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LMFF FASHION WEEK

AUTUMN 2011

NEO DIA BORSHA LISA TARANTO

ALEX PERRY


Melbourne City Store 273 Little Lonsdale Street. Ph: 03 9671 4545. Westgarth Store 59 High Street, Northcote. Ph: 03 9481 8034. Warehouse Outlet: 189 Grange Road, Fairfield. Ph: 03 9499 9844. Online store and stockist info:

www.catherinemanuelldesign.com


FJ O R D E | C O N T E N T S

CONTENTS 14

LISA TARANTO

20 MILK

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LMFF NATIONAL GRADUATES

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FROM THE BALKANS TO DRESSING DOLLS

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ALEX PERRY

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MAN SCAPE

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MINA & KATUSHA

60 NEO DIA

70 BORSHA

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LMFF RECAP

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SAMMY J

COVER Photographer: Filip Konikowski Stylist: Ben Anderson Make-UP Artist: Sandra Smith Hairstylist: Parissa Andreou Designer: Mina & Katusha Model: Belle [Darley Management]

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GARCIA & SON

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TREEHOUSE LOUNGE


FJ O R D E | C O N T R I B U T O R S

EDITORS Alex Cybulska Aaron Weinman

CREATIVE DIRECTORS Jamie Li Patrick Price

ART Studioktober hello@studioktober.com

CONTRIBUTORS Alex Cybulska Aaron Weinman Ben Anderson Emily Harris Katie Woolway Mahmood Fazal

PHOTOGRAPHY Ashlee Lauren Caitlin Jane McColl Filip Konikowski Matthew Wren

MAKE-UP & HAIR Abby Daniels Anu H채m채l채inen Nathan Weymouth Parissa Andreou Sarah Dalton Sandra Smith

ADVERTISING Contact Jamie Li or Patrick Price

STYLING Ben Anderson

THANK YOU Alex Perry Alex Wood Alfonso Ordonez Alice Klien Becky Chua Belle Hull Bojana Knezevic Gavin Lowes

Graham Forbes Jacinta Horan Jane Fuge Jordyn Woolley Josh Flinn Katy Baxter Lea Oldjohn Lisa Taranto Mark Fitzgerald

Melissa Williams Olivia Kranz Pheobe Jacobs Rob Tamburro Sarina Zammit Stefan Backovic Taysha Lupieri Travis Burns

CONTACT US EDITORS Alex Cybulska alex.cybulska@fjordemagazine.com

CREATIVE DIRECTORS Jamie Li jamie.li@fjordemagazine.com

Aaron Weinman aaron.weinman@fjordemagazine.com

Patrick Price pa.price@fjordemagazine.com

GENERAL ENQUIRIES enquiries@fjordemagazine.com

SUBMISSIONS FJORDE accepts submissions from freelance artists, photographers, designers and journalists, however, we cannot reply to every submission. Please see www.fjordemagazine.com for submission guidelines.

Fjorde Magazine will assume no responsibility for consequences that may result in the use of, or reliance on, the published information. No responsibility is taken for the content, images or advertisements. No part of Fjorde magazine may be reproduced without the written permission of the publisher. Copies of this publication may not be sold. The opinions expressed herein are not necessarily those of the publishing staff. Reproduction in whole or part is prohibited without the permission of the publishers. Articles received with no name, address and phone number(s) will not be published. Articles received will only be published by approval of the editorial team. Fjorde Magazine reserves the right to shorten and or edit received articles and letters. Fjorde Magazine does not accept responsibility on articles written by various columnists and writers

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FJ O R D E | C R E AT I V E D E S K

THE SOUNDS OF FASHION By Patrick Price & Jamie Li

The last two months have been a gruelling ride to deliver another issue. It hasn’t been just blood and sweat, there have been a lot of laughs and highlights along the way. Following a phenomenal response from the first issue, the team at Fjorde have learnt a lot. Therefore we will endeavour to bring you the undiscovered Melbourne. Its undeniable Melbourne has come alive lately with the L’Oreal Melbourne Fashion Festival. Taken over by fashionista, blogger, journalist and photographer alike, the colour and flare of Melbourne has been unleashed for many young designers to showcase a small fragment of the massive potential hidden within its famous laneways. The feverish clicking as models approach the end of a runway, the abrupt silence immediately follows as they turn and walk away. These moments in fashion make the experience of being there all the more exhilarating. Hopefully as you turn through the pages of this issue, you are able to capture a small part of the excitement felt when flashes go off and audiences gaze in wonder. As Melbourne rests its fashionable feet after another successful week, let us show you why we are the most fashion forward city, cultivating some of the best new talent across the globe.

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AUTUMN 2011

HIS DESK By Aaron Jude Weinman

COFFEE & CIGARETTES I don’t know about you, but the feeling I get when I open a new glossy magazine is incomparable. The smell of glazed paper. Being able to rub it in between your fingers. The sheen on the front cover, the thrill of turning to the contents page and sifting through the seemingly endless advertisements. It is one of those things in the world that will always bring a smile to my face. Bearing this in mind, you can imagine the pipe dreams I may have at the idea of being apart of my own magazine. Something to call my own, which identifies my life and me. This is what is going through my head right now. The surrealism. My feelings are a mixture of fear, nervousness and accomplishment. Every two months when pen is put to paper to form these pages you read, imagine these emotions and why we would go through them.

We love this. We adore this. I yearn for that morning where I sit and ponder what I am typing, espresso in one hand and the incredible urge for a cigarette in the other. After issue one, we realised the importance of not sitting on ones laurels. We have come back, better prepared and educated. Truly excited about this issue, we have been fortunate enough to be blessed with Melbourne’s illustrious social scene. Fashion week, Comedy festival and the conclusion of summer have given us a lot to be proud of and I sincerely look forward to enticing you to read some more. So many aspects of life is about trial and error. Many may argue what we are doing here at Fjorde Magazine is exactly that. Little do people realise

the work and efforts piled into compiling these glossy pages you view every two months. However the idea of trial and error could not be truer for us here at the creative desk of Fjorde. Our first issue turned out to be a bigger success than we ever imagined. The constructive feedback received turned out to be integral in creating this issue. So a huge thank you is in order to all of YOU who read, critiqued, loved or hated our inaugural issue. Behind the scenes I bore witness to tireless photo shoots, endless discussions on layouts and print possibilities and of course hours spent behind the keyboard producing prose. So ladies and gentleman, I give you issue two. I am ecstatic about the pages to follow. Are you?

