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11 Faculty of architecture and design Te WÄ hanga Waihanga-Hoahoa


Felix Hartmann

Industrial Design Graduate

Contents

Faculty of Architecture and Design Te Wāhanga Waihanga-Hoahoa 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus, Wellington 6011 Phone 04-463 6200 Fax 04-463 6204 Email architecture@vuw.ac.nz design@vuw.ac.nz websites www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture www.victoria.ac.nz/design

IMPORTANT NOTICE Victoria University uses all reasonable skill and care to ensure the information contained in this document is accurate at the time of being made available. However, matters covered by this document are subject to change due to a continuous process of review, and to unanticipated circumstances. The University therefore reserves the right to make any changes without notice. So far as the law permits, the University accepts no responsibility for any loss suffered by any person due to reliance (either whole or in part) on the information contained in this document, whether direct or indirect, and whether foreseeable or not. IMPORTANT Dates To find lists of important dates, including enrolment deadlines, accommodation, scholarships and deadlines for international student dates, visit the following websites: www.victoria.ac.nz/home/study/dates.aspx www.victoria.ac.nz/accommodation www.victoria.ac.nz/scholarships www.victoria-international.ac.nz

Introduction solar decathlon School of Architecture Undergraduate overview Postgraduate overview Architecture Architecture History and Theory Interior Architecture Landscape Architecture Bachelor of Building Science Project Management Sustainable Engineering Systems School of Design Undergraduate overview Postgraduate overview First-year Design Culture+Context Industrial Design Media Design services and facilities Te Rōpū Āwhina The Whānau Experience Vic OE Scholarships Support, Services and Resources Library Technical Resources Calendar

3 5 6 8 9 13 21 29 37 45 53 59 64 66 68 73 77 85 91 96 99 107 109 111 117 118 120

The 2011 Handbook cover features the work of a recent School of Design graduate, Felix Hartmann (BDes, 2009), developed in partnership with GNS Science. Felix was asked to create a threedimensional (3D) model of a section of the Kupe gas field off the coast of Taranaki illustrating the different layers of sediment and the intersecting fault lines. Given two-dimensional (2D) sections of the gas field, Felix transferred the data into a detailed 3D model to be used as a demonstration and display model at the GNS offices. While this project sounds relatively simple, the process as a whole took much longer than Felix first expected. What had been proposed initially as a one-week job, required 250 hours in front of a computer, 30 hours for printing and an additional week for preparing and dyeing the final model. Despite the significant investment of time, Felix found the project particularly interesting, “because the nature of the forms and layers involved meant that rapid prototyping was the only way possible to make an accurate model … some of the layer prints were as thin as a sheet of paper”. The project has been a great success for the GNS team. As Felix describes, “Previously only able to see the field through 2D seismic readings, everyone at GNS was amazed to not only see a model in 3D, but also to be able to separate the layers and visualise their work in a whole new way.” Felix also created a further simplified model to be gifted to Energy Minister Gerry Brownlee.

“I think my Bachelor of Design from Victoria was the perfect degree with which to begin my teaching career.” Felix is completing his Graduate Diploma in Secondary Teaching in Technology and Visual Art at Victoria, recognising the growing importance of technology and design at both secondary and primary school levels.

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introduction The Faculty of Architecture and Design Te Wāhanga Waihanga-Hoahoa is one of New Zealand’s leading providers of innovative education in a wide selection of disciplines encompassing design and the built environment.

three undergraduate qualifications

The Faculty consists of the School of Architecture and the School of Design and offers an extensive range of undergraduate and postgraduate degrees that cater for the growing requirements of the creative sector.

Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) has specialisations in project management and sustainable engineering systems. The BBSc is a three-year degree programme of full-time study that provides a thorough grounding in the science and technology of building and an understanding of architecture. This provides students with the skills and knowledge to create solutions to technical construction situations. More information is on page 45.

Our campus occupies a central city location just off cosmopolitan Cuba Street. We offer world-class exhibition spaces, lecture theatres, workshops, computer labs and design studios. Our location means we can easily engage with working practitioners in our teaching environment—the highest number of all disciplines in the University. The Faculty’s programmes address the growing need for cross-disciplinary study and will provide students with greater capabilities for the professions our graduates enter, and better prepare them for the increasingly complex society they engage with. Beyond undergraduate study, the Faculty offers a range of Master’s-level qualifications in architecture and design which can lead to traditional careers as architects and designers as well as a diverse range of other possible career paths. For suitably qualified candidates the Faculty offers doctoral (PhD)-level study and supervision in architecture and designrelated fields. Contact the Faculty of Graduate Research (FGR) for further information by emailing pg-research@vuw.ac.nz Caption: Faculty of Architecture and Design, Te Aro Campus, Wellington 2

Victoria University of Wellington

Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) has specialisations in architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture and architecture history and theory. The BAS is a three-year degree programme of full-time study that provides students with a comprehensive grounding in the built environment, specific to your chosen specialisation. More information is on page 8.

Bachelor of Design Innovation (BDI) has three design specialisations in culture+context, industrial and media. The BDI is a three-year degree programme of full-time study. Students can choose to specialise in one of three design disciplines and have the unique opportunity to combine study in design with a minor in another discipline such as psychology, cultural anthropology, Māori or Pacific studies, writing, film or media studies to name a few. This provides students with the opportunity to configure their studies to suit their individual interests and intended careers. More information is on page 66.

www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture www.victoria.ac.nz/design Architecture and Design 2011

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Solar decathlon Several students and staff from the School of Architecture have entered the United States Department of Energy Solar Decathlon 2011 to be held in Washington DC in October next year. This international design competition challenges 20 collegiate teams to design, build and operate a solar powered house that is cost effective, energy efficient and appealing. Ten contests worth 100 points each make up the competition. These contests include architecture, market appeal, engineering, communication, affordability, comfort, hot water, appliances, home entertainment and energy balance. The team’s FirstLight House showcases a New Zealand inspired home designed to fit the Kiwi lifestyle. The house was designed and will be built by students who will transport it to the United States where it will be stationed in the National Mall in a highly publicised week-long event. The School of Architecture emphasises the balance between sustainable design and technology and this competition is an exercise in both areas. The school’s reputation both nationally and internationally will be advanced through this competition based on the technical and marketable skills of the students. Originally the students began working on this project as part of an elective course. The project became more than that when the School decided to enter the international competition with their preliminary design. This seemingly simple project has developed into an impressive design competition that will further the students’ experience in design, marketing and technology as they move into their graduate programmes. This competition gives the students the opportunity to establish professional relationships with sponsors, business partners, Victoria University and the city of Wellington. Entering competitions on this level highlights the Faculty’s dedicated approach for multidisciplinary collaborations and could become part of your university life as well. 4

Victoria University of Wellington

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The built environment As designers and makers of our physical and material world, landscape architects, architects, interior architects and building scientists are at the leading edge of the environmental and social challenges of the new century. Among the most pressing of these are climate change, urbanisation, energy conservation and social and cultural equity. The demands are now of such a magnitude that the professional silos of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries are no longer adequately configured to deal with the new scales and complexities of environmental design. A collaborative professional approach is urgently required and universities must respond by providing the best interdisciplinary education available. The School of Architecture at Victoria University is structured to incorporate programmes in architecture, architecture history and theory, interior architecture, landscape architecture and building science. Architects imagine, create, design and build awesome public places, homes, workplaces and spaces of cultural and spiritual significance. They take our breath away with magnificent enclosures and design and build our cities of the future.

Interior architects will make and embellish our spaces and interior worlds—they paint our places with light, wash rooms and sequences of space with colour, embroider surfaces with texture and exquisite materials and craft, fabricate and design the artefacts of everyday life. For landscape architects the canvas is made up of terrains and ecologies from the mountains to the sea, from gardens to parks to waterfronts to urban and rural landscapes. They design and repair the natural and ecological systems of which human habitation is one aspect. Building scientists will invent and apply the science of building technology to solve the most pressing issues of contemporary habitation and create a liveable and sustainable world. They will manage the complex projects which will achieve this. All these people will graduate in a post-recession world and will lead us into the future.

www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture

Head of School Diane Brand taking a tutorial session with a group of architecture students.


undergraduate overview

postgraduate overview

Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS)

Master’s degrees overview

The Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) is a three-year undergraduate degree offered in four specialisations: ͠͠ Architecture ͠͠ Architecture History and Theory ͠͠ Interior Architecture ͠͠ Landscape Architecture.

The two-year Master’s degrees in Architecture, Landscape Architecture and Interior Architecture prepare students for professional careers.

The first year is a common year in which design, technology, environmental studies and communication practices are studied in the context of all four disciplines offered within the School. These courses give an overview of design knowledge for the built environment and introduce concepts, vocabularies and skills in an interdisciplinary context. In the second year students select one of the BAS disciplines to specialise in. The second year is discipline-specific, inclusive of technological, theoretical and design subjects which relate to the chosen specialisation. The third year reintegrates the disciplines and offers a richer and more complex interdisciplinary approach. This undergraduate degree alone does not qualify students for professional registration and would lead to a career as a technician rather than a professional architect or designer.

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(left) Para[site], final-year design project by John Bradbury.

The entry requirement is a ‘B’ average in core subjects in years two and three of the undergraduate degree.

Part One is a consolidation and integration of previous knowledge gained in design, technology, environmental studies, communication practice and professional and business studies as a precursor to professional practice. Research methods are taught to prepare students for a Master’s thesis in Part Two. Part Two involves a major design thesis which tests a research proposition and demonstrates a degree of academic rigour and professional specialisation prior to graduation.

Undergraduate and postgraduate chart SPECIALISATION

YEAR OF STUDY One

Two

Three BAS (Architecture)

Architecture

Architecture History and Theory

BAS (Architecture History and Theory) BAS year one

Part One

Part Two

MArch(Prof) Master of Architecture (Professional) PGDipATH Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory

MArch Master of Architecture

Interior Architecture

BAS (Interior Architecture)

MIA Master of Interior Architecture

Landscape Architecture

BAS (Landscape Architecture)

MLA Master of Landscape Architecture

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postgraduate overview Designed Environments overview

The School of Architecture has introduced two new graduate programmes, a Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma in Designed Environments. Both the Certificate and Diploma provide an attractive professional development vehicle for architects, interior architects, landscape architects, designers, planners, project managers, building inspectors and people working in related areas. The Graduate Certificate in Designed Environments (GCertDE) is a development programme for practising professionals. Graduates should have enhanced up-to-date specialist knowledge of an aspect of their professional discipline. The Graduate Diploma in Designed Environments (GDipDE) offers specialised study in six areas: ͠͠ Architecture ͠͠ Architecture History and Theory ͠͠ Interior Architecture ͠͠ Landscape Architecture ͠͠ Project Management ͠͠ Sustainable Engineering Systems. The Graduate Diploma provides a pathway into postgraduate study for students who have graduated in one of the undergraduate disciplines of the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) or Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) degrees and who wish to transfer to a related discipline.

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Programme Structure

Graduate Certificate in Designed Environments (GCertDE) At a glance: ͠͠ One trimester of full-time study or up to two years part-time (equivalent to four trimesters) ͠͠ 60 points ͠͠ Admission requires a good Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in Architecture, Building Science or Design ͠͠ Endorsement of a specialised area of study of your choosing: →→ Architecture →→ Architecture History and Theory →→ Interior Architecture →→ Landscape Architecture →→ Project Management →→ Sustainable Engineering Systems. Graduate Diploma in Designed Environments (GDipDE) At a glance: ͠͠ One year of full-time study or up to four years part-time (equivalent to eight trimesters) ͠͠ 120 points ͠͠ Admission requires a good Bachelor’s degree or equivalent in Architecture, Building Science or Design ͠͠ Endorsement of a specialised area of study of your choosing: →→ Architecture →→ Architecture History and Theory →→ Interior Architecture →→ Landscape Architecture →→ Project Management →→ Sustainable Engineering Systems. ͠͠ Students wishing to pursue further study from our range of postgraduate-level qualifications at Master’s level. Entry into Master’s qualifications is based on academic performance in the GDipDE.

Specialisation information/programme structure

For the Graduate Certificate, you require 30 points from your selected programme (for example Interior Architecture) and 30 points from other courses offered by the School of Architecture. For the Graduate Diploma you need to take the courses listed in the programme plus as many other courses as necessary to complete 120 points.

