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FineLifestyles Lifestyles JULY/AUGUST 2014 | VOLUME 1 ISSUE 2

PARKLAND MANITOBA

DISCOVER THE BEAUTY OF

LIVING THE GOOD LIFE IN ROBLIN CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF DAUPHIN’S COUNTRYFEST GEARING UP FOR MANITOBA’S MUDRUN

CLEAR LAKE


m EN’S • WomEN ’ S • k I DS • I N fA N tS

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We have something for every season and every occasion at Hodge Podge. • Keep that big red cardinal, blue jay, and even the lightning fast hummingbird happy this year with one of our unique houses or feeders • Keep the sounds alive with hand-crafted and handtuned wind chimes. Glass, bamboo, and metal chimes available in all sorts of new and creative ways • Keep the mosquitos away with citronella gel in any one

of our very popular styles of firepots. Regular gels are also available for indoor and outdoor use. • Keep your yards looking one-of-a-kind with a bright yellow flying pig, or bulldog made from recycled metal, or something a little more mystical from our line of fairy garden accessories. Come see what everyone is talking about!

Hodge Podge Store & Services

Store Hours Mon-Fri 10am - 6pm Saturday 10am - 5pm 831 Jackson Street, Dauphin | 204.638.4455 | www.hpodge.com |


first word With Fine Lifestyles editor AnnA DelAney

W

ith warmth and gratitude for sunny days I welcome you to the second issue of Fine Lifestyles Parkland Manitoba! Summer is a glorious time — especially in the Parkland. It’s a time to appreciate the beauty of our surroundings and experience all this gorgeous land has to offer. In this issue we explore two great, local communities — Roblin and Clear Lake. Summer fun is certainly happening in Roblin. From rodeos and car shows to weekend fairs — this gem of a town will have you enjoying warm days and starry nights. And the resort town of Clear Lake is so picturesque I dare you to not venture there this summer! It certainly puts the park in Parkland and we’ll show you why. We also have some fun in the mud as we give you a sneak peek at this year’s Manitoba MudRun — a Parkland favourite, that helps support the Dauphin Rotary Club and MS Society. In case you haven’t heard (although I’m not sure how that’s possible!), country music superstar Blake Shelton is coming to Parkland for Dauphin’s Countryfest this year. Shelton, along with a slew of other country mega stars, will entertain and delight you, ensuring the 25th anniversary of the Countryfest will be one for the books.

FineLifestyles PARKLAND MANITOBA

www.finelifestyles.ca July/Auguest 2014 Volume 3, Issue 2 Editor Anna Delaney annad@finelifestyles.ca Art Direction Amber Moon (Senior), Lisa Redden (Associate) Design Natasha Burkholder Staff Writers Trina Annand, Henny Buffinga, Melanie Furlong, Tobie Hainstock, Rebecca Henderson, Tonya Lambert, Tori Stafford, Courtney Tait Cover Photography Ken Frazer Photography Dori Fee, Heather Fitz, Ken Frazer, Jenna Faye Photography, S. Golding, Kelly Michaluk, Lori-Ann Munro, M. A. Nyquist, Todd Pedersen, Julie Shiner Contributing Writers Ken Beattie, Rebecca Schneidereit, Sarah Vermette Associate Publisher Susan Gellert, susang@finelifestyles.ca 306.641.5616 Subscriptions kellym@finelifestyles.ca Printed by Transcontinental Printers in Winnipeg & Montreal

So sit back and relax with your favourite cold, summer beverage and enjoy our summer issue of Fine Lifestyles Parkland Manitoba.

finemags ADVERTISING CONSULTANTS

Sandy Zielinski 306.563.7815 sandyz@finelifestyles.ca

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Fine Lifestyles Parkland Manitoba is published six times a year by Fine Lifestyles Ltd. All contents of Fine Lifestyles publications are copyrighted 2014 with all rights reserved, except for original articles submitted to Fine Lifestyles, where copyright resides with the author. No other part of this publication may be reproduced without the written permission of Fine Lifestyles. The views and opinions expressed in the expert advice columns herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the views and opinions of Fine Lifestyles or the companies it represents. Although we endeavour to provide accurate and timely information, there can be no guarantee that such information is accurate as of the date it is received or that it will continue to be accurate in the future. No one should act upon such information without appropriate professional advice after a thorough examination of the particular situation. Canada Post Publication Agreement #41818060 Return undeliverables to: 3440 Balsam Grove; Regina, Saskatchewan; S4V 1H1


