Page 1

FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

Build your dream home – in a dream location | beyondtoday.com.au | southcoastconstructions.com.au

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

Lifestyle and sustainability.

AU $8.95 AUTUMN 2015 AUTUMN 2015

Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments of 550-950 sqm from $160,000 SA’s most sustainable and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 or email adam@beyondtoday.com.au.

Tonto Homestead

Oliver’s Taranga

The Luxurious Wilds

Mavericks

Treasure in the valley of Kangaroo Island

Still going strong in the Vale of the Vale

McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island


South Australia’s premium lifestyle magazine with a focus on the Fleurieu. BUY IT · READ IT · BE IN THE KNOW. Available at newsagents, cafés, restaurants, cellar doors and Qantas Club Lounges. Celebrate the end of 2015 Vintage with fresh releases at our Cellar Door!

FLEURIEU LIVING FLEURIEU LIVING FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

AND KANGA ROO

ISLAND

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

ctions.com.au

S FLEURIEU PENINSULA

How does your da y Chiton’s starts at start? $369,000 Stage 2 is now

m.au

nstru u | southcoastco

Your idyllic retireme nt is now sustaina ble.

om.a www.fleurieuliving.c

nability.

u

day.com.a location | beyondto

THE BEST O F SOUTH AU S T R A L I A’

www.fleurieulivin g.co

Build your dream home – in a dream location | beyondtoday.com.au | southcoastconstructions.com.au

e – in a dream Build your dream hom

LIV ING

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

AZINE FLEURIEU LIVING MAG

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

O ISLAND AND KANGARO EU PENINSULA A L I A’ S F L E U R I SOUTH AUSTR F O T S E B E H T

Lifestyle and sustainability.

Lifestyle and sustai

CH ITO N RETIRE MENT

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

id Drive, Hayborough. home – 47 Sun Orch ‘The Kelsey’ display ays 1:00 to 4:30. -Sun and public holid Open: Mon-Wed-Sat 8552 4444. t Constructions on Telephone South Coas

under construction

$449,000.

AUTUMN 2015

ging from $369,000 –

Tonto Homestead Treasure in the valley

Oliver’s Taranga

Still going strong in the Vale

Catch some good times at the Sea & Vines Festivities. Hope to see you there! (wearing a shirt if possible)

9

772200

403004

hom Where you holiday at

· Goolwa · Victor McLaren Vale Region

SPRING 2014

y. bility, life and luxur from $160,000 balance of sustaina ts of 550-950 sqm Beyond, the perfect y.com.au. plan’ • Large allotmen il adam@beyondtoda ema 8 on sale now ‘off the e or Stag 022 • 620 OUT D ent • Phone 0412 Stages 1-7 SOL lopm deve ient effic ble and energy SA’s most sustaina

03

CHI036COASTLINES

The rean Way Wilds Mavericks icuLuxurious e Ep For of the Vale of Kangarool Island Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. more inform pectations Th pleasure AU $7. 95 ation550-950 Beyond ExBail visi$7.9 t ww5sqm In pursuit of sensua w.cfrom Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments ofAU $160,000 hit t on buil .co or call ey m. SPR ING au 4 Joh that 201 n Kelly 201 4Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor The house SUM onor04 27MER SA’s most sustainable and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 email adam@beyondtoday.com.au. 703 271 rs ke or KeyInvest on 130 Boutique Winema 0 658 904. r 7 Star Sustainable rbo Victor Ha Housing Vino with verve e SUMMER 2014

Porchetta Party? Book a table & enjoy a three course lunch matched with our wines.

Our innovative, mul ti-award winning, sustainable village designed to optimis has homes uniquely e warming winter sunlight and minimis gain. Solar Energy e summer heat and hot water sup ply, convenient und rainwater harvesting erground tanks for , double glazed win dows and high leve provide a dramatic ls of insulation AU $8.95 reduction in living costs and a level of intelligent design comfort only can provide. Private AUTUMN 2015 outdoor living area shading create bea s with external utiful indoor/outd oor relationships. Prices ran

Kangaroo Island Harbor · Yankalilla ·

McLaren Vale Reg ion

· Goolwa · Victor

Harbor · Yankali lla

· Kangaroo Island

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS in Fleurieu Living Magazine for 12 months and take advantage of discount pricing through our Gold, Silver and Bronze partnerships. Call Perscia on 0400 644 723 for more info or download the advertising info PDF from our website.

246 Seaview Road, McLaren Vale SA oliverstaranga.com | 08 8323 8498 /OliversTaranga /OliversTaranga /oliverstaranga

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

FLEURIEU LIVING

MAGAZINE


Wicker chairs from $299

Wicker stools $249

Directors chairs $159

NEW FLAGSHIP STORE • OP E NING M ARCH 2 0 1 5 •

SHOP 5 BALHANNAH VILLAGE, 104 ONKAPARINGA VALLEY ROAD COAST BY DESIGN · 34 THE STRAND, PORT ELLIOT

SIMPLE BEAUTIFUL THINGS SIMPLE BEAUTIFUL THINGS


Key Personnel Petra de Mooy Petra is a publisher, an interior designer, a furniture maker and a devotee of good food, good design and good stories. After three years of producing FLM, Petra is grateful to everyone who has helped make the publication a part of the community. Jason Porter Jason has worked as a graphic designer and creative director both locally and overseas for more than twenty five years. When not in the office, he can usually be found in the garage tweaking some kind of rare hi-fi component. Leonie Porter-Nocella After spending decades as a university editor, paid by one, pimped out to others – refining papers from Health, and Wound Management to Wine Marketing and – well, everything. Here the aim is to impart/increase style while decreasing errors and ambiguities. Perscia Maung After years of moonlighting as a blues singer and keeping rather anti-social hours, Perscia now enjoys her day job at FLM. This allows her to not only walk her Great Dane on the beach, but to properly take in the region she so adores.

Featured Contributors Jasper Savage Jasper Savage is from Toronto, Canada. Working primarily in the film industry as an ‘on set’ photographer, her personal work has shown in galleries across Canada and the US. She loves travelling, meeting new people and hearing their stories, while capturing a portrait ... or two. She has had an amazing time exploring the Fleurieu and meeting the exceptional characters within the region. This is her first time in Australia and she doesn’t want to leave.

James Potter James Potter is a landscaper who lives in the pristine hills of the Western Fleurieu. When he’s not rescuing his young daughter from the perils of living on a steep block with steel stairs and a beehive, he heads up the ‘Dirt Garden Design’ team ... with over fifteen years’ experience in design and construction of residential and commercial landscapes. Much to Jason’s frustration, James always delivers his contributions to the magazine in the final hours of production. We tolerate this only because we enjoy the humour and levity he brings to our content.

2


Publisher Information Pip Forrester For many decades Pip Forrester has lived and worked on the Fleurieu Peninsula. After sixteen years at the helm of the Salopian Inn in McLaren Vale, Pip moved on to set up the Retreat at Chapel Hill. This innovative residential cooking school in a winery was a first in Australia. Food, wine, community, stories and the stunning Fleurieu Peninsula which are dear to Pip’s heart form the fodder for the pieces she loves to write for Fleurieu Living Magazine (when she isn’t busy with her roles as Chair of the Willinga Farmers Market and Fleurieu Peninsula Food and member of the Fleurieu Peninsula Marketing Committee).

Other contributing writers and photographers Zannie Flanagan AM, Robert Geh, James Howe, emme jade, Stephanie Johnston, Heidi Linehan, Angela Lisman, Mike Lucas, Greg Mackie, Winnie Pelz and Gill Gordon-Smith CSW.

PUBLISHER Fleurieu Living Magazine is published four times a year by Fleurieu Living Pty Ltd. ISSN 2200-4033 PUBLISHING EDITOR AND MANAGING DIRECTOR Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au EDITOR Leonie Porter-Nocella leonie@fleurieuliving.com.au ADVERTISING SALES Perscia Maung perscia@fleurieuliving.com.au ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Cathy Phillips GRAPHIC DESIGN AND ART DIRECTION Jason Porter jason@fleurieuliving.com.au PRINTER Graphic Print Group DISTRIBUTION Integrated Publication Solutions SUBSCRIPTIONS www.isubscribe.com.au ALL ENQUIRIES Petra de Mooy petra@fleurieuliving.com.au POSTAL ADDRESS PO Box 111, Aldinga, South Australia 5173. ONLINE fleurieuliving.com.au facebook.com/FleurieuLivingMagazine twitter.com/FleurieuLiving COPYRIGHT All content copyright Fleurieu Living Magazine Pty Ltd unless otherwise stated. While Fleurieu Living Magazine takes every care to ensure the accuracy of information in this publication, the publisher accepts no liability for errors in editorial or advertising copy. The views of the contributors are not necessarily endorsed by Fleurieu Living Magazine. Printed on paper from well managed forests using environmentally friendly vegetable-based inks.

3


PROUDLY BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE CITY OF ONKAPARINGA

&

&

INTERNATIONAL SAND SCULPTURE EXHIBITION

WDC522 SandSculpting_PrincessPirate_Ad_Vert.indd 1

9/12/2014 2:55 pm

SATURDAY 18 APRIL

4–19 April

Christies Beach,10am–3pm

Port Noarlunga beach

Port Noarlunga, 2–10pm

OPEN DAILY

• Fashion parades, art exhibitions, live music & entertainment • Free children’s activities & amusements, camel rides along the beach • Seaside Cinema in Rotary Park, 8pm

A FAIRYTALE WONDERLAND WITH DISNEY’S MUCH LOVED PRINCESSES & PIRATES – FOR A LIMITED TIME ONLY! • Featuring SA’s first interactive sand sculpture

• Free transfers available between venues

• Sandsational Easter egg hunt, 4-6 April

• Gold coin entry

• Children’s activities including sand sculpting, sand art and interactive Lego play zone

A SEASIDE SHOWCASE OF OUR REGION’S FINEST OFFERINGS INCLUDING WORLD CLASS WINE, FOOD & ART

• School & group bookings welcome

FOR FULL EVENT DETAILS VISIT www.onkaparingacity.com/events


Contents

34 FEATURED HOME: Tonto Homestead – Treasure in the valley. FRONT COVER PHOTO: by Robert Geh.

14 FEATURED WINERY: Oliver’s Twist – Family owned Oliver’s Taranga still going strong in the Vale.

FOOD & WINE

LIVING GREEN

60 Taste the Season – Eggplant aka Cydonia oblonga.

44 The Dirt – A day out at Deep Creek.

70 Scoop – creating good food culture from the ground up. 50 Markets, markets,markets – why do we love them?

MARKETS & EVENTS

14 Oliver’s Twist – Oliver’s Taranga.

10 Diary Dates and Events to keep you busy this autumn.

74 Mavericks of the Vale – Genders and Dyson. 54 Peter Reschke of d’Arry’s Verandah and Neil McGlew of Penny’s Hiil.

6


60

22

30

ACCOMMODATION FEATURE: The luxurious wilds of Kangaroo Island.

EVENT FEATURE: Tough Mudder Langhorne Creek.

FEATURED ARTIST: Jane Bowring – Jeweller, collector, artist.

BOOKS & WORDS

PENINSULA PEOPLE

BEING SOCIAL

68 Mike Lucas dishes up five fantastic books for your autumn reading list.

43 Briony Liebich – Sensory Analyst. 30 Jane Bowring – Bowring’s bower.

WEDDINGS

UPCOMING FESTIVALS

80 Jessica Niejalke and Scott Schultz, 8th November 2014.

58 Festival Fleurieu – 11th to 19th April on the Western Fleurieu. 26 FEASTival – May 1st to 8th on Kangaroo Island.

82 FLM gets out to see who was at the following events: · Belo Brazil · Port Willunga Strata · Harvest Festival McLaren Vale · FLM summer issue launch · Summer drinks in a farmhouse garden · Love Velo seaside

7


ACKNOWLEDGES

A special thanks to the advertising partners that have made a long term commitment to FLM. GOLD PARTNERS

SOUTH COAST

SILVER PARTNERS

BRONZE PARTNERS

Fleurieu Renewables COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR SPECIALISTS

THE B LUFF RESORT A PA RTMENTS

8


Welcome to FLM Three years and twelve issues later!

Letters to the Editor

Hello! Our Autumn issue this year heralds issue number twelve for FLM! After almost three years in business we took the opportunity to take a real break and rather than going interstate we stuck close to home and made the most of the beaches, markets, events and eateries here on the Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island.

Hi Fleurieu Living,

It was not all fun and play however. We worked with our Canadian intern Jasper Savage on a number of photographic projects including a big day out in Deep Creek with Off Piste 4WD Tours – and an extensive self drive tour of Kangaroo Island. We are excited to have partnered with the Festival Fleurieu last year and we hope many of you make it down to the Western Fleurieu for this event in April. We have changed the format of our Diary Dates now so you can obtain information about the dates, times and subregions for all of the events and markets at a glance, in what is looking like a jam packed Autumn! Our favourite jobs are the ones that do not seem like work at all. We hope you enjoy this issue! The FLM Team.

I just wanted to write and let you know how amazing I find your magazine. Coming over from California with my husband we had looked through your magazine while waiting for a flight in the Qantas lounge. We were planning on only going to the east coast of Australia, but after looking through the magazine we thought we had to make a stop in the Fleurieu – and we were so happy that we did. The magazine is so great at capturing the spirit and class of the area and was great in helping us know where some amazing restaurants and cellar doors were. This whole area was definitely the highlight of our trip and we used the magazine as a travel guide. Thank you so much! Angela Packer Hi Petra, It was lovely to meet you at the Willunga Farmers Market last weekend. As I mentioned when we spoke, we are passionate about the Fleurieu – we love living here and love it’s produce and its people. We first had the business idea for Sunshine Ice Blocks back in 2012 and were finding it challenging to get the business up and running. It was hard at times to keep the motivation and to keep moving forward. While on a short break at the Australasian in August 2013 we came across your magazine for the first time and read some inspirational stories about local business doing great things. In particular two of them still stick out in our minds – one about the Home Grain Bakery and one about the Australasian itself. It really highlighted to us what a unique and special region we were living in and that it really was possible to do some pretty cool stuff even if you weren’t city based. We launched the business soon after this and started trading at the Victor Harbor Farmers’ Market in November 2013. We are now subscribers to your magazine and still find the stories about local businesses doing great things to be very inspirational. Kind regards, Brendan Lineage and Courtney Stephen Sunshine Ice Blocks Hello, My hubby and I are new residents on the Fleurieu and are jumping out of our skin with excitement living here. In fact work gets in the way of everything we want to do. I have subscribed to your great mag for my mum and mother in law and they are loving reading about where we live now. They have not visited yet ... soon we hope. I haven’t subscribed for myself because I pick out one of the places you review, buy my copy of FLM and read it over a cup of coffee ... that’s my new treat to me. Thanks for a great mag. Fiona Wilson

9


MARKETS & EVENTS

Autumn Diary Dates LOCAL MARKETS: Aldinga, McLaren Vale and Willunga Aldinga Bay Art, Craft and Produce Market On the 4th Sunday of every month at the Aldinga Institute Show Hall from 8 - 1. Arts and crafts from local artisans, as well as fresh local produce. Willunga Farmers’ Market In the Willunga Town Square every Saturday from 8 - 12.30.  You must go just for the Summer Fruits! Cherries, peaches, nectarines, blueberries – the freshest you’ll find! Don’t forget to buy a membership and receive discounts on all the fabulous local food! Willunga Quarry Market Adjacent to the Willunga Oval, every 2nd Saturday of each month, rain or shine! Come and browse an eclectic mix of everything, ranging from second hand tools to plants to craft.  Always something new to see.  Willunga Artisans’ Market In the Willunga Show Hall (opposite the Willunga Farmers’ Market) on the second Saturday of each month. Local art and craft, with a little bit of something for everyone. A great place to buy a unique handmade gift! The Vale Market Held from 9am to 1pm at the McLaren Vale & Fleurieu Visitor Information Centre on the 1st and 3rd Sunday of each month. The market features locally-made produce and products, wine, art and craft as well as hand-made souvenirs. The Vale Market is family friendly and features buskers and local acts. 

Goolwa, Port Elliot and Victor Harbor Goolwa Wharf Market The 1st and 3rd Sunday of every month from 9 - 3.30. With around 80 stalls there is a myriad of goods on offer. Bric-a-brac, collectibles, plants, books both new and old, and hand-crafted goods. Port Elliot Market At Lakala Reserve Port Elliot, on the 1st and 3rd Saturday of each month. A typical country market with plenty of fresh local produce on offer as well as a good mix of other goods, such as bric-a-brac, books, fishing gear – even a $2 stall! There is sure to be something for everyone. Victor Farmers’ Market At the Grosvenor Gardens, Victor Harbor every Saturday morning from 8 - 12.30. Over 32 stalls, with locally caught seafood, organic vegetables, seasonal fruit, local honey, mushrooms, fresh flowers, Fleurieu regional wines and much more. Well worth the visit. 10

Above: Photo courtesy Willunga Farmers’ Market.