Architecture History and Theory GDipDE:

Architecture GDipDE:

ARCI 311 Architecture Design ARCI 312 Architecture Design Integration

and one of

SARC 321 Construction SARC 351 Urban Design Theory and Practice

Three of: SARC 351 Urban Design Theory and Practice SARC 352 Pacific Designed Environments SARC 353 History of Architecture SARC 354 Interior Architecture Conservation

Project Management GDipDE:

BILD 361 Project Management BILD 362 Construction Law

Interior Architecture GDipDE:

and one of

INTA 311 Interior Architecture Design INTA 312 Interior Architecture Design Integration

and one of

INTA 321 Interior Fit-out Technologies SARC 323 Colour, Pattern, Light

Sustainable Engineering Systems GDipDE:

Landscape Architecture GDipDE:

LAND 321 Landscape Architecture Construction

BILD 321 Sustainable Engineering Systems Design BILD 331 Sustainable and Regenerative Design

LAND 311 Landscape Architecture Design LAND 312 Landscape Architecture Design Integration

BILD 322 Structures SARC 321 Construction SARC 362 Introduction to Practice and Management SARC 364 Building Code Compliance

and one of

BILD 322 Structures SARC 321 Construction SARC 362 Introduction to Practice and Management SARC 364 Building Code Compliance Architecture and Design 2011

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Architecture Specialisation overview

Career opportunities

Architecture is a science, responsive to the timeless needs of human inhabitation as well as new challenges such as environmental sustainability and rapidly evolving technologies. For all these reasons, people are constantly making or remaking their physical world, producing the special buildings and places we call ‘architecture’.

Graduates move on to satisfying careers in the architecture profession, either establishing their own practices or working as employees in large firms or government agencies. Before registering as an architect in New Zealand, graduates must gain practical experience usually under the supervision of a registered architect. Not all architecture graduates choose to follow this path. Because their skills and education are so broad, some pursue careers outside conventional architectural practice.

Our architecture programme encompasses the technologies of building such as construction, structures and environmental science. It also situates architecture within a world of ideas, examining the different meanings of buildings through history and from various theoretical perspectives. All these subjects are brought together under the umbrella of design in a series of studiobased courses. At Victoria, this diverse learning experience occurs within a broader multidisciplinary environment. Our BAS in Architecture combined with the Master of Architecture (Professional) (MArch[Prof]) is recognised nationally and internationally as meeting the academic requirements for registration as a professional architect.

Career opportunities are diverse, and some require further specialised courses of study: ͠͠ urban planning/urban design ͠͠ interior design ͠͠ environmental design ͠͠ stage/movie set design ͠͠ property management ͠͠ property development ͠͠ project management ͠͠ facilities management ͠͠ building conservation.

Graduates from the programme possess the skills, practical knowledge and theoretical understanding required in the architecture profession. These include an ability to think visually and three-dimensionally, particularly in relation to spatial subjects. (opposite page and above) A Network Place, final-year architecture design project by Eli Nuttall. Architecture and Design 2011

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Undergraduate degree structure Year one SARC 111

Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 112

Design Processes

SARC 121

Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 122

Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers*

SARC 131

Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151

Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161

Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162

Design Communication

Year two ARCI 211

Architecture Design

ARCI 212

Architecture Design Integration

ARCI 251

History and Theory of Architecture

SARC 221

Building Materials and Construction

SARC 222

Structural Systems

SARC 223

Human Environmental Science

Year one

At Victoria, the first year is unique because it is based on a diverse learning experience from the artistic to the scientific and from sustainable concerns to communicating design concepts. This multidisciplinary approach to the spatial environment provides you with a foundation of skills and vocabulary to design, question and research. This foundation will take you into your graduate studies in architecture. *SARC 122 may be replaced by an elective course by students who have at least 14 credits at Level 3 in each of two of the following: calculus, statistics, physics or modelling.

Years two and three

Year two of the BAS in Architecture introduces discipline-specific courses in architectural design and architectural history and theory. These are supported by a solid grounding in building technologies including structures, construction and human environmental science. Year three builds on this foundation, and presents increasingly challenging design issues at larger scales. At this stage, students are also introduced to urban design, Pacific architecture, professional practice and management. Each year culminates with an extended design studio which requires students to integrate what they have learnt in other courses.

and one elective course Year three ARCI 311

Architecture Design

ARCI 312

Architecture Design Integration

SARC 321

Construction

SARC 351

Urban Design Theory and Practice

SARC 352

Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 362

Introduction to Practice and Management

and one elective course

(opposite page—top) Second-year design project by architecture student Josephine DeGuzman. (opposite page—bottom) Architecture student using Te Aro Campus workshop facilities. (right) Student models by third-year architecture students Cameron Hurrell (top) and Zoe Chisholm (bottom).

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Postgraduate study The Master of Architecture (Professional) (MArch[Prof]) is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections.

Degree Structure (MArch[Prof]) Part One ARCI 411

Architectural Design Research

ARCI 412

Architectural Design Research

ARCI 421

Integrated Technologies

ARCI 451

Architecture History and Theory

SARC 461

Professional Practice

SARC 491

Research Methodologies

and one elective course Part Two ARCI 591

Architecture Research Thesis—120 points

or ARCI 592

Architecture Research Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400-599.

(left) Detailed images from fourth-year studio project designed by Christopher Field. 16

Victoria University of Wellington

Part one

In Part One students demonstrate their command of a broad range of architectural knowledge and skills. Once again, integration is the key. The technical aspects of building are addressed in combination, and an extended studio allows students to demonstrate near-professional competency in dealing with large structures and complex accommodation needs. At the same time, studio courses emphasise research-led approaches to design. Students prepare proposals for a designbased thesis project which will be undertaken in Part Two of Master’s study.

Part two

Part Two is devoted to the architecture research thesis. During a minimum nine-month period, students identify a novel research question then devise and implement an appropriate research strategy. A design project features prominently in this process. At the end of the course, students draw conclusions about their own design and about the broader architectural question which prompted the work. Students complete the year with specialised knowledge in one aspect of architecture. They also possess research skills relevant to modern professional practice or further academic study.

(right) Tree Tracker, fourth-year studio project by Robert Bruns. Architecture and Design 2011

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Grace Mills

Simon Harrison

When Grace finished high school she wanted to move cities for university, and so left her native Wellington for life in Dunedin. However, after a while away from home, the desire to pursue architecture drew her back to Wellington.

Simon came to Victoria as a mature student, having previously worked as an architectural technician at both Meritec and Chow:Hill Architects in Hamilton.

THIRD-YEAR ARCHITECTURE STUDENT

RECENT BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE GRADUATE

“Initially, the programme’s approach was a big change from my previous working life,” he says.

“Architecture stayed on my mind the entire year, so I had to try it out,” she says. “And Wellington seemed the best place for it.”

“Overall the architecture programme strikes a good balance between instructed course learning and the freedom to pursue your own ideas.”

Grace also says the School of Architecture held a special attraction: “I had been to various final-year exhibitions at the School, very much liked the feel of it and the variety and the artistic approach of the projects.” She’s happy she made the move: “The programme is extremely wide in scope—it covers history, theory, design, mathematics and physics and almost anything else you want it to incorporate. I have benefited hugely from both the practical and more theoretical aspects of the degree.”

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Victoria University of Wellington

“With its abundance of interesting architecture and its vibrant atmosphere, Wellington is a fabulous environment in which to get your first architectural bearings.”

Simon says he enjoyed the opportunity to pursue the areas of architecture that interested him the most. “I liked the studio environment of the School of Architecture, being able to work with other students and share ideas. And I loved that the School is in the middle of the city—working long hours it’s important to be close to the cafés and coffee!”

Having recently formed MOAA, a Hamilton-based architectural practice, with three friends, Simon is intent on continuing with the research areas begun during his degree, especially around housing and urbanism. Simon was the winner of the New Zealand Institute of Architects (NZIA) Graphisoft Student Design Award in 2009, and also a recipient of the NZIA Graphisoft Year 4 Studio prize. Simon completed the Bachelor of Architecture (BArch). This qualification has been replaced by the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) in Architecture.

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Architecture History and Theory specialisation Overview Architecture History and Theory is a three-year specialisation of the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS). This programme focuses on the historical, social, political and a critical understanding of the built environment. Architecture History and Theory students at Victoria have a unique advantage of an interdisciplinary approach to learning as you share courses with architecture, building science, interior architecture and landscape architecture. In this programme, importance is placed on the originality of information uncovered, the creativity of the interpretations made and the rigour of the methodological procedures adopted. Graduates can pursue further studies by carrying out a Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PGDipAHT) then move onto a non-professional Masters of Architecture (MArch).

Career opportunities

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Victoria University of Wellington

There are many opportunities for students studying in Architecture History and Theory to pursue various careers. These include: ͠͠ architectural conservator ͠͠ archivist ͠͠ critic or writer ͠͠ curator ͠͠ historian ͠͠ theorist ͠͠ librarian ͠͠ museum researcher.

(opposite page and top) Fourth-year studio project by Stephanie Liddicoat. (above) Room of Sands, second-year studio project by Henry Stephens.

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Undergraduate degree structure

Year one Year three

Year one SARC 111

Introduction to Design Processes

Year Three requires a total of 120 points that consist of:

SARC 112

Design Processes

Two courses from

SARC 121

Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 351

Urban Design Theory and Practice

SARC 131

SARC 352

Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 353

History of Architecture

SARC 151

Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 354

Interior Heritage Conservation

SARC 161

Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162

Design Communication

and a further 90 points numbered 300-499 from courses labelled ARCI, INTA, LAND, SARC, CCDN, ARTH, CLAS or HIST of which 30 points may be substituted for courses from the other subjects offered by Victoria University

and one elective course Year two Year Two requires a total of 120 points that consist of: At least two courses from ARCI 251

History and Theory of Architecture

INTA 251

History of Interior Architecture

LAND 251

Landscape Architecture History and Theory

SARC 251

History of Building Technology

Year one of the BAS in Architecture History and Theory provides you with a diverse learning experience from the artistic to the scientific and from sustainable concerns to communicating design concepts. This provides you with a foundation to understand the built environment which you will take into graduate studies in your history and theory specialisation.

Years two and three

Year two teaches students to acquire key skills and knowledge and a solid foundation in terms of history and theory, urban design, Pacific culture and heritage. Students in years two and three can take history and theory courses within the landscape and interior architecture programmes. Students can also combine their studies with a wide variety of theory-based subjects including culture+context, art history, classics or history.

and a further 90 points numbered 200 from courses labelled ARCI, INTA, LAND, SARC, CCDN, ARTH, CLAS or HIST of which 30 points may be substituted for courses from the other subjects offered by Victoria University

(opposite page) The Disconnector, fourth-year studio project by Patrick Thompson. (top right) Fourth-year studio project by Micah Rickards. This project looked at the cross programming of an art gallery and a supermarket that explored the new spatial and formal relationships that could be created. (bottom right) Students working collaboratively on a research design project in fourth-year studio. 22

Victoria University of Wellington

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Postgraduate degree structure PGDipAHT The PGDipAHT requires a total of 120 points that consists of: SARC 451

Critical Theory of the Designed Environment

SARC 491

Research Methodologies

One of: ARCI 451

Architecture History and Theory

INTA 451

Theory and Criticism in Interior Architecture

LAND 451

Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism

Three further courses from: ARCI 451

Architecture History and Theory

INTA 451

Theory and Criticism in Interior Architecture

LAND 451

Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism

SARC 452

History of the City in Landscape

SARC 453

History of Architecture

SARC 454

Interior Architecture Conservation

Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PGDipAHT)

Students specialising in Architecture History and Theory can continue studies with a one-year Postgraduate Diploma in Architecture History and Theory (PGDipAHT). This leads into the non-professional thesis-based Master of Architecture. Students can take approved courses from Architecture, Interior and Landscape at 400 level in history and theory for at least two trimesters.