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CONTENTS STYLE ..................................................... 6 HEALTH & WELLNESS ........................ 9 ARTS, DINING & ENTERTAINMENT 15

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SPORTS, RECREATION & TRAVEL.20 HOUSE & HOME ................................. 22 BUSINESS ............................................24 WHEELS ...............................................28

43

ROBLIN FEATURE...............................31 CLEAR LAKE FEATURE ....................43

Styling the Little Black Dress ............. 6 Rockin’ Out at Dauphin’s Countryfest ......................... 15 W. Brett Wilson on Capital Appreciation ......................................... 24 Discover the Beauty of Clear Lake ...43

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As VersAtile As You Are By Tori Stafford

T

here is no fashion staple as trusted and timeless as the little black dress. Praised for its versatility and its ability to turn heads, the LBD is something every woman should own at least one of – though the variety of shapes, drapes, cuts and fabrics make nearly every LBD unique. Still, a simple cut that lands just above the knee with a conservative neckline can be worn over and over for an entire decade without seeming dated. With the right accessories, the LBD can make your go-to garment a sophisticated statement piece, time and again. NeckliNes aNd Jewellery If there’s anything we’ve learned from classic beauties like Audrey Hepburn and Jackie O., it’s that a simple black dress with a stunning necklace can be the epitome of timeless elegance. Conversely, these same icons demonstrated that a simple silk kerchief tied casually around the neck can dress down the LBD, making them look approachable, but still chic and sophisticated. Taking a page from these iconic muses, the 2014 runways sparkled with heavy gemstones, encrusting everything from handbags to chokers. While bold, bright crystals in statement jewellery are the perfect way to add your own style to the LBD, keep in mind the advice of the great

Coco Chanel: look in the mirror and remove one accessory before leaving the house. Less is more when it comes to accessorizing. With heavy metal accessories making a comeback in a huge way, a broad belt in shiny metallic is a great way to make an on-trend embellishment to a simple LBD. Similarly, chunky bangles and bib necklaces are a simple one-item fix for glamming-up your basic blacks for a night out on the town. Forget everything your mother told you about mixing metals – be it bronze, brass, gold or gunmetal, layering different metals is encouraged this season, so dare to break the rules. coveriNg Up While it is easy to get caught up in the excitement of the warmer season, getting caught without something to cover up once the sun has set is far less exciting. Covering up to cut the chill of the night air (or an overactive air conditioner), is a constant throughout the season, so donning the LBD is a surefire way to know you can layer something on without clashing colours. This year’s calming and cute pastels are a perfect way to bring a sunny vibe to your outfit. Additionally, with sheer fabrics everywhere, covering up doesn’t necessarily have to cover much – an oversized sheer button-down shirt is a luxe way to make shielding shoulders a breeze. With power suits and structured blazers also playing a major role this season, a fitted jacket is a stylish way to wear what you have while being fashionably formal. Conversely, fringe and stud embellishments are also a trending way to make an impact, making a bomber jacket an ideal solution to mix classic formal wear and stellar street style on a colder day. If flowers are more your thing, a pretty punch of floral is an easy way to breathe an air of summer into your classic LBD for anything from patio nightlife to afternoon weddings.


THe LITTLe BLACK DReSS FineLifestyles

Parkland Manitoba

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Gardner's Lifestyle Fashions

223 Main Street North, Dauphin | 204-638-4831 |

|


The

VAST

WORLDof Alternative Health Part 1 of 3

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BY SARAH VERMETTE

n recent years, the landscape of health has changed. As more people explore options outside of traditional western medicine, the benefits of alternative health modalities become more wellknown and accepted. Just as western medicine is an umbrella term that encompasses dierent types of doctors, such as physicians, specialists, optometrists and so on, alternative medicine is an umbrella term that encompasses a large variety of modalities. This three-part series is a summary of some of the more popular and readily available forms of alternative modalities. In this issue we'll review those modalities that are considered complete systems, each in their own right.