Market of Earthly Delights Held from 1 - 4 at the Encounter Centre in Victor Harbor on the 1st Sunday of each month. Bring and swap your surplus produce with other like-minded growers. Think home-grown fruit, vegetables, seedlings, flowers, honey, sauces, recipes, kindling, compost and more!

COUNTRY MARKETS: Kangaroo Island Farmers’ and Community Markets Lloyd Collins Reserve by the beach at Penneshaw – first Sunday of the month from 9.30 - 1.00 – with Kangaroo Island’s top food producers selling a range of fresh local produce in a great village atmosphere. For special SeaLink Ferry fares, visit sealink.com.au Meadows Country Market Meadows Community Hall on the second Sunday of the month from 9.00 - 3.00. Local produce, crafts, collectibles, plants and bric-abrac. A true country market. Myponga Markets In the old Myponga Cheese Factory every Saturday, Sunday, and public holiday from 10 - 4. Enjoy browsing over 100 stalls offering produce, books, toys, Balinese imports, musical instruments, vintage collectibles and much more. Strathalbyn Markets In Lions Park, South Terrace, Strathalbyn. On the 3rd Sunday of the month from 8 - 2. Bric-a-brac, produce, coffee, pies, apples, plants, soaps, jewellery and much more in wonderfully historic Strathalbyn. Yankalilla Market In the Agricultural Hall, Main South Road, Yankalilla on the 3rd Saturday of each month. Craft and produce market featuring goods from the local area. You’ll be surprised at what you may find!


Above: Sand Sculpting Australia will present Princesses and Prates from the 4th ~ 19th of April at Port Noarlunga Beach. Image from the Frankston, Victoria exhibition.

FESTIVALS AND EVENTS: MARCH Art Exhibition: How Does Your Garden Grow? Where: Fox Creek Wines When: Until March 31 Sculptures by local artists Anna Small and Warren Pickering on display in the gallery and in the garden. To be enjoyed with wine from the cellar door! Willunga Waldorf School Autumn Fair Where: 1 Jay Drive, Willunga When: Saturday 28 March 10 AM ‘til 4pm Free Family Event Filled with stalls, games, food, entertainment and more, the Willunga Waldorf School Autumn Fair is a fun day out for the whole family. The Fleurieu Health and Well Being Festival Where: Wirrina Resort When: March 28 and 29. Local health and wellbeing experts showcasing their products and services in the surrounds of the resort at Wirrina Cove.

APRIL Kangaroo Island Easter Art Exhibition Where: Penneshaw Hall, Middle Terrace, Penneshaw When: Opens 6.30pm Good Friday April 3. Then daily 9am−4pm to Saturday April 11. Admission to opening night: $15 (includes wine and nibbles) Admission thereafter: $4

International Sand Sculpture Exhibition with Disney’s Princesses and Pirates When: April 4 - 19 Where: Port Noarlunga Beach Check on-line for all of the related kids activities (easter egg hunts) sand sculpting, and interactive Lego play zone. www.onkaparingacity.com Festival Fleurieu Where: various locations around the Western Fleurieu (Yankalilla, Normanville, Second Valley etc) When: April 11- 19 . Festival Fleurieu is the Western Fleurieu’s biennial celebration of artists, the arts, heritage, landscape and community. At more than 50 venues, in every town, village and hamlet across the Western Fleurieu Peninsula, locals and visitors alike will be in festival mode. There are over 90 events – most are free and a feast for all of your senses. http://www.festivalfleurieu.com.au Festival Fleurieu Finale Where: Leonards Mill When: Sunday 19 April 12 noon - 4pm Live Music: George Grifsas Trio Head down to Second Valley for the Festival Fleurieu Finale with street food, great ambience and grooves. 2015 Nippy’s Silver Sands Multisport Festival Where: Silver Sands, Aldinga Beach When: April 11-12 This multi-sport festival will feature open water swimming, beach and natural scrub running, and cycling on the picturesque Esplanade at Aldinga Beach. http://www.silversandstriathlon.com.au > 11


Above: The Beachside Food and Wine Festival 2013 courtesy of the Onkaparinga Council.

FESTIVALS AND EVENTS continued: Jayco Adelaide Tour 2015 Where: McLaren Vale When: April 11 - 12 This four-stage cycling event touches down in McLaren Vale in April as part of the Subaru National Road Series. Beachside Food & Wine Festival Where: Christies Beach and Port Noarlunga When: April 18, 2015 Both sites will offer a range of fun and exciting entertainment featuring fashion parades, art exhibitions and live music. There will be something for all ages with free children’s activities and amusements, including camel rides. McLaren Vale Vintage & Classic 10th Anniversary! Where: Various wineries and cellar doors around McLaren Vale When: Saturday 18th - Sunday 19th April The McLaren Vale Vintage & Classic is a great family celebration of vintage and classic motoring. Enjoy a great mix of gourmet food, world-class wines, music and the arts in the relaxed atmosphere of McLaren Vale’s wineries and cellar doors.  http://www.vintageandclassic.com.au

MAY Kangaroo Island FEASTival Where: Various locations across Kangaroo Island When: May 1 - 8 The annual Kangaroo Island FEASTival is a six-day culinary and viticultural adventure featuring a range of pop-up dining events and experiences staged in a collection of wilderness and private locations around Kangaroo Island. https://www.sealink.com.au/ki-feastival/ Langhorne Creek Wine Show Tasting Where: The Grand Marquee at The Winehouse, 1509 Langhorne Creek Rd, Langhorne Creek When: Sunday May 4 Time: 11am to 4pm Cost: $20 Enjoy a day out and sample all that the region has to offer with over one hundred fifty superb wines entered in the 2015 Langhorne Creek Wine Show. Food will be available throughout the day, live music and selected wines will be available to purchase. www.langhornecreek.com 12

A Flamboyant Party Where: Olivers Taranga When: Sunday May 24, 12 - 4 Enjoy a three course lunch including Oliver’s very own lamb on a spit complemented by Oliver’s Taranga Wines. Tickets: $90 www.oliverstaranga.com

JUNE McLaren Vale BankSA Sea and Vines Festival Where: McLaren Vale Region When: June 5 - 8 Come and celebrate the renowned wine district of McLaren Vale at the annual McLaren Vale BankSA Sea and Vines Festival where SA’s premier chefs and restaurants will feed all your senses and local wineries will open their cellar doors, wines and share stories.

ONGOING: Decant: Where: The McLaren Vale Visitors Information Centre When: Last Friday of every month Bring you work colleagues and friends to unwind from the week with some of the McLaren Vale’s finest wine and beer, great live music and complimentary nibbles. Red Poles - Live Music Where: 190 McMurtrie Road, McLaren Vale. When: Every Sunday 12:30 - 3:30 Woodstock Wine Estate - Wood Fired Pizza Nights Where: 215 Douglas Gully Road, McLaren Flat When: Every Friday 6:30 - 10. Angove Family Winemakers The Singles Club Where: 117 Chalk Hill Road, McLaren Vale When: Saturday and Sunday 12 - 4. Experience our collection of exquisite, rare and trophy winning single-vineyard reds – indeed the rarest wines ever produced by our 129 year old family business.


Rediscover your space

urbanhabitats design|construction|development

RENOVATIONS AND ADDITIONS NEW CUSTOM HOMES DESIGN CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT DEVELOPMENTS

Expanding our design and construct services to the Fleurieu. To find out more about how Urban Habitats can help you... please contact us on 8373 1731 and visit our website urbanhabitats.com.au

Urban Habitats Pty Ltd BLNo 159586 L1/179 King William Road Hyde Park South Australia 5061 T 08 8373 1731


James Howe explains a new

Oliver’s Twist Photography by Jasper Savage.


For 174 years, the Oliver family has been growing wines grapes in McLaren Vale. Nothing much had changed until twenty years ago, when the sixth generation introduced a new turn.

Previous page: Wine maker Corrina Wright often has her nails painted a deep burgundy for harvest season. Above: The cellar door sits at the foot of a hill covered in gorgeous vineyards.

Sitting down with Don, Corrina and Brioni of Oliver’s Taranga Vineyards, there’s a palpable energy in the air. Admittedly the voltage is being amped-up by Brioni, an elite CrossFit competitor who trains twelve hours a week doing unconscionable exercise routines (as I write this, the daily workout posted online by the international fitness movement is twenty pull-ups, thirty 9kg wall-ball shots, and forty push-ups repeated five times, resting three minutes between rounds: commence defibrillation). They’re here to tell me about the things that have happened since 1994, the year the Olivers started turning their grapes into wine. Things have changed a lot around the place since then. Especially for Don, who as a boy would ride a Clydesdale to help his dad in the vineyards after school (two of the beasts remained from before the days of tractors). Today, there’s a fancy cellar door, a marketing department, a pizza oven, and porchetta parties. Not that Don is at odds with this evolution. He’s still very much the slow-drawling

farmer, the man who feels most at home in his vineyard (or better still, in his boat with fishing rod in hand) but he wants to move forward, to bring the family business gracefully into the future. Part of this has meant ‘professionalising’ the business, moving it away from the casual family farm model. There’s a new board with an independent Chair, meetings, succession planning. It’s sink or swim – you’ve got to be professional’, says Don. The Oliver property, settled by the family’s ancestors 174 years ago, is a beautiful one-hundred and thirty-hectare parcel of land nestled among gentle hills a few kilometres north of the McLaren Vale township. Started originally as a mixed farm with fruit trees, wine grapes and livestock, now there are just vines; the only crop that makes sense in this ultra-premium pocket of McLaren Vale. It’s a charmed piece of dirt: that is, when weather, good governance and luck combine favourably, Don’s grapes can hit the jackpot. In 1996 Penfolds started paying big money for grapes that made the cut for Grange, making them a lot more valuable than at general sale. Don’s grapes made it in 1996 and 1997. ‘It turned the rules around quite dramatically from then on. It became good fun to grow grapes all of a sudden’, says Don. ‘You nearly win the lottery if you get Grange.’ > 15


Above: At the helm of the family business currently are: front to back: Corrina Wright, Brioni Oliver and Don Oliver.

Like gambling, it’s easy to become obsessed. Don admits to being a compulsive checker of weather and aficionado of soil moisture content. This data lands on his smartphone from where, with a few thumb-strokes, he can direct water to any part of his vineyard. ‘We’ve always been up with that technology’, he says. ‘You’ve got to strive to get more things you can control, and that means using all the tools’, he says.

500 breeding cows, pooling profits with the grape business and providing essential revenue during tough years. The third arm to the family business, the Oliver’s Taranga Vineyards winery, was launched by Don’s niece Corrina Wright, 41. ‘(My grandfather) and Don let me have some fruit and Pam Dunsford (the first female winemaker) at Chapel Hill let me do some winemaking up there ... Well, she really did it; I was very frightened’, she laughs.

Don, Brioni and Corrina are painfully aware of their responsibility to ensure the property makes it, unscathed, to the next generation. Often in the past it was split among family members and pieces chiseled off to sell when times got tough. Corrina has two young children – and although they aren’t exactly gunning to get into the family business at this point (‘the four-year-old would like to be a forklift driver and a superhero’), she feels the need to protect it for them and other family members who may wish to join.

The original intention was that the wine would showcase the quality of the family’s extraordinary fruit. Corrina, who had recently completed a commerce degree, was only a year into winemaking study at the time. ‘The whole theory behind it was that we’d make some wine so we could swap with our mates at all the wineries around us to show off our fruit, but it got bigger than that pretty quickly’, she says. Favourable reviews by US wine-writer Robert M Parker in ‘96, ‘97 and ‘98 secured the future of Oliver’s Taranga Shiraz. Corrina, who approaches winemaking with a hands-off philosophy, now also makes Grenache, Sagrantino, Vermentino, Mencia and Fiano. Fiano, in particular, has been a hit, reaping

The Olivers’ wine grapes business works in tandem with a sheep and cattle property run by Don’s brother Morris. The 6,400-acre property in Avenue Range in the Southeast runs 8,500 sheep and 16


Above left: The view from afar. Above right: Brioni showing us some of her physical skills while Patterson looks on.

‘We did this one called the bearded bottle’, says Corrina. ‘We snuck a bottle with a beard on it into one of our cases of Shiraz, and the person who found it got a “money can’t buy” trip over here with four of their friends.’ The prize was claimed by a Melbourne family, who spent a blissful weekend with the Olivers.

awards at the Alternative Varieties Wine Show last year. Corrina sees a strong future for the variety in the McLaren Vale. ‘Of all the alternative varieties people have been playing around with, Fiano’s probably the one that has the most legs’, she says. ‘The southern Italian varietals maintain their natural acidity, they’re heat tolerant, drought tolerant. Viticulturally, Fiano has turned out to be a really good option and makes a thoroughly solid wine’. Working with head of marketing Nicky Connolly, Brioni and Corrina have spawned some eccentric stunts to promote their wines. ‘We did this one called the bearded bottle’, says Corrina. ‘We snuck a bottle with a beard on it into one of our cases of Shiraz, and the person who found it got a “money can’t buy” trip over here with four of their friends.’ The prize was claimed by a Melbourne family, who spent a blissful weekend with the Olivers. They went to the Star of Greece, flew in a bi-plane over the coast and went out fishing with Don. >

17


18


Fishing is something Don thinks about a lot these days. He truly loves his job – doesn’t think he’ll ever be able to quite retire – but approaching 65, his eyes more readily wander towards the ocean. When he starts ‘going fishing a bit more often’, his position as decision-maker in the vineyard will need to be shared. Enter his 31-year-old daughter Brioni Oliver. Currently Operations Manager (she looks after things like distribution, staffing and the cellar door), Brioni hopes to take more regularly to the vineyards, learning to make the decisions that have been on Don’s shoulders for the past few decades. Originally trained in wine marketing, she’s eager to learn a new skill. ‘I’ve always been a bit of a jack of all trades. I’ve done anything from being in the vineyard, to cellar door, to doing the barrel work, to driving the forklift – it’s about knowing the business inside and out,’ she says. The business will no doubt continue to evolve, albeit perhaps at a slower rate than the past twenty years. Grenache and Fiano will come more to the fore, predicts Corrina, but ultimately it will take whatever turns the next generation wants it to. ‘Maybe there’ll be a Taranga Hotel ... or Taranga Meats!’ says Corrina. Previous page: Everyone in this family has a ready smile. Don Oliver in the tractor shed. Top: Corrina Wright in the vineyards she clearly loves. Above: On top of the hill on the Oliver Estate sits a small family cemetery. A quiet place of reflection where the the family legacy is carved in stone.

19


AR

BO

RR

D

RD RT H O N

874 MAIN NORTH RD ENTER OFF DIAGONAL RD

H RD

PORT ELLIOT RD

M A RS

RH

L RD

N

4 SARAH HOMES TO

ONA

7 SARAH HOMES

M

V IC

D IAG

AI

SOU

TH R

OA D

ENTRANCE VIA SHOPPING STRIP ADJACENT TO LIBERTY SERVICE STATION

PORT WAKEFIELD RD

ROSE ST

AD

M A IN

RD SO U TH

5 SARAH HOMES

PO R T RO

H IN D

WILD ORCHID AVE IS 2KMS FROM SOUTH RD

M AI N

ORCHID AVE

W

ILD

2 SARAH HOMES

ROWLEY RD

BANKSIA AVE

JAMES CONGDON DRIVE

ICE ARENA

ALDINGA BEACH SHOPPING CENTRE

ALDINGA BEACH RD

3 SARAH HOMES RU PA RA

AV E


Above: Making your way through the Quagmire is challenging and for some ... ‘fun’.

Petra de Mooy visits Langhorne Creek to experience a new American-style extreme sport ...

Tough Mudder

Photographs by Angela Lisman.

With its inaugural debut in South Australia last December, Tough Mudder Langhorne Creek was not only well attended but also well suited to the paddocks, bush and vineyards of the Southern Fleurieu. Tough Mudder, founded in 2010 by Harvard business student Will Dean, was inspired by the training regimes and courses used by US Special Forces soldiers. We met the General Manager, Jeremy Kann of Tough Mudder Australia on the obstacle course last December. As Dean tells it he pitched his business plan to professors at Harvard Business School only to be shot down, being told: ‘It just won’t work.’ With a current spending budget close to $150 million, with events staged worldwide, and with Dean being referred to as ‘the Mark Zuckerberg of extreme sports’ … it goes without saying, but ... ‘they were wrong’. ‘I said that by 2012 I wanted us to have 7,000 participants, yet we had half a million’ says Dean.

22

The event involves a gruelling eighteen kilometre obstacle course, but unlike most timed race events the business model relies on a different ethos in that it is all about camaraderie, team spirit, grit and determination – wherein merely taking part and finishing are the end goals. Although there are definitely hard-core participants – known as multi mudders – (people who travel far and wide to participate in yet another Tough Mudder) most of the Mudders are trying it for their first, and perhaps only, time. When you enter the starting point known as the Mudder Village you can see this event involves great business planning, as the clearly fit and toned line up alongside people of all fitness levels with an age-range from twenty to fiftyplus. Tough Mudder is definitely about undergoing the experience. People wear costumes, body paint, wigs and generally ham it up both on and off the course. Viewing the obstacle course as a spectator on a hot day was enough exposure to the muddy life for some of us, but even from the sidelines you can appreciate the mutual trust and respect between the participants, who will often stop on the course to give someone else a hand to climb a three-metre wall, or take time to yell


Above: Participants work in teams helping each other through the muddy mess. Below: Preparing for the obstacle course.