HER DESK Written by: Alex Cybulska

LIVE. LOVE. For most, the 1980s decade is filled with fond and often cringe-worthy memories. I’m certain I don’t need to remind everyone that blinding fluoro clothes were hotter than hot, leopard print tights were sooo chic, Wayfarer sunglasses were on everyone’s face and punk-rock fashion was massive. According to Sky News, the 1980s was voted the coolest decade of all time, which doesn’t surprise me at all. Take a stroll down Melbourne’s Greville, Acland or Brunswick Street and you’ll see why. By no means is this a recent phenomenon so if you haven’t noticed, you’ve most certainly been living under a rock. Remember a few years ago you couldn’t go to a rave without bumping into a (horrid) fluoro bright top or go to a shopping center without seeing the (irritating) Emo kids out the front… The recent shoulder-pad craze – which I must

say was amazing… all 80’s inspired. Look around and you’ll see we now have leopard print tights and Wayfarer sunglasses, bicycles and beards, thin ties and shirts buttoned up to the top. Over the past years we have slowly immersed ourselves in the fashions and culture of our childhoods, which has been amazing but got me thinking… What’s next? As they say, fashion always comes full circle so inevitably, it’s the 90s, but do we really want our boys with rat-tails, girls wearing pedal pushers and body glitter playing Pod? Or Pog? Whatever. If it doesn’t have an ‘i’ in front of it, it doesn’t exist anymore.

I can remember more vividly than the 80s. Does that mean I can yet again be Posh Spice and not be ashamed for knowing how to dance the Macarena and show off my moves from the Backstreet Boys video clips? Yes? Then HELL YEAH bring it on. The 1980s were awesome but the 1990s were even better. Write to us at enquiries@fjordemagazine. com and share your favourite memories of the 90s with the team and myself.  Live Love Melbourne.

Trust me, the very thought of bum bags resurfacing strikes fear into my heart however there’s something very endearing about reliving a decade

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FJ O R D E | L I S A TA R A N T O

MELBOURNE’S VERY OWN LISA TARANTO AND HER ETHICAL CLOTHING LINE ARE SLOWLY TAKING THE FASHION WORLD APART. PHOTOGRAPHER: MATT WREN

While getting to know Lisa Taranto many things come to mind, namely her boundless ambitions that extended beyond the world of fashion. Before fashion became her priority, Lisa had many a passion. Pursuing a deep love affair with writing, interior design and a self-professed bookworm, Lisa poured all her knowledge into a prominent independent fashion label, oozing talent, ambition and creativity.

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FJ O R D E | L I S A TA R A N T O

“TRAVEL ALLOWED ME TO DRAW ON MANY MORE INFLUENCES FOR THE CREATIVE PROCESS.” Not forgetting where she comes from and realising the importance of keeping your friends and family close, Lisa names her designs after the important figures in her life. “It became how we referred to all our pieces and I like thinking of them as our ‘girls’ rather than a style number.” The origins of Lisa’s designs evolve further than simply names. Asking about her collection name, ‘There will come soft rains,’ Lisa provokes romance citing a “1920’s poem written by Sara Teasdale which conjured some magnificent images.” Personally, I was curious about her collection titled ‘the fallen.’ Lisa states, “The fallen was about looking at the two sides of a personality,” citing Dutch actress and style icon, Talitha Getty as the prominent influence. Like most of Lisa’s designs, they are directional in patternmaking, contemporary in appearance and always seeking that perfect fit. “We care about the feel and movement of the garment as it is being worn.” Lisa finds inspiration through many avenues ranging from people, art, literature, photography and travel. Quizzing her on the ‘fallen’ and ‘there will come soft rains,’ Lisa is a firm believer in experimentation. “Experimenting in the studio is a big influence, sometimes things just don’t work but after experimenting, they can inspire new work.”

Travel in particular has been an eye-opener for Lisa and her inspirations at work. Studying illustration, photography and fashion design has provided her with a technical and creative nous, but Lisa believes travel has played an integral role in her work. “Travel allowed me to draw on many more influences for the creative process.” Lisa is a poster for travel and its wonders, because it really can allow any individual to open one’s eyes and nothing compares when citing inspiration. 16

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AUTUMN 2011

Photographer: Matt Wren

Expansion is an important word when describing Taranto’s business. Each day in the world of fashion Lisa’s name is becoming more known. Asking about this brings out a smile and a sign of accomplishment. “We are working with eight boutiques Australia wide as well as concentrating on our own store. It feels fantastic to have some recognition for the label.” Another staple of Lisa Taranto is her ethical ground. Supporting the industry and our nation is a high priority. Lisa believes being Australian made is “something I always wanted to do. It creates jobs here and the ability to work closely with our garments.” A true label to management who stands up for her beliefs and sees things through till the end. “ I want to have that level of control, where you know that every garment has been made ethically and to the best quality. We work very closely with our manufacturers and we love it.”