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BodyTalk The BodyTalk system was developed in the 90s by an Australian doctor. This modality addresses the whole person, overlooking no aspect of the human psyche, be it emotional, physical or environmental. With the use of a variety of non-invasive techniques, BodyTalk practitioners refocus the body's natural healing response to establish better communication within the body to bring about lasting changes. BodyTalk techniques provide insight to the areas of your body that need attention. What might seem like an obvious problem to you is not necessarily the one your body wants to address first. Ultimately, the “bodymind� knows best how to heal itself in a holistic way.

Ayurveda

BodyTalk is designed to integrate all fields of healthcare

Ayurvedic medicine, first recorded in Sanskrit 5,000

This includes referring a client onto another healthcare

years ago, is considered to be the world's oldest healthcare

practitioner or field of healthcare when necessary. While

system, and is India's primary healthcare system. The

the BodyTalk system is relatively new, there are already a

Sanskrit word Ayurveda means the "science of life."

few insurance providers that recognize the system under

Ayurvedic medicine is entirely holistic and strives to create harmony between the body, mind and spirit, maintaining that this balance prevents illness, treats acute conditions and contributes to a long and healthy life. Ayurveda is tailored to each person's unique needs, taking into account nutrition, exercise, personal hygiene, social interaction and other lifestyle elements. Following daily and seasonal regimes helps users of Ayurveda attain robust physical health, as well as mental and spiritual harmony. Ayurvedic treatment begins with a consultation and treatment can include dietary advice, herbal detoxification, toxin elimination, yoga and meditation, Ayurvedic massage and shirodhara, and a treatment of herbal oil dripped on the forehead to regulate the brain’s physiological equilibrium.

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to create a complete approach to health and well-being.

their health coverage plans.


Traditional Chinese Medicine Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), rooted in the

in which the various organs, tissues and other parts have

ancient philosophy of Taoism, originated in ancient China

distinct functions but are all interdependent. In this view,

and dates back over 5,000 years. TCM treats the individual

health and disease relate to balance of the functions.

and has a theoretical framework that includes the yin/

TCM practitioners use a variety of therapies in an effort

yang, as well as the vital energy or life force, qi.

to promote health and treat disease. Herbal remedies and

TCM views are based on the ancient Chinese perception

acupuncture are the treatments most commonly used

of humans as microcosms of the larger, surrounding

by TCM practitioners. Other TCM practices include

universe — interconnected with nature and subject to its

moxibustion, cupping, massage, mind-body therapy and

forces. The human body is regarded as an organic entity

dietary therapy.

Be sure to check the next issue for part two of this series, where we will discuss alternative therapies that are more commonly used as complementary forms of healing.

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Body, Mind & Soul‌ Finding Balance

A

fter suffering from the life altering illness of fibromyalgia and finding healing and regaining her health through alternative medicine, Heather Bednarski knew she wanted to be able to offer the opportunity to experience that same physical, mental and spiritual well-being and balance to those around her.

Do you or someone in your family have issues with joints, muscles, bones or tissues? Are you concerned about aches, pain, lack of energy, fatigue, toxins or just generally want to feel better? Heather offers treatments to balance the muscles and realign bones and joints, resulting in balance of body, mind and soul and offering physical, mental and spiritual tranquility.

Heather is a Registered Massage Therapist, a Certified Lensen Therapist and a Manual Osteopath. Heather is also a Reiki Master, Angel and Crystal Therapist, is practised in the technique of using Quantum Wave Lasers in the repair of damaged soft tissue and offers Ion Foot Baths, which aid in the removal of toxins from the body on a cellular level. Heather also offers Jade Stone Massages and Raindrop Massages using Young Living Essential Oils.

Call Heather at Diamond H Essential Pain Management Clinic in Swan River, M.B. for more information or to book an appointment.

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Watch for Diamond H Essentials story in the Fall issue of Fine Lifestyles Parkland. Diamond H Essentials Pain Management Clinic 131 5th Avenue North Swan River 204.734.0998


Wanna hear your BodyTalk?

Refresh Massage Studio and Spa recently added certified BodyTalk practitioner Janna Glasman to its staff. Janna has been practicing BodyTalk in Yorkton for the past eight years. She and her clients have seen amazing results using this form of therapy.