The obstacles have been given names like Electroshock therapy, Arctic enema, Hangin’ tough, Quagmire and Fire in your hole – giving some indication of what you’re in for!

out encouragement along the way. The obstacles have been given names like Electroshock Therapy, Arctic Enema, Hangin’ Tough, Quagmire and Fire in Your Hole – giving some indication of what you’re in for! With the working philosophy of planning carefully and ensuring safety by averting risk, the course is designed by internal staff but implemented on site by local builders, then certified by an engineer. The course is very well constructed and incorporates solid structures on mud hills and large, excavated pits filled with muddy water of varying depths, punctuated by steep mud banks that become increasingly difficult to negotiate as they get wetter, with footholds being eroded by the continuous thumping of feet, hands and bodies. At the starting point the energy in the Tough Mudder village is intense, as participants slather themselves in SPF, line up to get battle paint on their faces or ‘pump each other up’ while uploading their ‘before’ photos to their various social networks. Langhorne Creek was considered an option for SA’s first Tough Mudder at the suggestion of Paul Clifford, a member of the local Langhorne Creek football club. Paul and Roger Follett of Lake Breeze Wines >


were equally instrumental in securing the event for the district and coordinating the huge volunteer effort by the local community. The lay of the land along the picturesque Bremer River was a perfect blueprint for the course, while providing plenty of natural shade. No small commitment, as large swathes of land were excavated and piled with obstacles and dirt. There were approximately a dozen local landholders who opened up their front gates and secluded wetlands for the event. The main ‘hubs’ were Brothers in Arms winery, Rusticana and Lake Breeze, with various grape growers in between each of these hubs. This was a perfect opportunity for Langhorne Creek to showcase the region as a tourism destination to a new and quite large audience. Hot on the heels of the ‘Handpicked Festival’ it was great to draw so much positive and diverse attention to the region over such a short period of time. 24

Top: “Let’s do this!’ Above left: GM of Tough Mudder Australia, Jeremy Kann. Above: ‘Fire in Your Hole’ is one of the last on the course – just before ‘Electroshock Therapy’ – you have to see it to believe it!


RESORT APARTMENTS

Be surrounded by comfort and serenity O V E R L O O K I N G E N C O U N T E R B AY V I C T O R H A R B O R , O N S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A , T H E B L U F F O F F E R S S T U N N I N G O C E A N V I E W S W I T H I N L U X U R Y A C C O M M O D AT I O N

Ideal for a luxury weekend, wedding or conference accommodation, our Ocean View Studios or two storey

Be surrounded by comfort and serenity

apartments feature spa baths, leather lounge sofas, Nespresso machines, LCD TV and much more. The Bluff Resort Apartments overlooking Encounter Bay on South Australia’s Fleurieu Peninsula. Offering a variety of Mention ‘Fleurieu Living’ and we’ll have the complimentary ready withlarge a lateOcean check out. Accommodation styles to suit all budgets including Motel Suites, Oceanchampagne View Studios and View Apartments.

Be surrounded by comfort and serenity

Visit our website at www.bluffresort.com.au or call today to make your next reservation 08 8552 1200.

O V E R L O O K I N G E N C O U N T E R B AY V I C T O R H A R B O R , O N S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A , T H E B L U F F O F F E R S S T U N N I N G O C E A N V I E W S W I T H I N L U X U R Y A C C O M M O D AT I O N

T HE BLU F F

Ideal for a luxury weekend, wedding or conference accommodation, our Ocean View Studios or two storey

apartments feature spa baths, leather lounge sofas, Nespresso machines, LCD TV and much more. R ESO RT APARTMENTS Mention ‘Fleurieu Living’ and we’ll have the complimentary champagne ready with a late check out.

123 Franklin Parade Encounter Bay, Victor Harbor

+61 8 8552 1200 rsvn@bluffresort.com.au

LIVE THE ADVENTURE! South Australia 5211 Australia

THE BLUFF

www.bluffresort.com.au

R E S O R T A PA R T M E N TS

Fleurieu Peninsula, the place to be! Stunning natural scenery of rolling hills and vineyards, broken only by picturesque beaches and rugged coastlines. 123 Franklin Parade If your interest is in food, wine, culture, nature and wildlife –+61 8 8552 1200 Encounter Bay, Victor Harbor rsvn@bluffresort.com.au the Fleurieu Peninsula has it all. TH E B LUF F South Australia 5211 www.bluffresort.com.au Australia

Culture. Adventure. Life.

R E SO R T APAR T ME N TS

Be surrounded by comfort and serenity

V E R L O O K I N Peninsula G E N C O U N T E Roffers B AY V I C a TOR HARBOR , So much to do, so much to see! Just 45 minutes from Adelaide, the OFleurieu O N S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A , T H E B L U F F O F F E R S tapestry of experiences showcasing the best of South Australia. For more information, please go to S T U N N I N G O C E A N V I E W S W I T H I N L U X U R Y A C C O M M O D AT I O N www.fleurieupeninsula.com.au

Ideal for a luxury weekend, wedding or conference accommodation, our Ocean View Studios or two s

apartments feature spa baths, leather lounge sofas, Nespresso machines, LCD TV and much mor

Mention ‘Fleurieu Living’ and we’ll have the complimentary champagne ready with a late check out.

123 Franklin Parade Encounter Bay, Victor Harbor

+61 8 8552 1200

T H E B LUF F

25

rsvn@bluffresort


Faces of FEASTival 1st to 8th May 2015.

Now in its fourth year, KI FEASTival is gearing up for 2015 to be a unique, bold and engaging event for all the senses. Friday night will launch with the Sealink Enchanted Garden hosted by local chef Kate Sumner of Kangaroo Island Source, and Stephanie Alexander. The menu will feature local seafood, duck, pork, beef and lamb as well as incorporating ingredients from the three local schools that have embraced joining Stephanie’s Kitchen Garden Program. As Kate says, the partnership with Stephanie for FEASTival is a great fit because ‘her ethos towards heritage, seasonality and home-grown aligns so well with KI and what producers here are doing already’. The Wharf venue has great character, and no doubt the food, wine and music will be flowing for the kick off of the week’s events. On Saturday afternoon Sealink will provide transport for those who would like to take part in ‘A View to Kill’. Hosted by the very capable and talented Island caterers at Hannaford & Sachs, the event’s title is a play on words, referencing both the stunning views at Snellings Beach and the James Bond-themed event, which will feature a martini bar on the beach hosted by Jon and Sarah Lark of the award-winning Kangaroo Island Spirits – complemented by fresh oysters and other surprises. Guests will be ferried up to the Sky House (think sweeping, views, panache and style) where there will be a sushi bar, lamb on a spit with each guest given some chips to play Blackjack or Roulette in the mock casino that will be set up in the rooms.

26

Top: Promo shot for ‘A View to Kill’ – a James Bond-inspired night out with a view to die for. Above: Kate Sumner of Kangaroo Island Source is teaming up with Stephanie Alexander for the launch night event: Sealink Enchanted Garden.


Celebrate the rich history, spirit and character of Kangaroo Island through a degustation of authentic dining events unique to the island. Another feature ingredient of the festival will be honey. Known worldwide for being the unique home to the purest strain of the Ligurian Bee, KI honey is indeed a rare and special treat. On night two ‘A Sweet Romance’ hosted by Peter Davis of Island Beehive will feature food and drink that has incorporated their honey. Beginning with a Kangaroo Island Spirits’ cocktail party at Island Beehive, guests will be shown a live extraction from the hive, treated to a Honey Mead made specifically for the event, after which they will be guided to a secret location for an Italian smorgasbord complete with live band. Peter of Island Beehive will also be on hand to transport people in his newly restored 1948 Austin Fruiterer’s Truck. This casual-style dinner will be created by Island chefs, Rene Clifford and Kevin Ewings, who will be joined by Italian winemaker Ross Trimboli, from Hazyblur Wines, providing the perfect wines for you to sample along the way. Also look out for The Hothouse, masterclasses, and table surfing. http://www.tourkangarooisland.com.au/kifeastival These people really know how to create an event. Top: Jon Lark will be hosting Gin Master classes, a Martini Bar at ‘A View to Kill’ and a cocktail party at ‘A Sweet Romance.’ Middle right: ‘A Sweet Romance’ will be hosted by Peter Davis of Island Beehive. Bottom right: Stephanie Alexander in one of her Kitchen Gardens now implemented in schools all over Australia to teach children the benefit of growing your own.

27


Fleurieu Renewables COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR SPECIALISTS

COMMERCIAL AND DOMESTIC SOLAR Replace your electricity bill with high quality solar. No obligation, no cost appraisal and report. P: 1300 584 879 M: 0407 674 318 E: Danni@kresselec.com.au W: www.kresselec.com.au TESTIMONIAL: “Leonards Mill is proud to support local businesses that have the same commitment and passion to producing the absolute best, which is why we chose Fleurieu Renewables to provide our sustainable energy solution.” Jane Mitchell, Leonard’s Mill.

28


Guest chef Stephanie Alexander AO

Hit the road and discover all things delicious. Take time out and encounter the natural bounty of earth and sea at this 8-day FEASTival. Celebrate the rich history, spirit and character of Kangaroo Island through a degustation of authentic dining events unique to the island.

Enter The Hothouse garden with invited guest Stephanie Alexander for a relaxed day steeped in the heritage of Kangaroo Island. Taste real food - meet authentic producers and sample an honest drop with friends.

SeaLink ‘Enchanted Garden’ Join renowned chef and author Stephanie Alexander and local chef Kate Sumner in their secret

SA Life Table Surfing Events Join passionate artists, cooks &

garden where bountiful produce, sun and rain set the mood.

Pop-Up and Wilderness Events Located all around the island. producers around the island for private dining parties in their own homes.

Part p roc

For travel, accommodation and event tickets call 13 13 01 or visit sealink.com.au

o benefit ds t ee

Scan the code to go behind the scenes of F leurieu Milk Company.

325 Rowley Rd, Myponga SA 5202 | Ph: 8558 6020 |

www.fleurieumilkco.com.au

Locally Owned and Produced

29


Stephanie Johnston is intrigued by

Bowring’s Bower Photography by Jasper Savage.


Previous page: Knitted vessels in oxidised copper. Above left: Knitted silver half-moon with steel-gray hematite and freshwater pearls. Handmade greek chain earrings in oxidised silver. Above right: Experiments on vintage display bust.

From the tiniest of studs to her 3D sculptural objects, her eclectic output draws on a broad and evolving palette of human expression. Jeweller Jane Bowring’s studio in Adelaide’s iconic Edments Building is a veritable bowerbird’s nest crammed with raw materials, found objects, works in progress, finished pieces and an intriguing range of tools of trade. An Indian fly press, a German lathe and a plethora of pliers, pearls of all shapes and sizes, black and white diamonds, semi-precious stones, leather, silver, brass and copper, coral, sea urchins, blown glass, old steel flint boxes, knitted metal sculptures and a drawer full of German antique china doll heads all sit among the ordered chaos that informs the artist’s repertoire. ‘I am inspired by the materials and the layers of experience over years of practice’, explains Jane. She immerses herself with what surrounds her to create each piece, improvising with the tools and techniques she has at hand, and what has come before. From the tiniest of studs to her 3D sculptural objects, her eclectic output draws on a broad and evolving palette of human expression.

Bowring moves between the city studio, her home in Woodside and her mother’s shop in Port Elliot, where she works part time and sells her work. Before opening retail outlets in Balhanna and Port Elliot, Jane’s mum Mon Bowring ran a wholesale leatherworking business from a cottage on the family farm near Mannum. ‘So I grew up in that small business cottage industry environment’, Jane explains. Always good with her hands, she was the best in school at tech studies, ‘although that wasn’t really recognised because I was a girl,’ she observes. While she says it was a bit of a fluke that she picked jewellery at art school, Jane recalls an antecedent creative moment in her teenage years: ‘At one point I had these five teeth that had been extracted and I got this copper wire, and I wrapped it around the teeth and made it into a ring with a big sort of spiral in the centre ... that is a now piece of conceptual jewellery!’ Jane went on to study jewellery design at the University of South Australia, subsequently obtaining a first class honours degree at > 31


Top left: Classic double strand pearl with 65 million year-old ammonite, uncut quartz and handmade silver hardware. Top right: Lapis and brass bangles with black and white diamonds, chunky freshwater pearl and silver ring, organic white pearl hooks. Middle right: Lathe turned brass and silver rings with white diamonds. Bottom left: Oxidised silver knitted half moon. Bottom left: Necklace with faceted quartz and golden pyrite on leather, brass and silver turned rings, knitted silver circle earrings. Below: The artist, Jane Bowring.

Sydney College of the Arts before taking up residencies at various studio locations in Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide. In 2010 she did a stint as studio assistant to Erika Leitner in Vienna, who taught her the technique of knitting in metal to achieve three-dimensional forms that can stand alone as objects, or transform into wearable art. Jane fell in love with the technique straight away. ‘The quiet repetition of elements as you build form becomes a type of meditation’, she explains. It is also a process that requires minimal tooling, so can be transported anywhere. ‘I’ve had many beautiful knitting sessions on the beach’, she laughs. Jane informs me that you can see examples of the technique in ethnic jewellery from Indonesia, although Leitner began working with it when she was living in Africa over 50 years ago. Bowring’s knitted forms were shown in a 2010 survey of contemporary Australian jewellery at the Museum of Arts & Crafts in Itami, Japan. She has also exhibited in Bangkok, Hong Kong, Sydney, Brisbane and Adelaide.

32


Top left: Potpourris’ of inspiration can be found all over the studio. Top right: Maquette for lighting. Above left: Body pendants made from knitted copper (2010).

In 2011 ArtsSA funded a mentorship with Catherine Truman at Gray Street Workshop to further develop her creative practice. Together they explored sustainable processes and sought to increase depth within the work. Jane began to develop her own stitches within the knitting process, rethinking the repeated elements to develop new patterns beyond the simple plain stitch. Truman in turn introduced her to local jeweller and lighting artist Frank Bauer, who has a long history of influence on the Adelaide arts and crafts scene. (Originally from Germany, Bauer’s father was an architect in the Bauhaus.) Jane ‘house sat’ for Bauer, and was able to access the studio at the back of the house in Goodwood, where Bauer introduced her to his metal lathe. There she translated her interest in repetition to turned brass rings, an important part of her current output. Bowering is always seeking authenticity in her work. The technique controls the shape of the object and she likes the final piece to be true to the materials and tools. ‘Rustic and earthy’, she says.

The artist is also genuinely interested in her customers, in how they want to present themselves to the world, and how she can make pieces to help them in that space. She learns a lot from direct contact with them, and this has recently influenced her statement pieces to evolve from a ‘chunky’ to a more ‘beachy’ layered approach. You can find a selection of the rings, with a range of Jane’s signature pearl-and-leather necklaces at Coast by Design, on the Strand at Port Elliot. If you visit on a Sunday, you will also find Jane-the-salesassistant hard at work.

‘The quiet repetition of elements as you build form becomes a type of meditation’, she explains. It is also a process that requires minimal tooling, so can be transported anywhere. ‘I’ve had many beautiful knitting sessions on the beach’, she laughs.

33


Winnie Pelz discovers the hidden treasure that is

Tonto Homestead

Photography by Robert Geh.


Discovering Tonto is an extraordinary experience: almost like stumbling over a filmset. Hidden deep in a valley at the end of a long narrow track in the almost inaccessible hills east of Wirrina Cove, a gracious Edwardian stone homestead greets you: an historical monument of a grand era gone by. Built between the first and second world wars by local pastoralist Robert Alexander Robertson, the expansive seven roomed, high ceilinged home reflects a time of graceful living and considerable wealth, established relatively soon after European settlement of the area. But before Tonto, older walls told an earlier story: of a mud hut built on the same site by 1856. Known then as ‘Spring Hill’ because of the permanent natural spring that ran from between the rocks at the top of the hill, when the original 80-acre land grant was made to John Allen, a sheep farmer from Yankalilla. We can only speculate how the spring might have been discovered long before tracks or roads led into this land – by someone exploring or hunting on horseback or on foot? Even now the road is barely more than a track: back then the determination and sense of adventure of those early settlers must have been powerful. Sheep farming in this country would not have been for the fainthearted, but the property prospered, changed ownership and soon grew to 400 acres. In 1889 it was bought by Robert McIndoe Robertson of Appakaldrie, Normanville and the name was changed to ‘Tonto’ after a hill in Scotland bearing the same name. By this time a substantial dwelling had been built, which is now incorporated into the grand Edwardian homestead. >

Previous page: ‘Tonto’ was named after a property in Scotland which, like this one, was attached to a natural spring. Top: The former staff and shearers’ accommodation. Above: The rustic garden shed and adjoining wood storage.

