace. Bottom: The beauty room overlooking the Onkaparinga Hills must be the most picturesque beauty parlour on the Fleurieu.

‘Locals popped in and chatted to Darren while he was renovating. We’ve heard lots of tales about the history of the house and the village.’ One villager who lives across the road from The Gallery worked there as a girl, selling baked goods from the shop. Built in the 1860s when Old Noarlunga was a bustling town and had no ‘old’ in its name, the cottage at 48 Patapinda Road began life as a modest two-bedroom home owned by the Furler family. As the family grew – they had nine children – two more rooms and a shopfront were added. Over the years, the cottage has been a drapery, a general store, and an electrical shop as well as a home. Today, the many little rooms lend themselves perfectly to a hair and beauty studio, and the beauty room overlooking the Onkaparinga Hills must be the most picturesque beauty parlour in the land. Old Noarlunga locals were delighted to see the cottage revived and to have a young family investing business in the town. Says Kim, ‘Locals popped in and chatted to Darren while he was renovating. We’ve heard lots of tales about the history of the house and the village.’ One villager who lives across the road from The Gallery worked there as a girl, selling baked goods from the shop. Another Gallery customer used to live in the cottage: ‘She thinks it’s hilarious. When she comes to the salon, she pops her head through the doorways and says “Oh that was my bedroom!’” > 35


Kim’s early success as a young businesswoman, (she employs three staff at The Gallery), is the product of hard work and clear vision. ‘I’m from a farming family and I don’t mind hard work’ she says, and adds, ‘If you find something you love it doesn’t feel like hard work anyway. I love what I’m doing, I never want to stop.’ She always knew hair was her destiny, and was lucky to have an older sister, also a hairdresser, as inspiration and mentor. From a young age Kim spent her school holidays in Port Lincoln eagerly helping out at her sister Tracy’s salon. In the nine years she’s been in business for herself Kim has worked mainly by word of mouth and has rarely advertised: ‘If you keep your customers happy, they will return. It’s the old fashioned way, but it works.’ In fact it’s only this year that Kim has applied herself to the world of social media. The Gallery is a shot of adrenaline for rustic Old Noarlunga where the only other main-street businesses are a pub, a deli, and a curiosity shop. Tucked at the base of Horseshoe Hill, in the bow of the Onkaparinga River, the village is mainly a weekend destination for picnickers, but Kim hopes her business may encourage others to invest there. ‘I want to build up Old Noarlunga. It’s a great little town and I want to show that other businesses can make it too.’ The town-folk of Old Noarlunga are waiting with baited breath for Kim’s next trick. Apart from getting to grips with Facebook, her future directions include a make-up service, and also a day-spa that incorporates the spacious back-garden. But for the present she is simply enjoying her gorgeous new/old studio ...

Top: Kim’s flair for style and design is displayed well with these gorgeous handmade tiles. Above: Kim McFarlane.

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Winnie Pelz visits Coriole for a walk through

An evolving garden Photographs by Robert Geh


There were few trees planted back when the original cottage at was built in the 1860s.That was when land was being cleared. A photo taken in the 1960s, which hangs in the Barn, shows a very bare landscape, with a few vines planted by the early settlers of the region. At Coriole someone planted a Mulberry tree and a Carob tree well over one hundred years ago. Gnarled and knobbly, wearing their age and the scars of storms, they stand huge and proud on the lawns overlooking the vineyards and valleys. Whoever planted them would hardly have imagined the spreading shade and shelter they have offered to the thousands of visitors who have come to Coriole over the years. There were few trees planted back when the original cottage was built in the 1860s. That was when land was being cleared. A photo taken in the 1960s, which hangs in the Barn, shows a very bare landscape, with a few vines planted by the early settlers of the region. Established by the pioneering Kay Brothers, the land was part of the Amery vineyards when Hugh and Molly Lloyd bought it in 1967. Their first vintage was in 1970 which dictated that a cellar door be established the following year. The Barn provided the perfect solution. The vineyard took precedence, and the lack of water meant that a garden came second. Despite that, Molly planted birch trees, glory vines and a few flower beds, struggling with hoses and sprinklers. But she had an artist’s eye and the foundations for the Coriole garden were laid. Her artist’s eye has also been captured in the beautiful labels that used to feature on the Coriole wine bottles and which are soon to be re-introduced on a new vintage of Cabernet Merlot, named Mary Kathleen to honour her memory. On those labels the rows of vines stretch in green contours over the hills that the vineyard overlooks.

Previous page: The gnarled and knobbly Carob tree was planted over one hundred years ago. This page top: The cellar door sits beside the most glorious gardens tended daily by Ann Wilson. Above: The character filled buildings are a lovely backdrop for an array of colourful potted plants in the Coriole courtyard.

Molly had gardened at Coriole for some thirty years when she died aged seventy-nine. For the following three years her daughter-in-law Anne Lloyd tended the garden until her early death from cancer in 1997. Since then Molly’s daughter, Ann Wilson, has taken on the trowel and has been the constant presence, continuing the tradition established by her mother. Now seventy-two years young, Ann is still planting, planning and making changes as the garden adapts to changing seasons and the changing role of the winery with its extensive program of events, ranging from the famous Coriole Music Festival, the Shakespeare productions, weddings and family celebrations. > 39


Above and next page: Every corner of the garden is sculptural, textural and colourful – something is always in bloom.

She has inherited her mother’s innate sense of design and proportion and admits that she ‘spends a lot of time looking at what we are going to plant and where it will best fit’. With the help of different local gardeners over the years, and ably assisted for the last four years by local Melissa Crawford, Ann describes what has been ‘an evolving garden – a garden in progress’. She appreciates that nothing stays the same and is happy to try new plantings and new directions. ‘If I see something I haven’t seen before, I buy it and try it!’ she announces with happy confidence. Formal gardens are not her preferred approach, but this is not to say that she doesn’t plan. She has inherited her mother’s innate sense of design and proportion and admits that she ‘spends a lot of time looking at what we are going to plant and where it will best fit’. Colour is very important to her and the garden bears witness to her exuberant choice of mixed planting and enjoyable flowers. There is an abundance of petunias in pots around the cellar door and the cottage garden has a wildly riotous mix of reds, oranges, yellows, purples and blues in geraniums, penstemons, lavenders, gazanias, delphiniums, dahlias, daylilies, salvias, Californian poppies and roses. There are hollyhocks, cosmos, echiums and chrysanthemums ... 40

a list of what is NOT in the garden would be a great deal shorter! It is a true cottage garden, covering three beds, where something is in flower and leaf at all times of the year. About fifteen years ago the area adjacent the cellar door was altered structurally to provide outdoor spaces for the growing events program. The terraces and informal stone walls which were built at that time, and are now providing a perfect visual boundary for the cottage garden areas. By contrast, in more recent years, a seventy-metre long bank has been planted with natives. Grevilleas, atriplex (saltbush), eremophilas and correas have been under-planted with prostrate myoporum and hardenbergia, providing a more subtle range of colours and textures. An area of succulents was established some ten years ago, with echevarias, cotyledons, sedums and sempervirens growing in happy profusion. Ann describes it as ‘an absolute hotch-potch’ as she describes her love for the interesting ‘in-between colours’ that the >


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Above left: Bougainvillea lines a path. Right: A kitchen garden provides a small quantity of fresh herbs and vegetables to the menu at the Coriole Vineyards Restaurant.

It is a garden for all seasons and for many purposes; and judging from the public response it is a garden that nurtures the senses and restores the soul. succulents provide. It’s a visual delight of interesting forms, textures and subtle grey-greens, burgundies, and silvers of the plants. There is also a herb garden and vegetable garden which provide some fresh produce for the winery restaurant. Ann freely admits that while her energy and enthusiasm appear to be indefatigable, the task of tending a vegetable plot that could guarantee regular seasonal produce for a large restaurant kitchen is beyond her and would require a significant extension to the size of the garden. ‘We do what we can, providing herbs and small quantities of special seasonal vegetables’. From time to time there are special dinners at the winery, and for these occasions, the vegetable garden is planted with a special menu in mind, timed for picking perfection! The abundance of local growers, of whom there is no shortage in the Southern Vales and Fleurieu regions, ensures that the Coriole kitchen can always meet the high quality expectations of discerning patrons.

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Since Ann took on the task of ‘head gardener’, the Coriole garden has thrived and grown, adapting to change and need. It has continued to flourish, ignoring some of the more fashionable and superficial garden design trends, and has remained true to its original informal design and wonderfully welcoming character. It is a garden for all seasons and for many purposes; and judging from the public response it is a garden that nurtures the senses and restores the soul. Well into her advanced years, Molly planted trees that she knew she would never sit under, but where others now enjoy their shade. Her daughter Ann is continuing the tradition. The old Greek adage cited ‘men who planted trees ... ‘ (maybe women didn’t garden in those ancient times) but it is the women of Coriole who have made, and continue to make the garden such a special place.


The Western Fleurieu never looked so good We present the winners of the inaugural $15,000 Fleurieu Four Seasons Prize for Landscape Photography. The exceptionally high standard of entries in the inaugural $15,000 Fleurieu Four Seasons Prize for Landscape Photography was such that it had to be shared by two of the competitors: Jessica Macrow and Richard Kozuszko. Each entrant had spent a year capturing the essence of the seasonal landscapes of the Yankalilla District area, selecting their four best images to submit: one for each season. The judges deliberated long and hard to identify the five finalists, which also included Peter Barnes, Joel Durbridge and Gary Sauer-Thompson. The $2,000 People’s Choice Award was won by Steve Janssen. The prize is the brain-child of Adelaide Festival of Ideas founder and former SA arts supremo turned place-shaping adviser, Greg Mackie OAM. ‘I was despairing at the lack of high quality imagery available to celebrate the magnificent landscapes that are definitely SA’s best-kept secrets. For too long the journey from Sellicks Hill and Myponga to Cape Jervis has been the ‘road less travelled’ by South Australians. We are an hour’s drive from Adelaide’s CBD and there is just so much to see.’ says Greg.