The most unfortunate thing about getting to know Lisa is her busy schedule. Knowing my time with her is always short, as a journalist we cherish the little time we have with such interesting people making a difference in our fashion world. Looking over 2011, Lisa has big plans for the label. L’Oreal Fashion week and the RAFW are short term priorities for Lisa this year, but looking forward Lisa plans to work on expansion across the nation. “We really want to be more involved in Sydney so we are making moves to talk to people up there. Other than that, work in the studio in Greville Street is growing and as always we are perfecting our craft.” Lisa is a testament to hard work and determination and if you wish to view the full interview with Lisa Taranto, visit our webpage: www.fjordemagazine.com

“EXPERIMENTING IN THE STUDIO IS A BIG INFLUENCE, SOMETIMES THINGS JUST DON’T WORK BUT AFTER EXPERIMENTING, THEY CAN INSPIRE NEW WORK” W W W. FJ O R D E M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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FJ O R D E | S P I R I T O F T H E B L A C K D R E S S

LMFF2011

FROM COCO CHANEL, TO COUNTLESS MODERN INTERPRETATIONS, THE STAPLE OF EVERY WOMAN’S WARDROBE HAS BEEN THE SIMPLE REFINEMENT OF THE ‘LITTLE BLACK DRESS’ 18

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AUTUMN 2011

Photographer: Caitlin Jane McColl

Its purpose, simply to accentuate a woman’s body and inspire notions of beauty and sex appeal to all that set their eyes upon it. The Spirit of the Black Dress aims to capture the essence of this time-honoured tradition and bring it into the twenty-first century. At its core, fashion sustainability is fundamental to the future of fashion innovation. This notion of sustainability is the reason Tullia Jack founded the exciting concept of The Spirit of the Black Dress. On a cool summers night I sat with Tullia Jack and Jane Hayes, the two minds that have built a large following of Melbourne ‘fashionistas.’ Such is their empire, their followers now eagerly anticipate the release of the latest evolutions of the LBD. Sitting across from them it is clear that these women come from very different worlds but share a connection not always found, there is an honesty and understanding between these individuals rare in todays world. Listening keenly, you would imagine they have known each other for a lifetime, but surprisingly their relationship has only existed three years. It was at this time that Tullia came up with the now staple of Fashion Week, The Spirit of the Black Dress. Designed as a stage for young designers to showcase their amazing talents to a global audience

be out done by the tailored grace of a monochromatic runway that truly captured the essence of the Black Dress and the significance and stature it continues to have.

while incorporating the notions of sustainability. The inspiration for such a showcase came from Tullia’s passion for sustainable living, also currently undertaking her Master’s of Sustainability Practices. She believes sustainability needs to be incorporated within every aspect of everyday life as the current trajectory of modern living is headed for disaster and like all industries fashion needs to adopt a sustainable culture in order to meet the needs of an environmentally conscious future. In its third year The Spirit of the Black Dress finalist’s presented an offering of amazing designs from some of Australia’s most talented emerging designers including Dan Jones, Leanne Dempsey, Priscilla Lim and many more. A gala extravaganza was only fitting for such an event and the evening had an air of sophistication and elegance. In a relative sea of black there still remained highlights of colour, colour that would

So what has the experience taught its creator after three years of hard work? Namely for her, The Spirit of the Black Dress has been a truly rewarding journey with many friendships forged and tremendous creativity discovered along the way. While these friendships are held dear, Tullia’s greatest insight is “young designers are the future, and when they embrace sustainability there is no end to innovative answers”. Tullia went on to explain that her goal for the future of The Spirit of the Black Dress is to nurture sustainable talent.  Wanting to involve as many young people as possible and have a global conversation about sustainability. With an amazing gala opening this year’s offering has proved to be worth the wait with a relative kaleidoscope of diversity, the Little Black Dress has again been reinvented by some of Australia’s most aspiring young designers. With a fashion forward design ethic The Spirit of the Black Dress has again captured the imaginations of an industry. Written By: Ben Anderson

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M JANE FUGE IL K FJ O R D E | M I L K

PHOTOGRAPHER: CAITLIN JANE MCCOLL

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AUTUMN 2011

Photographer: Caitlin Jane McColl, Designer: Jane Fuge, Model: Phoebe Jacobs @ Darley Management, Make Up Artist: Elisa Clark, Hairstylist: Elisa Clark, Model: Phoebe [Darley Management]

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FJ O R D E | N AT I O N A L G R A D U AT E S H O W C A S E

GENEVIEVE KULESZA

LMFF NATIONAL GRADUATE SHOWCASE

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Colour was the theme of the National Graduate Showcase, in its third year the showcase promised to be bigger and better than its predecessors. From rich textures to intricate patterns the versatility and diversity was again the highlight of an already power packed week of alluring fashion. With twelve designers from across Australia, the showcase did not disappoint capturing the raw talent that is fashion forward creativity. With innovative themes and understated influences the designers came forth with a burst of energy that captured the audience’s attention from the first step on the catwalk. The designers including Ana Diaz, Celene Bridge, and many more have made their mark in the fashion world and the fashion world is rapidly taking notice. It can only be said that we can expect a lot more from these talented young designers. Ultimately what this showcase reminds us, is that designers, emerging or established, should never stop pushing the creative boundaries that define the everyday wearer and that fashion is not simply a means of clothing but can be an art form in its own right. Written by: Ben Anderson

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DIAZ

KATE WATSON

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KATE SALA

SANGEETA SINGH

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JASON HEWITT

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OUTPOST

HUIEE

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LAURA ANDERSON

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WHITE 3

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CELENE BRIDGE

EPHEMERAL RIVERIE

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Photographer: Matt Wren W W W. FJ O R D E M A G A Z I N E . C O M

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FJ O R D E | B O R S H A E D I T O R I A L

FROM THE BALKANS TO DRESSING DOLLS

Equipped with an open mind and equally inventive journalistic mind, Fjorde’s Fashion Editor Alex Cybulska had a delightful meeting with Bojana discussing all things life, love and fashion. Alex: You did a diploma of fashion design and International business, how did this help inspire your designs? Bojana: I did a TAFE course in school, where I was able to exchange weekly. This initially inspired me to sew, which led to studying fashion. I learnt patterns for all sizes and this appealed to my meticulous nature. I pride myself on being heavily organised and pedantic, so studying business helped fulfil this skill and passion. Without all this I wouldn’t be here today, designing and production. Alex: You’re a good learner. What do you mean ‘going into production?’ Bojana: I like to be unique. I am fond of varied colours. I just started focusing on men’s designs; I believe the current crop of menswear lacks creativity and ‘cool.’ So I have chosen two styles, choosing fabrics and formulating patterns. So expect difference and style. Alex: You confess you’re a little on the crazy side? So tell me about inspirations? Bojana: Colours and fabrics! It’s really hard to pinpoint specifics, but my goodness! When I see fabrics I go crazy, I love fabric shopping. Alex: Your passion and love for what you do is incomparable. This is really important in fashion. Why do you choose to utilise so much colour? Bojana: it excites me! The mystery behind colour is divine. I don’t know what it is like? Life can be boring sometimes, black is boring, it is merely shade.