35


Top and above: Wide wooden verandahs on three sides with ‘views to die for’.

Two years later Robert Alexander Robertson took over Tonto and completed the transformation into the elegant house it is today. Built from local materials by local tradesmen, Alfred, Charles and Henry Roads, the workmanship is that of skilled artisans. With a grand entrance hall, a huge central passage ‘the size of a cricket pitch’ and wide wooden verandahs on three sides, the fact that these changes were undertaken during the 1914-18 World War is testament that war-time austerity had not reached the grazing hills of the Fleurieu Peninsula. In its hey-day, the property had four house staff and four staff who managed the garden and livestock. The four-roomed cottage that was the tack room, staff and shearers’ accommodation still stands near the main homestead. The history of the place is a source of continuing fascination for the current owners, Chris Rann and Skye MacDonald. Despite the grand appearance and dimensions, little documented information was available. But in recent times photographs from the 1920s and 1940s have come to light along with the childhood memories of the station manager’s daughter, Noeline Morcombe, who lived at Tonto in the ‘40s, adding a personal dimension to the unfolding story. 36

By that time the property had changed hands again and was owned by Sir Mark Mitchell, eminent South Australian scholar and Professor of Biochemistry, who later became the first Chancellor of Flinders University. Noeline’s family lived at Tonto while her father managed the station for Sir Mark. She went to school in Yankalilla, a daily journey by pony trap, together with the children who lived down the road. Later she attended Victor Harbor High School, which entailed a daily bus ride from Normanville. Some days she rode her horse over the hill to the South Road near Lady Bay to meet the bus. With a slap on the rump, the horse was sent to find his own way home! The photographs and the childhood memories tell a story of a formal English-style garden with a circular driveway, stone retaining walls and a pomegranate tree so large that fruit could be picked from the verandah. There was an orchard with apples, pears and plums and a garden planted with roses and stocks. The war years left an imprint on Tonto. Where a shed now stands was a room occupied by two Italian prisoners of war, who worked >


Top left: Spectacular lead-light doors lead to a sitting room/dining room filled with naturalistic art and objects. Top right: The recently renovated country kitchen has a Scandinavian feel. Above: Guests’ bedroom with Swedish floor and wall coverings. 37


Top left: The central hallway – ‘the size of a cricket pitch!’ Top right: Tonto’s grand entrance is much admired. Above left: Tonto homestead in its heyday – circa 1922. Above right: A former resident heads for the tennis court – past long-gone manicured gardens and neat stone walls.

on the property and joined the family for meals. After the war, one of them, named Hugo, returned to Australia and opened a delicatessen in Payneham. War-time petrol rationing meant that travel became even more difficult and Tonto became isolated, with the garden gradually deteriorating. Today the house stands on just one hectare, a remnant of the once 3,000-acre land-holding, all of which has been sub-divided into smaller properties. Chris and Skye ‘stumbled upon’ Tonto in 2008. Chris, a former ABC journalist and public relations executive had owned a property nearby some years previously – and had always regretted leaving the Fleurieu. It was his love of nature that launched his career in journalism and remains a driving force in his life. For Chris, Tonto and the valley is a place that offers a sense of unspoiled beauty, of serenity and an escape from a hectic and demanding business. Skye, who manages commercial property development, has a fervent interest in heritage, landscape and development that reflects a genuine care and understanding of the environment.

38

They are both acutely conscious of the value of heritage – of events, stories, traditions and buildings that link with the past and provide a context for the future. The need to balance economic and population growth with environmental concerns in an area as special and fragile as the Fleurieu Peninsula is a topic that occupies much of their conversation. They share strong views on good planning and design, which they believe is fundamental to successful development, and both are deeply concerned about the increasing sprawl of discordant residential development, unsympathetic to the landscape or character of the region. Recognising that population and economic growth is inevitable, they understand the very real dilemma of the need to enable that growth without destroying the essential elements of landscape, beauty and tranquillity that attract people to the Fleurieu in the first place. Good planning and design are paramount in resolving this dilemma. They see themselves as custodians of a legacy. The built form of the house is one part: the other is the rich history of the people who have shaped the landscape and the environment of the Fleurieu. >


Top: Native birds are encouraged with food treats in special feeders (with protection from larger predatory birds). Above left: The hall sideboard features deer antlers found in the nearby paddocks. Above right: A corner of the farm office. 39


Above left: Family and guests log bird and wildlife sightings on a chalkboard. Above right: The hallway features a large and eclectic collection of hats. Below right: Horses were very much at home at Tonto in the ‘20s.

Outside, on the verandah, sits a blackboard with a chalked list of ‘wildlife sightings’. With seven year-old twin daughters Willow and Sari, Chris keeps a record of birds they have seen in the garden. Among the sightings of blue wrens, pardalotes, goldfinches and various parrots is ‘snake by the shed’. It is the country, after all. Their plans for the house do not include radical architectural change. A recent kitchen renovation has created a warm, functional space very much in keeping with the elegant simplicity of the existing house. Further renovations are planned to ensure the structure is maintained and restored rather than altered. Skye laughingly admits that ‘paintings and wall hangings have been hung as a way of hiding the cracks!’

Outside, on the verandah, sits a blackboard with a chalked list of ‘wildlife sightings’. With seven year-old twin daughters Willow and Sari, Chris keeps a record of birds they have seen in the garden. Among the sightings of blue wrens, pardalotes, goldfinches and various parrots is ‘snake by the shed’. It is the country, after all. As we wander around the garden, a wedge-tailed eagle swoops low over the valley.

The collection of paintings and wall hangings is quite remarkable and reveals a lot about Chris’ and Skye’s interests. Australian paintings ‘found’ in auction-house sales by Skye (who has a keen eye for finding exceptional works) hang alongside a collection of Scandinavian bird prints reflective of two of Chris’ particular interests – ornithology and the Nordic countries. As South Australian Consul for Finland, he has travelled extensively in that region, always keeping a look out for bird prints and paintings, portable (usually rustic) antiques and other eclectic objects. An elegant swan sculpture sits in the hallway and small bird houses and boxes occupy various nooks and shelves in the house.

For Chris the bird lover and lover of the Fleurieu, Tonto is a dream come true. For Skye it’s a warm and welcoming house in a beautiful environment to extend hospitality in a region famous for its wonderful food and wine. For their fortunate friends, it’s a haven that they can ‘borrow’ from time to time, to watch the sun set over the hill and sit around bonfires on misty wintry nights, sharing the dream.

40

For Willow and Sari it’s a legacy that they will treasure one day. They may never ride their horses over the hill to catch the school bus, but other adventures will surely provide them with priceless memories of Tonto.


10s0s% fed

gra & beef lamb

Ethical l free ran y ge pork & poultry

Farmgate Meats ANGELA LISMAN PHOTOGRAPHY Freelance Photographer with a passion for Food, Wine and Events.

T: 0409 738 297 E: angela@angelalismanphotography.com.au W: angelalismanphotography.com.au

Join our Buyer’s Club for

FREE DELIVERY

of farm fresh produce! www.wakefieldgrange.com.au

LanghorneqCreekq WineqShow Sunday:qMayq3 11amqtoq4pm

O2FqEntry Overq15Fq LanghorneqCreekqwines@ GrandqMarquee: @qTheqWinehouse:q LanghorneqCreek

Wine Food Music

www7langhornecreek7comq|qph:qF8q8537q3362

41


Offering a casual, modern menu of fresh food and changing wines. Relax inside, on the verandah or outside under the magnificent Moreton Bay Fig Tree. We encourage sharing meals with the ones you love. Families welcome. OPEN: Breakfast Sat & Sun 9 ~ 11.30 Ph: 8557 6997 E: info@theoldvine.com.au Lunch Wed to Sun 12 ~ 3 Dinner Wed To Sat 5.30 ~ close W: www.theoldvine.com.au Rob and Jo Kolencik look forward to seeing you at their latest cafĂŠ and foodstore. 22 Old Coach Rd Aldinga.

42


My calling Word has it that Fleurieu local Briony Liebich has a dream job. Jason Porter caught up with her to learn more about it. Photograph by Jasper Savage. Meet Briony. Most typical Aussie blokes would just love to be her. Not (necessarily) due to any desire to get in touch with their feminine side, but because to them she has the ‘dream job’. Briony tastes beer for a living. Her actual job title is ‘sensory analyst’ – although working for Lion, one of Australia’s largest (food and) beverage companies, means her days really are spent tasting beer. She’s one of four sensory co-ordinators nationally across Lion’s major breweries, responsible for ensuring that each tank of beer leaving the facility has been tested by at least two qualified tasters. Unlike the wine industry, where grapes are only harvested once a year and variation in flavour is quite natural – even exploited to a certain extent – beer drinkers expect their favourite brew to taste exactly the same from one schooner to the next. This requires numerous checks and balances throughout the production process. Some are carried out with scientific precision, others left in the hands of Briony and a team of skilled tasters. However, sensory analysts aren’t essentially specific to the food and drink industry. Briony explains how analysts can be used to give feedback in many manufacturing industries: offering assessments on fragrances in shower gels and perfumes, to the smell of upholstery in new cars. ‘It’s essentially a blend of physiology, psychology and statistics.’ Apparently scientists have even developed ‘e-noses’, electronic sensors used to detect levels of chemicals in harsh or hazardous environments, that we fragile humans best not be allowed to sniff. So how do I land a dream job like this I hear you say? Well in Briony’s case her prospects were considerably enhanced by coming from a background and family with over three generations in the winemaking business; all of whom grew up with an intense appreciation of good food and wine. After obtaining a Bachelor of Science degree, her first job out of university was in the lab at Penfolds in the Barossa. Briony travelled overseas early in her career, even judging the International Wine Competition in London in 2002. But while she was over there a colleague back in Adelaide told her of a position available at a specialist research and development consultancy collaborating with the Australian Wine Research Institute and encouraged her to apply. She was subsequently interviewed and offered the position over the phone, so came back to Australia to take up the new role of Sensory Analyst. She confessed that back then she didn’t really even know what this role involved. The Institute was actively looking for someone from the wine industry, but also offered on-the-job training – so she was off to a good start. Briony explains that this role enabled her to meet the best winetasters in the country. It’s interesting to note that when it comes to

taste analysis, wine differs from beer … in that beer tasters never spit out their samples. After ten years spent in all things ‘grape’ Briony took a job at Lion, launching her move to testing beers and ciders exclusively. However, over the years she’s been involved in projects outside her role at Lion. Briony loves supporting the local Fleurieu food industry – like helping organise the Fleurieu Fiesta Olive Awards in 2014 – citing the many similarities between tasting beer and tasting olive oil. She’s also developed her own brand, ‘Flavour Logic’, where she offers taste-training for corporate groups, or holds masterclasses in conjunction with local brewers, winemakers and food producers. Who wouldn’t love a job like that?

43


James Potter discovers he’s

Photography by Jasper Savage.

44


Above: Yep, sheep on the beach.

The smiles of two young Canadian women greet me at our rendezvous and we make small-talk about the potential for exotic encounters, ‘A bunyip? Really?’ they enquire. The morning light and lack of sleep encourage me to talk of drop-bears but I’m interrupted by the first striking specimen of the day. At around seven-feet of handsome, Ben, our tour guide from Off Piste, delights the Canadians with a well-worn, but perfectly delivered quip as he bundles me into the back of what appears to be the world’s largest ex-military vehicle. I sip my single-dubious-origin coffee as we make our way along the bitumen and into the park. The bench seats are comfortable and give superb views in every direction – but for some reason the Canadians have elected the front seat, next to Ben.

every colour water can, as it crashes into the bouldery shore. To me the climb back up is a reminder of my diminished lung capacity, but Ben and the spritely Canadians decide it is a walking, talking party. ‘Oh look a Superb Fairy-wren.’ I pretend to be birdwatching as I catch my breath. Thankfully if you stop anywhere in the park for more than six seconds you will be rewarded with at least seven of the park’s one hundred and twenty species of birds making a spectacular show of it.

We descend the track to a small car-park from where, with Ben’s encouragement, we begin the walk past lounging kangaroos down to Deep Creek Cove. There are about fifteen walks within the park that range from thirty minute loops to year-long self-discovery odysseys, including a section of the famous Heysen Trail. This walk thankfully seems closer to the former.

Nearing the top I reach a low point in my athletic life as I’m overtaken by an echidna. Granted I had almost stopped, and the terrain here produces a very muscular variant of the spiky monotreme, but still an unsettling moment.

Kangaroo Island looms large one minute only to be hidden the next as drizzle drifts across, mocking my attempt at dressing for a summer day. The water in the small cove twists and sloshes, turning

Ben on the other hand sees echidnas every other day and instead is gesturing towards Cape Jervis: he appears to be explaining some details of Aboriginal creation stories. Kaurna, Ngarrindjeri and Ramindjeri histories and cultures intersect in this area, but the finer points seem lost in translation. > 45


Top left: Ben (Seven-feet of handsome) Neville – our tour guide from Off Piste 4WD Tours. Top right: James Potter busies himself surveying the map (in case the Canadians happen to glance his way). Above left: From Tunkalilla Lookout you can see for many kilometres. Above right: dramatic rock features at Blowhole Beach.

Back on-board and winding back up from the windswept gullies that plunge down to meet the sea we pass paddocks of fat lambs, and then enter a towering stringy-bark forest. The diverse flora of the park gives us a chance to help each other finesse our botanical Latin. Before you lynch me for snobbery please understand this is an important skill. Incorrect pronunciation can get you in strife. I once had a plant grower look me in the eye and suggest I ‘Come out the back behind the glass-house’ ... so I could have a look at her ‘four inch Callitris’. I didn’t do it, feigning an urgent appointment or a ruptured spleen.

46

No such subtlety is needed while we chat to a rotund, gentleman hauling a yabby net from the creek in the cool air under the stringybarks. ‘Nah mate, marron.’ And mimes eating a particularly large specimen and gives me a big thumbs-up. He has understandably mistaken me for a tourist ignorant not only of the local fauna but also the language. Resembling a yabby on steroids, the marron is probably one of the more benign pests in the park and this guy’s appetite seems to have them in check. Unseen Yellow-Tailed Black-Cockatoo screech eerily as we wander under some of the oldest trees in the state. Among the stringybarks are huge double-headed grass trees, carpets of fern, and under them orchids are flowering in busy profusion. The park is an orchid-spotters paradise and even though we are visiting in the offseason they are hard to miss. >


Top: String Bark forest. Above: The endlessly photogenic kangaroos are abundant in Deep Creek. 47


Above left and right: The forest is filled with exotic orchids, and flora of all sorts.

You don’t need a four-wheel drive to enjoy Deep Creek but it does save exerting yourself in an unbecoming manner. Ben’s steady steed takes us past campgrounds with million dollar views as we take an Afghan-quality road down to Blowhole Beach. Perhaps it was named by an old three-toothed ex-whaler with a sterling sense of humour and a taste for the lean flesh of young hikers, as Blowhole Beach ain’t home to no Blowhole. Not that we could find anyway. It doesn’t need a Blowhole – this is still a little gem. Besides the familiar and endlessly photogenic large marsupials, the beach was home to three sheep the day we visited. Yep, sheep on the beach. These rugged, unkempt individuals had thrown off their agricultural past and taken the sandy route to greener pastures in the park.

48

Walking out onto the small rocky headland at the end of the beach I seized the opportunity to prove my naturalist prowess by charming the young Canadians with the complex geomorphology of the area. With their eyes glazing over, Ben sensed I was making some headway with the Canadians and suggested we hit the road. We bounce up the track along the park boundary and passed a paintball park. A set from the film Wolf Creek is what first comes to mind. ‘End of the Earth!’ I remark. ‘Only ninety minutes from Adelaide!’ Ben reminds me. Apart from a handful of visitors and three fat sheep Deep Creek could be all yours ... just keep an eye out for the cannibal.


Serafino occupies a prime position in McLaren Vale. Serafino’s scenic setting for its cellar door, restaurant, accommodation and function centre swathes of gum trees, animal life, the rustic-meets-modern charm of the winery buildings and of course the all important vineyard vistas. Open for Lunch: Thursday to Sunday from 12pm. Open for Dinner: Monday to Saturday from 6pm.

www.serafino.com.au 39 Kangarilla Road, McLaren Vale SA 5171 Australia T: +61 8 8323 8911

ect ? perf ble day ng e h i t a t r t e edd fo ing unforg nced w k o r lo e u gs peri you o yo Are track t s an ex weddin i d n n d i sou n Lloy lising nno specia Sha er orm u. perf Fleurie he on t Solo, duo and trio performances include a variety of genres with the latest and past hits. Also available for cellar doors, restaurants, private and corporate functions. Discounts apply for weddings in McLaren Vale.

Working like a dog? No time to organise a home loan? Our mobile brokers can come to your work place or to your home www.lendinghand.com.au | 1300 951 124

Contact us today: shannonlloydacoustic.com OR find us on Facebook: Shannon Lloyd Solo Acoustic

49


Pip Forrester travels the globe to investigate

Markets, markets, markets ... why

do we love them?