Master of Architecture (MArch)

Students who wish to specialise further in Architecture History and Theory can carry out a non-professional MArch thesis. A thesis allows students the flexibility to pursue and test their own research interests. The work that has been produced in the MArch stream is rigorous and innovative and graduates from this programme have gone on to teach and publish at other universities and institutions.

and a further 30 points numbered 400-499 from courses labelled ARCI, INTA, LAND or SARC MArch by thesis ARCH 591

Thesis—120 points

(left) Detailed images from Extrinsic(s) Diagram + Change, final-year project by Gregory Parsonson. 24

Victoria University of Wellington

(right) Detailed images from Matt Watson’s final-year project entitled Poiesis—The Making of Crafted Architecture. Architecture and Design 2011

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Philip Belesky

Fourth-year Bachelor of Architectural Studies in Landscape Architecture and Bachelor of Arts in Architectural Studies student

Matt Watson

MASTER OF ARCHITECTURE STUDENT Matt studied law and German at the University of Canterbury and practised law in Auckland and Christchurch before coming to Victoria. He says his experiences in the legal side of property development led him to study architecture.

“I’ve really loved the creative expression coupled with learning about the technical and pragmatic aspects of creating architecture.”

He was also drawn to Victoria by the attraction of Wellington itself: “I wanted to experience Wellington and the Architecture programme at Victoria appealed to me with its balance of design and technical application,” he says. “The mixture of architecture, interior architecture, landscape architecture and building science seemed to make Victoria’s programme more comprehensive and enabling than those at other universities.”

Matt says the programme is hard work but has been worthwhile: “The workload is not to be underestimated. That said, neither are the rewards and satisfaction of developing from an amateur to a qualified designer.”

For Philip, the appeal of Architectural Studies is its multidisciplinary nature: “It incorporates a variety of fields—it is the conflicts and congruences between its technical and liberal arts that I like.”

“Being able to work between science and art, craft and philosophy or experience and culture makes every project interesting.” Philip enjoys “the high level of interaction between students, and between the students and staff ”. Coming from high school, Philip chose Victoria on the advice of friends and teachers, and on the School of Architecture’s reputation. He says Te Aro is completely different from Victoria’s other campuses. “It is much more friendly and engaging than most university settings.” His advice for first-year students is: “Always make the most of studio time. Don’t over-complicate projects—focus on a simple idea early and execute it well.”

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Interior Architecture specialisation overview

Career opportunities

Interior architecture is defined as the study of spaces and spatial experiences, using the language of architecture, and with the goal of addressing and resolving issues of habitation. Interior Architecture at Victoria teaches students to design the 3D ‘architecture’ of an interior. In this sense it is very different from interior ‘design’ programmes offered elsewhere in New Zealand, which deal only with 2D surface treatments.

Victoria’s BAS in Interior Architecture and Master of Interior Architecture degrees are internationally recognised through their affiliation to the International Federation of Interior Design/Architecture (IFI). Our graduates find compelling careers as specialists within interior design and architecture firms— others find career opportunities in the following: ͠͠ retail design ͠͠ lighting design ͠͠ exhibition and furniture design ͠͠ event and set design.

Interior architecture students have a unique advantage in sharing common courses with architecture, landscape architecture, architecture history and theory and building science students, within a facility devoted to the study of the built environment. Students are trained to take a strong personal position in relation to design, to experiment and to reflect on the implications of their design position. Our aim is to prepare students for leadership roles in the interior discipline. Our interior architecture graduates are trained to become specialists in the design of architectural space and spatial experience. Students are taught to explore how time, movement and perception challenge presumed boundaries between the pragmatic and the theoretical, and even between the habitable and the mythological. Our graduates have gone on to design spaces for buildings, spaces for cities, spaces for movie narratives, spaces for video games—any career that requires a specialised knowledge of how we interact within space.

(opposite and above) A Stagnant Object Perplexed in a Sea of Movement, lobby design by Juliet Lloyd. 28

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Undergraduate degree structure Year one SARC 111

Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 112

Design Processes

SARC 121

Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 122

Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers*

SARC 131

Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151

Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161

Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162

Design Communication

Year two INTA 211

Interior Architecture Design

INTA 212

Interior Architecture Design Integration

INTA 251

History of Interior Architecture

INTA 261

Drawing and Modelling for Interior Architecture

SARC 221

Building Materials and Construction

SARC 223

Human Environmental Science

Year one

Year one of the BAS in Interior Architecture provides a multidisciplinary approach to exploring design communication, and technological processes relating to the built environment. Students pursuing Interior Architecture share common courses with students interested in Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Building Science and Architecture History and Theory. *SARC 122 may be replaced by an elective course by students who have at least 14 credits at Level 3 in each of two of the following: calculus, statistics, physics or modelling.

Years two and three

Year two of the BAS in Interior Architecture teaches students to acquire and use core skills related explicitly to the discipline, especially design, history of the discipline and communication. Year three provides a deeper knowledge of the specialisation, emphasising independence, self-reflection and engagement with applied problems. Year three involves research-focused learning, in preparation for entering the two-year Master of Interior Architecture (MIA).

and one elective course Year three INTA 311

Interior Architecture Design

INTA 312

Interior Architecture Design Integration

INTA 321

Interior Fit-Out Technologies

SARC 323

Colour, Pattern, Light

SARC 352

Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 362

Introduction to Practice and Management

and one elective course

(opposite page—top) Building interior of the National Library design by firstyear student Alexandra Davies. (opposite page—bottom) Provoking Change, hotel design by third-year interior architecture student Lee Hui Lai. (right) Working design simulations as part of Master’s research project by Nazia Kachwalla.

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Postgraduate degree structure The Master of Interior Architecture (MIA) is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections.

Part One

Part One is structured as taught courses that embrace substantive disciplinary material, theory, research methodologies and research through design projects.

Part Two

Part One INTA 411

Interior Architecture Design

INTA 412

Interior Architecture Design Research

INTA 421

Integrated Technologies

INTA 451

Theory and Criticism in Interior Architecture

SARC 461

Professional Practice

SARC 491

Research Methodologies

Part Two, which completes the degree, is structured as a one-year studio-based design research project, selected from a range of research topics. Students will learn to establish a strong personal position in response to social, cultural and theoretical imperatives, while independently researching interior architecture-specific issues through advanced modes of design inquiry.

and one elective course Part Two INTA 591

Interior Architecture Research Thesis—120 points

or INTA 592

Interior Architecture Research Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400-599

(left) In Search of Memories, hotel interior design by fourth-year interior architecture student Wen Ting In. (opposite page) Exposing the Shadow, hotel interior and lobby design by fourthyear interior architecture student Shamiz Kachwalla. 32

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Alan McCorkindale

Yirao Lee

Alan McCorkindale is currently completing his fourth year in Interior Architecture.

Yirao Lee is currently completing his Master’s degree specialising in Interior Architecture, while tutoring in undergraduate design studios.

Final-year Bachelor of Design in Interior Architecture

His third-year hotel design, City of Dreams, was awarded the bronze medal in the BEST Design Awards at the Designers Institute of New Zealand awards in Auckland. The hotel interior was conceived as a spatial gateway for the visitor to enter the realm of dreams, a gateway to an alternate dimensional dream-state. The reception area was cloaked in shadows, in opposition to the bar which spilled light throughout the lobby. Alan’s interest in design originated when he was a young student, helping with graphic design for the family winery business in Christchurch. After travelling in Europe he developed a keen interest in design that solves problems.

MASTER’S STUDENT—INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE

His thesis, entitled Coalescence and Contradiction of Opposing Elements in Architecture, explores how parametric interiors can successfully inhabit historical buildings based on classic orthogonal grids. Yirao, originally from Malaysia, is particularly interested in rediscovering the sacred qualities of interior space that are fundamental to traditional architecture, but so often lost in our modern buildings.

“We should not forget the principles of the sacred that are so fundamental to human culture and values.”

He believes that contemporary architectural design is “not characterised by the specific formal and figural virtues found in traditional sacred spaces. As a result, there is little sign of sacrifice and offering to invoke the quality of sacred.” Yirao’s objective is to invoke the sacred in high-tech design.

“I thought I could bring something new to architecture that no one has ever considered before as opposed to what people think is fashionable.” Alan is in his final year of the Bachelor of Design in Interior Architecture. This qualification has now been replaced by the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) in Interior Architecture.

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Landscape Architecture specialisation Overview

Landscape architecture sits at the forefront of rising global interest in the environment, the sustainability of cities and the quality of urban life. As facilitators of change, landscape architects draw together diverse disciplinary interests in the creation of landscapes that are culturally, economically, socially and environmentally responsive. Landscape architecture blends the rigorous understanding of the sciences, focusing on ecology and natural systems, with the creative process of embracing art and human interactions with the landscape. Victoria’s landscape architecture programme encompasses the technology of site development and site systems, historical and contemporary interactions of people in the landscape and design as critical methods of facilitating landscape change. All of these subjects are offered in an integrated programme anchored by the studio experience. Opportunities for the integration of teaching across disciplines are widespread at the School of Architecture and across the academic community at Victoria. Landscape architecture students work on projects that address place, community, activity, meaning, form and aesthetics. The outcomes include integrated solutions for open space networks, transport routes, street typologies, built form, land use mixes, recreation space, community facilities and urban ecology.

Third-year studio project by landscape architecture student Cory Manson. 36

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Career opportunities

Landscape architects work in private, public and academic organisations and typically collaborate with artists, ecologists, architects, planners and engineers to plan and design a wide variety of projects at regional, urban and local scales. These may include large-scale infrastructure projects and the rehabilitation and design of post-industrial and residual urban sites as well as parks, gardens and public open spaces. Victoria’s landscape architecture programme is accredited by the New Zealand Institute of Landscape Architects (NZILA) and prepares students for registration as landscape architects. Graduates from the programme are working in many different capacities throughout New Zealand and abroad. Possible career opportunities include: ͠͠ parks and recreation planning ͠͠ site design and planning ͠͠ urban design ͠͠ civil design and public infrastructure consultant ͠͠ sustainable development consultant ͠͠ landscape assessor.

The programme’s vigorous interdisciplinary design culture promotes the skills and values necessary to practise as a landscape architect in a wide variety of contexts within this rapidly growing and pivotal field of the built environment. Architecture and Design 2011

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Undergraduate degree structure Year one SARC 111

Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 112

Design Processes

SARC 121

Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 131

Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151

Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161

Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162

Design Communication

and one elective course Year two LAND 211

Landscape Architecture Design

LAND 212

Landscape Architecture Design Integration

LAND 221

Landscape Architecture Sites and Systems

LAND 222

Landscape Architecture Application

LAND 251

Landscape Architecture History and Theory

LAND 261

Landscape Architecture Communication

Year one

The first year of study provides a common foundation for all students in the School of Architecture including course content spanning design, technology, history and theory.

Years two and three

In the second year students are introduced to courses in landscape architectural design, technology, site systems/ecology, history and theory. The third year introduces greater complexity and broad-scale issues related to landscape planning and urban interventions requiring more sophisticated integration of human and natural conditions into the design process. With successful completion of the first three years, students can be awarded the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) in Landscape Architecture.

and one elective course Year three LAND 311

Landscape Architecture Design

LAND 312

Landscape Architecture Design Integration

LAND 321

Landscape Architecture Construction

SARC 351

Urban Design Theory and Practice

SARC 352

Pacific Designed Environments

SARC 362

Introduction to Practice and Management

and one elective course

(left) Site analysis from final-year studio project by Peter McCartney. 38

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(right) How can Landscape Architecture inform, illustrate, and improve hydrological systems within the Wellington City?, images from final-year landscape architecture thesis by Nick Griffin. Architecture and Design 2011

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Postgraduate degree structure The Master of Landscape Architecture (MLA) is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections. Part one LAND 411

Landscape Architecture Design

LAND 412

Landscape Architecture Design Research

LAND 421

Urban Technologies

LAND 451

Landscape Architecture Theory and Criticism

SARC 461

Professional Practice

SARC 491

Research Methodologies

Part One

Students interested in postgraduate study may continue for two additional years and earn the MLA degree. In Part One students are introduced to design-based research, they develop greater understanding of theory and criticism in landscape architecture and are engaged in additional courses that provide exposure to contemporary practice in landscape architecture.

Part Two

In Part Two student’s work is devoted to the development of original work through preparation of the Master’s thesis. This is intended to be a culminating experience that demonstrates the capability for individual thought and creativity in landscape architecture.

and one elective course Part two land 591

Landscape Architecture Research Thesis—120 points

or land 592

Landscape Architecture Research Thesis—90 points

and elective courses to the value of 30 points from courses numbered 400-599

(left) Third-year studio project by Hanna O’Donoghue.