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Alex: So your thought process behind designs? Tell me about it. Bojana: My ideas are endless! I have so many samples stuck around my room; I need to get them out! I need a studio! Other wise it escapes me. I generally work in reverse to contemporary design. A lot of designers draw first, but I generally draw in my head, then I see the fabric and finish it.

Alex: How has your heritage influenced your designs? Bojana: I like to think my designs have the vivacity of Europe in them. I was born in Bosnia and after the war, I moved to Spain, which became a second home. I learnt the language, indulged in the culture and have so many wonderful friends in Spain. A lot of my designs are of Spanish influence. Frills and gypsy tailoring styles, a mixture of Spanish and Estonian. Alex: Now rather than churn out mundane questions, I figured why don’t you tell me something? You don’t need to scream off the page, but something no one else knows about you, but you wish that they did. Bojana: Well I did most things, growing up in Bosnia was always a matter of safety first. Particularly when the war began. But like most kids I did everything with dolls. I planted watermelon seeds, put ants in jars. Nothing too ridiculous! Alex: How important is it for you to be unique? Bojana: I just don’t like when I go out to a place and I see the same thing as I have on. It has happened before, when I was younger and I hated it. Everytime I go out now I make something before and I wear it purely to be different. It’s just how I feel, not because it’s cool. Alex: Your family are all creative? Was there a push from them to unleash your creativity? Bojana: Yes definitely. My father is a freelance designer and poet. My elder sister is a graphic designer – she is very well known in Bosnia and

my other sister does architecture, so yes we seem to ooze creativity! We even dabble in poetry! Alex: Why do you keep everything Australian made? Have you ever considered mass production abroad?

Bojana: I don’t really want to do mass production, so I feel like I can keep it here. I like to be hands on. I prefer to know exactly what’s happening, and with my individual designs I have to be there. I am not scared of the challenges involved with this, I feel confident working under such pressures, and I guess you could say I am in my ‘element.’ Alex: How do you feel prior to your models hitting the catwalk? With such unique designs, surely there is much to consider? Bojana: Yes, totally stressed! I am always nervous because my clothes can be complicated to dress. When you are pressed for time with each model coming and going, you need a little bit more than a minute to make everything sit properly. Alex: So what plans for 2011? What can we expect from ‘Borsha’ designs? Bojana: I have a show coming up at Fashion Lounge and another photo shoot soon, following the ‘Rock-Pretty’ theme at the Esplanade in St. Kilda. I am not one to reveal too much but I am excited about this, especially with Woodrow Wilson doing the photography and Mark Fitzgerald will be directing. He was the director of ‘Vogue’ Model management, so the future is exciting for now! See page 84 for Borscha latest collection.

Photographer: Ashlee Lauren, Stylist: Ben Anderson, Make-UP Artist: Anu Hämäläinen, Hairstylist: Nathan Weymouth, Designer: Borsha, Models: Olivia K [Darley Management]

Young and with a fresh view on fashion, Bojana Knezevic presents a new line-up in ‘Borsha,’ her new innovative line after debuting in last years ‘Made in Melbourne’ show.


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FJ O R D E | A L E X P E R R Y

ALEX PERRY A N A M E T H AT I S SY N O N Y M O U S W I T H AU S T R A L I A N FA S H I O N

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FJ O R D E | A L E X P E R R Y

Year after year he graces the catwalks with intuitive designs, that capture the essence of elegance and sophistication. With winter fast approaching we look at the effortlessly timeless Autumn/Winter 2011 collection ‘TZARINA’. With accentuated waists, deep florals and uncomplicated framing, Tzarina offers any fashion lover understated style. Retaining an air of old world grace, Alex Perry explains to me that Russian Aristocracy and the frozen tundra that surrounded their kingdoms inspire the collection. He wants to capture the textures and fabrics that Northern Europeans use in colder climates but make it wearable for the Australian seasons. In contrast to his 2010 Spring/Summer collection that was modern and playful, Tzarina saw a return to clean lines and crisp cuts. A lover of clean lines and simple silhouettes, Alex further embellishes his creations with the use of beautiful jerseys and crepes to compliment his designs. This esthetic of clean lines and framed silhouettes is retained through his latest collection ‘Cuban Princess’. Cuban Princess in itself was a showstopper with rich vibrant colours and simple embellishments of florals to intricate detailing that elevated them from gorgeous to glamorous. While Alex continues to make leaps and bounds with effortless creativity and flawless simplicity, he has also in recent years taken on a greater role within the fashion community and more recently as a mentor to young emerging designers on Project Runway Australia. “I think the work I am doing on Project Runway is a way of helping talented and interesting designers gain first-hand knowledge on how to maintain a successful career in the industry”, said Alex when asked what he has learned about himself and the industry by working with these young designers. He remarked that young designers are always passionate and hungry to express their design aesthetic, but also need to need to learn to take on board criticism and use it to constructively in their designs process. What’s more, Alex recalls that in his youth as a designer he shared the same enthusiasm and it is that enthusiasm which continues to drive him forward in business. Asked if he is at all influenced by the younger generation of designers that are moving through the ranks of Australian fashion, Alex took the position that “young designers are very important and invigorating components of the industry”. Demonstrating there is a necessity in the nurturing of young designers, as they are essential to the longevity and fashion forward thinking that