It seems we really do love them; and by ‘we’, I mean all people: people through time and people across the world.

and gossip. In addition to shopping for food, my Saturday morning market visit helps me to understand what is happening in my region, establish how friends and acquaintances are going and occasionally make social arrangements.

When planning a recent trip to Spain and France, I found myself making decisions based on the locations and times of the local markets. Having understood before I left Australia that I would visit as many markets as possible, my curiosity about markets – particularly food markets and their role in our lives – was aroused. I asked myself numerous questions: why has the relatively recent Farmers’ Market movement in Australia, New Zealand, Canada and the USA been so successful; and how do the markets in Europe differ from markets in the ‘new world’? And is it just about shopping?

Is that why I love it? Of course I like the fact that I know who has grown the food I am buying. I value the fact that I am purchasing directly from the farmer, thereby eliminating the middleman. I applaud the reduced food miles involved and the impact this successful market has had on the local economy. The fact that the popularity of this market has been a fillip to the business activity in the Willunga Township, as well as bringing a wonderful vibrancy to this historic town, is very pleasing.

As a long time shopper and champion of the Willunga Farmers’ Market I understand the impulse to go to your local market. It is impossible for me to get up on a Saturday morning and do anything other than go to the market to shop for our weekly food … and most importantly, to engage in social exchange. In other words, chitchat

50

The Willunga Farmers’ Market, a good example of a new world market, is fifteen years old and is one of the oldest in Australia. It, together with the other markets in this country and the hundreds of markets across New Zealand, the USA and Canada, is a result of the creation of a market culture and is not just a re-kindling of that culture, as is the case with some of the European markets. This makes a huge difference to the style of our markets. We are more


We are more conscious of and more stringent about the proximity of the source of the produce to the market, and about ensuring that we are food-only markets. The Europeans appear to be more relaxed, often selling produce from out of the region and even the country, but with the source always acknowledged.

conscious of and more stringent about the proximity of the source of the produce to the market, and about ensuring that we are foodonly markets. The Europeans appear to be more relaxed, often selling produce from out of the region and even the country, but with the source always acknowledged. They are also inclined to have a non-food component to their markets, albeit an add-on, but food is usually front and centre. What we have in common, however, is the personal interaction on display. These relationships, developed between shoppers and sellers via their regular weekly exchanges, are a fundamental component of all the markets, and central to our experience.

Previous page: A fabulous array of mushrooms at La Boqueria Market in Barcelona. This page top: Providore at Les Halles Biarritz. Above left: Spoilt for choice at Les Halles Biarritz. Bottom right: Spectacular display La Boqueria Market in Barcelona.

All across Spain and France, in towns, cities and villages, markets are set up in squares and streets. The surrounding cafes do a roaring trade and the locals collect in groups to talk between the stalls. If we, as visitors, want to get a sense of the local people and culture, we need to go to the market. Many of them have developed over centuries, their growth being intertwined with the history of their villages, towns and regions and they remain relevant to their communities. >

51


Take, for example, the La Bogueria market in Barcelona. This covered market in the centre of Barcelona is exhilarating. The buzz, colour and smells draw you in and it is almost impossible to leave. Le Bogueria had its beginnings in the thirteenth century on the outskirts of the town. It is now in the centre of the city and is a major tourist attraction, but it is also a place for the locals. Friends and families gather to shop, gossip and to eat at the very busy, tantalising food bars. Everyone, local and tourist alike, is enjoying the sense of community that oozes from this place. The Le Halles covered market in Biarritz, although very different in its style and atmosphere, is self-evidently crucial to the locals for their food shopping and socialising. The development of providores, bars, restaurants and pop up seasonal produce stalls around the market complex is a clear indication that this place is fundamental to the life of this seaside town. The market grew in prominence in the mid-1800s, when Napoleon III and Empress Eugéne built a villa on the beachfront, making Biarritz their holiday destination – and consequently the place to be in nineteenth-century Europe. As markets in the past had their genesis in agricultural economics; so, too, has the recent development and growth of Farmers’ Markets fuelled compelling financial and environmental arguments. The purchase of produce from a market was a necessity of life in the past, explaining its pivotal role. This is not the case now. But what is the case now, as in the past, is the less tangible outcome of the sense of wellbeing we experience as a result of being connected to our community through the interactions that occur at a market. So it would seem the answer is obvious and simple. Whether it is the practical economic imperatives of the past or the environmental and economic advantages today, we love our markets because they are also about connecting people.

Top: Fresh produce, always fresh and in season at the Willunga Farmers’ Market. Middle: Richard Casley-Smith of Bull Creek Organic Garlic at the Willunga Farmers’ Martket. Bottom: Courtney Stephen of Sunshine Ice Blocks at the Willunga Farmer’s Market. All photographs by Jasper Savage.


This is Jimmy. This is his dairy.

Many moons ago, Jimmy Smith ran a herd of dairy cows on that spot above. He slept in his dairy, and woke up before the sun. We’ve given his pride and joy a spit and polish – introducing Jimmy Smith’s Dairy, the Fleurieu’s newest, top-end B&B. We reckon Jimmy would be well chuffed. jimmysmithsdairy.com.au +61 409 690 342 Mentone Road East, Port Elliot SA (via Brickyard Road)

Still in founding family hands. Fall From Grace Wine Wine Education Tasting Discover, taste, learn and buy –

small local producers, international wines and emerging varieties, national and internationally accredited wine courses, master classes and food and wine events. Open Friday 12-8pm Friday, Sat 10-1pm (Sat wine school 2-5pm) and Sun 12-4pm. T: 08 855 62590 E: gill@fallfromgrace.com.au www.fallfromgrace.com.au

Celebrate with us on 5th of April 2015 Consult our website for details: www.kaybrothersamerywines.com

53


FOOD & WINE

Leonie Porter-Nocella talks with two chefs: Peter Reschke of d’Arry’s Verandah and Neil McGlew, new chef at Penny’s Hill Kitchen.

A culinary epiphany Photographs by Heidi Linehan.

Above: Chef and Manager – Peter and Jo Reschke of d’Arry’s Verandah.

Peter Reschke has been at d’Arry’s Verandah for so long that he’s almost become fused into its superb scenery. Peter and his wife Jo are respectively Head Chef and Manager at the famous restaurant with its iconic verandah perched over (and in) the lush green landscape. Peter’s food is fresh, light and bursting with subtle, sensitivelybalanced flavours. The menu shows a firm knowledge and love of food in general, with passing nods throughout to various styles and cuisines – albeit with his unique spin. At about ten he began cooking under his mother’s tender guidance ... even taking out wins baking for various fetes and shows. At fourteen and still at school, he answered an ad for an apprentice chef at the then very prestigious Park Royal, Adelaide. To his amazement he got the job, left school and was away. He proudly says that he’s been at it now for 39 years. However, a culinary epiphany took place while working for Peter and Kathy Jarmer, handling their King William Road establishment, Riley’s, while they were in the process of setting up the eponymous Jarmer’s on Kensington Road. Epiphanies aside though, by far his most significant and life-changing encounter occurred a bit later at Caffé 48 on Unley Road – when he met Jo, the love of his life. Peter attended the 1984 Culinary Olympics in Frankfurt, and while visiting Paris dined at the famous Tour d’Argent ... where the ‘pressed duck’ is numbered under a system initiated in the days of Napoleon. It’s simply mind-boggling to imagine the number of ducks they would have pressed since that time!

54

Finally returning to Oz, to the really happening area of Carlton, Peter cooked Japanese-inspired food at Kiss-a-Ten on Pelham St – just off Lygon Street. But the pull of his mentor saw him back at Jarmer’s again; back to where he’d absorbed immeasurable knowledge and nuance of European style and presentation. Peter Jarmer virtually introduced him – in a culinary sense – to ‘the world’. After going back as Head Chef to Caffe 48 he later joined friends in a partnership in Boltz – the first café of its kind in Rundle Street, flagging the way for the East End’s still-vibrant café culture. However the need for more family time after the arrival of children, saw him at Springs Smoked Salmon (now Harris Smoked Salmon) where he developed ‘value added’ lines. But the kitchen’s lure drew him to the Treasury on King William. A little later in Croatia, taking the family on a mixture of business and pleasure, Peter and Jo undertook a six-month stint at the Marina Restaurant ... then back to the Treasury. However, he and Jo ultimately decided to go back to doing their own thing. At about that time d’Arenberg presented them with the opportunity to have a sea change ... and work mainly lunches; a rare luxury in hospitality and a real bonus for family life. That was about eleven years ago and still counting. It would seem that the Verandah and the Reschkes were, and long will be, a perfect match! During the course of our interview I asked Peter how he could possibly accomplish so many of his mind-blowing passionfruit soufflés so many times throughout a single service. His answer confirmed just how talented and ‘outside the square’ this chef really is. (But I dare not print his technique for fear of infringing intellectual property.) Peter shares one of his recipes:


Slow Roast Pork Belly with Salsiccia, Rosemary Braised Grapes served with Apple, Celery and Roasted Almond Salad (serves 4 people). Pork Belly 1.5 - 2kg pork belly Salt Olive oil Method Score the rind then season with salt and olive oil. Rub into the skin. Place the belly rind-down in a nonstick roasting pan. Place in the hot part of a pre-heated oven. Cook for 1 hour at 250˚C until the skin is crisp and bubbled. Turn pork belly over, add water to moisten and reduce heat to 150˚C. Cook for a further 1.5 hours until tender. Rest for 30 minutes before attempting to slice. Salad 4 sticks finely sliced celery 2 McLaren Vale Orchards apples of choice – cored and julienned 80g Willunga almonds – roasted then coarsely chopped

¼ bunch flat leaf parsley – chopped coarsely 25ml Diana extra virgin olive oil 10ml white balsamic Season to taste Method Combine the above ingredients. Set aside and dress with the oil, vinegar, salt and pepper once the sausages and grapes are ready. Sausages with Grapes 4 Ellis pork, fennel and chilli sausages (Salsiccia) 1 glass of McLaren Vale white wine – whatever may be at hand. 2-3 fresh rosemary sprigs Method Cook the sausages in a heavy frypan. Once they are done remove them from the pan and set aside. Deglaze the pan with a little white wine, adding the fresh rosemary and grapes to warm through. To serve Remove the crackling from the belly, portion the belly then serve together with the salad, belly, sausage and crackling. Pour the grapes and jus over the top to finish it off.

55


FOOD & WINE

Then there’s the length – very, very long Leonie meets Neil McGlew, the new Head Chef at Penny’s Hill Kitchen. Neil was born in Kent of Irish descent and came over here in 2010, arriving and working in Perth at Five Bar (five partners) before coming to the Fleurieu about a year ago. Now I hate to be sexist, writing shamelessly about a man’s appearance before even mentioning his abilities ... but that’s the first thing you notice about Neil – his appearance! He has the most, well, noticeable beard I’ve ever imagined/met in my life. First there’s the colour – reds of varying hues. Then there’s the texture – silky, wavy. Then there’s the length – very, very long. Now I’m not a facial-hair kinda gal, but my eyes kept being drawn back to it. It is an entity of its own, rippling and jiggling away as it catches the light. Anyhow, back to what this is really all about: the food. Lamentably, since Neil has hit the ground at Penny’s Hill running, he’s cooking to his predecessor’s menu ... which doesn’t really reflect his style (new menu imminent). He has some great ideas for both his menu and style. For a start he plans to assign the dining room to fine dining alone – and the outdoor area, with its lush, lawned outlook, to more casual dining with its own menu reflecting the more laid-back, child-friendly atmosphere. There will be platters (warm and cold) ... chocolate Brownies, ice-cream and various ‘fools’ as part of the new style on offer. The menu in the dining room will be overrun with ‘Wellingtons’ – including Kangaroo, Pork with apple and sage sauce ... and

56

presumably the better known ‘Beef Wellington’. His ‘wholesome, hearty and value-for-money’ menu will also feature elk (see recipe), venison, ‘swordfish tartare’ and Fish Kiev, which after hearing Nelly describe it is a ‘must-taste’. I can hardly wait for all this fare to be launched onto our radar! And while Nelly is not a name that would instantly spring to mind when meeting Neil, for some inexplicable reason this name has been bestowed upon him, so despite his former UK life playing rugby and shot-put ... he seems perfectly happy to go with it. Nelly is also something of a chocoholic, so the new menu will feature plenty of rich chocolate (see recipe again) along with frozen blueberry parfait, various tarte tartin, and all in all lots of fruity freshness. If this profile seems to be lacking a culinary journey, it’s because most of his experience took place in a range of places around the UK, most of which would be lost on us. However, he’s cheffed it up in London, worked at a Scottish-themed restaurant featuring ‘Haggis nights’: but he’s also, while studying catering, worked as a silver service waiter, put in a couple of years as a pastry chef in a commercial kitchen, and generally covered a good deal of gastronomic ground. Anyhow, Tony Parkinson is obviously happy to have Neil at the helm in The Kitchen and I, for one, can’t wait to see and taste Nelly’s new direction. This recipe should give you an indication of where he’ll be taking us:


Pan seared Elk on a white bean and cauliflower puree with orange and blueberry braised red cabbage, stout and chocolate sauce, and crispy pancetta. Ingredients 1 x Elk tenderloin 15g Butter 350g Red cabbage 1 x Orange (juice and zest) 25g Blueberry 100g White beans 300g Cauliflower 2 x cloves Garlic 1 x Bay leaf 1Lt Milk 2 x Bottles Stout (330ml) 100g Dark chocolate (70%) 300ml Venison stock (Beef or Chicken will be fine) 4x thinly-sliced Pancetta Method for Puree Take white beans and put into a pan containing 500ml of milk, 300ml of water, bay leaf and garlic cloves. Cook until soft and ready to blitz (but remove bay leaf before blitzing). Strain off liquid, keeping it aside in case you need to add some while you’re blitzing … to get a smooth creamy texture. Put cauliflower in a pan with 500ml of milk and 100ml water. Cook until soft. Strain the beans and blitz together with cauli while both are still warm. Season to taste. For Cabbage Finely shred the cabbage, zest and juice orange in a pan, add the cabbage to the juice and zest, then place over a low heat and start to braise. When cabbage has softened, season and add 20g of

blueberries. Cook for another 5min until blueberries soften and bleed their colour into the cabbage. You are now ready to serve. For the sauce Pour stout put into a pan and reduce to a light syrup. (This means that when you put a spoon into the stout it will leave a light coating on the spoon.) From 660ml of stout it should reduce to about 200ml. Warm your stock in a separate pan and add the reduced stout. While the stout is reducing, place chocolate in a bowl over a pot of water to melt it. When ready whisk your chocolate into the stock and stout mix. Your sauce is now ready! Elk Make sure your tenderloin is clean of all fat and sinew. Heat a pan making sure it’s Hot before you add 20ml of veg oil. Season Elk with salt and pepper and place in the hot pan. Sear the Elk on all surfaces so it gets a nice colouration all around and place in 180o preheated oven for 4 minutes. Take from oven and add knob of butter (15g) to the pan. Roll the Elk in it and then remove from pan and place on a cooling tray, pour the butter over and allow to rest for 2-3min. Pancetta Crisp Place your pancetta on a tray lined with baking paper. Place another sheet of paper on top with a tray or something heavy on top to ensure the pancetta stays flat. Cook at 180o for 6min or until pancetta is crisp. For Garnish Use some florets (the very tops of the broccoli). Cut remaining blueberries in half and place on cabbage. NB: Deep fried saltbush optional. If Elk is unavailable venison is a perfect substitute. The elk was from Hahndorf Venison, but most butchers in the area to should be able to obtain venison for you. Another NB: Neil just informed me that Nelly was bestowed upon him by his best friends back in the UK – partly because he missed an important game of rugby (due to his partying ways) but also because ‘I can be a bit of a Nelly at times’! 57


Above and opposite: Local Artist Barb Pettigrew painted the artwork on the doors which represent the iconic landscapes and pastoral lands of the western Fleurieu.

Festival Fleurieu 2015 After the metro March madness of the Adelaide Festival, Fringe, WOMADelaide and the Clipsal auto-fest in February, it’s time to relax as the days shorten and the evening air becomes crisper. Easter heralds the start of the autumn holiday period, and it is time to get out and about to make the most of the changing season. It is at this time of the year that something very interesting is happening ‘en-Fleurieu’. Every alternate year for the last decade in the Yankalilla District ‘The Leafy Sea Dragon Festival’ was hosted. This event has now evolved ... and so too its name. ‘For non-locals and for prospective festival sponsors, the name LSD Festival brought to mind all manner of things psychedelic and alternative, but it said nothing about the place where it was held,’ says festival board chairman and former Arts SA supremo Greg Mackie OAM. The board decided on a new name: Festival Fleurieu: art from the heart of the Western Fleurieu – nine days of celebrating all things artful, culinary and local. ‘Small regional festivals are pure gold. They strengthen community identity, they present pathways to connect audiences with artists the arts, and they contribute to a sense of

58

place and create a great vibe, says Mackie’, the former head of Arts SA and founder of the Adelaide Festival of Ideas. A resident of Yankalilla, jazz musician and music tutor, Jillian Langford, is the festival coordinator. An enthusiastic group of volunteers from the region came together to form the festival program coordination group. ‘The western Fleurieu is blessed with amazing artists and a great sense of community’ says Langford. ‘Our role has been to stimulate local creativity and to engage with the community to ensure that the festival reflects community aspiration,’ she says. ‘We held meetings in every town in the area and we invited each community to get involved ... and they have rallied with imagination and energy.’ They have invested thousands of volunteer hours to deliver a festival that the community values, and believe that a name change and social media strategy can deliver a bigger impact for the region. They have formed great partnerships with local business, and have been proactive in inviting tax deductible donations from local residents and stakeholders.