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(right) Studio project by landscape architecture student Marita Hunt.

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Amy Collingbourne

Cory Manson

Following a gap year and an exchange to France after the end of high school, Amy is now combining her landscape architecture studies with French courses. She says landscape architecture is “interesting in the way that it combines spatial design with understanding about the landscape”.

Cory says he had not heard much about landscape architecture until he started thinking about what to study at university, but was drawn to it by its focus on a combination of design, architecture and the natural environment.

SECOND-YEAR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT

“I started out with hardly any expectations, and found a first-year design project was really great in helping me understand the processes of landscape design,” she says.

“The programme crosses over several disciplines from science to art and everything in between.” Amy says she enjoys the creative side of designing spaces and presentations the most, as well as having discussions with tutors, and going on field trips for LAND 221 Landscape Architecture Sites and Systems.

FOURTH-YEAR LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT

“I came into the landscape architecture programme with a pretty open mind,” Cory says. “I thought the course would have an urban focus, which it does, but it has also developed my broader understanding of the subject—so many things can be relevant to a project.” His studies have already seen him taking a field trip to Melbourne and Sydney, and he is looking forward to another to New York in 2011. Cory is confident he has made the right study choice: “I thought landscape architecture would be something I would have an interest in, but over the last few years it has turned into a field that I am quite passionate about building a career around,” he says.

“The field trips are great, especially going to the unique landscapes around the Wellington region. The class dynamic is also really good.”

She lists her plans for the future as continuing with her degree and making a return trip to France at some point, and says she would like to continue on to the Master of Landscape Architecture after her undergraduate studies.

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Bachelor of Building Science Undergraduate Overview Our Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) examines and analyses the built environment and the way people interact with it. It gives a thorough grounding in the development of construction methods, materials and systems, as well as an awareness of the impact and importance of trends in the development of sustainable building technologies. It introduces the science of comfort in terms of air quality, heat, light and sound. You will develop an understanding of structural engineering, and of the legal and economic environments in which buildings are constructed and inhabited. At Victoria, building science is taught alongside the architecture, architecture history and theory, interior architecture and landscape architecture programmes, enabling BBSc students to engage with these related disciplines and ensure the science of buildings is explored in the context of an awareness of architectural design issues. The first year of the programme consists of seven introductory courses that lay the foundations for the following years, plus an elective course of your choice. Two technically-orientated courses focus on the technologies inherent in today’s buildings and sustainability.

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Four others cover basic aspects of design and the associated history and theory. They will introduce you to the world of architecture in which building science plays a crucial role. In the following two years you will study core building science topics including construction, structures, environmental science, systems and management. Depending on your choice of courses you will specialise in one or both of Sustainable Engineering Systems and/or Project Management. At the end of three years’ study you will have knowledge and skills to either begin a satisfying career in some aspect of the building industry or continue your study in the two-year Master of Building Science programme. Students of building science should have a keen interest in the complexities of the building construction process and an ability to interact well with others. With the increasing emphasis on project management, students should develop a sharp business mind as well. We expect a majority of the BBSc graduates to continue their education and undertake the Master’s degree in Building Science. This degree will present the opportunity for a graduate to focus on a specialist subject area of their choice. Some students will continue on beyond that to undertake a PhD in Building Science.

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Postgraduate Overview Master of Building Science (MBSc)

The Master of Building Science (MBSc) is a two-year postgraduate degree with a focus on examining the science of the built environment in depth. Entry into the MBSc will be available to BBSc graduates with grades of ‘B’ average in years two and three of the BBSc degree. During the first year of the MBSc students will enrol in taught courses such as Project Integration, Integrated Technologies, Sustainable Engineering, Buildings and Energy, Green Building Assessment, Building Project Management and Built Facilities Management and Research Methodologies.

In the second year of the MBSc students undertake a Building Science Research Thesis, where a student’s interests in a topic of their choice are fully researched and developed. The thesis allows students to establish a strong academic position in the analysis of an aspect of a building, researched in both theoretical and practical form. Our current Master’s students are working on a wide range of topics including analysing intelligent lighting systems, a benchmarking system for commercial buildings, developing a liveability index for urban apartments and examining the construction of structurally insulated panels.

Undergraduate and postgraduate chart Specialisation

Year of study One

Project Management

Two

Three

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Five

BBSc Project Management

MBSc Master of Building Science Project Management

BBSc Sustainable Engineering Systems

MBSc Master of Building Science Sustainable Engineering Systems

BBSc year one Sustainable Engineering Systems

Four

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Luke Newman

Lee Bint

Luke began studying at Victoria doing a Bachelor of Commerce and Administration, but changed his mind and switched to the Bachelor of Building Science after hearing about the material a friend was studying in this programme.

Lee has had a long journey to become a PhD candidate.

Final-year Bachelor of Building Science

“I was already studying at Victoria and developed a passion for the building industry and I wanted to learn more about the technical side of buildings,” Luke says. He is now enjoying learning about what makes buildings tick: “I enjoy analysing the performance of buildings through simulations and understanding how buildings are put together through construction detailing,” he says. When Luke finishes his degree he hopes to get a job working for a building consultancy firm, and has aspirations to work in a project management role. His advice for first-year students is:

“Make the most of your tutors and lecturers. Ask as many questions as you can, because if you don’t understand something you are most likely not the only one.”

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Current PhD student

“I left high school at the age of 15. I then wanted to better my education once I reached around 17 or 18, and undertook a Diploma in Construction Technology in order to meet the entry requirements for the Bachelor of Building Science,” she says. At the end of her undergraduate degree she undertook a research-based course which she says “ignited my passion for research”. “I wanted to continue learning under the guidance of the best in the industry,” she says. Lee is now busy completing her PhD studies. “My future plans are to use my knowledge and expertise to contribute to the future building industry,” she says. Lee says she was encouraged to continue with building science:

“Building science enabled me to further understand the actual performance of buildings, and Victoria University has some of the world’s best lecturers and research staff in this field.”

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Lauren Christie Recent PhD graduate

Lauren gets some strange reactions when she says her background is in building science. “Most people have a view of building science as being all about construction sites, and they don’t expect a blonde-haired girl to be doing it—especially not in combination with a psychology degree!” she says. But she says it’s a versatile programme that can be applied to a variety of interests. “My undergraduate and Honours classmates are now doing a wide range of jobs—no-one seems to have the same job.” Having recently completed her PhD thesis, Lauren is now searching for the means to further develop her niche in the field: “I’m looking to find a way to combine my cross-disciplinary knowledge in building science and psychology, most likely through a service-based consultancy.” Lauren is confident she will find just the thing, having had the support and experience of studying at Victoria.

“The staff are very supportive and encouraging, and they go out of their way to help you with your future.”

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Project Management Specialisation overview

Career Opportunities

Project management is the methodical approach to planning and guiding project processes from start to finish. The processes are guided through five stages: initiation, planning, executing, controlling and closing. Project management can be applied to almost any type of project.

There are many career opportunities in this area of expertise that include the following: ͠͠ construction project management ͠͠ building consultant ͠͠ building research ͠͠ consultant on city council buildings consent processes ͠͠ technician in a structural engineering consultancy, perhaps beginning with computerised drafting and moving into management ͠͠ quantity surveying ͠͠ technical writing.

Victoria offers a new specialisation in Project Management within our Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) degree that is designed for students who want a professional career at the core of the building industry. This specialisation focuses on the logistics surrounding the built economic environment. Some key topics include the feasibility analysis, planning, cost control and the critical path of building and urban environments. The project management specialisation is taken alongside the core building science and elective courses of your choosing. In this specialisation students will study topics including economics, cost planning, project management and construction law in the second and third years of study. These courses can be enhanced by carefully selected elective courses related to project management or by taking a second specialisation in Sustainable Engineering Systems. This specialisation is available as a postgraduate specialisation within the Master of Building Science (MBSc), for students who wish to pursue further study at postgraduate level for a professionally recognised qualification. Caption: xx. 52

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Undergraduate degree structure Year one SARC 111

Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 121

Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 122

Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers*

SARC 131

Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151

Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161

Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162

Design Communication

and one elective course Year two BILD 251

History of Building Technology

BILD 261

Building Project Management and Economics

BILD 262

Building Project Management Cost Planning

SARC 221

Building Materials and Construction

SARC 222

Structural Systems

SARC 223

Human Environmental Science

Year one

In your first year you study core courses alongside students in the first year of the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS). This maximises your exposure to all aspects of the built environment and is designed to increase your awareness of different disciplines contributing to it. You will take a series of design and lecture-based courses in communication, sustainability, building technology and history and theory. *SARC 122 may be replaced by an elective course by students who have at least 14 credits at Level 3 in each of two of the following: calculus, statistics, physics or modelling.

Years two and three

In your second and third years you will study core building science topics, including construction, structures, environmental science, systems and management. Within this specialisation you will take courses in building economics, cost planning, project management and construction law.

and two elective courses Year three BILD 322

Structures

BILD 364

Building Code Compliance

BILD 361

Project Management

BILD 362

Construction Law

SARC 321

Construction

SARC 362

Introduction to Practice and Management

and two elective courses

(opposite page) Interior building renders of the Monastery of Novy Dvur by Andew Pester. (top) Interior building render by Anthony Gates. (bottom) Interior building render of Shigeru Ban’s Paper Museum by Ke Fang.

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Postgraduate degree structure The Master of Building Science (MBSc) specialising in Project Management is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections. Part one BILD 411

Integration Project

BILD 421

Integrated Technologies

BILD 431

Green Building Assessments

BILD 461

Project Management

BILD 463

Facilities Management

SARC 491

Research Methodologies

Part One

In Part One of your Master’s you will cover a series of topics within your core courses that include project integration, building technology, green building assessments, research methodologies and project management. These courses prepare you to undertake a written thesis in Part Two.

Part Two

In Part Two you will undertake a written thesis which can be in project management or a related field within the building science discipline that can be supervised within the School of Architecture. Students can undertake a 120-point thesis.

at least 15 approved points from courses numbered 400-499 Part two BILD 591

Building Science Research Thesis—120 points

(left) Interior perspective renders of the Grand Rapids Art Museum, Michigan USA by Kayla Oughton. 56

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(right) Interior building photograph of Te Aro Campus Atrium. Architecture and Design 2011

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Sustainable Engineering Systems Specialisation overview

Sustainability is an important component in the built environment. It involves the promotion of energy efficient buildings and minimising the harm to our environment. At Victoria, we are now offering a new specialisation in Sustainable Engineering Systems within our Bachelor of Building Science (BBSc) degree that is designed for students who want a professional career at the core of the building industry. Sustainable engineering systems focus on the study and performance simulation of environmental engineering systems and sustainability at both the building and urban level. Students will study and develop appropriate design systems to address the quality of the built environment from heating to lighting to air quality and acoustics, while incorporating the efficient use of sustainable materials and building resources. This specialisation is taken alongside the core building science and elective courses of your choosing. In this specialisation students will study topics including environmental engineering systems, sustainable architecture, sustainable engineering systems design and sustainable and regenerative design in buildings in the second and third years of study. These courses can be enhanced by carefully selected elective courses related to sustainability or engineering, or by taking a second specialisation in Project Management.

Career Opportunities

There are many career opportunities in this area of expertise that include the following: ͠͠ sustainable engineering systems designer ͠͠ consultant advising design teams on energy conservation ͠͠ lighting adviser, designer or supplier ͠͠ researching building materials’ performance either in a private company or a research institution such as the Building Research Association of New Zealand (BRANZ) ͠͠ consultant for the city council buildings consent processes ͠͠ technician in a structural engineering consultancy, perhaps beginning with computerised drafting and moving into management ͠͠ fire design and regulations ͠͠ quantity surveying ͠͠ acoustic engineering ͠͠ technical writing.