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FLM is a proud partner in the prize and all finalists’ and winners’ images can be viewed online at www.fleurieufourseasons.com.au. Jessica Macrow I am the owner of Macrow Photography located in Mount Compass. I primarily photograph families, but I really enjoy getting around the Fleurieu Peninsula and taking photos. We are blessed with some lovely scenes and I particularly enjoy capturing the night sky and sharing my own unique view of the area. Richard Kozusko From a young age my parents encouraged me to foster an appreciation and interest in the natural environment, which has continued on into my adult life. I’ve tried to develop my photography from taking simple snapshots of locations I’ve visited, to making a conscious attempt at taking photographs that bring out the beauty of the locations I visit while incorporating the mood of the light, weather and how these dynamic elements interact with my feelings at that place and time. I hope this comes across in the images I take and that people enjoy viewing them. >


Previous page: The Road into Blowhole Creek – Spring – Deep Creek Conservation Park. Winning photo by Richard Kozusko. Above: Summer Storm – Myponga Beach Road. Winning photo by Jessica Macrow.

The three images above are the remainder of Jessica’ Macrow’s winning entries. Top left: Spring Harvest – Myponga Beach. Below left: Autumn Campfire under the Stars – Fishery Bay, Cape Jervis. Below right: Winter Stream – Hay Flat Road, Delamere. 45


The three images above are the remainder of Richard Kozusko’s winning entries. Top: The Milky Way – Winter – Blowhole Creek. Bottom left: Hot day in January – Summer – from a tinny at Rapid Bay. Bottom right: Early Autumn Sunset – from the top of the cliffs at Second Valley.

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Leonie Porter-Nocella finds that there’s a new bevvie in town.

Rare Fizz ‘Well it’s not exactly NEW new, but I’ve only just discovered it ... ‘

The history of the McLaren Vale region is deeply entrenched in Oxenberry Farm, with the land having been surveyed by John McLaren in 1838 and settled a year later. The soil was rich and ideal for any kind of livestock or crop. This land later became one of the great wine regions in Australia. Over a century later, Michael and Filippo Scarpantoni were born and raised on part of the original Oxenberry Farm site. In 1998, the brothers purchased a section of the land for themselves on which they established Oxenberry Farm Wines. They carefully selected the best-suited varieties of the region in order to produce optimum styles of wine – rather than attempting to turn popular varieties into popular styles. While Oxenberry Farm Wines and Scarpantoni Estate Wines are produced by the same family, the Oxenberry Farm Wines range reflects Michael and Filippo’s understanding of terroir and the way it contributes to each wine’s unique and distinct characteristic. Those who are familiar with the wines would know that this approach has paid off. Being joined by the talents of winemaker David Fleming in 2007 has also strengthened the winemaking team. As with many great new advents the path to a new product came about organically. Just before the 2011 vintage harvest the Scarpantonis were approached by an apple producer in the Adelaide Hills who wanted them to make an apple vinegar for him. The Scarpantonis agreed – but decided to try out something of their own at the same time. This is when the idea of producing ciders made from a combination of premium wine grapes and apples occurred. With the apple supply about to arrive, they picked Chardonnay and Gamay grapes, extracted and chilled the juice of both grape varieties then waited for the apples. A little later the apples arrived in the form of fresh apple juice. The resulting blend produced white (Chardonnay) and red (Gamay) Grapple Ciders. White Grapple Cider offers a pleasantly tart flavour, somewhat like a barely-ripe Granny Smith apple. Although there’s an underlying sweetness, the tartness cuts through leaving a fresh, dry finish. At eight per cent alcohol, it’s stronger than beer, but weaker than wine. Red Grapple Cider displays a vivid pink rather than red, and the aroma is quite like that of rosé. There’s quite a bubbly fizz at first mouth-feel; then the fresh, simple raspberry and strawberry aromas are challenged by apple-like flavours and a tangy acidity – most probably derived from both the early picked Gamay and the apples. All in all, these Grapple Ciders offer an interesting alternative to straight wines ... and even beer! Especially enjoyed in a cold glass in good company.

Tasting notes from the producer: The White Grapple Cider shows similar characteristics to both a blanc de blanc style of sparkling white wine (a sparkling wine made purely from white grapes, typically Chardonnay) and a traditional apple cider, with the strong green apple characters that Chardonnay often displays when picked early and made into a sparkling wine. With plenty of apple characters from both the Chardonnay grapes and the apples, plus a hint of stone fruit characters in the background courtesy of the Chardonnay. It’s yeasty, clean and very refreshing. The Red Grapple Cider shows plenty of the vibrant red fruit aromas and flavours that Gamay is known for (which we use to create the multi award winning Ceres Rosé at our sister winery Scarpantoni) with strawberries, raspberries and fresh cherry flavours at the forefront. The red berry fruit flavours dominate the palate with the apple flavours playing a supporting role to the berry fruits. Both are very food friendly and the Red Grapple Cider, in particular, seems to work extremely well with a wide range of Indian curries; a cuisine many wines have trouble pairing with successfully. Both are offered in crown-sealed 500ml bottles. www.oxenberry.com


Petra de Mooy visits an

Award winning Encounter Bay beach house Photographs by Robert Geh.


Previous page: The McGovern’s beach house at Encounter Bay won it’s category in the Housing Industry Awards in 2014. Above: The dining area is designed for long stays at the table in comfort and style.

Standing on the hills overlooking Encounter Bay the elevation allows for a panoramic view across Encounter Bay encompassing Granite Island, Wright Island, the Bluff and the ocean beyond. Although it’s a wild place with stretches of treacherous coastline, once you are in an enclosed space next to a fireplace with the winter chills descending outside, it’s safe, comforting and tranquil. The rooms facing west in Phil and Maryanne McGovern’s holiday house are gorgeous. As the light changes you can appreciate the colours and mood of the ocean going from a beautiful pale green to deep blue: still, to turbulent. In 2013 the McGoverns were enjoying a stroll at Encounter Bay after a relaxing luncheon with friends. Halfway up the hill they noticed an empty block with sea views ‘for sale’ (a rare commodity in the Victor Harbor area). It occurred to Phil that this would be a fantastic location to build. After looking into it though, Phil and Maryanne discovered that the title had been approved for two houses to be built, and as this was not part of their idea they shelved the concept. Nevertheless, as luck would have it the block stayed on the market, so after some musing and discussion with Phil’s brother and his wife, the two families decided to build together … thereby creating a duplex and fulfilling the requirement of the two titles.  The design of the two homes uses the same basic plan but shares

a long overhanging deck. The effect is fantastic – making the deck span the entire frontage of the two homes, giving the interior a truly expansive feel. Development of the site and design on a fairly steep slope had its challenges, and after some back and forth with an Adelaide-based builder it became apparent that working with a local builder would be more advantageous. After securing South Coast Constructions, with their local knowledge, extensive on-line gallery and some pleasing preliminary designs, the McGoverns were confident and moved ahead effortlessly getting their plans through council. Knowing what the council required and getting everything they wanted on the plan was where South Coast really delivered. ‘Creating two homes on a prominent, steep corner block with only a small building envelope is a challenging brief for any builder’ says Matt from South Coast. ‘Naturally, both brothers wanted to ensure they each received a fair share of the million dollar views. This required homes, which although quite similar due to their duplex design, would be unique and reflect the tastes of the respective owners.’ > 51


Top: The views from the second floor can be enjoyed from many vantage points. Above left: The home is actually a duplex, with Phil’s brother owning the adjoining property. Above right: ‘Moet’ enjoys her cosy spot by the fireplace. Next page: The entryway features a flagstone wall, a new/old style pendant light and some interesting decorative paddles from ‘Coast’ at Port Elliot.

‘They were a very “can do” company; nothing seemed to be too much trouble’ says Phil. The entrance to the home highlights beautiful flagstone, extending from the floor and up the stairwell wall. It gives the space a grand scale and the beautiful putty colour of the flagstone has an earthy warmth. ‘We wanted to choose a material that wouldn’t really date’ says Phil. A seamless continuity is created by extending these large tiles through the downstairs entryway and corridor winding down into the Flag Room. The light on the day we visited was fantastic, and even on the ground floor the views from the seating area were impressive. An interesting collection of vintage, framed flags and pillows give the room a slightly nautical feel without overstatement. One wall is lined with Phil’s eclectic collection of historical biographies and novels. The stone floors, comfy linen-look lounges and wood combine really well to create a lovely space for the couple’s grown children to retreat when they come to visit, or for Phil to spend long afternoons reading. 52

But where this home really comes to life is in the grand room upstairs. Stepping up onto the second-floor landing, the floorto-ceiling windows create the feeling of an endless view with the contrast of the craggy rocks and the fathomless ocean below creating an ever-changing picturesque landscape. The room is decorated very minimally, because as Maryanne says ‘It’s all about the view here, not really all of the things you have around.’ This is true, but everything in the main living area has been carefully considered and selected. The floors transition to a superb wideplank oak floorboard, and again this is smartly extended throughout the entire upstairs living area. The dining area is designed for long stays at the table in comfort and style. This ensemble also works well with a few standout pieces making it really special. The mirror over the table acts as a reflection to capture more views, but is an art piece within itself. >


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Although these are holiday homes, the builder has not scrimped on the finishes or the detail inside. In fact the home was the winner of the Housing Industry Awards for its category in 2014. A great deal of time was spent finding materials to provide the perfect balance between a holiday home and a quality liveable finish. Raked ceilings add character, altering the space from expansive on the high side, to more intimate where the ceiling height drops. A mirror on the splashback also serves to allow the person at the sink to enjoy the reflected ocean views behind. The kitchen is open and benefits greatly from a walk-in pantry – big enough to keep clutter at bay.

‘Everyone is on holidays and in a chilled, relaxed mode and people are very friendly and say hello’ says Phil. There are also high quality eateries around and the McGoverns particularly enjoy places like the Eat at Whalers Happy Hour and DeGroots Café. ‘There are lots of lovely places to go, but the Anchorage is our favourite spot’ says Phil.

The windows in the home are double-glazed and together with the large solar system make the home very energy efficient. After seeing South Coast Construction’s homes around the area and doing a lot of research on local builders, the McGoverns discovered that South Coast had won a number of awards. ‘We took a look at them and were really happy with the quality of their homes and liked their track record for building locally.’