“It only makes sense to approach each individual person from that perspective,” says Janna. “It’s how BodyTalk is designed.”

For those unfamiliar with BodyTalk, it’s a healthcare therapy that uses non-invasive techniques to help your body heal more effectively. BodyTalk is a “whole-healthcare system” in that it addresses all factors that can affect our health including physical, mental, emotional and environmental. It’s described as a truly holistic approach to healing.

Refresh Massage STUDIO AND SPA

Each BodyTalk session is completely tailored to the individual. There is no simplistic approach to any symptom or concern because everyone is very different in how they live, see and take in the world around them.

To request an appointment with Janna, please visit our website or call us.

306.783.1370 | www.refreshmassagestudioandspa.com


Natural Path to Wellness Our goal is to help you learn how to increase your health and vitality by having the tools to make health living a reality. Health food and healthy living products available: • • • • • •

Swedish massage Hot cool stone massage Raindrop therapy Nutritional assessment Bra Fitting Approved retail supplier for the Manitoba Breast Prosthesis Program

Swan River Valley Natural Path 520 MAIN ST SWAN RIVER | 204-734-2848 |


Celebrating 25 Years o f r oC kin’ g ood tim es at

Dauphin’s

Countryfest By Anna Delaney Photos Courtesy of Dauphin’s Countryfest

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G

ood country music has graced the stage at Dauphin’s Countryfest for 25 years. It all started in 1990 as a way to help sustain the historic Selo Ukraina (Ukrainian Folk Arts Centre and Museum) site, but has grown to become a summer highlight for music fans throughout the region. This year, country superstar and TV personality from NBC’s The Voice, Blake Shelton, is headlining — ensuring the 25th anniversary of Countryfest will be one for the books. “Dauphin’s Countryfest is Canada’s longest running Country music festival

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and Manitoba’s largest camping festival. For four days every July long weekend, more than 14,000 people per day descend upon the Selo Ukraina site, 10 minutes south of the city of Dauphin, for one of the summer’s best parties,” says Eric Irwin, president of Dauphin’s Countryfest. “It’s a chance to reconnect with old friends, take in more than 50 bands on three stages, and plenty of time to unwind at the unique festival site. It’s even been quoted by some that ‘some people go to Mexico, some go to Countryfest.’ It’s their major vacation for the year.”

This year, not only will attendees be able to see Blake Shelton up close and personal, they’ll also be rocking out to Rascal Flatts, The Band Perry and Tim Hicks, just to name a few. “There are plenty of other activities to take in during the event besides the music, including helicopter rides over the site, beach volleyball, extreme freestyle motorcross, and more,” says Irwin. “Fans will also notice further site improvements this year, including more camping and parking, new seating, and concession buildings upgrades.” Celebrating 25 years is a milestone for the festival, and they want to give back to


their fans and community in a big way. “Fans who have attended all 25 years — yes, there are fans who haven’t missed a year — will be recognized on site and one lucky ticket purchaser will take home a 2014 Chevy Silverado after the event,” says Irwin. There is also a “25 for 25” campaign this year with 25 donations of $1,000 being given out to various community organizations. This campaign echoes the festival’s roots of community involvement, all stemming from the support for the Selo Ukraina site that started Countryfest. The not-for-profit music festival is unique, as it was built by the community, for the

community. Even the amphitheatre is distinctive, with its 14,000 seats built right into the natural landscape — guests are nestled among towering trees near the winding Vermillion River while they enjoy the festival’s sights and sounds. When asked what Countryfest can attribute to its success, Irwin smiles and acknowledges the dedicated volunteers and supportive business community. “It’s a festival that offers something for everyone and an opportunity to choose your own adventure — whether you’re there to take in as many acts as possible,

or taking the time to reconnect with old friends in the campground.” In its silver anniversary year, Dauphin’s Countryfest shows no sign of slowing down, but only plans to get bigger, better and greener. Their onsite recycling facility processed 13,150 kilograms last year, and they’re always finding more ways to have little impact on the environment. If the past 25 years are any indication, the Parkland can look forward to enjoying Dauphin’s Countryfest for many summers to come.