This specialisation is available as a postgraduate level within the Master of Building Science (MBSc), for students who wish to pursue further study at postgraduate level for a professionally recognised qualification. 58

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Undergraduate degree structure Year one SARC 111

Introduction to Design Processes

SARC 121

Introduction to Built Environment Technology

SARC 122

Introduction to Applied Physics, Numerical Methods and Statistics for Designers*

SARC 131

Introduction to Sustainability in the Designed Environment

SARC 151

Introduction to Design History and Theory

SARC 161

Introduction to Design Communication

SARC 162

Design Communication

and one elective course Year two BILD 251

History of Building Technology

BILD 231

Environmental Engineering Systems

BILD 232

Sustainable Architecture

SARC 221

Building Materials and Construction

SARC 222

Structural Systems

SARC 223

Human Environmental Science

Year one

In your first year you study core courses alongside students in the first year of the Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS). This maximises your exposure to all aspects of the built environment and is designed to increase your awareness of different disciplines contributing to it. You will take a series of design and lecture-based courses in communication, sustainability, building technology and history and theory. *SARC 122 may be replaced by an elective course by students who have at least 14 credits at Level 3 in each of two of the following: calculus, statistics, physics or modelling.

Years two and three

In your second and third years you will study core building science topics, including construction, structures, environmental science, systems and management. Within this specialisation you will take courses in environmental engineering systems, sustainable architecture, sustainable engineering systems design and sustainable and regenerative design.

and two elective courses Year three BILD 322

Structures

BILD 364

Building Code Compliance

BILD 321

Sustainable Engineering Systems Design

BILD 331

Sustainable and Regenerative Design

SARC 321

Construction

SARC 362

Introduction to Practice Management

and two elective courses

(opposite page—top) Interior building render created by Ashton Wright. (opposite page—bottom) Building model by second-year student Steven Chen. (top) Interior building render, created in BBSc 303 Computer Applications by Ashton Wright. (bottom) Interior building render of Sartogo Architetti Associati’s Santo Volto di Gesù by Thomas Ward.

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Postgraduate degree structure The Master of Building Science (MBSc) in Sustainable Engineering Systems is a two-year course of study taught in two distinct sections. Part one BILD 411

Integration Project

BILD 421

Integrated Technologies

BILD 431

Green Building Assessments

BILD 422

Sustainable Engineering Systems Project

BILD 423

Building and Energy

SARC 491

Research Methodologies

Part One

In Part One you will cover a series of topics within your core courses that include project integration, building technology, green building assessments, research methodologies and sustainable engineering systems. These courses prepare you to undertake a written thesis in Part Two.

Part Two

In Part Two you will undertake a written thesis. This can be in project management or in a related field within the building science discipline that can be supervised by the School of Architecture. Students can undertake a 120-point thesis.

at least 15 approved points from courses numbered 400-499 Part two BILD 591

Building Science Research Thesis—120 points

(left) Interior building render, created in BBSC 303 Computer Applications by Erica Brouard (top) and Duncan Barron (bottom). 62

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The global recession, and the associated pessimism about our collective future, presents a provocative challenge to design, particularly as a discipline that actively seeks positive change. In the spirit of positive change, the School has already addressed this challenge through our Bachelor and Master of Design Innovation programmes. This signals our commitment to foresee and lead the latest developments in design education within a constantly changing global context. The growth of new disciplines, along with the increasing sophistication and complexity of design theory and practice, demands new academic programmes that respond to these emerging trends. In this way we can ensure that our young graduates are prepared for the changes they will face and that they will have the capacity to realise their potential to actively implement meaningful change and to design more optimistic futures, not only for themselves, but also for humanity and the future of design. Inspired by the changing context of design today, the School of Design has forged a unique environment of collaboration between the media and industrial design specialisations with a strong focus on digital technologies. The School has also initiated Culture+Context, a new and highly original design specialisation aimed at developing and strengthening critical and theoretical

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exploration of past, contemporary and future design issues within a studio context. This approach brings a human dimension to our commitment to digital technologies. While technology inspires and shapes us, it is also the role of design to shape technology for the benefit of humanity. It is at the point where the social, behavioural and cultural insights of humans meet technology that truly innovative, unexpected and meaningful designs emerge. These developments are supported and informed by an expanding design research programme that enhances the School’s teaching culture and provides new perspectives on the potential of design as a creative discipline. This enriches the undergraduate course with innovative design knowledge and theories, while providing a channel for young graduates to continue their studies and to take design scholarship to its highest levels. In order to sustain the high quality and global relevance of our programmes, the School of Design calls upon the significant international profile, expertise and experience of its academic staff. It also has a strong commitment to forming and maintaining working relationships with world-class businesses, organisations and institutes.

www.victoria.ac.nz/design

Rachel Macdonald’s project Dress investigates the camera and its case as an element of jewellery, while also referencing the style of renowned New Zealand fashion designers employing distinctive textiles. Architecture and Design 2011

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Undergraduate Overview Bachelor of Design Innovation (BDI) overview The School of Design offers a three-year Bachelor of Design Innovation (BDI) with three specialisations—Industrial, Media and Culture+Context. The BDI will lead into a two-year Master of Design Innovation (MDI), which starts in 2012. The new degree structures give students a greater variety of recognised qualifications and a much greater opportunity to customise their course of study to their individual interests and intended careers. The addition of minors is an important aspect of our students’ ability to customise their study. Students enrolled in Culture+Context select one minor from a wide variety of minors in complementary disciplines available across the University. Media and Industrial students may also choose to pursue a minor in a design-related discipline, but it is not compulsory. The Head of the School of Design, Professor Simon Fraser says, “We are uniquely positioned at Victoria to align the School with disciplines that are not normally associated with design but have real potential to enrich the discipline. We felt it was an opportunity not to be missed. The minors offer courses of study for our students which are simply not available elsewhere— nationally or internationally. We expect to see our graduates occupying some exciting, unexpected and influential career niches in the future—in areas where other design schools cannot compete.”

“Design is increasingly understood as a multidisciplinary activity. Because of the growing importance of collaborative work, the ability to function effectively across disciplines and in multidisciplinary teams is a critical workplace competency for new graduates,” he says. The new degrees are aimed not just at educating future generations of designers, but also design educators, curators, critics, advocates and scholars who will strengthen the operating framework for design by contextualising it within a broad theoretical, technological, commercial and cultural exchange. Our degree is named Bachelor of Design Innovation for several reasons. First, it more accurately reflects the experimental approach to design and design education practised at the School. Second, it captures a philosophy and an approach to design where innovative and previously unknown design solutions are a primary objective, rather than reiterating or ‘restyling’ the existing. Third, since innovation can only be achieved by research, it signals the research-led nature of the programmes. This is particularly true of the MDI which is aimed at graduates who are not only versed in forging innovative ideas and knowledge, but who also have the ability to create value by successfully applying and disseminating new ideas to expanding audiences and markets.

For more information on the BDI and its specialisations, go to www.victoria.ac.nz/bdi

(opposite page) Students participating in a studio project review in the first-year design course DSDN 111. 66

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Postgraduate Overview Master of Design Innovation (MDI) overview

Beginning in 2012, the Master of Design Innovation (MDI) will be available in all three specialisations—Industrial, Media and Culture+Context. This will offer students a structured qualification that provides necessary and critical support throughout the two-year programme. The MDI acknowledges that a Master’s degree is becoming the standard entry-level professional qualification in Europe and that this trend is likely to grow internationally. The MDI will: ͠͠ prepare students for advanced levels of professional employment ͠͠ enable students to develop a critical view of new technologies and the social and cultural implications of design today ͠͠ develop high-level skills for conceiving and constructing artefacts, systems and environments ͠͠ ensure a high level of expertise in human factors research methodologies and design in multicultural contexts in combination with a concentration on the user/technology interface ͠͠ enable students to actively participate in the process of creating value by design, to shape business strategy and to differentiate according to strategic design objectives ͠͠ engage with industry and cultural organisations through applied research projects ͠͠ encourage international exchanges at the postgraduate level.

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PhD overview

The ability to establish new standards for creative PhDs, the School of Design’s doctoral programme, is available to qualified applicants with an appropriate research area aligned with the School’s specialisations or identified research focus areas. Contact the Faculty of Graduate Research (FGR) for further information by emailing pg-research@vuw.ac.nz

Undergraduate and postgraduate chart SPECIALISATION

YEAR OF STUDY One

Culture+Context

Design Innovation

The new 120-point Graduate Diploma in Design Innovation is a flexible programme designed for BDI graduates (or those who have completed a similar degree) wishing to broaden their design education with a further year of study at 300 level in one of the other specialisations at the School of Design. It will be particularly useful for students coming from other institutions prior to entry to the two-year MDI programme.

Industrial Design

Media Design

BDI year one

Two

Three

Part One MDI

Part Two MDI

BDI Culture+Context

MDI Master of Design Innovation Culture+Context

BDI Industrial Design

MDI Master of Design Innovation Industrial Design

BDI Media Design

MDI Master of Design Innovation Media Design

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(opposite page and above) Kris Henning’s Master’s research uses the Media Lab’s 3D Stereoscopic environment to explore new approaches to traditional industrial design methods of manipulating surface, form and space. 3D Immersion facilitates a more in-depth understanding of the triangulations between vertices, faces and folds compared to traditional 3D modelling software. 70

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First-year design programme Overview

A unique and distinguishing feature of the School of Design’s first-year design programme is its cross-disciplinary nature, which allows for relationships across Culture+Context, Industrial and Media Design to be investigated and redefined. An intense and integrated programme of study, first-year students investigate a broad range of essential design ideas, principles, histories, theories, practices and strategies. Vocabularies of three- and four-dimensional design are also undertaken during this first year, allowing students to challenge traditional and presumptive definitions of design. The first-year design programme offers a highly structured learning environment which supports creative exploration, helping students to develop the discipline necessary for working in an innovative design practice. Study is structured around the concept of ‘designing by making’ where students develop design confidence and commitment through a series of strategically formulated and progressively complex design challenges. All students are encouraged and assisted to develop a strong, individual approach to design that allows them to engage in both physical and digital while evolving around a commitment to a specific design discipline.

Completed by student Caila Anderson in the first-year DSDN 111 studio, this project analysed movement in the body and translated this data into an abstracted physical form. 72 Victoria University of Wellington

Students are able to vary the structure of the first-year programme to a certain degree, allowing them several options when they move into their second year of study. Following the first-year design programme, students enter their chosen specialisation, selecting from Culture+Context, Industrial Design or Media Design.

(above) A detail of a 3D printed model designed and developed for DSDN 104 Digital Creation. Architecture and Design 2011

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(above) Amelia Smith presents her design work to lecturers and students from DSDN 104. Amelia is utlising real-time video and the internet to present her design work and development for this project. 74

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(above) Model by first-year Design Student Chris Graham for DSDN 111.

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Culture+Context Specialisation Overview

A unique opportunity in New Zealand, Culture+Context combines both studio-based and theoretical studies in design within a multidisciplinary approach. Culture+Context gives students the opportunity to design objects and environments, both real and virtual, within a critical, analytical and conceptual framework. Graduates will have a strong grounding in issues and influences within the expanding field of design and design knowledge as expressed through a diverse range of media. The Culture+Context specialisation offers a cross-disciplinary qualification for students who have a strong interest in design and who seek professional career opportunities in a wide variety of design and design-related fields, both enhancing and complementing traditional design practice.

Culture+Context minors

All Culture+Context students are required to include one minor in their programme of study to complete their degree. It is suggested that Culture+Context students complement their minor with design electives. Suggested minors include: ͠͠ Māori Studiest ͠͠ Architecture ͠͠ Marketing ͠͠ Art History ͠͠ Media Studies ͠͠ Asian Studies ͠͠ Music ͠͠ Computer Studies ͠͠ Pacific Studies ͠͠ Cultural Anthropology ͠͠ Philosophy ͠͠ English ͠͠ Psychology ͠͠ European Studies ͠͠ Religious Studies ͠͠ Film ͠͠ Sociology ͠͠ Gender and Women’s Studies ͠͠ Sonic Arts ͠͠ Geography ͠͠ Theatre. ͠͠ Industrial Design ͠͠ Management

(opposite page) Explorations into and with light offer new insights into our perception of what is believed to be invisible to the naked eye. These experiments investigate how photographically long exposures can reveal a different entirety, each a part of a whole. Jessica Castle IDDN + MDDN 389 Design Research. 76

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Career Opportunities Potentially, there are unlimited opportunities within reach for students with a Culture+Context background, as this programme aligns with contemporary expectations and the developing needs across the creative industries, businesses and cultural organisations. The BDI and MDI in Culture+Context provide a wide variety of career opportunities, a few of which are listed below:

CULTURE+CONTEXT SPECIALISATION WITH ONE MINOR Minor subject

Career

Art History

Museum/gallery critic/curator

Cultural Anthropology

Design and material culture critic and researcher

Management

Design innovation manager (in-house or in cultural organisations)

MÄ ori Studies

MÄ ori design advocate/curator/specialist

Philosophy

Design theorist/researcher/futurist

Psychology

Product/system interface and usability designer

Sociology

Design consultant/design critic/social issues advocate

(above) Justin Davies explores the boundaries between living bodies and prosthesis in this project, asking at what point do prosthetics embedded in the body become parasites. (right) Questioning the individual experience of emotions, this project explores the interrelations of memory, feelings and experience. Here sadness is represented by the drooping tear-like forms while experience is shown through the particles left behind. (below) In this project Jessica Castle explores the nature of perception, experimenting with light through long exposure in order to reveal what is not visible to the naked eye.