Spending a little time on a rather cold and windy day you can see why this home ticks all of the boxes. The views, the cosy warmth of the fire and the quiet of the interior contrasting with a background of the rugged coast and wind is quite a testament to the strong foundation of a well-built home.

Phil and Maryanne wanted to build once and build it right. They chose the materials for the home very carefully and worked on the old adage, ‘you get what you pay for.’ Although these are holiday homes, the builder has not scrimped on the finishes or the detail inside. In fact the home was the winner of the Housing Industry Awards for its category in 2014. A great deal of time was spent finding materials to provide the perfect balance between a holiday home and a quality liveable finish. Maryanne and Phil just love spending their weekends there.

Previous page Top left: The texture and wood of the bar stools add a nice contrast to the clean modern white on white kitchen. Top right: The floor to ceiling windows and stone tiles in the entryway create a bright airy space. Bottom left and right: The home is full of an interesting collection of decorative art including these lovely book ends from Coast at Port Elliot. This page The ground floor rooms have a slightly nautical feel without overstatement.

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Fun with gin James Howe discovers an old sea dog who’s been showing the competition some new tricks. Photographs by Jasper Savage.


Above left: Coriander, Cumin, Cardamom and Juniper are some of the flavours added to Settlers Gin in the distillation process. Above right: Rowland and Shelley Short at their McLaren Vale vineyard.

An old sea dog, it’s natural that Rowland Short likes his gin. What’s remarkable is that, on the verge of 70, his creations are turning heads in the top echelons of the gin business. Rowland Short is a retired sea captain whose hobbies tend to get out of hand. In 2006, he and his wife Shelley bought a small vineyard in McLaren Flat intending to make a leisurely living selling grapes to neighbouring wineries. It didn’t work. Within five years, Rowland had completed a winemaking certificate, built a winery and cellar door on-site and was making Shiraz, Grenache and a variety of blends under the brand Maximus with resounding success. The erosion of his retirement didn’t stop there. Operating a winery, Rowland discovered he had access to plenty of grape juice. He reasoned he could ferment this into wine, then distill it to make spirits. So, he built a still. Three months ago, he released a gin commercially under the brand Settler’s. The reception was extraordinary.  ‘The feedback we’re getting from the marketplace is absolutely wonderful,’ says Rowland. ‘The Gin Palace (in Melbourne) is just the place, and we’re there. Eau De Vie in Melbourne and Sydney – top, top shelf – we’re there. InterContinental in Sydney have just opened a brand new five-star hotel in Double Bay with a gin bar on the first floor, and the guy there who has worked as a barman around the world says that this is the best gin he’s ever had.’ Rewarding? Definitely. But the extra labour involved in the gin production has stretched the retiree’s workload to about ten hours a day, seven days a week. Why, on the verge of turning seventy, does he do it? Rowland shrugs and smiles dryly. ‘We like to drink gin,’ he says.  To understand how Rowland’s hobbies tend to snowball, it’s helpful to look into his past. He and Shelley are passionate sailors, so thirty three years ago Rowland built a two-masted yacht known as a ketch. Surveyed to carry passengers, it had to captained by a qualified skipper. Naturally, this position would be filled by Rowland. He studied for his qualification, then he and Shelly ‘sailed the oceans of the world together for three years – we went the equivalent of one and a half times around the world,’ he says.  Returning home a qualified sea captain, he turned his hobby into a career training masters and mates for their certificates to travel

overseas on commercial vessels. His sea-going history is where the gin comes from. ‘I’m an old sea dog, so of course I have an affinity with gin,’ he says. ‘The crew gets rum, and the captain gets gin.’ In Rowland’s case, very good gin. So what makes it so good? Two things, he says. Firstly, the base spirit he uses to create it. ‘The origins of gin are that it was made from grape spirit,’ he says. ‘Over the centuries that’s mostly changed so that most gins are made from grains. The difference in your mouth is significant – grape spirit is much softer and more aromatic.’ Rowland’s second big secret is the manner in which he adds the ingredients known as botanicals, the plant-based ingredients which add flavours to the distilled grape spirit. The most vital of these is the juniper berry (imported from Europe), without which the drink cannot be called gin. Once the juniper box is ticked, the gin maker may add whatever he fancies. In the case of Settler’s Gin, additions include Australian natives such as lemon myrtle and mountain pepper berries cultivated in the Adelaide Hills and salt bush and muntrie berries from the Coorong. The real secret, says Rowland, lies in how these flavours are extracted. ‘What 99 per cent of gin makers do is take all of their ingredients for their recipe, put them into their pot with the alcohol and boil it away. It comes out of the still, and there it is,’ says Rowland. He likens the approach to making a stew, where the various ingredients, boiled together for a long time, combine to create a pleasant flavour, but are no longer individually discernible.  Settlers Gin benefits from a more exacting approach. Rowland hangs his botanicals in a basket in the still, the steam extracting the flavours as it ascends. Most importantly, each botanical receives a separate distillation. ‘Then we blend them afterwards, which is what a winemaker does,’ says Rowland. ‘By distilling them separately, you can discern each of the flavours, and they’re bright and they’re clean and they’re clear – I call it fun in your mouth.’ To further add to that fun, Rowland intends to make a tonic to complement his gin. He also has plans make a British-style sloe gin using Tasmanian sloe berries and is in the process of launching an old Tom gin in the style of those produced in 18th Century England. He also wants to introduce a gin master class, where people will be able to blend and take home their very own gin.  How big is this thing going to get? ‘It could get huge,’ says Rowland. His working days don’t look to be getting any shorter.  57


A painter’s progress Petra De Mooy visits painter Tom O’Callaghan at his Victor Harbor studio.


Previous page: ‘Waitpinga straight’. This page top: ‘Firelight’. Above: ‘Bark Painting’. All works by Tom O’Callaghan.

I always look forward to visiting an artist’s studio. I love the idiosyncratic character of the individual that shines through their décor, collections and books. You can also get a sense of their working style and appreciate, in a broader context, the life existing behind their art work. Tom grew up at Brighton, a beach suburb near Adelaide surrounded by a large family of six sisters and three brothers, coming in at number eight. Tom found his way to art through the influence of his older brother Matt (also a professional painter), following him to the ocean to surf and working on art projects together at home. Tom was good at art but spent a few years post-secondary school living in Noosa enjoying the surf and easy lifestyle of coastal Queensland. Meeting Kate in 1994 was his turning point and the couple moved to Victor Harbor to start a family and settle down. It was at this time that Tom started to take his artwork more seriously.

Tom’s studio sits in a big open space with double doors and a large window facing north. ‘A work in progress’; Tom points to an assortment of rusty bits of corrugated iron recently applied to the outside of the building. It looks lovely, creating a nice patina and rustic charm. When Tom and his wife Kate moved in the backyard was in disuse, ‘full of gravel,’ Tom says. Over the years they have built a real oasis of beautiful succulent gardens, kids’ play areas, and a series of small buildings along the fence-line for surfboard storage, Tom’s studio and a garden shed. The old survey properties of Victor are on large blocks, so despite all of this there is still plenty of space and from up here on the hill above the town you can clearly see Encounter Bay in one direction and the rural countryside to the north. All areas of the home are creative spaces filled with references to rural life, the seaside and surf. As an avid surfer Tom uses the ocean and the landscapes that surround him as key reference points for his art. >

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‘I love the sweeping coastal vistas and atmospheric landscapes of Australia and particularly the Fleurieu. I am equally interested in more intimate subjects such as plants and bird life and sunlit corners of the backyard.’ The textured and layered paint and deft use of colour in his paintings are beautifully realised. Unusual compositions and varying styles keep the work fresh. The scale of the work also varies from large enveloping landscapes to smaller studies. ‘I have a recent interest in capturing the elusive qualities of flame and smoke, there are subtleties of transparency and colour that have me captivated. I look forward to more paintings that challenge my senses and observational skills in this way.’ Tom has also been inspired by the Australian impressionists of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; particularly by the work of Arthur Streeton. Like these early pioneers of modernist painting Tom has spent lots of time travelling around and camping on location to set up an easel and capture the raw beauty of the place through careful examination. Spending time with other painters trying to ‘work things out’, and in later years travelling further afield to New Zealand, Queensland and Bali to refresh the senses and to see some new coastline has served to expand his style. Quietly confident, Tom is a career artist, supporting his family through the sale of his paintings. Representation through the well-respected Greenhill Galleries in Adelaide in the late nineties has formed a solid part of his early success. Tom now shows his work through No.58 Cellar Door and Gallery on Waterport Road in Port Elliot. ‘I met Campbell and Anna of No.58 when I first started showing with Greenhill Galleries in 1998. Anna worked there and they purchased some paintings in those early days. When Campbell built No.58 we talked about showing my work there and I have been doing so for around three years now. ‘ The casual environment of No.58 provides an almost living room-like quality to the setting for Tom’s art work, making it easy to imagine what it may look like in your own home. Tom is also working towards an exhibition later this year at Signal Point Art Gallery in Goolwa (December 16 – January 15). Previous page top: ‘Sand piper’. Bottom: ‘Pennington Bay, Kangaroo Island’. This page top left: ‘Eastern rosella’. Top right: ‘Shallows KI’. All works by Tom O’Callaghan. Above: Artist Tom O’Callaghan. Photo by Jasper Savage.

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BOOKS & WORDS

Book Reviews by Mike Lucas.

same time? This is the subject discussed and answered in this poetically composed rhetoric by a master storyteller who ranks with the best in the field of literary fiction.

The Bird’s Child by Sandra Leigh Price

Published by HarperCollins ISBN 9781460750001 $32.99

The Wonder Lover by Malcolm Knox

Published by Allen and Unwin ISBN 9781760112509 $32.99 When we were very young, our father sat on the end of our bed to unload his sack of stories. So begins the revealing tale of John Wonder as narrated by his three pairs of children, Adam and Evie, from each of his three families living separate lives in separate countries of the world. Working as an Authenticator, corroborating record breaking feats and collecting facts, John Wonder’s work is to verify truths, while all the time his own life is a series of lies and deceptions. Recounting the events that lead from one marriage to the next, the three pairs of children explain how their father’s analytical mind enabled him to maintain that separation between his three lives until one day he meets a young woman and falls in love. Can love be measured? Can beauty be empirical? These are the questions posed by John Wonder as he struggles with a new complexity within his already complicated life. Can a man keep three families and his sanity intact at the 62

and the journeys Ari, Lily and Billy have taken to arrive at the wondrously depicted boarding house of the eccentric Miss Du Maurier. This is a macabre, sometimes dark, constantly flourishing tale of three young people with troubled pasts struggling to find their places in a post-war society, at a time when the mysteries of magic were still being discovered and audiences could be easily deceived by well-practised sleight of hand.