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THUNDERS RESTAURANT & SALOON 19 Memorial Blvd., Dauphin 204-638-6080


June 26-29 Dauphin’s Countryfest 11km south of Dauphin, MB on Hwy#10 July 31 Dauphin Street Fair Dauphin

events Parkland Manitoba

june–august

July 13-14 Gilbert Plains-Grand View Fair & Rodeo Gilbert Plains Fair Grounds August 1-3 Canada’s National Ukrainian Festival Selo Ukraina Site August 2-3 Rossburn Fair Rossburn

August 8 Rumble in Roblin Roblin

August 9 Little Britches Rodeo Roblin

August 8-10 Wasagaming Chamber Days Clear Lake

August 9 Manitoba MudRun Countryfest Site 11km south of Dauphin, MB on Hwy#10 August 15-16 Rossburn Duke Fest Rossburn August 15-17 Harvest Sun Music Festival Kelwood

August 17 Supper in the Field at the Lake Kelwood

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COMMUNITY SPOTLIGHT

Mud, Sweat & Facing FearS MA NiTobA’ S M ud d ieST Fu N d r Ai Se r

I

By Courtney Tait Photos M. A. Nyquist and S. Golding

f crossing a pond on a tightrope, crawling under barbed wire and dragging a tombstone up a hill — all while covered in mud — sounds like a strange way to spend a Saturday afternoon, then you may not yet be aware of one of Manitoba’s most exciting events. The Manitoba MudRun, a 10 km challenge that raises funds for the MS Society of Manitoba-Parkland and the Dauphin Rotary Club, is made up of more than 20 obstacles that test the strength and endurance of its participants. The goal? To finish — and have a lot of fun. Held south of Dauphin at Countryfest Site, the event was started last year by a group of MudRun enthusiasts. “It encourages a more active lifestyle, and creates community pride,” says Kevin Steinbachs, one of the MudRun organizers. “People said it was a great day and that they would come back next year. The idea is to keep doing it annually.” This year’s MudRun will take place Aug. 9, with people ages 14 and up welcome to join. Participants are encouraged to form teams for the challenge, as many of its obstacles require helping hands to complete. The 2013 MudRun, which drew 625 participants, raised a total of $80,000, with funds divided between the MS Society Parkland Chapter and the Dauphin Rotary Club. The same organizations will benefit from funds raised this year, with a goal of $100,000 set by MudRun organizers. Participants have the option to raise pledges for the MS Society, with incentives such as a free laundry bag and VIP treatment at the event given to those who meet specified amounts. While MudRun challenges happen across the globe, with many organized by companies who re-create the same obstacles in each location, Kevin says part of what

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makes the Manitoba MudRun unique is the obstacles are inspired by their surroundings. “It’s about utilizing whatever you have access to naturally,” he says. “There’s a pond on the property, hills for climbing, round and square bales, and an amphitheatre grandstand. People loved the obstacles. We’re adding a few more this year, and changing some of them so they work better.” Some challenges, such as navigating through a dark tunnel, provide an opportunity for participants to conquer personal fears. More than 400 spectators watched Manitoba’s inaugural MudRun, cheering from the sidelines as participants jumped across floating docks or climbed over the events’ 16-foot sign. This year’s MudRun will feature a horse and wagon that people can ride to view some of the action. While those participating should wear clothing they don’t mind getting muddy, Kevin says costumes are encouraged. “Pink tutus, team T-shirts, superheroes — anything goes,” he says. Food vendors will be on location, offering a range of items from burgers to snow cones. The MudRun is not a race, but participants are encouraged to complete all the obstacles, and can walk or run the 10 km course, which can take anywhere from 1.5 to three hours. “Some people who are in decent enough shape think they can’t do it, but they can,” says Kevin. “It’s at your own pace.” Organizers are aiming to register at least 1,000 people in this year’s MudRun. Those interested in the muddy challenge can find more information on the MudRun website houndsportservices.com/index. php/mudder-home. Kevin says participants should prepare to get dirty within the first five minutes of the challenge, as a mudhole obstacle is featured at the top of the course. But don’t worry, if you raise enough pledges, you’ll be treated to a laundry bag, and maybe even a VIP hot shower.