Small regional festivals are pure gold. They strengthen community identity, they present pathways to connect audiences with artists and the arts, and they contribute to a sense of place. The result is the largest program in the event’s ten years with over ninety registered events in fifty venues across the western Fleurieu: from Myponga and Inman Valley to Cape Jervis and Ingalalla Falls. The 2015 Festival Fleurieu promises something for everyone. There is a culinary program that features a beer tasting degustation at Smiling Samoyed in Myponga, an Art of Food banquet at The Courthouse, Normanville, even an outdoor long-table event, ‘High Camp: Gourmet Grazing at the Camp Kitchen’ and a celebratory brunch at Ingalalla Falls. There are many free activities too. The festival’s opening event promises to be memorable as Main Street Normanville is recreated as a piazza, with musicians, dancing, food and wine. And there is also a Family Fun Day at Myponga. The artist trail boasts a diversity of creative practice, and there’s a growing number of artists moving into the region. A remade Beach Gallery and Cafe at Normanville Beach will host an exhibition of the finalists and winners of the inaugural $15,000 Fleurieu Four Seasons Prize for Landscape Photography and $2,000 People’s Choice Award. On opening night renowned jazz musician Bruce Hancock and his band will be performing live at the Normanville Hotel.

Hancock is a weekend resident of Cape Jervis, and is looking forward to performing in his favourite part of the world. And locally born drum aficionado, Wade Nixon, is bringing his band PIG to get funky at the Yankalilla Hotel. For the classically inclined there is a Bach Cello recital with Sydney cellist Dave Loew at Christ Church Yankalilla. ‘Crossing Thresholds –The Doors Project’ will present an outdoor ‘gallery’ across the western Fleurieu where visitors will discover artist-painted doors in unusual locations; and a map will be accessible on the festival’s website to help viewers to find their way. Many of the doors will later be auctioned as a fund-raiser to help with the next festival, as part of a ‘Salon des Refuse’ art sale. ‘A festival once every two years is a long time between drinks’ says Jill Langford. ‘We want to foster a lively arts culture that connects artists and audiences year-round. We know that festivals are good economic and community generators.’ When asked does this mean we might see an annual Festival Fleurieu, Greg Mackie rolls his eyes and looks to the sky. ‘Festivals are as much about hope as resources ... ‘ Festival Fleurieu 11-19 April 2015

59


Petra de Mooy discovers

The luxurious wilds of Kangaroo Island Photography by Jasper Savage.


Previous page: A beautifully rustic stone sign marks the entrance to the Kangaroo Beach Lodge. Top and below right: The Lodges sit perched high on the hill above a private bay. Above left: A well appointed kitchen with amazing views at Kangaroo Beach Lodges.

From very basic beachside camping, to views, comfort, luxury and style – all can be found on Kangaroo Island – including of course, the highest of the high end at the world renowned Southern Ocean Lodge. On our latest retreat to Kangaroo Island at the end of what was an extremely mild January we had the opportunity to explore two other well-appointed and unique selfcontained lodgings, also under the five star luxury category – Kangaroo Beach Lodges and Lifetime Private Retreats, both locations family-owned and on the north coast.

Driving from Penneshaw to our first destination of the Kangaroo Beach Lodges is a two-hour journey. No need to rush though. There are so many things to see and do along the way! Spectacularly beautiful beaches, state parks, with the added attraction of unique food and beverage experiences and art galleries selling local art and craft. Be aware that some of this can require going off-road and onto dirt tracks, so a sturdy vehicle with good traction and shocks is an advantage. If you catch an early ferry from Cape Jervis there is plenty of time to explore. On this trip we explored the Dudley Peninsula. Home to two of the better wineries in the region (Dudley, and Chapman River) both locations have unique character and charm. If you have a fascination with lighthouses, the oldest South Australian lighthouse lies at the point of Cape Willoughby and is often manned by a very knowledgeable Scottish character named Cameron. The recently opened Zest and Lime Café is also a lovely little stopover for lunch. >

61


Above left: The bathroom shower at Kangaroo Beach Lodges has views to die for. Above right: The Angus cows that graze the hills to the east take a walk on the beach.

The three lodges sit perched and cantilevered high on the hills surrounding a beautiful sheltered bay. Black Angus cows graze the slopes adjacent and sometimes even stroll down onto the beach. To make your way over to the Lodges from the fork in the road at Cygnet River, it is probably best to head along the Playford Highway. There you may wish to stop at Kangaroo Island Spirits for a fortified affogato. Ohhhhh yaaahhhhhh! The dirt road from the West End Highway winds its way through both pastoral lands and pristine bush. Yuccas, gums, casuarinas and mallee create shelter for local fauna, which may come slinking, bounding or lurching out in front of you at any moment – so keep your eyes peeled. The native habitat of the eight thousand acre property is also parttime home to the rarely seen Glossy Black Cockatoo. The current owners of the property are working with Parks and Wildlife to ensure their continued population. The land was originally owned by Clive Bonython and purchased as a grazing property. It was subsequently purchased in the seventies by the Wilkinson family, who still own it. We were greeted by third generation custodian Amelia, who chaperoned us to one of the three lodges – The Fides, named after the Fides shipwreck just off of the coast to the north. 62

The three lodges sit perched and cantilevered high on the hills surrounding a beautiful sheltered bay. Black Angus cows graze the slopes adjacent and sometimes even stroll down onto the beach. Sitting in the quiet comfort of the lodges is meditative. A recently planted forest of casuarinas in the valley creates shelter for kangaroos, which come out at dawn and dusk to graze on the grassy pasture. The Fides is quiet, private and designed to make maximum use of the space both indoors and out. Employing the very skilled and talented Troppo architects to design the lodges was a triumph. The use of a very neutral palette and understated design features for the exteriors allows the buildings to fit seamlessly into the landscape while maximising the views, with clever use of materials indoors creating some interesting transitions – often blurring the lines between interior and exterior. Outdoor decking continues without interruption into the master ensuite, right up to a glass wall, which apart from being etched for privacy in the shower area, allows views all the way to the bay below. This is a truly impressive feature, making for one of the best views from a shower you could wish for. Sliding glass doors across most of the north face peel back to create a virtual indoor-outdoor deck – lovely for warm breezy days – while the easily secured doors and windows in the living areas enable guests to snuggle up in the colder months, with a slow combustion wood heater contributing to the magnificent ambience. Separation of the two sleeping areas by the two large living areas allows families to have a nice break – giving enough space for privacy and a great room for coming together to enjoy meals and entertainment. On-site catering facilities are not available yet, but


Above: Bejewelled candelabras, fine wine, music and delicious food under the Fig Tree. Below: Under the Fig Tree at Life Time Private Retreats. Bottom: The newly finished Sheoak House at the Retreats is earthy and very comfortable.

plans are under way to add this, along with some walking trails and outdoor eating experiences, which will serve to highlight some of the key features of the property. In the meantime the very well equipped kitchen and barbecue area give guests everything they need for selfcatered casual meals or gourmet fare. Our second stop on the north coast was Snellings Beach. Owned and operated by the Hannaford family, the Lifetime Private Retreats have four separate accommodations, all with their own design and style. The newest addition to the Retreats is the Sheoak house, where we stayed. Rammed earth walls and a warm palette of wood, leather and stone are offset by the punchy colours of the fabrics and textiles both in the TV ‘pit’ and bedrooms. Again we were treated to the sweeping views of a large, pristine bay. The house has loads of nice personal touches, like an extensive collection of novels, DVDs and board games, as well as books on local history, flora and fauna. A good cappuccino machine and separate kitchenette in the master bedroom further enrich the retreat. While the kids play in the main living area and take advantage of the pillow pit, the adults can relax in their room with a TV, lounge area, views and just enough of a kitchen to make toast and coffee or a light lunch. Once again, the Sheoak is well equipped for a bring your own, selfcatering holiday, but on night two we decided to treat ourselves to the catering offered on-site by Hannaford and Sachs. There is an option of eating indoors in the old shearing shed, or else a choice of two outdoor settings: the Taverna or the Fig Tree. Being a slightly cooler night they recommended the Fig Tree. I was not sure what to expect but what we were treated to was easily one of the best dining events of my life. > 63


64


The food was sublime. A lovely entrée of spicy shrimp was followed by a mind-blowing ceviche complemented by a delicate avocado dip. Mains – including a lovely salmon and taramasalata – were accompanied by an enticing eggplant dish and some beautiful naan bread. The setting under the big old Fig Tree was magic. Large areas under the branches (which grow right down to the ground) had been cleverly pruned out to create a number of small rooms. Decorated with fairy lights, tapestry, jewels and candles, we were led to the back room where our table was set with linen, a candelabra and some chilled sparkling white. A small and discreet music box played a selection of jazz. We were asked to sit back, relax and bask in our surroundings while our host disappeared to bring the first course. The food was sublime. A lovely entrée of spicy shrimp was followed by a mind-blowing ceviche complemented by a delicate avocado dip. Mains – including a lovely salmon and taramasalata – were accompanied by an enticing eggplant dish and some beautiful naan bread. Drinks were poured, and as it grew darker we enjoyed the candlelight, wine and music, taking a little break before our lovely dessert of puff pastry and fresh mulberry and pear compote appeared. Heading back to Sheoaks, a mere stone’s throw up the hill, we marvelled at how amazing it was, how much we love Kangaroo Island and how rich and varied the place is. Both Kangaroo Beach Lodges and Lifetime Private Retreats took us to places we have never been before, both physically and mentally. Lovely. Previous page: Bejewelled candelabras, fine wine, music and delicious food under the Fig Tree. Top left: A lovely entree of spicy shrimp. Top right: A delicious ceviche accompanied by homemade chips and a delicate avocado dip. Above right: The Lounge / Dining area of the Sheoak House. Below right: The earthy interiors are offset by punchy colours. 65


FOOD & WINE

TASTE THE SEASON:

The ugly, yet delicious Quince – or (Cydonia oblonga)

Story by Leonie Porter-Nocella. The quince is part of the rose family, Rosaceae, which includes pears and apples; however it differs from them due mainly to its intense perfume-like fragrance and its ability to leave the mouth in an almost permanent pucker if eaten raw. With its pale yellow, rather mottled skin, incredibly tart taste, and lumpy shape, the quince doesn’t have quite the same eye-appeal of its more glamorous siblings, but the quince’s appeal lies in its capacity to be transformed into wonderful marmalades, jams, and jellies. Quince, like apple and guava, produces a natural pectin when cooked, making it ideal for jelling. The homeland of the quince lies between the Caspian and Black Seas, in the mountainous region of the Caucasus, touching northern Turkey, Iran and Southern Georgia. The ancient Greeks considered quinces to be the symbol of fertility. And Aphrodite, the Greek goddess of love, was known to consider apples sacred, but historians now believe that the apples favoured by Aphrodite were actually quinces, and that the legendary golden apple of Hesperides that Paris gave to Aphrodite was really a quince. Some historians even believe that Eve’s fruit of temptation might have been a quince (bearing in mind that the Mulvian variety can be eaten raw). Quince has been favoured as far back as time began, but it fell out of the limelight here for many decades, but it’s once again back in favour, possibly due to its ability to be hero of any dish, no matter which way it’s cooked.

Quince paste ... Dulce de membrillo 2-3 quinces Juice of half a lemon Approximately 2 cups of sugar Pinch of salt

Apicius, (Ancient) Rome’s first cookbook author, combines them with leeks, honey, and broth in hot oil (but we’ll give that recipe a miss). Instead let’s go with a recipe that will be more fitting to our lifestyle. The recipe below is the Portuguese/Spanish dulce de membrillo – known to us as quince paste. Dulce de membrillo is also popular in Brazil, (known there as marmelada), in most of Latin America and in Israel, where it’s a typical Sephardi dish.

Preparation Peel and core the quince. Cut into large wedges. Place fruit in a pot and cover with water. Add lemon juice. Bring water to a boil, and cook fruit until very soft. Drain and let cool for 5 minutes. Process fruit in a food processor/ blender, until smooth and sauce-like. Measure fruit (you should have around 2 cups) and place in a heavybottomed pot. Measure 3/4 of that amount in sugar (so if you have 2 cups, add 1½ cups of sugar), and stir sugar into the fruit. Bring sugar and fruit to a low boil and simmer, stirring frequently, on low heat. Cook slowly, keeping the mixture barely at a boil and stirring often to prevent burning, until mixture thickens. Continue to cook over low heat, stirring constantly, until mixture becomes a thick paste that stays together in a ball. The mixture should seem almost dry, and stretchy. The fruit will change colour and become bright orange-red.

One myth even has it that pregnant women who indulge in generous quantities of quince will give birth to industrious and highly intelligent children. So if this is your aim (or even if your aim is to impress your friends) ... try this:

Pour into a lightly oiled dish and let cool. Slice when firm. Quince paste will keep for several weeks if covered and refrigerated. Eat with your cheese platter, with nuts and fresh or dried fruits ... or even spread it on hot toast in the morning. Buon appetito!

Hindus prepare a quince sambal by pounding peeled quinces with onions, hot peppers, salt and a little orange juice into a coarse puree to serve as a condiment very much like chutney. Moroccan cuisine incorporates the quince in highly seasoned tagines, with combinations of meats and dried fruits, often spiced with cinnamon and cloves. It can be stuffed with an aromatic minced meat mixture and baked. It can be roasted, poached, made into marmalade or a smooth quince jelly.

66


d lifestyle.

ism an g in travel, tour in lis ia ec sp y; ph

ogra Location phot AN HEIDI LINEH er ing Photograph nn

AIPP Award Wi

6 t. 0402 716 40 ho.com e. heidi@heidiw m os .co ho iw id w. he . heidiwhophot agram / twitter facebook / inst

Open Mon to Thurs 10 ~ 4 | Fri 9 ~ 4

W i n e s

Sa t 10 ~ 4. 30 | Sunda y 11~ 4 .3 0

C a f é

B & B

Your One Stop Tourist Destination

And Home to Unique Grapple Ciders, Award Winning Two Tribes Shiraz Grenache, Signature Farmers Platter and the Famous Oxenburger!

A: 26/28 Kangarilla Rd Mclaren Vale 5171 T: 8323 0188 E: info@oxenberry.com W: www.oxenberry.com

n and art directio Graphic design b. for print and we lier to FLM Preferred supp 1223 32 Telephone: 81 seven.com www.threefifty

67


BOOKS & WORDS

Book Reviews by Mike Lucas.

The Crooked House by Christobel Kent

Published by Sphere ISBN 9780751556971 $29.99

This is a novel for fans of Gone Girl and The Silent Wife; a story that will leave you with the notion that you may have missed something, and that may you want to read it again and that English villages may not be as ‘quaint’ as they first appear.

There’s nothing quite like settling down to read a good, old-fashioned whodunit set in a quaint English village. Well, this may not be an old-fashioned tale, but the mystery keeps going until the last few pages and the stereotypical location is here, along with a horrific murder and an intriguing cast of characters. Thirteen years after Esme’s family is brutally shot dead, her father accused of the murders, she returns to the seaside village of Saltleigh in Essex where the killings occurred. With her identity changed and a new life forged she is apprehensive about returning … and with good reason, for she soon makes a discovery that forces her to question everything she thought she knew about the day her old life died. Christobel Kent weaves so many curves and forks in the road to the final resolution of this story that the pages will burn in your hands on the way to the truth.

His Other House by Sarah Armstrong

Published by Pan MacMillan Australia ISBN 9781743532188 $29.99 Morality, fidelity and honesty, or lack of all three, dominate this story set in the Australian subtropics. Doctor Quinn Douglas spends a few days each week working away from his wife, Marianne. After several failed pregnancies and a long spell of IVF, Marianne is desperate for a child.

Time and Time Again by Ben Elton

Published by Bantam Press ISBN 9780593073575 $32.99 As with any time travel tales, there are questions of paradox within this book that keep the reader’s mind ticking throughout. But these questions are given satisfactory answers in this impressive book by Ben Elton, the comedian and writer behind the hit series, The Young Ones and Blackadder. In 2024, adventurer Hugh Stanton is given the opportunity to change history by travelling back one hundred and ten years and altering the events that led to the First World War. With the recent loss of his family in a tragic car accident, he has very little to lose. And so begins an attempted rewriting of history

68

that begins in Constantinople and journeys to Sarajevo and Berlin with the ultimate goal of preventing the needless loss of millions of lives during the twentieth century. Elton maintains the impetus necessary for a tale that plays with time, and interweaves fiction with fact, using his politically enlightened voice to present scenarios and hypotheses that challenge the actuality of history. The atmosphere and attitudes of twentieth century Europe are compared and contrasted to those of today: the butterfly effect is ever present and the true benefits of past intervention for the sake of prevention are explored time and time again.