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will keep not only established designers but also emerging designers dynamic in their creativity and designs. Delving further into the state of the industry Alex reflects on the struggles that young designers face today in comparison to those he was met with when he began. Despite the vast improvements in technology he believes the fundamental ideology behind design is still very traditional and at the core of any designer there is still an understanding of the art of drawing the human form. In saying that

Alex also has the opinion that no matter the changing face of the industry, every designer, no matter the era or experience, encounters the same if not similar challenges, going on to illustrate the industry as one that is extremely difficult to get a foot hold in. As the conversation continued we discussed the future of fashion and had a discussion on whether fashion is still moving forward or has it simply hit a stagnant point in it’s evolution. Alex’s response was that fashion is ultimately both reflective and


AUTUMN 2011

Images courtesy of Alex Perry, Photographer: Jez Smith

“YOUNGER DESIGNERS ARE VERY IMPORTANT AND AN INVIGORATING COMPONENT TO OUR INDUSTRY” progressive – you have to reference past designs and make sure you keep them relevant to today’s needs, while keeping your own ethos behind your work. Moreover his perception of the industry to come was one of stability and success. Before we parted ways I put forth the notion that Fjorde Magazine is seen as a platform for

young designers and creative individuals to gain experience and exposure in an industry that is often unforgiving and relatively insulated. In true mentor fashion, he plainly stated that young designers are always in need of assistance and exposure and anything that helps that process move along has to be seen as a positive.

It is clear from the brief encounter I shared with Alex Perry, that he is a man that has built himself from the ground up and after almost two decades in an industry that states you are only as good as your last collection Alex Perry has stood the test of time. All the while staying true to his vision while bringing us breath-taking collections year after year.

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FJ O R D E | M A N - S C A P I N G

MAN-SC In a society where beauty seems to be in the eye of anyone who wants to judge it, women have bore the brunt of marketing manipulations revolving around the idea of “perfection” for decades. Celebrity beauties and bombshells have plugged lash extension mascara and lip plumping gloss for as long as my memory serves (Miss Jolie, you are a constant thorn in my side).

Dior. Chanel. Dolce and Gabbana. MAC. Napoleon. Maybelline. Revlon. Estee Lauder. Cover Girl. Oh, the list goes on while our pockets get emptier and our self-esteem gets more and more reliant on Vanity’s validation. However, while women were busy plucking, powdering and primping, the sudden boom in the market of man-scaping man-kini lines and masculine man-icures has seen “Him” ranges

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“THE BATHROOM HAS BECOME A BATTLEFIELD; LIPSTICK LINES HAVE BEEN DRAWN DOWN THE MIDDLE OF MIRRORS IN AN ATTEMPT TO ESTABLISH HIS SIDE FROM HERS.”

created, seemingly overnight, by established cosmetic conglomerates.

L’Oreal. Clinique. Ella Bache. Biotherm. American Crew. Man! What a Fuss. AussieBum. Calvin Klein. Calloused hands can now be managed with moisturizing gloves when before, a man’s only reason for protecting digits was for tree chopping. Pale pecs can be given a bronzed tan from a can where once, the only acceptable thing to spray from a can was paint or WD40. In light of such changes, the bathroom has become a battlefield; lipstick lines have been drawn down the middle of mirrors in an attempt to establish his side from hers. Previous days of a sink top dominated by sweet scents and Velcro curlers have been replaced by the pursuit of mutually managed space. From tradies to techies,


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CAPING the colossal explosion of the male beauty market has seen a shift in the traditional ideology of a man’s place as a cosmetic consumer.

According to a report done by IBISWorld Industry, men’s cosmetic contributions added $48.4 million to the Australian beauty market in 2009-2010 which saw the yearly expenditure of $5 million a mere twenty years ago amongst the same gender demographic dwarfed nearly ten times over. In the hair and beauty salon industry alone, men spent $1.04 BILLION in 2009-2010; representing 33% of the sector’s profits. By 2014-2015, this figure is expected to increase by another five percent. Most would argue that this change would be likely due to the increase in celebrity endorsed advertisements. Now, it’s easy to smell like P.Diddy while having waxed washboards like David Beckham and maintaining hair follicles that shine like Fabio’s.

However, like most pivotal changes in societal structure, there are deeper influences within core gender roles that account more strongly towards the ‘why?’ argument than just these shallow assertions. Previous to the paradigm shift in gender responsibilities, women were largely seen as homemakers; cooking the bacon, not bringing it home. Which is why Robert Bryant, General Manager of IBISWorld Australia, argues that the spend trend in the male market can be largely attributed to growing gender equality within the workforce. “The entry of women into the workplace, and more importantly into high level management positions, has seen a huge shift in how men and women interact, as well as behavioural and appearance expectations at work and home.”

bother smelling/grooming/dressing nicely in the company of other males. It is only the peahen’s presence that excites a flurry of feathers or in our case, a woman’s eliciting a reactive response for male counterparts to shave, spray and soften.

Whatever the reason for this sudden surge of masculinity in the beauty industry, it seems as though a new age has dawned; an age where men and women cosmetically co-exist in bathroom and boardroom territories.

Written by Katie Woolway

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Share your creative work. Anonymously. Someone is anonymous design. A space for creatives to share their undiscovered work, purely for the love of design. With all importance on creativity, rather than the artist, allows creatives to contribute to a new method of visual understanding.