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An

ELFIN Influence By Ken A. Beattie, NPD, PH.D

G

arden design can be and has been influenced by a great many external forces. Look at the great follies and bucolic pastorals of British landscape architects to the Trompe l’oeil, parterres and symmetry of French and Italianate gardens — all influenced by something. Contemporary design influences may not be as obvious or for that matter even rational, however “kitch” and garden ornamentation seems to never go out of vogue. The mirror gazing ball or, goodness knows, the garden gnomes have survived for countless ages; fortunate or not, they are still with us. Gnomes and “wee folk” have been associated with gardens in many cultures — most

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popular in the United Kingdom. Leprechauns, flower fairies and even the odd troll have found their homes in many gardens from the distant rocky shores of the Hebrides to the Brecon Beacons of Wales and, of course, throughout Ireland. It’s not such a leap to understand that these wee folk have found their way into North American gardens in a big way. “If you build it, they will come” has long been the mantra of fairy gardeners, so why not consider giving it a try this season? My personal introduction to the commercial side of fairy gardens happened at about this time of the year on a requisite jaunt to a cluster of local garden centres. Always cognizant of the “new” for the season in plants, typically I avoid the landscape accoutrements. However,


this time there was a serious congregation around what appeared to me to be a collection of doll houses complete with miniature landscapes surrounding them. I thought cute, but not for my garden. Boy, was I wrong! Before you could say Rumplestiltskin, the shopping cart was full to the brim with a bridge, stone walkway, cute little garden bench a lantern, and on it goes. So popular was this display of fairy gardens that the fairy house we had selected had to be ordered in. As I am the person in our home charged with anything to do with creativity, it was now my chore to make a fairy garden, and for my sake, fit it into the existing landscape. It was actually a lot of fun! Consider that a fairy garden can be as complex as you wish, or perhaps just a corner in your garden where you may be having difficulty growing a wide selection of plants. I used a container as the base of my garden for a couple of reasons. First off, it would be portable within the landscape and, as the mood determined, I could place the garden in full view or completely out of sight. Secondly, the plants that I chose required relatively moist conditions; this situation is more easily achieved in a container. Should you choose to develop a fairy garden within the existing landscape, it may take considerably more planning, but the results could be very rewarding. As a matter of fact, this season I may create a village scene along the east side of a walkway in the rear garden. The plants you choose need to be hardy for your region if you decide to use perennials. Annuals and exotics naturally can be used as a “one off � to create your elfin landscape. Scale is important; if you choose to place fairy furniture, accommodations or wee folk into the landscape, all should appear to be of the correct proportion. Consider using Maidenhair Fern, as it can be selectively trimmed to resemble a fairylike tree and it tolerates rather low light. For drier and sunnier areas, the Aeoniums, Crassula and selections of succulents provide a rather unusual texture for your fairy-scape. Bacopa and Iris Moss, in combination with Black Mondo Grass, makes a truly magical combination. In short, the sky is the limit when creating a fairy garden, containerized or in situ. I do caution everyone who decides to engage in this activity — it is somewhat addictive.

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W. BRETT WILSON on Capital Appreciation

Demonstrating Respect to Build a Better Business by Tonya Lambert photos Heather Fritz, courtesy of Prairie Merchant Corp.

Canadian entrepreneur, philanthropist and investment banker, W. Brett Wilson believes that respect is a key ingredient to success in all areas of one’s life — personal and professional. According to Wilson, to be treated with respect is a basic human desire, and people soon lose interest in relationships where this is lacking. Indeed, Wilson writes that a lack of respect in the workplace is the most common reason people will leave a job. “The most important asset you will ever have, and the one that appreciates the most, is the human capital you hire, develop and retain,” says Wilson. In other words, if you want to grow your business, you need to attract and retain good people, and to do that, you need to establish a work environment that is based upon mutual respect.

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should mean something, and he often closes a deal on that very basis. Leaders also need to set an example by being honest. He advises that if you do not know something, admit it; but also be sure to let people know that you are taking steps to acquire the information. If you make a mistake, admit it and learn from it. Wilson believes mistakes are opportunities for learning, and that a mistake is only a failure when you do not learn from it. Employees and clients need to be able to trust that business owners and managers will deal with problems in a timely and respectful manner. According to Wilson, it is the rare employer who deals with an under-performing employee in a timely fashion. Most employers will allow problems to continue on a lot longer than they should because most people by nature avoid conflict. Unfortunately, such delays undermine a sense of trust in management. Furthermore, Wilson advises that once an issue has been dealt with, it should be left alone; do not go picking at scars.