But Quinn does not feel the same. With tensions mounting in their marriage, Quinn begins an affair with Rachel, the daughter of one of his patients. When Marianne receives the news she has been hoping for, Quinn finds that he has placed himself in a situation where there is no easy way out. And as time goes on, the right decision becomes harder and harder to make. The self-reflections of the three main characters and the acts of love and lies between them are so well played out that there is no doubt about the authenticity of the tale. There is no forced drama; actions and reactions are natural and completely believable. But the real strength of this story is in the dialogue; it is the voices that carry this narrative and speak of regret and resentment, forming the ripples borne of wrong choices and indecision that grow wider every day.

campaign held in 2014. The story follows Mali and her young keeper, Luk, who cares for her and helps her to overcome her loss and set her back on her feet again. Jane and Sally, both from Adelaide, have matched sentient word with vivid picture to create a book that can be appreciated by children and adults alike. The serious nature of the tale, which represents a true and all too common threat within some countries, is captured sensitively and cautiously within Jane’s evocative text. The colourful and bold hand-coloured lino illustrations for which Sally is well known conjure the vibrant beauty of South East Asia. And the facial expressions of an injured and recovering Mali say more than any words about the pain inflicted on countless animals and the faith they place in humans. A percentage of the royalties from this book will go to Safeground.

Poetry by Heart: Poems for Learning and Reciting Published by Penguin Group ISBN 9780241185544 $35.00

One Step at a Time by Jane Jolly Illustrated by Sally Heinrich

Published by MidnightSun Publishing ISBN 9780987380951 $27.99 This emotive and heart-warming picture book about Mali the baby elephant, who loses a leg when she steps on a landmine, was made possible by a crowdfunding

For those who would like an introduction to the real art of poetry; for those who would like to expand their knowledge of poetry; for those who are extrovert enough to express their true self within another’s written work – this book is for you.

As explained in the introduction, before the onset of printing, poems were designed to be read and heard aloud; the reader’s voice and even body movements an interpretation of the author’s original sentiment and passion. Over time, however, as poetry has been published in its written form, it has sometimes become a silent genre, often resigning its emotion and power to that of thought and a string of words upon a page. This book provides the reader with over 200 poems that are best read with voice and expression. From ancient Beowulf, written by that all too common poet, Anonymous, to twenty-first century works, this is a collection of poetry to enjoy in all of its magnificence. Along with each poem, there is a page about the work and the poet and even a QR Code which will link the reader to the Poetry Archive’s website, where you can hear the poems being read, sometimes by the author.

69


Zannie Flanagan AM looks at Food Culture

Food culture from the ground up Photography by emme jade.


Previous page: Platters of local cheese olives, greens and bread to start off the night. This page top: The feasting took place in one of the shade houses at Scoop headquarters on the outskirts of Willunga. Above left: Rachel toured the crowd through some of the growing sheds and explained a bit of the process. Above right: Green tomato and cylindra beetroot salad.

... if you’ve recently been to a Fleurieu restaurant and eaten a beautiful salad decorated with borage, violas or rosemary flowers, chances are they have come from Scoop’s very gardens ... What better way for Scoop to celebrate a decade as the Fleurieu’s favourite local food provedore than to feed the chefs and producers underpinning the business’s success? Producers are a hardworking lot, who generally prefer to remain at the coalface, so dining out on their own produce prepared for them by exceptional chefs, is a rare treat. And so it was that on a warm summer evening in early December, provedore Rachel McMillan, ably assisted by some of the best chefs in this region and beyond, created a magical feasting venue in one of the shade-houses where her business and gardens are located. Planning for the event had been going on for months. Rachel, and Ben Sommariva, chef at local Willunga restaurant, Fino, had developed a challenging seasonal menu with a twist – the meal was to be organic, vegetarian, GM free and most importantly, 100% Fleurieu!

As planning progressed and excitement grew, more chefs from around the region offered their time and precious days-off to the project, jumping at the chance to work together to create a memorable celebration of the region’s renowned produce. The venue, loosely draped with shade-cloth and reminiscent of an Arabian Nights’ middle-eastern desert tent, was scattered with old couches, rugs, cushioned hay bales and low tables, providing spaces for guests to recline and dine as they settled in for a night of fun and feasting. Lindsay Durr and Brendan Wessels, who lead the kitchen team at Second Valley’s Leonards Mill, and whose food is now heralded as some of the finest in the region, agreed to contribute their time and expertise to the project, along with well-known freelance chef, Simon Burr. Chef Simon Bryant, who is a fan of produce from the region, was unable to attend on the night, but lent a hand developing a couple of impressive dishes the day before the event. Penny’s Hill also provided chefs, time, expertise and kitchen facilities for the event. >

71


Top left: The greenhouses have a constant supply of edible flowers and micro greens. Top right: Sprouted lentil and baby carrot salad with watermelon radish – another dish created on the day with produce from the garden. Above: Local chefs availed themselves on the night to provide an amazing array of vegetarian dishes. From left to right: Ben Sommariva, Brendan Wessels and Simon Burr.

Prior to the feasting, Rachel took her guests on a tour of the ‘polyhouse’ gardens where her team grows many of the herbs, flowers and greens supplied to leading restaurants. Chances are that if you’ve recently eaten a beautiful salad decorated with borage, violas or rosemary flowers in one of the region’s restaurants, they have come from these very gardens. In keeping with the regional theme, guests were offered a selection of Fox Creek wines, cider from McLaren Vale Orchards and beer from the Smiling Samoyed Brewery, all served from a caravan bar parked close to the entrance of the venue. As the sun began to set, platters of food materialised from the makeshift kitchen in the Scoop distribution shed where the chefs assembled the dishes. Simon Bryant’s wonderful dish of caramelised walnuts in the shell and oven-baked crispy kale was magnificent, with Dione Flanagan’s dish of dolmades made with a smoked potato and roast almond filling was an impressive take on an old favourite. (I had an even greater appreciation of this dish, having seen Beth Busbridge run in from the vineyard after an encounter with a large brown snake while picking the vine leaves!) Sean Mullholland’s food truck ‘Mullygrub’, parked near the bar, acted as Ben Sommariva’s kitchen where he prepared the potato and goat curd gnocchi with glazed beetroot. The gnocchi had been prepared earlier by Leonard Mill’s Brendan Wessels, and as the final dish, was one of the highlights of the evening’s fare, sending many back for seconds. Andy Clappis’s still-warm bread added the perfect accompaniment to a refreshing pale green pea and mint chilled soup and platters of local cheeses provided by Hindmarsh Valley Diary and Alexandrina Cheese. 72

Lindsay Dur, whose desserts have become legendary down at Second Valley, presented two desserts – a burnt-honey panna cotta with nettle praline, served with a pistachio ice cream in strawberry syrup, and a pot-set yoghurt with lemon basil and compote of cherries and blueberries. Over the course of the event fifteen dishes were served, but as evening began to fall and the wind became cooler, I decided it was time to head home. I could see though, that the night was just commencing for the hardworking chefs who were just beginning to wind down. As I drove down the road, I couldn’t help but reflect on the changes that had taken place in the region since I arrived over 30 years ago. The farmers’ markets of Victor Harbor and Willunga have now been providing residents with local, seasonal food for over fourteen years, stimulating a resurgence of crops other than grapes and a trend of cooking with local produce. The growth of world-class restaurants, now scattered throughout the region’s towns and vineyards, has also been a response to the growing appreciation and diversification of the regional produce, providing an incentive for chefs to embrace career and lifestyle moves to the Fleurieu. Regional provedore, Scoop, has provided the last crucial link in the region’s food value chain by offering growers the opportunity to have their food delivered straight to restaurant kitchen doors, providing chefs with quality and inspiration, giving local producers the freedom to get on with the business of growing and making some of the best food in the State. The low food-miles ensure freshness, with the added benefit of lower costs for everyone. The Fleurieu is now poised for a successful and sustainable food future, with a food culture that has literally grown from the ground up!


Lunch Wed to Sun from midday Dinner Friday and Saturday Experience our Taste of the Fleurieu menu – a culinary journey.

Bookings: 8598 4184 www.leonardsmill.com.au

Explore the unknown and hidden beauty where other tours do not go … Benjamin Neville: 0423 725 409 www.offpistetours.com.au

7869 Main South Road, Second Valley

IBIS HAS THE LOT!

Plants, Water Lilies, Aquatic Plants, Statues, Goldfish and Aquarium Accessories, Stock Feed, Honey, Apiary Gear and Gifts. We are at the Corner of Kessell Rd and Cadell St Goolwa SA. Ph: 08 8555 1311

73


Gill Gordon-Smith CSW recalls the

Mavericks of the Vale Photography by Jasper Savage.


Previous page: Diana Genders is deeply proud of her roots as a wine maker in the Vale. Above: When you drive down the road to the McLaren Vale oval you will see the Genders sign next to the 100 year old oak tree on the edge of the vineyard. Below left: The winery houses dozens of steel tanks where with every particular attention to detail, terroir. The Pedlar Creek flats are so variable that every parcel is ‘vinified’, and aged separately before blending.

‘We visited Diana Genders and Allan Dyson the week before the hectic schedule of vintage began in early February. We walked around their properties and heard about their history and their wine and found it truly humbling to understand the depth of knowledge and fortitude it has taken to create and keep the intrinsic nature of their brands. Both are thoughtful, pragmatic, unique and eccentric in the best possible way.’ Petra de Mooy, Publishing Editor.

If you have spent time in the McLaren Vale Region you would probably have driven along Sheriff Road at Maslin Beach or perhaps noticed the large brown shed that welcomes you to the McLaren Vale oval with a slightly faded ‘Genders’ sign. The people behind these names are two unique, independent and almost underground winemakers, with firm roots in the region and tales to tell both in the glass and face to face; and while others may come and go, here are a couple of mavericks quietly getting on with expressing the region they know so well – their way (given the rugged individualism, eccentricity and never say never attitude of these two). Genders Wines Diana Genders is a passionate and talented winemaker with literally both hands in every aspect of her wines: starting in the vineyard and working her way methodically through each phase of production, you may finally get to sit down with her in the cellar. With a staff of one, you’ll find Diana anywhere between the tractor or the fermenter, crafting traditional wines of provenance from vines she has lovingly >

75


Above left: Diana Genders. Above right: A portrait from years gone by.

nurtured for over thirty years as guardian of a true winemaking legacy originating on both sides of her family tree. Diana’s great, great grandmother was Mary Laurie – the first registered female viticulturist in South Australia, while her maternal great grandmother, Amy Pridmore, ran Woodley Wines after the death of her husband. Unable to sell the property due to a caveat, Amy, by default, became the winemaker, earning a reputation for her great palate. Diana is proud of her heritage and her family, who all followed their passions. Her mother became the first local providore in the region, starting Rosemary’s kitchen and recruiting the locals to produce Shiraz chutney, flavoured almonds and turkey liver pates, sourcing the liver from the Aldinga Turkey farm. The Genders winery was started by Diana’s father Keith, who turned to agriculture and poultry farming in 1948 after dropping out of law school, subsequently purchasing a twenty-seven acre property at McLaren Park. The vineyard is one of the oldest in the Vale, with Shiraz planted in 1895. In 1968 Keith decided to make wine and borrowed a book from the local library on winemaking, by Amerine and Cruces (the book never made it back to the library) ... and Genders began. His winemaking innovations included commissioning the first stainless steel tanks seen in the Vale from the now famous Mr Potter. The tanks are still in the winery along with successive and improved models. The cabernet vines were sourced and planted in 1967 by Diana’s brother Duncan, who passed away suddenly in 1979. Diana, a first

76

year language and arts student, decided to come home to help in the winery. Years following her father and brother around the winery and vineyard, listening and observing everything finally paid off. Passion followed obligation to family. After two years Diana realised she needed to get an education, thereby becoming one of two female winemaking students. In 1989 she went to work for Andrew Garrett, then Tolleys for seven years ... and after that spent time in France as a flying winemaker and consultant. The family needed her so she came home in 1997, rolled up her sleeves, pushed the pumps across the gravel and worked like a Trojan – as she still does today. The vineyard consists of various parcels of land with diverse attributes; the Pedlar Creek flats are so variable that every parcel is ‘vinified’, and aged separately before blending. McLaren Park Shiraz is thirteen rows of the very best. To commemorate her father she makes a Shiraz/Grenache called ‘Keith’ and for her brother, a cabernet called ‘Duncan’. Diana does everything apart from the pruning and only has very little assistance when the fruit comes in. She has five tractors, each with a different implement, since she is physically unable change them over. She hasn’t had a holiday in a decade but is joyfully independent, doesn’t answer to anyone, and makes four-hundred cases of amazing wines that sell out every year. Genders wines are hand-grown, hand-made and hand-sold. Sales and tastings are by appointment, and she has museum stock going back to 1998 ... in tiny quantities. A visit to Genders is a true experience for the soul.


Above and below: The Dyson cellar door at Maslin Beach is as character filled and idiosyncratic as the owner.

He recalls that as he stood on the rise with the breeze blowing in off the sea, he knew he had the exact location to make the wines he wanted. The site had deep clay soils over limestone, good drainage and those cooling breezes that gave the best conditions for perfect ripening and flavour development.

Dyson Wine Allan Dyson’s family came to the region three generations ago when Christies Beach and Port Noarlunga were tiny villages. He was born on Dyson Road in the homestead of the family property that was originally six hundred acres and included land up to the high tide line at Christies Beach. Allan started his wine journey at Seaview Winery – now Rosemount – when he was fourteen. There wasn’t enough work on the farm so he took a job there doing everything from washing Ben Chaffey’s car to pruning and cellar work, learning everything he could. He started full time in the cellar when he was sixteen, and credits opening and smelling a puncheon of wine in that cellar with the beginnings of his love affair for wine. Allan left the Vale and headed to the Hunter Valley for six years working with John Hordern at Hollydene vineyard. He came back in 1976, and believing he could make a living and develop a vineyard from what was bare paddock, convinced his father to sell him fifteen acres at Maslin Beach. He recalls that as he stood on the rise with the breeze blowing in off the sea, he knew he had the exact location to make the wines he wanted. The site had deep clay soils over limestone, good drainage and those cooling breezes that gave the best conditions for perfect ripening and flavour development. The estate is planted with what Dyson likes to drink. A proudly selftaught winemaker, Allan’s wines have a distinct nod to the old world, and he has a penchant for good Burgundy, travelling regularly to

77


Above: Dyson even does the bottling and labeling on site. A truly independent production line.

France to taste and educate his well-honed palate. The oldest vines are forty-year-old cabernet, the viognier is twentythree years old, there’s a patch of chardonnay, some pinot noir and some Sangiovese. The vines are dry grown, hand pruned, hand picked, made, bottled and labelled in situ ... and are true estate wines full of passion and place. His chardonnay is one of the best in the region and his 2014 Sangiovese has true drinkability. He’s passionate about everything from food to growing and making wine, and believes a man must live life that way. At close to seventy he’s a testament to that philosophy, with incredible energy and character. Dyson wines produce around twenty five hundred cases a year which are available mail order only from the winery on Sheriff Road at Maslin Beach. He doesn’t use distributors as he sells his own wine himself, but you can find him on Facebook. Drop by and taste everything he makes at the cellar door.

78


Eat, Buy and Shop Locally

gallery studio

Luxury award-winning boutique hotel offers five modern Asian-themed suites. Professional and discreet service. 1 Porter Street, Goolwa. T: 08 8555 1088 www.australasian1858.com

If you love art, visit John Lacey’s contemporary gallery/studio and meet this award winning artist. Originals and prints. Open most days 11am - 5pm. 41 Woodcone Rd Mt Compass. T: 8556 8388 M: 0419 823 708 W: johnlacey.com.au

Auraria Antiques Importers of Fine Quality Antiques

Specialising in items from the 15th century to the 1920s. Open Thurs & Fri 10 am ~ 4 pm. Sat, Sun and Public Holidays 10 am ~ 5 pm. Contact Gregory Bickford 0400 668 370 www.aurariaantiques.com.au

Enjoy a relaxing day in Myponga; potter through the market, enjoy lunch with a view, sample a local brew and live music at the brewery – and meet resident Samoyeds, Mia, Cooper and Hoppy. 46 – 48 Main South Rd Myponga Markets open Sat & Sun & most public holidays t:8558 6121 Smiling Samoyed Brewery weekend wood oven pizza t:8558 6166

BLUE DOOR

STUDIO Yoga, Meditation and Mindfulness The iconic blue door in Willunga will open again in magnificent style – April 2015.

Alma Hotel “Pouring great beers for over 150 years.” 11 Hill Street Willunga. www.almahotel.com.au Ph: 85562027 Beergarden, free Wi-Fi, Sip n Save bottleshop, TAB, SA Lotteries and meals 7 days. Photo courtesy emme jade.