Set in Sydney in 1929 this is a cleverly crafted tale of magic, love and prejudice. Ari, a young Jewish man, with a strange tattoo upon his hand, resides with his Uncle and Aunt and dreams of becoming a great magician like Harry Houdini. Across the road in Miss Du Maurier’s boarding house lives Lily, a ‘glimmering girl’ with the same passion for magic, who immediately captures Ari’s heart when she helps him care for an injured parrot. But newly arrived lodger, Billy, on the run from his own past, sees Lily as the object of his own desire and takes it upon himself to come between Ari and Lily using any means possible. Written in the first person by each of the three main protagonists, the story fully submerges the reader in their motivations

The Trivia Man by Deborah O’Brien

Published by Random House Australia ISBN 9780857988027 $29.99 Deborah O’Brien’s fourth novel carries the reader along on a smooth ride with very little respite from the humour and character driven entertainment of this heart-warming story. If you are looking for a light-hearted, fun, time-out read, you can’t get much better than this. Deborah’s portrayal of Kevin Dwyer, a socially awkward middleaged forensic accountant, is as sincere as it is funny. Kevin is a man obsessed with trivia. He keeps notebooks (in


chronological order) filled with important events from the history of the world in his perfectly ordered room. His best friend is his eight year old nephew. He is viewed by his sister and his work colleagues as strange and distant. But when he takes part in a trivia competition as a one man team and wins the first round, he makes a big enough impact to be approached for recruitment by, among others, the team of Latin teacher, Maggie. The story follows the dynamics of the individuals taking part in the contest through a season of competitions and, in particular, focusses on the growing relationship between Kevin and Maggie. There is romance, conflict, controversy and a touch of sexual tension in this unquestionably satisfying novel from a queen of quirk.

Alfred Hitchcock by Peter Ackroyd

Published by Random House ISBN 9780701169930 $32.99 Born in London in the last year of the nineteenth century Alfred Hitchcock was in the right place at the right time to witness the birth of the silent film. Through the

evolution of cinema he worked with some of the greatest stars to create mysteries and thrillers that were received by critics around the world with mixed reactions. The man behind the camera, always conscious of his physical image, was one of extreme nervousness, often described as lugubrious, reliant upon his wife, Alma, for praise and encouragement. Peter Ackroyd has created a concise, yet thorough, account of one of the greatest, and certainly the most iconic, directors of the Twentieth Century. Hitchcock was a man of dry humour who knew exactly what he wanted in a movie, sometimes arguably to its detriment. He preferred the safety of the studio to the unknowns of location filming. His sometimes subliminal use of colour and image helped to create scenes that led to extreme suspense and shocked audiences at a time when censorship was strong. And his cameo appearances in movies and at the beginning of each episode of Hitchcock Presents made him a household name and celebrity who was instantly recognisable.

Thunderstorm Dancing Published by Allen and Unwin ISBN 9781743314593 $24.99 Every child who loves a storm will appreciate this galvanising tale that embraces nature’s rage and makes it fun. And every child who fears the storm will find solace in the playfulness of the rhyming text that skips its way through this energetic picture book by Adelaide author, Katrina Germein. When a storm approaches a seaside home, a little girl sees members of her family as the wind, the rain, the thunder and the lightning and welcomes it all with lively dance and frolics. Daddy is the wind; Poppy is the thunder; Mummy is the rain. And when it passes, she shines as a colourful rainbow. Judy Watson’s energetic illustrations capture the foreboding storm and turn it into a force of excitement and exhilaration. Seagulls dart across the sky; the cat plays with the shadows; chickens fly for cover. Together the text and illustrations form a cacophony of words and pictures that will have young children acting out movements and voicing the sounds of the storm at home or at school. Ideal for preschool children or lower primary students. 63


FOOD & WINE

Leonie Porter-Nocella catches up with Thomas Dörre, Head Chef at Serafino’s in McLaren Vale – then does coffee with Bree May, 2014 MKR winner and proud Home Cook.

Warming winter repast Photographs by Heidi Linehan.

Above: Serafino Head Chef Thomas Dörre.

I’d just arrived at the stunning lakeside setting of the Serafino complex and was hoping that the large, healthy-looking geese at the edge would stay focussed on the lake ... (who needs a guard dog when you have geese) ... and luckily there was enough going on water-side to save me from their attention. I’d made my presence known to ‘reception’ (non-avian) and they had summoned Thomas. After a couple of minutes he arrived. I looked up, way up … and there stood before me the virtual poster boy (man) for Germanic pre-eminence. Tall with noble bearing; unusually opaque blue eyes; old-world European manners: it was all there. In one package. … However, on a more relevant and appropriate note, Thomas was born in the German town of Bochum, known for producing the Opel car and a mere 50km from the better-known city of Düsseldorf. He has no real recollection of when he became interested in cooking, but recalls cooking meals for himself at home as a means of ‘topping up’ between meals. 64

At fifteen he did the then compulsory ten months of what we’d call National Service, returning to commence a three-year apprenticeship, followed by a one-year stint at the Cologne Hyatt. It seems that if a chef has a wish to travel, working at the Hyatt makes it effortless ... they (chefs) just apply for Hyatt chef-vacancies to wherever they wish to be. Well, almost. Thomas had a desire to go to India to learn English (‘what the?’) The Hyatt, in its infinite wisdom, sent him to the London Hyatt. But it wasn’t all bad. That’s where he met Adelaide-born Samantha – the woman whose homesickness eventually brought him to Adelaide. After three years in London their final destination loomed larger when they signed on for a year at the Park Hyatt in Canberra – delivering Thomas his first position as Head Chef. However the final destination almost eluded them. Adelaide’s Regency Hyatt was sold right before they made it here. But not to be daunted Thomas broke with the Hyatt chain of chef-tourism and on the helpful referral of his chef-friend Mark, attained a place at Mount Lofty House for a year, followed by a year at Jolley’s Boat House. Now at Serafino’s on the beguiling and ever-fascinating Fleurieu where he happily lives near the sea with Samantha … plus their two year-old son (who’s also wary of the geese). Thomas is a big advocate of local produce and buys Fleurieu wherever possible. So, as a tempter Thomas offers us this recipe for a warming winter repast:


Braised Fleurieu Peninsula Lamb, potato gnocchi with cavolo nero and roasted butternut pumpkin (Serves 4) 3 lamb shanks (Willunga Farmers’ Market: Zara Lamb) 2 carrots 1 red capsicum 4 tomatoes 1 brown onion 4 cloves garlic 150g celery 1 tbsp tomato paste 200ml dry Shiraz 3L lamb stock (or other) 2 bay leaves 5 sprigs thyme Murray River pink salt and black pepper to taste Garnish: 300-400g butternut pumpkin 1 small bunch cavolo nero (black cabbage) 500-600g good quality potato gnocchi (or if there’s time, Google a recipe)

Method 1. Dice the pumpkin into 2cm x 2cm pieces. 2. Lightly season lamb shanks and panfry in large oven dish on each side until golden brown. Take out and leave aside. 3. Sauté onion until translucent, add carrot, garlic and capsicum. Slow roast until golden brown. Add herbs, celery and tomato, roast for another 2 min then add tomato paste. Cook the paste out on low for 5min, deglaze with red wine, reduce to half and add lamb shanks and stock. At least ¾ of the lamb should be covered by the stock. Top with foil and put into 150ºC preheated oven for around 2½ hours. The meat should almost fall from the bone. Keep in liquid for 1 hour to rest. 4. Flake and clean the meat of any bone or fat. 5. Pass remaining stock through a sieve and reduce to a creamy consistency. 6. Blanch gnocchi in salt water and cool down quickly in ice water or fridge. 7. Clean cavolo nero in cold water (just the leaves). Blanch in salt water and cool quickly under ice water. Dry and cut into strips. 8. Panfry diced pumpkin until golden. Take out and start panfrying the gnocchi until golden brown. Lightly season the gnocchi. Add pumpkin, cavolo nero and lamb. Add to reduced sauce and if too thick add some more stock or water. Enjoy. > 65


FOOD & WINE

Bree in three words – snap, crackle and pop! If, like me, you’re a My Kitchen Rules tragic Bree May needs no introduction. However, if you don’t follow television’s culinary battle to the (near) death, Bree and her cooking companion, Jessica Liebich, battled bravely to cross the Winner’s line ahead of all others to take out last year’s big quarter million dollar prize! Bree has been interested in food all her life and can’t get enough of it. To look at her this seems quite unlikely, given her slim, exceedingly-toned body; but when I pointed out this incongruence to her she admitted to being a resolute runner and gym junkie. Damn! I should’ve known there’d be a catch. From the moment Bree could read she’d be out there scanning the cook-book titles and videos in the Brighton Library, picking out the ones that interested her: usually the ones with recipes for pikelets, chocolate, scones … but even cake decorating. At this stage Australian home-cooking icon Margaret Fulton was her favourite. And despite all the terrain Bree has covered since then, she still is. She threw her first-ever dinner party for half a dozen of her year-five friends … and served them Chicken Paprika, sourced from a book by Maria Cordelli called Everyday Italian Food. So you can see that Bree has had a hunger for cooking virtually all her life. She and her husband Cory jointly run a roofing business (and no, she doesn’t clamber around roofs clad in hi-viz with a tool-bag swinging from her belt) ... although, oddly, given Bree’s dynamic energy that concept doesn’t seem to be too far-fetched. That was while she was also working full-time at The Flight Centre; so all in all, she was regularly working sixteen-hour days. Twenty-four hours minus sixteen leaves eight hours. Sleep takes another four, so how can she fill the remaining four hours? I know! Enter the most gruelling, stress-filled contest where she can undertake a steroidal version of what she really loves doing!!! That should take care of that annoying free time! However, it was actually Cory who urged her to go for it … even though it meant that he’d be looking after their two young daughters for six months. No mean undertaking. However, MKR requires teams of two, so Bree worked on a friend (Jessica) who shared her passion for food, and as Jessica’s husband was equally supportive the winning team of Bree and Jessica from SA was born. MKR tragics will know the story; for those who are unfamiliar with the show there’s always the internet to fill your knowledge-gaps in the no pain no gain saga that is MKR.