CULTURE+CONTEXT SPECIALISATION WITH TWO MINORS Minor subject

Second minor subject

Career

Film

English

Film industry writer/film producer/film critic

Industrial

Asian Studies

International design ambassador/facilitator

Industrial

Marketing

Designer/retail store manager/start-up developer

Media

Marketing

Advertising industry/design promoter/entrepreneur

Psychology

Cultural Anthropology

Design analyst/researcher/consultant

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Rangi Adams

Dan Scudder

After an extended period employed in the general workforce, Rangi Adams decided to create a new career pathway for himself and enrolled at Victoria’s School of Design.

After graduating from Victoria’s School of Design, Dan Scudder took up a leading position at Fraser Engineering, a manufacturing company that produces fire appliances onsite for the New Zealand market and overseas export using computerised numerically controlled machinery.

First-year Culture+Context student

With a clear direction in mind, Rangi came to the School with a different objective than many of his classmates. Rather than wanting to become a designer, Rangi intends to pursue a career in teaching. With his unique interests, Culture+Context was particularly attractive as it provided the flexibility necessary for his chosen career path.

“The Culture+Context programme allows me the opportunity to integrate a minor into my degree and also pursue elective interests outside of my core papers.”

Postgraduate Culture+Context student

“Working closely with high-tech machinery and shoulder-toshoulder with the engineers gives me a better understanding of digital manufacturing and how to use it,” says Dan. Applying his deep interest in both digital manufacturing and printmaking to his Master’s research, Dan is investigating digital manufacturing and its role in the future of the book. Having recently travelled to Edinburgh to present his research at the International Conference on the Book, Dan is finding strong international support for his project.

“I am aiming to gain a minor in Māori Studies, which will aid my teaching degree, and have also chosen photography as an elective to develop my creative interests,” says Rangi.

“I believe that design is all about loving what you do.”

While his intention is to pursue a one-year Graduate Diploma in Teaching after obtaining his BDI, Rangi is open to other professional opportunities as he already sees broadening horizons in design.

“I love big machines, big lasers, big trucks and big books. Studying at Victoria taught me how to turn my curiosity into something—if you’re willing to put in the time and effort there’s not much you can’t do.”

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(top left) Design-led Futures project undertaken by Alex Fontainas in 2009 titled Virtual Voyage. These experiments explored synthetic mutation to the skin that enhanced tactile sensation, thermal performance and abrasion resistance. (right and bottom left) Design-led Futures project undertaken by Jason Frost and Jaime Mayne in 2009 titled Virtual Voyage. The hypothetical research explored the creation of energy through photosynthesis by hybridising human and biological growth. 82

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Industrial Design Specialisation Overview

A creative discipline that aims to connect culture with technology in innovative ways, industrial design pursues new and unexpected insights that result in original, useful and meaningful manufactured products or systems to enrich daily life. The programme encourages a hands-on experimental approach to design with a focus on creative applications of digital technologies. Particular emphasis is given to digital technologies with physical outputs. Students are encouraged to explore the potential digital technologies offer in the development of new and more sustainable forms of manufacturing and distribution. With full access to the School’s extensive digital prototyping capabilities, students quickly build expertise with digital visualisation, lasercutting, computerised numerically controlled (CNC) machining and three-dimensional (3D) scanning and printing. The Industrial Design programme also encourages creative exchange with other specialisations, such as Culture+Context, allowing students to explore the theoretical, social and cultural considerations of the discipline. In conjunction with Media Design, students can investigate interactive, responsive and intelligent technologies, products and environments. Industrial design students can elect to include a minor to enhance their practice-based studies, although it is not required.

Research assistant, Tiago Rorke, with a Makerbot 3D print made on a NZ$900 printer. Based on an open source philosophy, Tiago was able to freely download the laser cutting files and then imported the physical components directly from the manufacturers in United States. Two more Makerbots are currently being assembled during IDDN 341 to explore Makerbot recycling. 84

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The programme is committed to collaboration with industry leaders in New Zealand and internationally, and encourages students to reach wider audiences and explore ideas within a business context.

Career opportunities

The Industrial Design specialisation prepares graduates for work as designers in an exciting variety of professional product design areas such as healthcare, office and industrial equipment, furniture, home entertainment, homeware, personal accessories, sports and leisure, transportation, agricultural products, lighting and architectural and urban products. Depending on interests and expertise, graduates may target a specific product category as an in-house designer or may prefer the diversity offered by consultancy. Specialisations within the discipline such as computer-aided design (CAD) expertise or human factors will lead to more focused career niches, while careers in related fields such as design education are also possible. Opportunities include: ͠͠ in-house product designer ͠͠ in-house design manager and strategist ͠͠ self-employed design consultant ͠͠ CAD and digital prototyping designer ͠͠ product development project manager ͠͠ film prop/set designer ͠͠ exhibition designer ͠͠ human factors designer ͠͠ academic/corporate design researcher ͠͠ design and technology educator.

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Emma Whiteside

Clark Bardsley

Industrial Design graduate In her final year of Industrial Design at Victoria in 2009, Emma Whiteside decided to enter the World of WearableArt Awards. Her garment, Queen Adelaide, won the Shell Sustainability Award for its use of scrap automotive radiator copper. A self-confessed overachiever, Emma spent around 250 hours working on the garment while she was completing her thirdyear courses. The award has positioned Emma as an emerging designer in New Zealand and she has learnt that “pushing yourself to engage with the outside world while at design school really has its benefits.” Emma is now working for Grow Wellington, Wellington’s Regional Economic Development Agency, in a programme aimed at boosting the capability of the manufacturing sector. The programme consists of three six-month internships in Wellington businesses. Emma is currently placed at Windsor Engineering, a large metal products producer.

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Industrial Design alumni Although originally planning to work overseas, Emma has decided to stay in Wellington and start a design studio, White Bus Design, with fellow graduate, Sean Antrobus.

Following his studies at Victoria Clark Bardsley relocated to London hoping to gain work in design, but found he had to pay his dues as a bicycle sandwich delivery boy first.

The connections Emma has made through Victoria, World of WearableArt and Grow Wellington are helping to drive her new business forward.

Now a designer for PearsonLloyd in London, Clark works on a range of projects from airline interiors and office furniture to hospital equipment and outdoor furniture in this multidisciplinary studio.

“Always talk to as many people as you can about your ideas because it opens doors, and your mind.” Emma completed the Bachelor of Design in Industrial Design. This qualification has been replaced by the Bachelor of Design Innovation in Industrial Design.

“What always attracted me to a design career was the diversity of the work. My day-to-day work is true to this ambition as I juggle sketching and modelling (on the computer as well as in our small workshop), presentation of work and communication with a variety of clients and suppliers.

Despite his start as a delivery boy, Clark is thriving in London’s design community. While New Zealand’s “green pastures still beckon”, he is enjoying the intensity and opportunities of international work. “My advice to prospective designers would be, first be prepared to work hard, and second, don’t fall in with the crowds too hard,” says Clark.

“Find what makes you unique as designers and develop it. Victoria’s School of Design is the perfect place to do that.”

“In fact it doesn’t feel so far from the studios of Victoria. After four years in the working world, the rate at which I learn has not slowed,” says Clark.

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(opposite page) The first project in INDN 211 explores opportunities of designing and making a small turned vessel using computer software as a medium. The students develop their design ideas into physical objects that convey context and meaning. This year the students used the School’s new computer controlled lathe to realise their ideas. By Kate Raine (left) and Richard Clarkson (right). (right) Lulin Ding MP3 player for listening to music in the rain.

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Media Design Specialisation Overview

The Media Design programme’s primary objective is to develop curious and dedicated students into promising design professionals, exemplary citizens and learned scholars. The programme guides this process by teaching valuable skills and studio approaches that will yield immediate advantages in the media design professions, with particular attention to computer and media literacy, virtuosity with digital production methods, a cross-disciplinary approach and by promoting collaboration. Another hallmark of the programme is its ties with local and international industry. Over a given term, the media lab showcases several lectures in-person from contacts across a diverse range of media design disciplines. Media courses are predominantly studio-based. This means that most of the time students are brainstorming and conceptbuilding, polishing projects and developing new software skills in the state-of-the-art media lab. Course-coordinators and tutors monitor this work, which culminates in critique and presentations that mirror professional practice.

Career opportunities

Media design has an abundance of career opportunities that grows larger with each year. To meet the demands for employment in these areas, the programme has identified areas that are prominent both locally and internationally, which also match up with lecturer expertise—postproduction and game design. All of media design coursework falls within these areas which clearly indicate professional pathways with significant potential and growth. New Zealand excels in these fields, and is especially well represented right here in Wellington. Possible careers include: ͠͠ 3D modeller/animator ͠͠ interactive designer ͠͠ artistic director ͠͠ media installation designer ͠͠ character artist/animator ͠͠ mobile applications designer ͠͠ digital video editor ͠͠ motion graphics designer ͠͠ flash animator ͠͠ multimedia artist ͠͠ experience designer ͠͠ special effects artist ͠͠ game designer ͠͠ video production specialist ͠͠ game programmer ͠͠ web designer and developer. ͠͠ graphic designer

(opposite) This project was designed by Kelly Cheesman, a graduate of the Media Design programme in 2009. Kelly is currently working as a designer for the innovative Wellington-based design firm, 3months. 90

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Kenny Smith

Final-year Media Design student Final-year media student Kenny Smith’s mixed media animations have already gained considerable recognition— an exceptional accomplishment for an undergraduate still completing his degree. Kenny’s recent work for New Zealand’s 24 Hour Movie Marathon won the competition for making a trailer. Subsequently, Kenny was asked to create a promotional animation for New Zealand’s largest film competition, the 48 Hour Film Competition www.v48hours.co.nz/2010. With a rich balance of technology and experimentation, the School of Design’s Media programme has been instrumental in helping Kenny realise these successes.

Johann Nortje “I chose to study Media Design at Victoria for the programme’s unique blend of design and innovation with new media.” “ It has also helped me achieve other personal goals, like exploring creative uses of technology and creating visually stimulating pieces of work that include interactive, animation and performance design.” With his recent achievements, Kenny is learning that success often provides a stepping-stone to new opportunities. Kenny is in his final year of the Bachelor of Design in Digital Media Design. This qualification has been replaced by the Bachelor of Design Innovation (BDI) in Media Design.

(above) Imitation Virtual Face by Kenny Smith. Created in the Wearable Technology course in 2010. 92

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Master’s Graduate, Media Design After graduating in 2006 from Victoria’s Industrial Design programme, Johann Nortje spent the summer as a research assistant collaborating on Chinese Whisper: Mediating Oscillations Between Physical Form and Digital Space, an investigation developed in collaboration with HIT Lab NZ. These research opportunities, alongside Johann’s passion for VJing and visual performance, led him towards the Master of Design in Media at Victoria. Johann’s thesis, The Persistence of Illusion: Using Spatial Illusion as a Visual Performance Mechanism, explores the theoretical framework for the design of a visual performance system.

“The research and postgraduate opportunities at the School, especially the cross-disciplinary angle, have really provided me with the skills necessary to sculpt a career in the direction I am most passionate about.” Actively involved in the music video industry, Johann continues to VJ and has recently set up a label collective that provides a platform for other video artists and pushes for innovative visual performance within the scene.