To submit work: 1.  Email digital files to: info@someoneanonymous.com 2. S end samples of your work via Post to: PO Box 2079, Prahran 3181, Melbourne Victoria, Australia www.someoneanonymous.com


FJ O R D E | M I N A & K AT U S H A

ENIGMA E N I G M A TAKES YOU ON A JOURNEY WITH P L AY F U L MINI DRESSES IN EXQUISITE LACE, TO B I L LOWING SLEEVED BLOUSES PAIRED W I T H T HEIR SIGNATURE PANTS, CHEEKY S H O RTS MADE WINTER APPROPRIATE WITH T H I C K O PAQUES, ALLURING BODY CON AND F I N I S H I NG WITH SEXY HIGH WAISTED KNEE L E N GT H HERRINGBONE SKIRTS. D E S I G N ED WITH A BUSY MODERN WOMAN I N M I N D WHO REQUIRES AN EFFORTLESSLY C H I C WARDROBE, MINA AND KATUSHA KNOW T H AT C LEAN LINES AND VERSATILITY ARE V I TA L . T HE THOUGHT BEHIND EVERY PIECE I N T H E ENIGMA COLLECTION IS CLEAR A L LOW I NG IT TO CARRY YOU FROM DAY-TO - NIGHT IN STYLE.

MINA & KATUSH PHOTOGRAPHER: FILIP KONIKOWSKI

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Photographer: Filip Konikowski, Stylist: Ben Anderson, Make-UP Artist: Sandra Smith, Hairstylist: Parissa Andreou, Designer: Mina & Katusha, Models: Belle [Darley , anagment] / Jacinta [FRM]

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FJ O R D E | N E O D I A

RHYTHMIC ALGORITHM “ R H Y T H MIC ALGORITHM” WAS INSPIRED BY T H E T H EORY OF RHYTHM AND CHILDHOOD M E M O R I ES OF PATTERNS MADE FROM S P I R O G RAPHS. FOLLOWING FROM THEIR D E B U T COLLECTION, LUCID CONSTRUCT, NEO D I A’ S S ECOND COLLECTION REMAINS TRUE TO I TS MODERN AND FEMININE AESTHETICS O F O R I GAMI-LIKE PIECES PAIRED BACK WITH M U LT I -T EXTURED VELVETED GARMENTS W H I C H ARE BOTH SLEEK AND SOFT.

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I met Gavin Lowes and Becky Chua on the set of their latest photoshoot for Fjorde Magazine in an attempt to pose casual questions in a relaxed atmosphere and a throwaway manner. Together they create an explosion of energetic, artistic flow that contains an inspiring sense of collaboration through a tight bond of friendship and like-minded aesthetic approach. Graduates of fashion at Melbourne’s RMIT, the Gavin and Becky met on the first day and have since grown to become each others muse in building the Bauhaus fashion house that is Neo Dia. I taunted Gavin by mentioning the idea of Neo fashion becoming a trend amongst Melbourne designers in the last five years, but was cut short with a rebuttal containing their latest conceptual works to that of mathematics and post-modern architecture. Inspired by the polyhedra and geometric distortions of Maurits Cornelis Escher, the latest works engineer a rippled tense garment that flourish with distinctive, sharp cuts which lend to the over arching vision of a magical modernism. When I first arrived on set I was allowed to see each garment, their lay roughly 6 pieces of which Patrick and I struggled ‘matching’ to the correct presentation of the piece. Our situation became a puzzle in which we were constructing pieces that although incorrect added a spontaneous edge to the idea at the heart of the collection, a calculation of mathematical algorithms that dissolve into a structure of visual illusion. Recently chosen as one of six avant garde designers from around the world, Neo Dia showcased their latest collection ‘Theory of Rhythm’ at Modefabriek in Amsterdam. This opportunity allowed there experimentation of garments to flourish on the worlds stage, hence giving way to the stark contrast from piece to piece leaving buyers and media thinking conceptually at every breath.

“Clean, refined and concise” is how the latest collection is perceived and explained. This allows the garments to be layered in slight texture, structuring the garments in an origami-esque process, be it gentle folds that may provide a dress with modesty or sharp snaps at the fabric that lead us into imaginings of the future. Melbourne based artist Robin Fox comes to mind, working with sound and visuals with live digital media in improvised, composed and installation settings he creates laser-based presentations for the cathode ray oscilloscope. Conceptually we gain an insight into a modernistic expression of ideas through mathematics, in the same way as Neo Dia executes the ideas in their garments through scientific process in the latest collection. Whilst taking the photos, the collaboration between the photographer and the artists developed when Becky demanded that ‘We don’t want sexy.’ The garments are to be accentuated in a manner that is going to shape the over-arching ‘theory,’ my interpretation wasn’t as Japanese, as it was French. Godard’s shaping of the Nouvelle Vague and philosophical impact on the French art scene in the late fifties through to the sixties in my mind is almost sub-consciously ever present in this collection, from the prophetic stillness of the ever post-modern garment, to the neon contrast of light the collection gasps an air of the fashions from the future that the Nouvelle Vague era concisely contained. The work of Neo Dia reminds us of fashion as art, an electrifying portrait from garment to garment that develops a progressive minimalist pattern between the works, each garment folding like origami to a rhythmic soundwave. Carl Craig, a pioneer in the Detroit techno scene once said that he doesn’t play notes he plays with vibrations, in the same way I feel Neo Dia doesn’t simply construct garments they construct an idea through rhythm and numbers.

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“AN EXPLOSION OF ENERGETIC, ARTISTIC FLOW THAT CONTAINS AN INSPIRING SENSE OF COLLABORATION” 64

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Photographer: Filip Konikowski, Stylist: Ben Anderson, Make-UP Artist: Sarah Dalton & Abby Daniels, Hairstylist: Parissa Andreou, Designer: Neo Dia, Accessories: Thoxa, Models: Alice K [Vicious Models] / Jordyn [FRM]

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BORSHA ‘BORSHA FOR MEN’ IS QUIRKY, YOUTHFUL, UNCONVENTIONAL AND FUN AND IT’S TIME FOR OUR MEN TO TRY SOMETHING THAT’S THAT SUCH AS THE ‘LONG SLEEVE CUFF TOP’ AND THE ‘LADDER SINGLET’. 70

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PHOTOGRAPHER: ASHLEE LAUREN

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Photographer: Ashlee Lauren, Stylist: Ben Anderson, Make-UP Artist: Anu Ham, Hairstylist: Nathan Weymouth, Designer: Borsha, Models: Alfonso [Scene] / Olivia K [Darley Management] / Stefan