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Above: 2014 My Kitchen Rules winner Bree May.

Winning the 2014 MKR completely changed Bree’s life. For starters, wherever she goes now there are people saying; ‘Hey, aren’t you ... ?’ It’s also enabled her to mix it up with some of her culinary idols. In addition she was invited to be a judge at the Gelato Grande Tour Finale held in Rimini, Italy ... where the winner was the Australian competitor ... much to her delight, since she had voted for his gelato and predicted that he’d win. Just how then does Bree qualify for inclusion in our lovely FLM? Apart from her expertise in the kitchen and boundless energy and determination ... she lives on the Fleurieu ... in Happy Valley, where she is now fully occupied with her catering, cooking classes, food blog and a food line she’s about to launch. Her ambition is to be a successful published food writer, with a gaggle of cookbooks to her name and working on a regular basis for any and every magazine that will have her! Basically, she wants to build a food empire and work ‘til she’s 95! Did I mention her ambition overload? Note: Bree also has several charity roles, which includes being official ambassador for The Longest Table, and work with Oz Harvest and Ronald McDonald House.


Steamed Golden Syrup, Orange and Pecan Pudding with Orange and Ginger Ice Cream (Serves: 6 to 8) ½ cup golden syrup 225g self-raising flour 2 tsp ground ginger 1 tsp ground cinnamon ½ tsp salt 125g unsalted butter – plus extra for greasing ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar 2 large eggs 150ml whole milk 50g pecans – roughly chopped Orange and Bourbon sauce 400ml freshly squeezed citrus – 4 oranges 1 lemon – juiced 50g unsalted butter ½ cup firmly packed brown sugar 2 tbs Bourbon whisky 1. Well-grease a 2L pudding steamer with butter and line the base with baking paper. Place golden syrup into the base of the steamer. 2. In a separate bowl combine flour and spices. 3. Beat butter and sugar together until pale and creamy, then beat in the eggs, then the flour/spice mix and milk. Mix through the chopped pecans. 4. Pour batter into the pudding steamer, smoothing the top, then fasten the lid. Alternatively, if using a lidless pudding basin, wrap the top with a piece of greaseproof paper, then triple wrap the entire basin with foil to make it water tight. 5. Place a small upturned plate into the base of a large pot or saucepan big enough to snugly hold the steamer, then place steamer into the pot. Pour enough boiling water into pot to come halfway up the sides of the steamer, place the lid on the pot and simmer over a low/medium heat for 2 hours – adding more water during cooking if necessary.

Meanwhile make the orange sauce. 1. Place the juice, butter and sugar into a small saucepan and bring to the boil. Simmer for 20 minutes until reduced by half, then add the bourbon, stir well and set aside to cool. 2. Remove the steamer from the pot and sit for 5 mins before turning out onto a serving plate. Serve the pudding with the orange sauce and ice cream. Orange and ginger ice cream Makes 1.5 litres 600ml thickened cream 600ml whole milk 1 vanilla pod – split and seeds scraped 3/4 cup caster sugar 6 large egg yolks 4cm knob of fresh ginger 4 oranges – zested, juice reserved for orange sauce 1. In a medium saucepan place the cream, milk, scraped vanilla pod and seeds, peeled and thinly sliced ginger and the orange zest. Bring to just below boiling point over a low/medium heat, stirring often, and then remove from the heat and leave to infuse for 1 hour. 2. In a medium bowl, place the yolks and sugar. Whisk together for a couple of minutes until silky and pale. Pour 1 cup of infused milk into the eggs and stir well to combine; then add the egg mix back to the saucepan. Stir constantly over a low heat for about 15-20 minutes until the custard coats the back of a spoon. Strain the custard though a fine sieve into a large bowl, cover the surface with cling film (to stop a skin forming) and place in the fridge for 2 hours or until completely cooled. 3. Place the cooled custard into an ice cream maker and churn according to the manufacturer’s instructions, then place the churned ice cream into a container and freeze until ready to use. Tip: if you don’t own an ice cream machine you can still make ice cream. Place the cooled custard into a baking dish and cover with cling-wrap, then put the dish into the freezer. Check every 45 minutes and vigorously whisk any frozen ice particles back into the custard. Repeat this process until the ice cream is frozen.

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Fleurieu Renewables COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR SPECIALISTS

COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR Replace your electricity bill with high quality solar. No obligation, no cost appraisal and report. P: 1300 584 879 M: 0407 674 318 E: Danni@kresselec.com.au W: www.kresselec.com.au TESTIMONIAL: “Leonards Mill is proud to support local businesses that have the same commitment and passion to producing the absolute best, which is why we chose Fleurieu Renewables to provide our sustainable energy solution.” Jane Mitchell, Leonard’s Mill.

LIVE THE ADVENTURE! Fleurieu Peninsula, the place to be! Stunning natural scenery of rolling hills and vineyards, broken only by picturesque beaches and rugged coastlines. If your interest is in food, wine, culture, nature and wildlife – the Fleurieu Peninsula has it all. Culture. Adventure. Life.

So much to do, so much to see! Just 45 minutes from Adelaide, the Fleurieu Peninsula offers a tapestry of experiences showcasing the best of South Australia. For more information, please go to www.fleurieupeninsula.com.au

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Open Mon to Thurs 10 ~ 4 | Fri 9 ~ 4

Sa t 10 ~ 4. 30 | Sunda y 11~ 4 .3 0

W i n e s

C a f é

B & B

Your One Stop Tourist Destination

And Home to Unique Grapple Ciders, Award Winning Two Tribes Shiraz Grenache, Signature Farmers Platter and the Famous Oxenburger!

A: 26/28 Kangarilla Rd Mclaren Vale 5171 T: 8323 0188 E: info@oxenberry.com W: www.oxenberry.com

Gemtree is a family owned winery dedicated to growing better wine ~ naturally Relax on the deck of our sustainable cellar door with a glass of organic Gemtree wine (or two). Enjoy the sweeping views of our biodynamic and certified organic vineyards and sample our platters featuring a selection of the finest local and organic produce while the children play on the playground. We also serve organic tea, coffee, soft drinks and sweets and if you love the outdoors, discover our Wetlands Ecotrail.

Biodynamic and certified organic wines. Wetlands Ecotrail. Sustainable cellar door. Family friendly facilities.

 

CELLAR DOOR 167 ELLIOTT ROAD McLAREN FLAT OPEN. Daily

10.00AM - 5.00PM P. (08) 8383 0802

GEMTREEWINES.COM

Tuesday ~ Friday 9am~3pm Saturday 8am~3pm Sunday lunch on booking Functions welcome 44 High Street Willunga SA 5172 T: (08) 8556 2612 E: laterrecafe@gmail.com facebook.com/laterrecafe

FRENCH FOOD MADE WITH FABULOUS FLEURIEU PRODUCE

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Stephanie Johnston investigates the concept of

Winey Kids Photographs by Jasper Savage.


For Becky it is a bit like the difference between exposing your child to primary colours only, (in the form of participating in traditional play cafes in ‘wholesome’ alcohol-free environments) against exposing them to the whole rainbow of complexity, nuance and unstructured adventure of an agricultural landscape.

‘A drunk Mummy is not a good Mummy.’ I first heard this maxim when I was seventeen years old, living as a ski bum in a shared bunkroom with six or seven (or maybe eight) others in the late 1970s. Amongst us was a couple and their newborn, and the young Mum who said those words was no doubt trying to separate herself (with a bit of humour) from a bunch of boozing teenagers fresh out of high school. ‘We share jokes about wine and information about how to enjoy visits to cellar doors with children, and how to run wine clubs,’ explains Becky Hirst, the founder of Winey Kids, an evolving cross-media guide to enjoying McLaren Vale (and other wine regions) with a toddler or two in tow. Daughter Elsie is playing with some goodies from the Angove cellar door toy box as I interview Becky about the philosophy behind her venture. ‘It’s all about getting out and about, exploring where you live, providing some light humour and reducing the isolation of parenthood,’ she explains. When a couple of concerned locals wondered whether she could come up with a more socially responsible name for the Winey Kids Facebook page, Becky did what she does naturally. As a specialist community engagement consultant, she used the page to generate a public discussion around that very question. ‘The debate really took off and that helped us work out how to respond.’ She and partner Dan decided to keep going with the name, but to make it clearer that the focus of the whole venture is not about promoting drinking while supervising children, but about promoting and enjoying the region where they live, educating children about agriculture, viticulture and farming, helping them learn about tastes and flavours, and generally enjoying time together as a family, or with friends, in beautiful and inspiring surroundings. Those concepts do however beg the question ‘Does early exposure to wine culture promote responsible drinking, or is it better to treat alcohol as forbidden fruit?’ People point to the French and Italians as beacons of common sense when it comes to this issue. They don’t regard alcohol as a vice, and it has long been their custom to offer children a sip à table. Presumably as a result of this liberal attitude, French and Italian teenagers and young adults seem far less prone to excessive drinking than their Anglo-Saxon peers.

Top: Mandy Walker, Julie Hearn and Winey Kids’ owner Becky Hirst enjoying the sunset while watching their children enjoy the kid-friendly surrounds at the Gemtree Cellar Door.

Backing up that stance is George Vaillant’s ground-breaking 1983 book, The Natural History of Alcoholism, which compared the backgrounds of alcoholic and non-alcoholic men, and found that those who grew up in households where alcohol was forbidden were seven times more likely to succumb to alcoholism than those whose families had consumed alcohol with meals. >

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Above: A big grass hill to roll down and alpacas to pat make Gemtree a great family friendly destination.