During his Master’s Johann tutored extensively across the three specialisations at the School, focusing on research-driven papers.

(above) Johann Nortje demonstrates his Master’s thesis research project, Persistence of Illusion—an interactive interface for VJ performance. Architecture and Design 2011

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(above) Harry McArthur: TREEAT created for the course Audio-Visual Space in 2010. Coordinator: Anne Niemetz, Media Design programme.

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(above) Benjamin Kamp: Pipette created for the course Audio-Visual Space in 2010. Coordinator: Anne Niemetz, Media Design programme.

(above) Lilli Sachse is wearing Scott Goldsbury’s design for the Wearable Technology course in 2010.

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Services AND Facilities 96

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Te Rōpū Āwhina The Whānau Experience E nga Mana e nga reo tena koutou katoa he mihi tino mahana ki a koutou na te Rōpū Āwhina Te Rōpū Āwhina is the campus whānau for Māori and Pacific students enrolled in the Faculties of Science, Engineering and Architecture and Design. We welcome all new students beginning your journey with us here at Victoria University. Doing well and achieving your goals while here with us can, and will, be hard. But don’t worry—we are here to help. If you believe in, and agree with, our kaupapa then it doesn’t matter who you are or where you’re from—you can become a member of our whānau community. We are a combination of science, engineering, architecture and design students and staff with a common goal—collective success, a goal we have achieved for the past 11 years. The kaupapa of Āwhina is to produce Māori and Pacific science, engineering, architecture and design professionals. We strive to do this through offering a support system for our tauira who wish to be a part of a whānau and develop within a whānau environment.

Āwhina is made up of senior students across each discipline within the Faculty who will support you throughout your first year. We have a number of academic staff across the various disciplines who are actively involved in Āwhina. In addition to this we have the support of our general staff within Student and Faculty Administration. What can Āwhina do for you? ͠͠ Provide support on an individual and group basis. ͠͠ Provide a whānau room equipped with computers and various other discipline-specific resources. ͠͠ Provide supervision in the whānau room throughout the day (rosters posted on whānau room wall). ͠͠ Additional assistance with tutorials and one-to-one sessions. ͠͠ Assistance with exam preparation.

Te Rōpū Āwhina Room 148, Level 1, Cotton Building, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5987 Email teropuawhina@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/science/awhina 98

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Collective Success

Collective Success

The Āwhina whānau recently celebrated our first milestone for 2010 with the awarding of the Queen’s Service Medal to Liz Richardson in the New Year’s Honours for services to the Māori and Pacific communities.

We recently celebrated the launch of our second publication entitled Cybrospace: Journeys to Success Volume 2. The book is full of stories about our whānau members, the people at the heart of Āwhina, showing the world what can be achieved through positive support and encouragement.

Our Cybrospace: Journeys to Success Volume 2 profiles our Pacific students’ success stories. This volume is the perfect companion to Cybrospace: Journeys to Success Volume 1 which profiles our Māori students’ success stories.

(above) Cybrospace—Journeys to Success.

(above) Cybrospace—Journeys to Success, Reloaded.

Queen’s Service Medal

The awarding of this medal is an acknowledgement that we, the whānau, are making our mark in the world. The Queen’s Service Medal is also an acknowledgement of the hard work and ongoing commitment of our whānau members and Āwhina supporters over the past 11 years.

Cybrospace—Journeys to Success Reloaded

Attributed to the fact that nothing is ever done in isolation or without input from others, Liz accepted this honour on behalf of the Āwhina whānau and all those who have contributed to the success of Āwhina. Te Rōpū Āwhina celebrated this honour at Te Puni Kōkiri, with senior whānau members, community supporters, staff and kaumātua gathering to share in the history of Āwhina and a glimpse of what the future has in store for us.

(top) Liz Richardson celebrating with Āwhina whānau during the QSM celebration held on 30 April 2010. (bottom) Liz Richardson, Patsie Karauria and Ken Richardson enjoying the QSM celebrations. 100 Victoria University of Wellington

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Samantha McGavock

Abbie Whangapirita

Master of Architecture (Professional) Āwhina mentor, Ngāti Porou, Tawhiti ngā Titirangi, Ruataupare

Master of Architecture (Professional) Āwhina mentor, Ngāi Tahu Samantha says her first-year Āwhina mentor was a huge help “when I thought I had hit an impenetrable wall”. These days she is enjoying returning the favour: “I’m currently working in a team of three, mentoring five first-year students. At the start of the year we introduce ourselves to our assigned mentees and then they can call on us when need be.”

“We are a resource and a bouncing board for ideas.” “Āwhina means a lot to me. I am thankful to have had this opportunity. I love being able to help younger students as I know how hard it can be. Āwhina is primarily about support for people of

(above) Third-year studio project by Samantha McGavock. 102 Victoria University of Wellington

Abbie came to Victoria from Gisborne in 2007 after finishing high school. She has been involved with Āwhina since her first year and is now a mentor to two students, one first-year and one second-year.

“It was great to have someone to talk to who had experienced all that I was going through in that first year. Now, I enjoy being able to help other students. It’s amazing to be able to give back and also gather knowledge from other students around the school.”

Abbie’s advice for those considering joining Āwhina is “go for it”. She says Āwhina is for anyone who is of Māori or Pacific descent and for anyone who enjoys helping other people.

Āwhina and Victoria have helped Abbie set up plans for a bright future: “I plan to get a job and register as an architect, work overseas and then eventually move back home to Gisborne to start my own practice.”

“In my first year I found Āwhina extremely helpful.” Māori and Pacific Island descent, however it is not exclusive. People from all walks of life help out with mentoring which is fantastic.” Samantha’s advice to students considering joining Āwhina is simple: “Just do it. There is nothing to lose and everything to gain.”

(above) Second-year studio project entitled, Can you hear me? Lecture theatre design by Abbie Whangapirita. Architecture and Design 2011 103


Juliet Lloyd

Final-year Bachelor of Design student in Interior Architecture Āwhina mentor, Te Atiawa Juliet has been a mentor to first- and second-year design and architecture students for the past two years. For Juliet, being a mentor not only means being available to help mentees with work they might be struggling with, but also “just catching up with them and being mates”.

Juliet first heard about Āwhina through a friend who was already involved in the programme. “It’s a great support network, there is a real sense of being part of a community and everyone helps each other out,” she says.

Originally from Taranaki, Juliet completed high school in 2005 then worked in the United Kingdom and travelled around Europe for a year before coming to Wellington to study.

“Āwhina is an opportunity to get involved with a group of like-minded people and be supported in striving for success in your selected field.”

“The city of Wellington is quite focused on creativity,” she says. “It’s a good place to be a design student—there’s a lot happening.”

Juliet is in her final year of the Bachelor of Design in Interior Architecture. This qualification has been replaced by the new Bachelor of Architectural Studies (BAS) in Interior Architecture.

(above) Project designs from A Stagnant Object Perplexed in a Sea of Movement by Juliet Lloyd.

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Earl Stewart

Final-year Bachelor of Design student in Industrial Design Āwhina mentor, Ngāpuhi Earl is a Āwhina coordinator at Te Aro Campus and is currently involved in organising Āwhina events as well as mentoring. He says the programme is open to anyone “willing to contribute their time and effort towards building an environment of success”.

“We get together twice a month as a whānau to make sure everyone in the programme is receiving the help they need.” “For me, Āwhina means the chance to forget about myself for a while and be genuinely interested in the progression of other students. We will always be more successful working together than as individuals.”

Earl says this collaborative approach extends not just between students but also across disciplines: “Āwhina has provided the opportunity to interact with other disciplines at Victoria. It has given me the chance to pick the brains of people not associated with industrial design and apply these collaborations to my projects. Helping others has meant I receive help from those around me.” Earl is in his final year of the Bachelor of Design in Industrial Design. This qualification has been replaced by the new Bachelor of Design Innovation (BDI) in Industrial Design.

(above) Third-year studio project using bone and 3D printed MP3 player by Earl Stewart.

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vic oe The Faculty of Architecture and Design is internationally connected. With more than 20 established exchange partners from universities all over the world, the Faculty is a strong participant in the global tertiary education community. It has the highest proportion of students embarking on formal exchange agreements to these partner institutions through the Vic OE programme. Architecture and design students may attend universities such as Pforzheim University and Fachhochshule Mainz (Germany), University of Ferrara (Italy), Rhode Island School of Design and Carnegie Mellon School of Design (United States). Victoria International (Victoria’s international relations office) administers the Vic OE programme. It allows predominantly thirdand fourth-year students with a minimum average ‘B’ pass over the duration of their studies to have the opportunity to complete one or two trimesters of their degree abroad. The University is very supportive of the Vic OE programme and presents every Victoria student who goes on exchange with a grant to help cover the cost of airfares and living expenses. Students gain full credits for their home degree from courses completed overseas.

If you are interested in applying for the Vic OE you must: ͠͠ be enrolled as a full-time student at Victoria University (at the time of application) ͠͠ have completed a year of full-time study by the date of your intended departure ͠͠ have achieved a ‘B’ average overall on your studies at Victoria ͠͠ be able to demonstrate that you would be a good ambassador for Victoria. Successful applicants will be supplied with grant funding of $1,000. Students are also eligible for full StudyLink Student Loans and Allowances (if normally eligible in New Zealand). Application deadlines ͠͠ 16 January 2011 (for study in Trimester Two, 2011) ͠͠ 16 July 2011 (for study in Trimester One, 2012) University of California applications should be submitted as early as possible, no later than 5 January and 30 June. www.victoria.ac.nz/exchange/howtoapply.aspx

Victoria International Easterfield Building, Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus (from November 2010) Phone 04-463 5350 Email victoria-international@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria-international.ac.nz 106 Victoria University of Wellington

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Scholarships Victoria has a range of scholarships and awards available to students including hundreds of scholarships for first-year undergraduate students. Victoria Excellence Scholarships are awarded on academic merit to students who have their NCEA Level 2 Certificate endorsed with Excellence. Applicants with alternative qualifications (eg. CIE or IB) will be assessed on a case-by-case basis. In 2011 the value of these awards will be $5,000 each. A small number of Excellence Scholarships can be held for up to three years, based on achievement during the first year of university study. Scholarships can be awarded at any time during the year prior to the commencement of study, but applications close on 1 December. Victoria Achiever Scholarships are offered to academically-able students who are of Māori or Pacific descent, have a disability or were educated at a decile 1–3 school and can demonstrate financial hardship. These $5,000 scholarships aim to encourage students who may otherwise be unable to attend Victoria University. Applications close on 1 October. Applying for scholarships Eligibility criteria for all scholarships may change, so it is essential that scholarship details are checked on the website prior to application. Up-to-date information and application forms are available from the Scholarships Database accessed from the Scholarships webpage.