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FJ O R D E | L M F F R E C A P

LMFF RECAP THE L’ORÉAL MELBOURNE FASHION FESTIVAL / EMILY HARRIS

The L’Oréal Melbourne Fashion Festival (LMFF) has come and gone for another year. Continuing to inspire and unite the designers, consumers and retailers who keep Australian and Melbourne fashion alive, LMFF proved yet again why it is Australia’s premium consumer fashion event. Officially launched on the 9th of February on the lawns of Government House, the festival was host to a wealth of celebrities (including the 2011 festival ambassador, Melissa George), Australian and International fashion designers, as well as a multitude of excited festival friends who came together to celebrate fashion, design, business and creative endeavour. Kicking-off LMFF in spectacular style was ‘Fashion Full Stop’ on March 14, at The Plenary, South Wharf. Part runway show, part rock concert and part theatrical spectacular, the event showcased the best in fashion and music from the 1960s to today. Featuring live performances from some of Australia’s leading music talents including Guy Sebastian, Marcia Hines and DJ Agent 86, the evening celebrated iconic designers, labels, styles and moments that have shaped Australia’s history in fashion. The week-long festival, under guidance from new creative director Grant Pearce, is best renowned 78

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for it’s Docklands based L’Oréal Paris Runway shows. The runway shows presented Autumn/ Winter collections from Australia’s leading designers including Sass and Bide, Gorman, Rachel Gilbert and Collette Dinnigan. For the first time, the runways also staged the LMFF Designer Award 2011 Finalists, who this year included Arnsdorf, Bassike, Dress Up, ELLERY, From Britten, Laurence Pasquier, Lui Hon and the 2011 winner ‘Song for the Mute’, an innovative menswear label created by graphic artist Melvin Tanaya and Parisian-born, Italian-trained fashion designer Lyna Ty.

season collections and went to silent auction at the conclusion of the exhibition (with all proceeds being donated to a charity of the designer’s choice).

A new comer to the 2011 program, Jack London, featured in their first solo runway show at one of the LMFF Trunk Shows at Prahran Town Hall. The Winter 2011 collection entitled ‘Urban Warriors and Dandy Lions’ was heavily influenced by the punk styling of the 1960 UK Skinheads and the Hard Mods era and featured a crowd-favourite, well behaved British bulldog walking the runway with the models. The Melbourne based label also starred along-side 11 other celebrated Australian designers at the Chadstone Qee Designer Toy Exhibition. In an Australian first, Qees (pronounced ‘keys’) were used as a blank canvas by some of Chadstone’s favourite fashion designers. Each Qee was customised to reflect the latest

Also incorporated into this year’s program were beauty workshops, business seminars, forums and a multitude of offsite runways. There was something there for people of all ages.

KOOKAÏ were another Australian label who launched it’s A/W collection titled ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ with a standalone event at Central Pier, Docklands as part of LMFF. The collection, wholly designed in Australia, was inspired by the freedom and carefree spirit of the eternal traveler and highlighted all of the key trends for the season including suede, knitwear, jewels, sequin collars and chunky knits.

LMFF is one of Melbourne’s most prestige events and is held in a city that has long ago made its name as a fashion capital. Amongst our local and national talent there is a plethora of international designers waiting to showcase their designs to us. If you didn’t make it along this year, be sure to get yourself a 2012 diary and pen it in for March!


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Photographers: Filip Konikowski / Matt Wren

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FJ O R D E | S A M M Y J

PUPPETRY & THE WRITER During my interview with rising Australian comedian Sammy J, the feeling of guilt courses through my mind. “Is he livid with me? Is he frustrated?” Seven days ago our interview across state lines was due to take place, but it didn’t. Now I could sift through the myriad of excuses I had, but needless to say, my introduction with Sammy was heavily layered with apologies. Being a telephonic interview, missing one’s call is laced with high possibility. “Well now we are even hey?” Jokes Sammy as he returns my two missed calls, with an obvious hint of laughter, the atmosphere is relaxed despite being severely unknown. Melbourne born and bred, Sammy took an interesting and somewhat ‘counter’ pathway before realising his call in comedy. “I generally was always the class clown all the way through school and university, so I guess it made sense? I was always more interested in cracking jokes than studying.” Indeed that would make sense, but the one-time law student turned comedian, has never looked back with his signature brand of comedy and many would agree, he made the right decision.

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Sammy is currently in Adelaide, performing at the Fringe festival, and from all reports, this festival is of utmost importance to Sammy. “Being an up and comer in this business, these state wide gigs give me great exposure.” Currently Sammy is performing his latest act ‘Bin Night’ showcasing his unique line of comedy with a stage puppeteer and collaborator, Heath McIvor, whom he has worked with closely for almost three years now. “I am always learning, everyday, with every performance.” After our fruitful interview, he made it seem like researching him would prove difficult. There I was thinking that my search results would return with nothing more than lagging, indecipherable youtube links trying to depict his stage shows. To say I was wrong, proved to be an understatement. Being ridiculously humble is Sammy down to a tee, a complete paradox when compared to his wit on stage, and this is but one way with which he illustrates this. In the space of merely five years, Sammy has performed at various festivals, racking up numerous awards. Breaking out in 2006, Sammy took out the ‘Best newcomer’ award at the Melbourne International Comedy Festival with his debut

solo show “Sammy J’s 55 minute national tour.” Add to this appearances at festivals in Edinburgh and Adelaide, Sammy was fast becoming much more than an up and comer. 2008 however saw Sammy cement his unique line of comedy. Collaborating with McIvor, the duo performed “Sammy J and the Forest of Dreams.” “Make sure you are not around any kids,” remarks Sammy when I quiz him about these shows. Starring Sammy, the ‘Forest of Dreams’ features fourteen vulgar puppets hilariously parodying Disney children’s films making for great viewing and laugh out loud humour. Sammy and Heath collaborated together again to create “Sammy J: 1999,’ with Sammy portraying a fifteen year old version of himself. Without giving into commercial stability, Sammy chose not to follow up with a sequel to the “Forest of dreams,” choosing rather to challenge himself with another solo show and to no surprise, Sammy met with critical acclaim. Proving triumphant both critically and commercially, Sammy continues to collaborate with Heath and their trademark brand of puppetry and comedy combined. This year Sammy brings “Bin Night” to Melbourne for our lauded Comedy festival and looks to take the show abroad, where I have no doubt his success will forever grow. Images courtesy of Sammy J