When it comes to the health aspects of allowing a child to taste wine, one US-based blogger points out that he’d prefer a child to have a glass of watered-down wine with dinner any day over a borderline obese child drinking can after can of soda pop at dinner or throughout the day. For Becky it is a bit like the difference between exposing your child to primary colours only, (in the form of participating in traditional play cafes in ‘wholesome’ alcohol-free environments) against exposing them to the whole rainbow of complexity, nuance and unstructured adventure of an agricultural landscape. It is also about promoting responsible use of alcohol within the context of children. So the aim is to guide parents away from establishments and events that might encourage loud and obnoxious behavior – the scantily clad women who fall out of limos or tanked up men who stumble from the tasting room and get behind the wheel of their car. ‘Similarly, parents will want to avoid the cellar door which has a display of glasses at toddler level,’ says Becky, ‘or the one with a filthy floor’. Wine consultant and father of four young children, Marc Allgrove, believes it is a terrific idea to reinforce the fact that McLaren Vale is a very family-friendly region. ‘Our priority is to make sure anyone and everyone feels welcome to visit McLaren Vale and experience all the fantastic food, wine, culture, coastal scenery and hospitality we have to offer.’ Winey Kids has produced a ‘Little Explorer’ activity book for youngsters, highlighting the attractions of McLaren Vale. Leading the list of Winey Kid-friendly cellar doors is Gemtree, on Elliot Road, McLaren Flat. The Gemtree website in turn plugs its association with the initiative: ‘Your children are fully catered for at our cellar door. We have a playground right next to the deck, an enclosed grass area where they can say hello to our sheep and our two alpacas, Gus and Caruso, through the fenced off dam and when it’s a little colder, a toy box and kids’ packs available for purchase … with colouring books, pencils and healthy apricot treats.’

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The Gemtree cellar door also reflects the Buttery family’s commitment to sustainability and the environment. Purpose-built in Melbourne it sits lightly on stilts for minimal impact on the ground soil. Inside, decorative frescoes explain the winery’s biodynamic philosophy and a strategically-placed sign draws attention to the existence of a baby change table. The Gemtree page in the Winey Kids’ activity book encourages children to pick snails off the organic vineyard and explore the organic and biodynamic orchard and veggie patch, which provides produce for the seasonal platters served at the cellar door. Other features that educate children about sustainability include solar panels, water-saver fittings, energyefficient lighting and glazing, the use of recycled materials, large capacity rainwater tanks, a worm farm and a wetlands eco-trail that is open free to the public every day. Seated on comfy couches and admiring the floor to ceiling glass views from Angove’s kid-friendly space, we finish off our coffee and babyccino with Becky and Elsie’s top ten tips for toddlers: ‘Start with Maxwell’s maze, followed by Maxwell’s cellar door which has honey tastings, then Angove’s where you can enjoy the view and run around the vineyards. Then go to Gemtree where there’s a big grass hill to roll down and alpacas to pat, and Woodstock where there’s kangaroo feeding every morning at eleven. You could do a round of mini golf at Willunga Creek wines, or visit Fox Creek where they have a treasure hunt. There’s a barbecue at Wirra Wirra and a boat up on the vines you can climb all over, then pop in to check on the resident donkeys, Gus and Nora (who’s about to have a baby) at Walker’s Run Wines in McLaren Flat. Finally try the climbing wall at Magpie Springs up on Willunga Hill … and finish up at Beach Road where they’ve got a kids’ meal deal of pizza, juice and gelato.’


One of the very nicest things about life is the way we must regularly stop whatever it is we are doing and devote our attention to eating Luciano Pavarotti

SALADS TAPAS

House made sour dough loaf with chef’s dips

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Leafy green garden salad

5

Greek salad

7

Roast baby root vegetables with sticky balsamic

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INTRODUCES WINTER THEME NIGHTS! SLIDERS Wicked Wings Wednesday • Taco Thursday Fill Up Friday • Stylish Saturdays. Shoe string fries, tomato sauce

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Fresh Shucked SA Oysters (3) Natural Thai lime and ginger

8 9

All sliders served with a side of fries

Deep fried cayene white bait with herb salad and aioli

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Wagyu beef, cheese, tomato, pickle and salad

9.5

Spinach and fetta croquettes with paprika and aioli

8

Smashed falafel, cucumber, mint and yoghurt

9.5

Crispy soft shell crab with Som Tam salad

12

Pork, sweet onion jam, mustard cres

9.5

Pan fried SA calamari with chorizo, aioli and basil

11

Any three sliders with a side of fries

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Golden fried thick cut polenta chips with house made harissa

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Ethical Fashion Boutique

17-21 Ocean Street Victor Harbor 11

Mens & Childrens • Friday, Saturday & Sunday 10am - 3pm starting at $30 per head, Can’t decideWomens, what to eat?? Why not take up our “feed me” option?

Spring Bay mussels, chorizo, chick pea and tomato broth

08 8552 9883

Lamb meatballs with romesco dipping sauce

11

Stuffed, baked filled mushrooms, ricotta cheese, rocket salad

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Open Wednesday to Saturday from 5pm 9 11 www.harbar.net.au

Red wine marinated chorizo with grilled sour dough Chicked Kofta skewers, quinoa salad, minted yogurt

Tempura battered king prawns with nham jim and Asian slaw

13

Espresso rubbed beef fillet, romesco sauce, crostini

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Buffalo wings, sweet spicy and sticky with blue cheese sauce

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Beef Cheeks, briased in sherry, carrot and citrus puree

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see our friendly staff for details

24 Old Coach Rd Aldinga • Facebook.com/bohochicwillunga

DESSERTS

T : 0415 861 849 or110431 345 856

Traditional Crème Brulee with almond biscotti Home made Churros with warm chocolate sauce

‘Saving the planet one11 outfit at a time’

Dessert platter for two (chefs selection)

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Cheese platter, 3 cheeses and accompaniments

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After a good dinner, one can forgive anybody, even ones own relations Oscar Wilde

Share style dining, focusing on small dishes with lots of flavour in a relaxed atmosphere. Our menu features produce from KI, the Fleurieu and the best that SA has to offer.

HarBar is available anytime for functions. Please ask our friendly staff for details. No seperate accounts please 08 8552 9883 www.harbar.net.au

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Tom O’Callaghan renowned SA artist new exhibition now showing.

THUNDERBIRD VINEYARDS CELLAR DOOR WINE TASTING & SALES • ART GALLERY • COFFEE

Aldinga Central Shopping Centre is located on Aldinga Beach Road and a short walk to the beach. We have two supermarkets and 30 specialty shops – something for everyone. Visit us on our website or like us on Facebook to find out more; aldingacentral.com.au facebook.com/AldingaCentral

LUNCHES • REGIONAL PRODUCE Open Friday to Monday 10.00am to 4.00pm Also available for functions and special events T: 8554 3149 | W: www.58cdg.com | 58 Waterport Road Port Elliot (Situated in the vineyard of Waverley Estate)

No. 58 Cellar Door & Gallery 73


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Call 1300 951 124 or visit lendinghand.com.au J & R Cirillo Pty Ltd T/A Lending Hand Finance is a Corporate Credit Representative (470900) of BLSSA Pty Ltd, ACN 117 651 760 (Australian Credit License Number 391237).

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Above left: Green Lip abalone. Above right: Abalone fisherman Chris Royans. Photo by Jasper Savage.

Green lips undersea Petra De Mooy heads oceanside to meet Chris Royans, a local abalone diver.

Chris Royans has been living at Cape Jervis and diving for abalone since the 1960s. Initially fishing for sport, Chris soon found the market for good, fresh abalone was a great business opportunity, so in 1995 he opened Hot Dog Fisheries. The original Hot Dog was an old sheep dog Chris found at Streaky Bay way back in ‘69. Their first fishing boat was named after him ... and subsequently their now-burgeoning export business at Cape Jervis. Holding a licence to harvest the mature abalone is a rare advantage in itself, but with the increase in areas designated as marine parks, the business has become progressively challenging. These days Chris’s son Luke takes care of a good deal of the diving, teaming up with other boats. Chris manages the stock once it comes in to Cape Jervis from the deeper coastal waters around Kangaroo Island. There is a strong overseas-following for the abalone from our pristine waters, renowned as they are for their uncompromised purity. Chris sells canned abalone locally as well as home-made abalone pies at the Cape Jervis Market on a Sunday. ‘Pretty damn good’ the locals say. Green Lip Abalone is not a particularly common variety and is especially sought-after for its milder taste and tender flesh. This

uncommon and desirable abalone is the type that are found in the coastal waters of South Australia. And getting these treasures off the ocean floor is a true sport. Armed only with a propeller-driven sharkcage, a knife and a bag, the divers need to be extremely skilled in guiding themselves through the depths and knowing just where to go. Chris laments not diving any more, but it would seem that there are bigger fish to fry ashore. Apart from the fishery and export business, which requires frequent trips to China to open even further distribution channels, Chris is also a part-owner of Fleurieu Milk. On the day we visit Chris at Cape Jervis his old friend Paul happened to be there. ‘It’s his fault’, he says, nodding in Paul’s direction. ‘He made me buy the dairy.’ Paul wanted Chris to grow hay for the cows and suggested it might be a good idea to just buy it as well, thereby completing part of the supply chain. Chris hired Geoff Hutchinson to run the dairy ... and grew the hay on his property at Cape Jervis. When things got a bit tough in the milk industry, and Geoff and Barry of the now hugely successful Fleurieu Milk asked if they could band together and try something a bit different; Chris agreed. It is a good partnership. Chris is not on-site but retains interest in the company and has watched the business grow from strength to strength.