Tutor Brad Knewstubb interacting with student work during a project review and presentation. 108 Victoria University of Wellington

Scholarships Office Research Office, 10 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5113 Email scholarships-office@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/scholarships

The Faculty of Architecture and Design encourages students to apply for scholarships and awards and also encourages applications into national design competitions. Throughout the year you will receive email notifications and material is displayed on our noticeboards located within our main foyer. Our students have been acknowledged for their cutting edge designs, studio projects and research while studying here with us. They have been awarded top prizes or have been highly commended in these national design competitions: ͠͠ red dot design awards ͠͠ BeST design awards (DINZ) ͠͠ New Dowse student design awards ͠͠ World of WearableArts ͠͠ Dyson awards. In addition to the scholarships and awards offered by Victoria, the School of Architecture has developed, with industry connections and friends, awards and scholarships that are offered annually to students. There is a range of undergraduate and postgraduate awards available including: ͠͠ Benson-Cooper Sustainability Awards ͠͠ New Zealand Historic Places Trust Prize ͠͠ BRANZ Project Award ͠͠ CCANZ Concrete3 Sustainability Award ͠͠ John Fitzgerald Memorial Award ͠͠ Team Architects Scholarship in Architecture ͠͠ Mainzeal Undergraduate Scholarship. More information on these scholarships and awards can be found on the School of Architecture website by visiting www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture

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Support, Services and resources Advice and further information Admission to Victoria from 2011

There are various ways you can gain admission to Victoria University of Wellington. You need to understand what qualifications and results you require for admission and how to apply to the University. For full details of admission and enrolment requirements, see www.victoria.ac.nz/home/admisenrol

Course Advice

The Faculty of Architecture and Design has student advisers who look after students from admission through to graduation. All our dedicated team are knowledgeable in all the programmes we offer and are well-placed to give advice. Student advisers can help with a variety of services, including campus tours and information sessions, admission advice, credit assessment of prior study, degree audits, Vic OE (Exchange) or even just a friendly face to talk to. We offer objective advice to help you make the right decisions when choosing your degree and planning your courses. Whether you’re entering first year or fifth, whether you want to change your degree programme midstream or you just want to be sure you’re on the right track, drop in and talk to them about your plans! Student and Academic Services 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Phone 04-463 6200 Emails architecture@vuw.ac.nz design@vuw.ac.nz Websites www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture www.victoria.ac.nz/design

Student Recruitment, Admission and Orientation

SRAO (formerly Student Recruitment & Course Advice) provides independent, informed advice on courses and programmes to potential first-year students. They have liaison officers specifically to help both Māori and Pacific students. The team also welcomes enquiries from mature students and has a specifically designated Liaison Officer for initial enquiries about all postgraduate programmes. Student Recruitment, Orientation and Admissions Level 1, Hunter Building, Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 0800 VICTORIA (842 867) 04-463 5374 Email course-advice@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/srca

International Students

The Faculty of Architecture and Design welcomes international students. If you are a prospective international student thinking of studying with us you should contact Victoria International. The International Student Services Team is dedicated to providing support to current and prospective international students. They can help you with any questions or concerns, big or small. Victoria International Easterfield Building, Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus (from November 2010) Phone +64-4-463 5350 Email victoria-international@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria-international.ac.nz

(opposite page) Xanthe Flesch and Cornelia Tan working on a project in the Media Design computer lab. 110

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Scholarships

As outlined on page 109, Victoria has a number of scholarships available to both undergraduate and postgraduate students. These include Victoria Excellence Scholarships and Victoria Equity Scholarships. Scholarships Office 10 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5113 Email scholarship-office@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/scholarship

Student Services

Victoria has a highly active Student Service network, which includes the Accommodation Service, Vic Careers, counselling, crèches, Disability Support, Financial Support and Advice, Kaiwawao Māori, Manaaki Pihipihinga mentoring programme, physiotherapy, Student Health and Student Learning Support. Student Services Group 14 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 6000 Email student-services@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services

Accommodation Service

Career Development and Employment

The Vic Careers team is available to help you explore work, study and lifestyle options. The service includes a comprehensive careers resource library, graduate destination information, internet access to research career opportunities and more. Workshops are held throughout the year on job-searching strategies and making career decisions. Career Development and Employment 14 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5393 Email career-service@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services/careers

Counselling

Counsellors are available to discuss personal and academic issues that affect your general sense of wellbeing, your relationships or your learning. Ring to make an appointment for this free, confidential service. Counselling Service 2 Wai-te-ata Road, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5310 Email counselling-service@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services/counselling

If you need a flat, flatmates or Hall of Residence information, the Accommodation Service is a great place to start. The website has an online letting service with a range of vacancy listings to suit all budgets and tastes. Our staff are happy to advise you on tenancy issues.

Crèches

Accommodation Service Level 1, The Atrium, Student Union Building, Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5896 Email accommodation@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/accommodation

Crèches Phone 04-463 5151 Email childcare@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services/creches

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The University crèches can provide your children with the best possible education and care while you study. The Student Crèche has three centres on Kelburn Campus and one at the Law School, Pipitea Campus.

Disability Services

At Victoria, disability is self-defined and includes people with permanent, temporary or recurring impairments, injuries or chronic medical conditions. Contact Disability Services Student Advisers to confidentially discuss your individual needs. Disability Services Level 1, Robert Stout Building, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 6070 Email disability@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/disability

Financial Support and Advice

Student Learning Support Services (SLSS)

Build confidence and maximise your academic success with support from SLSS. They offer workshops and one-to-one tuition in such areas as essay writing, mathematics and statistics, learning strategies, study skills and language skills. SLSS offers regular seminars on topics of interest to postgraduate students, which include Writing a Research Proposal, Writing a Literature Review, Managing the Research Process, What Makes a Good Argument and Editing your Thesis. They also facilitate postgraduate writing workshops, help set up and maintain peer support groups and organise other workshops on request. Some individual assistance is also available.

Finance advisers can provide you with practical advice on budgeting and coping financially, help you with Student Loan and Allowance applications and the preparation of financial statements for scholarship applications. Through the Hardship Fund they are also able to provide emergency financial assistance.

Student Learning Support Services (SLSS) Level 0, Kirk Wing, Hunter Courtyard, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5999 Email student-learning@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services/slss

Financial Support and Advice 14 Kelburn Parade, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 6070 Email disability@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services/finadvice

VUWSA

Health Service

The Health Service offers you a general practice medical advice on campus which is free or very low cost for most students. It deals with illness, accidents and prescriptions, and offers specialist services such as psychiatry, nutrition, dermatology and physiotherapy. Health Service 4 Wai-te-ata Road, Kelburn Campus Phone 04-463 5308 04-463 7474 Email student-health@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/st_services/health

The Victoria University of Wellington Students’ Association (VUWSA) is your students’ association—it fills a number of diverse roles, but overall its task is to serve students. When you enrol at Victoria you become a member of the Association which gives you voting rights at all student meetings and VUWSA general elections. VUWSA supports and funds the many student clubs and societies that exist on campus. Check out www.vuwsa.org. nz/clubs/clubs-directory for a complete list of VUWSA clubs and societies. VUWSA also provides entertainment, including Orientation, Reorientation and other events throughout the year. For more information, check out www.vuwsa.org.nz

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STUDiO

STUDiO is the student representative group for students in all courses of study at the Faculty of Architecture and Design. STUDiO officers are elected each year and are responsible for everything from social and sporting events to student representation on faculty boards. Along with class reps, STUDiO reps are able to assist their fellow students with course-related issues. STUDiO holds regular social events such as STUDiO-invited talks, barbeques, drinks evenings and sports tournaments, the annual STUDiO Ball each August and design competitions throughout the year, arranging student discounts with local shops and suppliers and generally incites fun and excitement to give everyone a break from study now and then. STUDiO is always looking for people to get involved and help run things—keep an eye out for STUDiO noticeboards near the main staircase of the Te Aro Campus and the STUDiO website for information about events and meetings.

STUDiO Faculty of Architecture and Design Atrium, 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Email info@studio.org.nz Website www.studio.org.nz 114

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(opposite page) School of Design student Charmaine Williams using the digital computer lathe machinery in our world-class workshop facilities. Architecture and Design 2011

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library Architecture and Design Library The Architecture and Design Library supports the research and teaching activities of all subjects within the School of Architecture and the School of Design. It offers a range of reference, borrowing, short loan and teaching services. The Library provides access to books, journals, plans and resources in other formats including DVDs and an increasing range of online electronic resources. Users can request books from the other four University campus libraries through Intersite Delivery while the Borrow Direct service connects students and staff to collections at Waikato, Auckland University of Technology (AUT) and Otago University libraries. Photocopying and scanning facilities can be found in the Library as well as space for group study. Computers with internet access and word processing are also available for student use. Reference services and classes to increase research skills are regularly offered to assist the development of all users.

Architecture and Design Library 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Phone 04-463 6241 contacts www.victoria.ac.nz/library/contact/ departments.aspx#AD Website www.victoria.ac.nz/library.aspx Catalogue http://victoria.lconz.ac.nz/ 116

Victoria University of Wellington

(above and opposite page) Developed by Loesje van Wetten in the Culture+Context paper IDDN 389, Eye Spy triggers our curiosity, inviting us to look behind the wall and revealing the unexpected—ourselves. Eye Spy provokes compelling questions of who is watching and who is being watched.

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Technical Resources The Faculty has a team of 15 technicians and a Technical Services Manager, supporting the specialist Architecture and Design technical infrastructure and services for students’ and staff teaching and research. These include: Computing services The Faculty computing environment consists of approximately 400 student computers and 100 staff computers spread around nine studios, numerous staff offices and five computer labs to support the particular needs of architecture and design students and staff. This also includes a dedicated Mac computer lab for students studying in the Digital Media Design and Media Design programmes currently offered by the School of Design. Audio-visual (AV) and photographic facilities These include lecture theatres, seminar rooms, portable AV teaching equipment, mobile LCD displays, SmartBoard equipment and loan AV equipment for students. The Faculty also has an Advanced Learning Communications Facility (ALCF) containing video conferencing equipment and MediaSite recording. The ALCF room also has Access Grid technology connected to KAREN high-speed internet. There is also a photography studio open to all students, located next to the Faculty photography office/studio.

3D Modelling Workshop facilities This includes not only the traditional carpentry and metal machinery areas, paint booth and modelling equipment, but also three ULS laser cutters, four small 3D Modella routers, a full bed (2.4m x 1.2m) Techno CNC router, two Eden 3D Rapid prototype machines and a HAAS CNC lathe. Technical Resource Centre This service for students provides for their specialist architecture and design needs. From here students can order wide-format printing and have prototyping carried out on site. Students can also loan digital AV equipment and building science test equipment, and purchase specialist modelling and art supplies at cost—an essential service considering the difficulty students would otherwise face attempting to source various modelling supplies from around the country. Specialist building science and School of Design labs These currently include an Architecture School wind tunnel and lighting lab, and a Design School ergonomics lab and a photographic studio.

Mark Shaw Manager, Physical Resources and Technical Staff 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus Phone 04-463 6251 email mark.shaw@vuw.ac.nz 118

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2010

AUGUST—october Liaison Officers visit schools for course planning 27 AUGUST Study at Vic Day october Enrolment Packs available 1 OCTOBER Halls of Residence applications due Victoria Achiever Scholarship applications due 31 October Discretionary Entrance applications deadline for courses starting 15 November 2010 15 NOVEMBER Summer trimester begins 22 NOVEMBER—10 DECEMBER Course Planning Weeks for first-year students, Kelburn Campus and Auckland 1 DECEMBER International students’ first-year applications due for February 2011 intake 10 december Discretionary Entrance applications deadline for courses starting 5 January 2011 Applications due for limited-entry degrees and courses for 2011

2011

10 JANUARY Applications due for open-entry degrees and courses and Discretionary Entrance for 2011 16 FEBRUARY Enrolment Completion Period and International Students’ Orientation for first trimester 20 FEBRUARY Halls Head Start programme for all first-year students in Halls of Residence 21—25 FEBRUARY New Students’ Orientation Week 25 FEBRUARY All fees are due the Friday prior to commencement of course, or immediately upon enrolment during the year 28 FEBRUARY First trimester begins; VUWSA Orientation Week 1 MAY International students’ first-year applications due for second trimester intake Accommodation applications due for second trimester 6 July Enrolment Completion Period and International Students’ Orientation for second trimester 11 JULY Second trimester begins; VUWSA Re-orientation Week

Some of these dates are provisional, and should be checked in the Guide to Enrolment, or on the website www.victoria.ac.nz Note that Teacher Education has different enrolment and start dates for some courses. Check out www.victoria.ac.nz/education for details.

Detailed image from Simon Harrison’s final-year design project entitled, Urban Neighbours. 120 Victoria University of Wellington

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Faculty of Architecture and Design Te WÄ hanga Waihanga-Hoahoa Phone 04-463 6200 Fax 04-463 6204 Email architecture@vuw.ac.nz design@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/architecture www.victoria.ac.nz/design 139 Vivian Street, Te Aro Campus, Wellington 6011 Victoria University of Wellington PO Box 600 Wellington 6140 New Zealand

Student Recruitment, Admission and Orientation Phone 0800 VICTORIA (842 867) 04-463 5374 Fax 04-463 5193 Email course-advice@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria.ac.nz/srca Level 1, Hunter Building Gate 2, Kelburn Parade Kelburn Campus Wellington 6012

Victoria International Phone +64-4-463 5350 Fax +64-4-463 5056 Email victoria-international@vuw.ac.nz Website www.victoria-international.ac.nz Level 1, Easterfield Building (from November 2010) Kelburn Parade Kelburn Campus Wellington 6012 New Zealand

FAD0009-August 10

handbook2011  

Faculty of Architecture and Design Handbook 2011

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