After merely five minutes listening and absorbing Sammy’s commentary, my biggest regret was not being there in person to indulge in my interview. Taking in the surroundings, his facial expressions or even physical attire and features. The beauty in talking to such animated personalities is the boundaries you can still cross despite lack of sight and difference. Sammy is a natural comedian. As much articulate as he is humorous, he has an ability to liven up even the dullest of situations and personally I am not one for telephone conversations.

Vociferously trying to take notes listening to Sammy was beginning to prove difficult, with the noise of fellow students rustling around the courtyard. Sammy’s sentences careen wildly, weaving through one another, and before you know it he counters with a plethora of anomalies, ideas and wit, true trademarks of a solid and confident comedian.


FJ O R D E | R E V I E W

REVIEWGARCIA & SON Out with a friend we sit down at Garcia & Son, at the quiet end of Maddock St, the Windsor end of Chapel St with the warm night air surrounding us. At initial glance Garcia & Son radiates a subtle yet intimate environment that invokes colours and flavours of a traditional Spanish eatery. John of Garcia & Son has only recently opened their doors in early December of 2010 and John, a second-generation restaurateur himself wanted to create a place capturing the essence of traditional Spanish food. Presented with Huevos Muijol a delicacy oozing the flavours of sweet and savoury through a combination of sweetened Quail egg balanced perfectly with the saltiness of black caviar finished with the light crunch of warm toasted bread. This dish is further complimented with a crisp glass of Champagne drawing out flavours to increase the rich textures and overall experience. Further complimented by a relative banquet of delectable delicacies from Albondigas a veal and pork meatball complimented by a piquant tomato sauce, Pincho de Chorizo a trio of Chorizo each representing the intense flavour. Croquetas con Jamon while an old favourite of mine still managed to surprise me with hidden flavours. As if this was not enough we were graced with Chuletas de Cordero a delicately crumbed lamb cutlet that was undeniably tender with a subtle crunch. To complete an already indulgent feast of flavor there remained the Cerdo Asado Crujiente, a pork belly that was cooked to perfection and accompanied by a date and almond stuffed roasted apple, to say more would rob you of an experience which must be had by ones self.

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To finish we were offered a new addition to the menu, Peras En Vino Tinto Y Aroz Con Leche that was accompanied by a Sherry, setting off the natural aromas of pear exuded and the elements of Vanilla served to compliment an already stand out dining experience. There are many restaurants in Melbourne but Garcia delivered a dining experience offering more than traditional Spanish food, the engagement of the staff and John who took the time to sit down and educate their diners about the traditions and history of their food was enviable. With a menu constantly evolving each night there are no two identical as each offer its own treasures and delights. It is these small gestures elevating Garcia & Son into their own category of indulgence. A Spanish rose set to become a favourite amongst Windsor and Melbourne Residents alike.

Photographer: Matt Wren

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REVIEWTREEHOUSE LOU

Walking into the Treehouse you are immediately taken away from the bustle and mayhem of Carlisle Street. With a spacious interior it brings back notions of the old backyard cubby high amongst the treetops! The low lighting and hand picked furnishings – the hand made custom chandelier is especially beautiful – create a warm and intimate setting that creates a friendly atmosphere that allows you to feel at easy and relaxed as if you have been going there for years. With people spread across the room the open plan allows the room to feel spacious and open despite the large amount of people excitedly talking over their drinks. For many the benchmark of a successful opening is how many people walk through the door but for me its what sits behind the bar. Sitting at the bar my gaze is captured by a single bottle sitting in the corner of the top shelf, with a slight smile I call over the bartender and ask to see the bottle to make sure my eyes were not deceiving me. He obliges my request and brings over an old friend – an 18 year old single malt McCallan. Now every person has their own tastes but for me the smooth flavours and rich textures of a perfect single malt shows that these guys have an understanding of what drinking is all about. To compliment the beautiful surroundings the boys in the kitchen have tireless created a menu that hits just the right notes, showcasing a mature tapas menu and tantalizing pizza selection both offer an amazing taste experience. That is not to be outdone by the impressive cocktail list, offering a range of old favourites to new and inventive taste sensations. Sampling the local martini I was impressed with is sophistication and crisp taste an impressive serve if you ask me. Treehouse maybe new on the block but it fast becoming a regular spot for casual and after work drinks. 96

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UNGE

Photographer: Matt Wren

TREEHOUSE LOUNGE 2 63 C A R L I S L E ST B A L AC L AVA 3 1 8 3 T ( 03 ) 9527 89 4 0 I N FO @ T R E E H O U S E LO U N G E .CO M . AU

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FJ O R D E | S T O C K I S T

ALEX PERRY www.alexperry.com.au BODYOGRAPHY www.bodyography.com.au BORSHA www.borsha.net CATHERINE MANUELL DESIGNS www.catherinemanuelldesign.com COCOLO www.cocolo.com.au DOUBLE DUTCH www.doubledutchdesign.com.au FABRICADO www.fabricado.com.au HER PONY www.herpony.com.au THE LINGERIE BOUTIQUE www.lingerieboutique.com.au LISA TARANTO www.lisataranto.com.au MINA & KATUSHA www.minaandkatusha.com.au NEO DIA www.neodia.portableshops.com OAT DESIGNS www.oatdesigns.com

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FAS H I O N

Photographer: Matt Wren

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FJORDE MAGAZINE AUTUMN 2011  

FJORDE MAGAZINE AUTUMN 2011

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