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Tastings Wine reviews by Richard Souter. 2013 Thunderbird Vineyards Shiraz You’ll find the home of Thunderbird Vineyards at No.58 Cellar Door & Gallery situated on the grounds of the historic Waverley Estate in the gorgeous seaside town of Port Elliot. Owners Anna and Campbell Haig designed and decorated No.58 themselves, taking care not to intrude on the historic nature of the property. Visitors to this unique cellar door will be able to taste the range of Thunderbird Vineyards wines. They can also enjoy some great regional tasting platters, light meals or coffee and cake before having a browse through the gallery space which features paintings, ceramics, glassworks and jewellery from leading South Australian artists. 2013 Thunderbird Vineyards Shiraz shows peppery black fruits such as blackberry, notorious in the Shiraz grape, instantly shining through on the palate. These are complemented by tertiary savoury characteristics of liquorice, dark chocolate, black olive and forest floor. The wine’s overall rounded flavour continues through the front, middle and back palate with a long, silky finish, which is dominated once again by the herbaceous notes, warm spice and dense black fruit. This is an interesting Shiraz intended to be rustic in style when compared to its siblings in South Australia, which are, in a high percentage, solely fruit driven. You could almost compare this wine to its Old World counterpart grape, Syrah, widely use in the Rhone, Southern France. Taste this at the cellar door and then take it home to enjoy with your favourite cut of beef. www.58cdg.com 2012 Penny’s Hill McLaren Vale ‘The Experiment’ Grenache The Penny’s Hill cellar door and restaurant complex at McLaren Vale is recognised nationally for its excellence of food and service, as it is for its iconic location. In keeping with the long-standing focus on regional and seasonal produce, ‘The Kitchen Door’ Restaurant has recently released the 2015 Autumn Menu. This marks a new and exciting era for the restaurant, with Neil McGlew now at the helm.

The coming months will see Neil preparing the food he loves for locals and tourists of the region. The 2012 Penny’s Hill McLaren Vale ‘The Experiment’ Grenache is deep purple with a vibrant red rim. Lifted floral, dark cherry and red berry fruits combine with baking spice, aniseed and hints of dried herb. This flavoursome wine packs an intense palate and displays seductive fruit sweetness. Supple tannins provide structure and balance leading to a wine with exceptional length and generosity. www.pennyshill.com.au 2010 Geddes Experimental Mataro Usually a wine used to blend, Geddes has chosen to produce a straight varietal to showcase the characters of Mataro, highlighting the distinctiveness of this grape variety. This wine has a meaty fullness on the palate, with blue fruits and exotic spices. With a light tamarillo tarmat feel, it still offers the elegance of torte cake and persimmons. The tannin structure is present and noticeable, but fine grained and complementary. Geddes Wines are a small family-owned company that prides itself on grape to glass production by the hand of one man. Every now and then in this industry you come across a small-batch winemaker who turns out small batches of seriously good wine. Tim Geddes is one such winemaker. Tim has a calm sense of knowing his own style. For those wanting to get their hands on future releases, my advice is join his mailing list now. www.geddeswines.com.au

Enter and Win! Enter our new competition and you can win a case of 2013 Thunderbird Shiraz or lunch for two at Penny’s Hill. Simply go online to fleurieuliving.com.au/flm/winwine and fill in your details. Competition closes 5 pm on August 31 and is open to Australian residents only. Must be over 18 years of age. Winners will be contacted via mobile phone. Good luck!


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2015 CHEF HAT WINNER REGIONAL WINNER

This is Jimmy. This is his dairy.

Many moons ago, Jimmy Smith ran a herd of dairy cows on that spot above. He slept in his dairy, and woke up before the sun. We’ve given his pride and joy a spit and polish – introducing Jimmy Smith’s Dairy, the Fleurieu’s newest, top-end B&B. We reckon Jimmy would be well chuffed. jimmysmithsdairy.com.au +61 409 690 342 Mentone Road East, Port Elliot SA (via Brickyard Road)

Morning tea from 11am and lunch from midday Wednesday to Sunday. Dinner Friday and Saturday. Two new winter menus and bar snacks – a culinary journey. Bookings: 8598 4184 www.leonardsmill.com.au 7869 Main South Road, Second Valley

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Previous page: Sandi’s partner Scott models one of the Hunted hats. Above left and right: Sandi has fun seeing the response she gets from her hats.

Hunted Hats Q&A Photographs by Jasper Savage.

A conversation with Sandi – the creative spirit behind Hunted Hats – those super soft high-quality faux-fur animal hats that can be seen at their Wicked Willy’s Wicks stall at the Quarry Market in Willunga. How did the Hunted Hats evolve? A passion for furry ears and strange sense of humour perhaps, led me to the world of Hunted Hats. The more creatures I tried to recreate the more addictive it became. It’s a fun thing ... and at least keeps me entertained. Eventually, after making them for myself and friends they seemed to acquire a growing appeal ... so we went on to unleash the furry critters on The National Folk Festival in Canberra in 2013. When we had sold out and were taking orders on the Easter Saturday evening of the Folk Fest weekend, we realised that perhaps we were not alone in our passion for fun, furry ears. How long have you been making them? For ages, but in a more simple handmade-style. Then I took some time out to learn the millinery skills and pattern making from our dear friend Victoria of Charleston. Vic is a most talented tailor and designer who we met working at WOMAD. I have also been most fortunate to have great advice from friends in the design and ragtrades. Once I’d learnt the tricky stuff I began to evolve the design aspect so that they were face-framing, to bring out people’s eyes … but most importantly, to be practical. I feel they should not muss your hair, yet be effective in keeping you dry in the wind and rain while preserving your ‘look’. My aim was that ‘you could wear ‘em in the rain, wear ‘em in the wild winds, wear ‘em with a big grin, laugh at the world and enjoy the smiles of new friends who want to fondle your fabulous new ears’.

Who designs them? I do, having been schooled in recent years in the fine art of Millinery and fur wrangling. Most tricky stuff, it is. Who are your biggest buyers? Not truly clear cut as they seem to capture the imagination of most folk who see them – both young and old. Perhaps though, I was most surprised at how gleefully the fellas take to them. I have always said that ‘every good bloke deserves to be hunted!’ Which is possibly why the ladies seem to have such a hungry look in their eyes when they wear them too. There is a creature side to us all, methinks, and it almost always emerges with a laugh. What have you observed about people who wear your hats? Always a big smile and laugh, then comes a certain lift of their chins, a gleam in their eyes, and a definite sense of mischief set to unleash itself. Do you get any custom animal requests? Indeed, and these inspirations are to us a chance to play and evolve. Sometimes challenging but always great fun. Where do you get inspiration? Oh that’s there everywhere you look, and most often at the least expected moments. NB: We at FLM are enormous fans of the Willunga Quarry Market and the great people who make it the most anticipated Saturday of the month. (Held in the Willunga Oval car park on the second Saturday of each month.)

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Above: Fennel photograph by Alice Bell, courtesy Willunga Farmers Market.

TASTE THE SEASON:

Fantastic Fennel – (or Foeniculum vulgare)

Story by Leonie Porter-Nocella.

Fennel is widely cultivated for its edible, strongly flavoured bulb/ leaves. Its wonderful aniseed flavour comes from anethole, an aromatic compound also found in anise and star anise. Florence fennel is a cultivar group with inflated leaf bases that form a bulblike structure which is eaten either raw or cooked. Its Italian name, finocchio, is also used (for some odd reason) to denote a gay man. Wild fennel can often be seen along roadsides, but unlike Florence fennel bulbs are not eaten. However, the seeds are often used as flavouring in pickles, olives and the like. Florence fennel is one of the three main herbs used in the preparation of absinthe, an alcoholic mixture which originated as a medicinal elixir in Switzerland but by the late 19th century, became a popular, though somewhat infamous alcoholic drink. The bulb, foliage, and seeds of the fennel plant are widely used in many culinary traditions of the world. Dried fennel seed is an aromatic, anise-flavoured spice, brown or green in colour when fresh, slowly turning a dull grey as the seed ages. For cooking, green seeds are optimal. The leaves (wispy fronds) are delicately flavoured and similar in shape and taste to those of dill. The bulb is a crisp vegetable that can either be sautéed, stewed, braised, chargrilled, or eaten raw. Fennel seeds are sometimes confused with those of anise, which are similar in taste and appearance, albeit smaller. Fennel is also used as a flavour in natural toothpastes and is a component in Chinese five-spice powder. In many parts of India and Pakistan roasted fennel seeds are consumed as mukhwas, an after-meal digestive and breath freshener. They are also the primary flavour component in Italian sausage. An aniseed addict from early childhood, my favourite herbal tea is made from fennel, and because of its aromatic properties, fennel fruit forms one of the ingredients of the well-known compound, liquorice powder. Shifting away from the culinary use, fennel is one of the plants which is said to be disliked by fleas, with powdered fennel driving fleas from animals and carpets. Now, on to the fennel recipe:

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Fennel-stuffed baked sweet potato 4 small orange sweet potato, unpeeled olive oil cooking spray 1 tablespoon olive oil 1/2 red onion, finely chopped 1 baby fennel bulb, trimmed, thinly sliced 1/2 cup cottage cheese 1/3 cup chopped fresh basil leaves 1/2 cup fresh wholegrain breadcrumbs Method Preheat oven to 200°C. Line an oven tray with baking paper. Wash (but do not peel) sweet potato and cut in half lengthways. Place cutside-up on prepared tray. Spray or brush with oil. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until tender. Meanwhile heat the oil in a non-stick frying pan over medium-high heat. Add onion and fennel. Cook for 5 to 6 minutes or until light golden. Remove from heat. Scoop the soft sweet potato flesh into a bowl leaving shell intact. Roughly mash sweet potato flesh. Add onion mixture, cottage cheese and basil. Season with salt and pepper. Mix with a fork until well combined. Spoon fennel mixture into sweet potato shells and sprinkle with prepared breadcrumbs. Spray lightly with oil. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until light golden. Serve. Yum.


THE

GallerY hair studio

• Haircuts and styling for women, men & children • Hair colour • Re-styles • Wedding and Formal hair styling • Makeup for all occassions • Beauty services available in The Gallery Beauty Room.

48 Patapinda Road, Old Noarlunga Phone: 8327 4554 www.thegalleryhairstudio.com

Winter 2015 In Store Now

Proudly stocking Threadz, Clarity, YB, Black Pepper, The Clothing Company, Equus, Jillian, Wrangler, Emily Adams, JoRo, Joy & Fun, Thomas Cook and Sportswave.