38 High Street Willunga SA 5172 M: 0419 035 344 E: deevine@chariot.com.au  W: deevinestudio.com.au  Dee Vine Studio

Geddes Wines Womens, Mens & Childrens Friday, Saturday & Sunday 10am - 3pm 24 Old Coach Rd Aldinga Facebook.com/bohochicwillunga T : 0415 861 849 or 0431 345 856

are handcrafted by Tim Geddes. All basket pressed and award winning wines. Winner best McLaren Vale Grenache 2014. New cellar door opening soon! T: 0407217798 www.geddeswines.com.au

79


Fleurieu Weddings On November 8th 2014, Jessica Niejalke and Scott Schultz were married at the character filled Woodstock Wine Estate.


Jessica and Scott were married on the 8th of November 2014 in the gardens of Woodstock Wine Estate, McLaren Flat, holding a reception for close family and friends in the Coterie Restaurant of Woodstock. Scott first laid eyes on Jessica four years ago at a mutual friend’s birthday at Fumo Blu on Rundle Street. They didn’t speak that night, but Scott was captivated and began communicating with Jessica on Facebook. Lengthy internet conversations turned to phone conversations, with a first date establishing their inseparability. It wasn’t long before Jessica moved into Scott’s house at Woodcroft … and a holiday to Bali sealed their relationship … culminating in Scott’s proposal. The bride wore a beautiful ivory Jasmine gown from Jenny and Gerrys Bridal House in Payneham, complemented with a handmade lace and beaded garter created by her friend Brittany from Brittany Radcliff Vintage. Her blue peep-toe shoes added the ‘something blue’ to the day. The groom was dressed in a dark charcoal suit from Peter Shearer Menswear at Glenelg. Floral arrangements were created by Fabulous Functions in Old Reynella and featured shades of ivory, champagne, with a touch of vibrant green. Burlap was

used to hold the bouquets together, adding a rustic touch to further complement their theme for the day. With her mother and mother-in-law Jessica designed and handcrafted the potted succulent bomboniere, to let love grow, complementing the centerpieces of tall willow and Singapore orchids created by Covered Events. Another personal touch on the day was old dressing table that Scott and Jessica had purchased second hand and restored to a rustic look to use as a candy buffet. Jessica’s mother set up the candy buffet decorated with lace runners, lacy flowers, and utilising vintage jars collected from second-hand stores. The bride arrived at the venue in an MKV Jaguar hired through Classic Jags. A highlight of the evening was the hand-feeding of kangaroos in the wildlife sanctuary attached to Woodstock. The day was captured by Joel Roosa Photography and included photographs taken in the barrel room, vineyards and wildlife sanctuary on site at Woodstock Wine Estate. The couple honeymooned around Europe for 6 weeks, returning home just in time to spend Christmas with their family. Jessica and Scott would like to thank their parents Steve and Sue Niejalke and Trevor and Christine Schultz, along with the rest of their family and friends for helping to make their happily ever after so memorable. Join the Woodstock team at the Woodstock Wedding Expo on Sunday 15th March from 10am to 5pm. 81


SOCIAL PAGES

Being Social: Belo Brazil On 6 December 2014 FLM attended the launch of Belo Brazil, a traditional Brazilian Churrasco Dining Experience at the Fleurieu Golf Course. With head chef Josh Elies serving up an array of meats from an open spit, and dance group, La Bomba, providing the night’s entertainment. A good time was had by all.

01

02

03

04

05

06

Being Social: Port Willunga Strata On Friday 3 December 2014 FLM attended an art opening at the idyllically situated Star of Greece for the opening of ‘Port Willunga Strata’ by Brian O’Malley. The event featured a taste of the new summer menu, accompanied by local McLaren Vale wines and was hosted by Doug and Nikki Govan. Photographs courtesy Angela Lisman.

07

08

09

10

11

12

01: Richard Harvey, Mary Bice and Robin Dawson 02: Marg Tate, Phillip Tanner, and Ute Annells 03: Merry Gartrell, Grant Gartrell, Tracy Parkes and Keith Parkes 04: Alan Bennett, Keith Parkes, Robin Brokenshire and Grant Gartrell 05: Flora Zappia and Francesca Staltari-Stones 06: Sue Bailey, Lyn Chamberlin, Helen Diswey, Julia Dolling and Elizabeth Morgan. 07: Tim and Sue Thorn 08: Iain and Mel Mair 09: Falie Eldridge and Sally Cranney 10: Bill Boyle, David Montgomery, Pip Forrester and Alistair Cranney 11: Andrew Bovell, Bridget Gardiner and Jaynie Langford 12: Nikki Govan and Brian O’Malley.

82


Being Social: Harvest Festival McLaren Vale On 17 January 2015 FLM set up a display at the annual Harvest Festival McLaren Vale. The event was very well attended. The FLM photo booth with a brilliant Brian O’Malley painting as a backdrop provided a stunning setting for photos.

01

02

03

04

05

06

08

07

09

10

11

01: Gabby and Georgia Bahr, with Danielle Bator and Claire Lockwood 02: Dee Reynolds. Kerri Hall and Judy Hoey 03: Emma Reynolds, Paige Hall and Jessica Reynolds 04: Casey Sorell, Kristoffer Lucia, Emma DeBoer and Corey Winston 05: Rose and Isobel Grimwood 06: Alan Johnson with Zoe, Bri, Cheryl and John Chappell 07: Jenni Mitton 08: Heather Watson and Vicki Rounding 09: Rachel McMillan 10: Jennifer and Holly Curnow 11: Petra de Mooy.

83


SOCIAL PAGES

Being Social: FLM Summer Launch On 10 December 2014 FLM launched the summer issue at beautiful Chapel Hill Retreat. With an array of wines from Chapel Hill, Samuel’s Gorge, Dodgy Brothers, Beach Road and Geddes, a great crowd enjoyed the picturesque surrounds and delicious canapés provided by Chapel Hill chef, Rebecca Stubbs.

01

02

03

04

05

06

Being Social: Summer Drinks in a Farmhouse Garden On Saturday 17th January in a balmy late afternoon, nearly 100 guests gathered at the Second Valley Farm of Grant and Wendy Pember. The purpose was to raise funds for, and awareness of, the forthcoming autumn’s 2015 Festival Fleurieu.

07

08

09

10

11

12

01: Sande Bruce and Graham Richards 02: Jane Smeets and Kelly Reynolds 03: Luke Growden and Caleigh Hunt 04: Angela Lisman and Barnaby Scantlebury 05: Jacki Cornish, Carolyn Bailey, Jessica Bailey and Sally Anne Butler 06: Nick and Helen Vrees. 07: Jillian Langford, Rhonda Smith, Ken and Donna Messenger 08: David Montgomery, Dr Robert Lyons, MIchael Lincoln, David Waterford and William Boyle 09: James Potter, Jacqui Salkeld and Jonathan Lambert 10: Former Leafy Sea Dragon Festival Director, Lorraine McLoughlin, Hon Anne Levy AO and Councillor David Olsson (Yankalilla) 11: Jennifer Russell, Kerry Flanagan and Gabrielle Kelly 12: Anna and Damian Brown with host Grant Pember. 84


Being Social: Love Velo seaside On 23 January Port Willunga Beach was alight again with Love Velo seaside. A fantastic long-table beachside dinner was served as the sun was setting, with great local food and wine – along with live entertainment from Ricky Lee Coulter and a band of roving fire jugglers.

01

02

03

05

06

08

09

04

07

10

11

01: Rita Windle, Jamie Battams and Antonietta Sofia 02: Emma Radovanovic, Cordula Wild and Hailey Radanovic 03: Abbey Threadgold and Karen Dowd 04: Johanna Bennett, Haydon Manning and Hazel Wainwright 05: Ben Gillard and Joanna Arulampalam 06: Scott and Claire Wilson 07: Mark Dowd and Deputy Mayor of the City of Onkaparinga, Heidi Greaves 08: Impressive light display on the cliffs 09: Alisa Fraser, Alannah Yerbury and Kelly Noble 10: Artist Brian O’Malley not letting the lack of daylight hinder any progress. 11: Ricky Lee Coulter and band perform for the diners.

85


Happy Ever After

WHENEVER YOUR EVENT NEEDS MUSIC WITH MOOD – WEDDINGS, WINERIES – OR ANY SPECIAL EVENT.

Pure Envy Jewellery 74-76 King William Road Hyde Park 8373 1176

www.PureEnvy.com.au

86


The Victor Harbor Page marriages are made in heaven

and consummated on Earth

fter

er a v e r o f r u o y Eat at whalers...

salty air & frosty glasses

eat

TAPAS

www.harbar.net.au

House made sour dough loaf with chef’s dips

7

Shoe string fries, tomato sauce

6

Fresh Shucked SA Oysters (3) Natural Thai lime and ginger

8 9

17-21 Ocean Street Harbor Deep fried cayeneVictor white bait with herb salad and aioli

Ph: 08 8552 4400

SLIDERS

All sliders served with a side of fri

7

Wagyu beef, cheese, tomato, pickle an

Spinach and fetta croquettes with paprika and aioli

8

Smashed falafel, cucumber, mint and y

Crispy soft shell crab with Som Tam salad

12

Pork, sweet onion jam, mustard cres

Pan fried SA calamari with chorizo, aioli and basil

11

Any three sliders with a side of frie

08 8552 9883

www.whalers.com.au | eat@whalers.com.au

Tapas style One of the very nicest things about dining stop whatever it is we are doing a Professional cocktails SALADS Leafy green garden salad Great function Greek salad venue Roast baby root vegetables with stick

Open Wednesday to Saturday Golden fried thick cut polenta chips and with house made harissa from 5pm Spring BayFriday mussels, chorizo, chick from pea and tomato broth lunch 12pm

8 11

Lamb meatballs with romesco dipping sauce

11

Stuffed, baked filled mushrooms, ricotta cheese, rocket salad

9

Red wine marinated chorizo with grilled sour dough

9

Chicked Kofta skewers, quinoa salad, minted yogurt

11

Tempura battered king prawns with nham jim and Asian slaw

13

Espresso rubbed beef fillet, romesco sauce, crostini

14

Buffalo wings, sweet spicy and sticky with blue cheese sauce

9

Beef Cheeks, briased in sherry, carrot and citrus puree

14

Can’t decide what to eat?? DESSERTS

Traditional Crème Brulee with almond

Home made Churros with warm chocolate

Dessert platter for two (chefs select

Cheese platter, 3 cheeses and accompa

Share style dining, focusing on small dishes wit Our menu features produce from KI, the Fleur

After a good dinner, one can forgive anybody, even ones own relations Oscar Wilde

HarBar is available any Please ask our friendly No seperate acc 08 8552 9883 www

Open 7 days from 9.30am till late. Serving visitors and locals alike for more than 40 years. High quality, relaxed dining – coffee, dessert, gelati – and now serving a full breakfast menu on Sundays. 17 Albert Place, Victor Harbor (Opposite the Crown Hotel) Ph 8552 3501 www.ninoscafe.com.au

Enjoy amazing views! 12 Warne Street Victor Harbor SA 5211 www.hastingsdesign.com.au admin@hastings-design.com.au 8552 5955

W

In one of our five fully equipped apartments, retreats and townhouses. Individually designed and decorated with elegant style. All with stunning ocean and island views in the elite area of town. Victor Harbor S.A 5211. Phone 08 8278 6685 or 0450 798 952 Email victorapartments@gmail.com Website: victorapartments.com.au

87


FORMERLY LEAFY SEA DRAGON FESTIVAL

11–19 APRIL 2015 | PROGRAM OUT NOW

MAJOR PARTNER

GOVERNMENT SPONSOR

PRINCIPAL PARTNER

DESIGN PARTNER

alison fort graphic designer

PRINT PARTNER

ONLINE PARTNER


South Australia’s premium lifestyle magazine with a focus on the Fleurieu. BUY IT · READ IT · BE IN THE KNOW. Available at newsagents, cafés, restaurants, cellar doors and Qantas Club Lounges. Celebrate the end of 2015 Vintage with fresh releases at our Cellar Door!

FLEURIEU LIVING FLEURIEU LIVING FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

AND KANGA ROO

ISLAND

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

ctions.com.au

S FLEURIEU PENINSULA

How does your da y Chiton’s starts at start? $369,000 Stage 2 is now

m.au

nstru u | southcoastco

Your idyllic retireme nt is now sustaina ble.

om.a www.fleurieuliving.c

nability.

u

day.com.a location | beyondto

THE BEST O F SOUTH AU S T R A L I A’

www.fleurieulivin g.co

Build your dream home – in a dream location | beyondtoday.com.au | southcoastconstructions.com.au

e – in a dream Build your dream hom

LIV ING

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

AZINE FLEURIEU LIVING MAG

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

O ISLAND AND KANGARO EU PENINSULA A L I A’ S F L E U R I SOUTH AUSTR F O T S E B E H T

Lifestyle and sustainability.

Lifestyle and sustai

CH ITO N RETIRE MENT

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

id Drive, Hayborough. home – 47 Sun Orch ‘The Kelsey’ display ays 1:00 to 4:30. -Sun and public holid Open: Mon-Wed-Sat 8552 4444. t Constructions on Telephone South Coas

under construction

$449,000.

AUTUMN 2015

ging from $369,000 –

Tonto Homestead Treasure in the valley

Oliver’s Taranga

Still going strong in the Vale

Catch some good times at the Sea & Vines Festivities. Hope to see you there! (wearing a shirt if possible)

9

772200

403004

hom Where you holiday at

· Goolwa · Victor McLaren Vale Region

SPRING 2014

y. bility, life and luxur from $160,000 balance of sustaina ts of 550-950 sqm Beyond, the perfect y.com.au. plan’ • Large allotmen il adam@beyondtoda ema 8 on sale now ‘off the e or Stag 022 • 620 OUT D ent • Phone 0412 Stages 1-7 SOL lopm deve ient effic ble and energy SA’s most sustaina

03

CHI036COASTLINES

The rean Way Wilds Mavericks icuLuxurious e Ep For of the Vale of Kangarool Island Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. more inform pectations Th pleasure AU $7. 95 ation550-950 Beyond ExBail visi$7.9 t ww5sqm In pursuit of sensua w.cfrom Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments ofAU $160,000 hit t on buil .co or call ey m. SPR ING au 4 Joh that 201 n Kelly 201 4Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor The house SUM onor04 27MER SA’s most sustainable and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 email adam@beyondtoday.com.au. 703 271 rs ke or KeyInvest on 130 Boutique Winema 0 658 904. r 7 Star Sustainable rbo Victor Ha Housing Vino with verve e SUMMER 2014

Porchetta Party? Book a table & enjoy a three course lunch matched with our wines.

Our innovative, mul ti-award winning, sustainable village designed to optimis has homes uniquely e warming winter sunlight and minimis gain. Solar Energy e summer heat and hot water sup ply, convenient und rainwater harvesting erground tanks for , double glazed win dows and high leve provide a dramatic ls of insulation AU $8.95 reduction in living costs and a level of intelligent design comfort only can provide. Private AUTUMN 2015 outdoor living area shading create bea s with external utiful indoor/outd oor relationships. Prices ran

Kangaroo Island Harbor · Yankalilla ·

McLaren Vale Reg ion

· Goolwa · Victor

Harbor · Yankali lla

· Kangaroo Island

ADVERTISE YOUR BUSINESS in Fleurieu Living Magazine for 12 months and take advantage of discount pricing through our Gold, Silver and Bronze partnerships. Call Perscia on 0400 644 723 for more info or download the advertising info PDF from our website.

246 Seaview Road, McLaren Vale SA oliverstaranga.com | 08 8323 8498 /OliversTaranga /OliversTaranga /oliverstaranga

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

FLEURIEU LIVING

MAGAZINE


FLEURIEU LIVING

‘The Kelsey’ display home – 47 Sun Orchid Drive, Hayborough. Open: Mon-Wed-Sat-Sun and public holidays 1:00 to 4:30. Telephone South Coast Constructions on 8552 4444.

T H E B E S T O F S O U T H A U S T R A L I A’ S F L E U R I E U P E N I N S U L A A N D K A N G A R O O I S L A N D

FLEURIEU LIVING MAGAZINE

Build your dream home – in a dream location | beyondtoday.com.au | southcoastconstructions.com.au

www.fleurieuliving.com.au

Lifestyle and sustainability.

AU $8.95 AUTUMN 2015 AUTUMN 2015

Beyond, the perfect balance of sustainability, life and luxury. Stages 1-7 SOLD OUT • Stage 8 on sale now ‘off the plan’ • Large allotments of 550-950 sqm from $160,000 SA’s most sustainable and energy efficient development • Phone 0412 620 022 or email adam@beyondtoday.com.au.

Tonto Homestead

Oliver’s Taranga

The Luxurious Wilds

Mavericks

Treasure in the valley of Kangaroo Island

Still going strong in the Vale of the Vale

McLaren Vale Region · Goolwa · Victor Harbor · Yankalilla · Kangaroo Island

Fleurieu Living Magazine Autumn 2015  

Published quarterly, Fleurieu Living Magazine features the best in food and wine, homes and gardens, growers, producers, accommodation and d...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you