Serafino occupies a prime position in McLaren Vale. Serafino’s scenic setting for its cellar door, restaurant, accommodation and function centre swathes of gum trees, animal life, the rustic-meets-modern charm of the winery buildings and of course the all important vineyard vistas. Open for Lunch: Thursday to Sunday from 12pm. Open for Dinner: Monday to Saturday from 6pm.

Angas & Bremer

1/41 Commercial Road Strathalbyn SA 5255 Ph: 8536 4228

www.serafino.com.au 39 Kangarilla Road, McLaren Vale SA 5171 Australia T: +61 8 8323 8911

Just that little bit country www.facebook.com/AngasBremer

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SOCIAL PAGES

Being Social: Woodstock Wines Fringe Event On March 8th country music aficionados gathered at Woodstock Wine Estate to enjoy ‘The Songs & The Sagas: Country Music’s Biggest Hits and Scandals’ by Amber Joy Poulton and The Holy Men. Beautiful food and wine were enjoyed by everyone and fun dancing flooded out over the Woodstock lawns.

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Being Social: Red Poles 10th Anniversary On Saturday April 11th Red Poles celebrated their 10th anniversary. The event also celebrated a mixed media exhibition from selected artists. Guests enjoyed great wines by Leconfield and fantastic finger foods by Red Poles’ wonderful kitchen team. Nice Verdes provided live music, with the artists on hand to chat with anyone who wished to know more about the art.

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01: Joan Davies, Jan and Garry James 02: Helena and Dennis Williss, Beryl Leibelt and Country Singer Amber Joy Poulton 03: Sandy Bear, Donna Marnane, Marilyn Brandt, Claire Robinson and Julie Coates 04: Bonnie and Michael Rosser 05: Juliet, Peter, Heather and Andre Oliver 06: Peter Roberts and Ian Harris. 07: Jordan Hooper, Carol Harrison and Megan Hooper 08: Maureen and Alex Prichard 09: Verity Holton, Shoji Sinclair and Maia Whitehouse 10: Eva Skoczynska, Keith Giles and Jayne Langford 11: Matthew Ives and Ros Miller 12: Julianne Kruger with Mary and Rhiannon Pulford. 82


Being Social: The Homeless Grapes Wine Project On Sunday March 22nd hundreds of volunteers and winemakers gathered to pick grapes. These so-called ‘homeless grapes’ were donated to make wine for charity. The grapes from Chalk Hill Wines, combined with wine-making know-how of Peter Fraser of Yangarra Estate, along with the bottling by Torresan and sales by Vino Mofo raised $36,000 for the Hutt St Centre to help support Adelaide’s homeless.

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Being Social: Magic in the Moonlight – Penny’s Hill On February 28th the crowd was bedazzled by ‘Magic in the Moonlight’ 1920s-inspired dance party by Bonnie Dowie of Jolly Good Events. One hundred percent of funds raised from the event supported projects in Uganda. Lights suspended above a dance floor glowed under the stars by the old barn at Penny’s Hill Winery. Vintage lounges set the scene as guests arrived, all looking exceptionally glamorous.

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01: Sandra DePoi and Chrissie Spencer 02: Jock Harvey 03: Peter Fraser, Damien Torresan (and son), Danielle Bayard Dudley Brown and Andre Eikmeier 04: Tom Harvey and Becky Hirst 05: Marianne Taylor, Pam Lovell and Andrew Archdall 06: Anika Henning and Stella Neverman 07: Under the stars at Penny’s Hill 08: Dancing the night away 09: Robert Nsereko and Jemima Dowie 10: Custom Jazz: Louise O’Reilly, Dave Resce, Thomas Leach, Vince Symes and Greg Tenikoff 11: Anna Rose and Stephy van den Hoek 12: Amanda Richardson and Bonnie Dowie.

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SOCIAL PAGES

Being Social: Gemtree’s Second Birthday On April 30 Gemtree celebrated the second birthday of their Sustainable Cellar Door surrounded by their closest friends in the Vale. It was a lovely evening and the Gemtree organic wines had the perfect accompaniment – good food, good banter and good company.

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01: Prue Young and Jo Kolencik 02: Dan Procter and Becky Hirst 03: Toby Good and James Murray 04: Sandrine Mattrett and Tarik Marco 05: Mike Brown and Michael Armstrong with Fletcher 06: Marie Kimber, Peter Kimber and Jeanne Scarman.

estyle. , tourism and lif

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nning Photogra

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LIVING GREEN

The Dirt

James Potter with some gardening dos and don’ts for what promises to be a wet winter.

Do finally get around to getting those rainwater tanks sorted out. No it’s not too late. Go big, go bold, otherwise you’ll be paying bottled water prices to store a bath-full. Be your own Minister for Infrastructure ... you could probably be mine as well. The people will love you. Have you ever heard anyone loitering at a bus-stop muttering regrets about putting that extra tank on? Don’t throw out all those fallen leaves. You don’t need me to explain why. Well I don’t think you do ... but if you do, please refer to any one of the twentyseven million column-inches dedicated to the topic of soil improvement that have been written over the past century. Do plant those spring seedlings early; inside on the window sill, or ‘under glass’ as they say in the classics. You’ll run out of time if you leave it till spring ... like last year. The warm weather workforce: zucchinis, capsicums, cucumbers, eggplants etc are vitally important, but the main game is the tomato. Never cease the quest for earlier tomatoes. It might be the best thing you’ve done this year for your mental health. Don’t leave your irrigation running when the rain is falling. You know that green tinge on the bare soil in between the blades of grass and that pool of water on top of your veggie garden? That’s probably a sign things are a bit too wet. If this happens, don’t panic: but don’t try and work the soil when its sodden; well you can have a little dig, but leave the rotary hoe alone as it will compact the soil further. Let it dry out and refer to the list of ‘dos’ and maybe learn how to master the irrigation controller before next winter. Do put your indoor plants out into the rain. You can’t match the magic of rain to transform mediocre performers into lush beauties. And it’s the least labour intensive way to clean the dust off the leaves. If only you could lift the roof off the house. Don’t build a green wall. Ever. Unless you’re planning an overengineered, expensive, technophilic alternative to a couple of climbers. You should generally avoid mountains of plastic in your garden anyway and you won’t have to look at it when it dies. Try a passionfruit vine or a Hardenbergia instead. Do sharpen your secateurs. I used yours last week while you were out and they are woefully blunt. I know they seem alright and yes, they are just cheapies from Bunnos, but it’s an insult to our ancestors to let cutting tools get blunt. Imagine sitting in a pile of chipped flint and looking down at Bronwyn brutally mashing the stems of her roses? A lot of head shaking would be in order. Of course you should take them apart to sharpen them properly, but I recently read that after about 1996 we’ve been too time-poor, so you can just take a small metal file to one side of the blade and with a few deft flicks of the wrist you’re done. Don’t ever follow dos and don’ts lists! Well, maybe just this once.

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ANGELA LISMAN PHOTOGRAPHY Freelance Photographer with a passion for Food, Wine and Events.

12 Warne Street Victor Harbor SA 5211 www.hastingsdesign.com.au admin@hastings-design.com.au 8552 5955

Website design and development Corporate identity and branding Wine label and packaging design Preferred supplier to FLM

www.threefiftyseven.com

T: 0409 738 297 E: angela@angelalismanphotography.com.au W: angelalismanphotography.com.au

Cnr Stump Hill & Main Road McLaren Vale 5171 8323 8686 www.TheElbowRoom.com.au

B.-d. Farm Paris Creek, 100% Australian, family owned multiaward winning dairy company. Premium Biodynamic – Organic milks, yogurts, quark, butter, French Style soft and European hard cheeses. Quality milk from grass fed, free ranging cows ‌ REAL MILK. Enjoy!

www.bdfarmpariscreek.com.au Ph: 8338 3339

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The Local Ad Page

Alma Hotel “Pouring great beers for over 150 years.” 11 Hill Street Willunga. www.almahotel.com.au Ph: 85562027 Beergarden, free Wi-Fi, Sip n Save bottleshop, TAB, SA Lotteries and meals 7 days.

Luxury boutique hotel adjacent Goolwa Wharf. Chef-prepared breakfasts – delivered discreetly. Total privacy. Daily room servicing. Concierge. Onsite is The Australasian Dining Room. www.australasian1858.com

Photo courtesy emme jade.

“ Food is like a loving touch or a glimpse of divine power, has that ability to comfort”

eat

-Norman Kolpas

at whalers...

Ph: 08 8552 4400

121 Franklin Parade, Encounter Bay eat@whalers.com.au

BLUE DOOR

STUDIO Unwind at DeeVine Every Saturday 11am-1pm. The doors are open to the community to come in and meditate, practice, relax and unwind. All welcome – optional donation. 38 High Street Willunga SA 5172 M: 0419 035 344 E: deevine@chariot.com.au W: deevinestudio.com.au Dee Vine Studio

gallery studio • • • •

trophy winning wines delicious regional food stunning vineyard views stay at The Creek Cottage or Alice’s bed + breakfast

7 days 10-5 Step Road Langhorne Creek 08 8537 3017 lakebreeze.com.au

If you love art, visit John Lacey’s contemporary gallery/studio and meet this award winning artist. Originals and prints. Open most days 11am - 5pm. 41 Woodcone Rd Mt Compass. T: 8556 8388 M: 0419 823 708 W: johnlacey.com.au

Every Saturday 8am til 12:30pm Willunga Town Square

Enjoy a relaxing day in Myponga; potter through the market, enjoy lunch with a view, sample a local brew and live music at the brewery – and meet resident Samoyeds, Mia, Cooper and Hoppy. 46 – 48 Main South Rd Myponga Markets open Sat & Sun & most public holidays t: 8558 6121 Smiling Samoyed Brewery weekend wood oven pizza t: 8558 6166

willungafarmersmarket.com.au

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Enjoy responsibly

@darenbergwine


South Australia’s premium lifestyle magazine with a focus on the Fleurieu. BUY IT · READ IT · BE IN THE KNOW. Available at newsagents, cafés, restaurants, cellar doors and Qantas Club Lounges.

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Fleurieu Living Magazine Winter 2015  

Published quarterly, Fleurieu Living Magazine features the best in food and wine, homes and gardens, growers, producers, accommodation and d...

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