Respect is an essential part of a successful company. It’s the responsibility of a business leader to foster an environment of respect in the workplace so that line managers in turn treat their employees with courtesy and appreciation.

W

ilson chooses what he says carefully, demonstrating both a love of words and a respect for their power. He expresses a belief that everyone should understand their own definition of important words, and know what success and respect means to them. He gives as an example a person’s definition of success, which will reflect their values and determine their approach to everything in life, including business. Whether their definition of success is a large bank account or being a great dad, it will be reflected in personal choices. Without a clear understanding of what key words and concepts mean to you, he says, you will be directionless and your business and relationships will flounder. Wilson’s book, with its reflective title — Redefining Success: Still Making Mistakes — is a thoughtful consideration of definitions. He writes, “For me, respect

is the ability to value another person and their perspective. It involves treating people with courtesy and kindness. Respect is not the same as agreement. In fact, it is a basic sign of respect to trust people enough to tell them when you disagree. But respect should dictate how you express your opinion.” Wilson says that attitude is everything. He has no interest in doing business with someone whose attitude is win-at-allcosts; he chooses, rather, to deal with those who treat others fairly and respectfully. This approach is geared towards long-term success rather than short-term gain. Trust, he says, is a key component of respect; you cannot respect someone whom you cannot trust. Business leaders need to ensure that their employees, partners and clients know that they are trustworthy by honouring their commitments. Wilson believes that a person’s word and handshake

Another way to create respect in the workplace, Wilson advises, is through establishing mutual interests. This can be done in many ways. First, everyone needs to know the company’s aims and the plans in place to achieve them; that way, everyone feels they are a part of things. One way that Wilson achieves this is by beginning each day with everyone gathered together for what he terms “the office huddle.” Second, if people understand the company’s goals and plans, they can then contribute to their attainment by voicing their concerns about what is not working and sharing their ideas on how to improve performance. Listening to the ideas and concerns of your staff and acting on them when deemed appropriate, Wilson adds, fosters feelings of mutual interest and respect. This leads to the third and, possibly most important, component to establishing respect in any relationship: communication. Leaders need to convey their ideas, thoughts, feelings and concerns to others in a constructive manner, while at the same time listening to their ideas, thoughts, feelings and concerns in an open, thoughtful, non-judgmental way. Wilson says that a willingness to communicate shows that you value the other person.

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An employee who feels valued will work harder and more creatively, be loyal to the company, and contribute to an overall positive atmosphere at work. Wilson advises companies to participate in team-building exercises to help build trust and mutual interests, as well as to foster better communication. In his own companies, staff have participated in a variety of activities — often outdoors — which require them to work together to achieve a goal. If you place people first, Wilson says, you will have a better chance of success; this is true in your personal life, as well as in the business world. The tagline of FirstEnergy, an energy-focused investment bank that Wilson co-founded in 1993, is “Our focus is energy, but our passion is people.” The huge success achieved by this company is proof that people are a company’s number one asset and that investing in them is of the utmost importance. Wilson writes, “When you’re investing in someone, think of it as a relationship rather than a transaction. The best relationships are based on trust, respect and mutual interests. And those relationships are the best way to make money.” Demonstrate respect to others — business partners, employees, clients and even competitors — and you will not only earn their respect in return, but also see your capital appreciate. W. Brett Wilson has earned the distinction of being one of Canada’s top investment bankers; FirstEnergy is a globally recognized energy-investment firm, of which Wilson was a founding member. His success as an entrepreneur has led Wilson into the Canadian spotlight where he has been a co-star of Dragons’ Den and host of Risky Business. Wilson is also widely known for his philanthropy, a focus in his life to which he lends his energy, marketing expertise and mentorship. Wilson hails from North Battleford, Saskatchewan. His book, Redefining Success: Still Making Mistakes (2012) is published by Penguin Group, Canada and widely available in bookstores. Wilson speaking with attendees of the sixth annual Pitch Party on November 14, hosted by the University of Saskatchewan’s Wilson Centre for Entrepreneurial Excellence, Photos by David Stobbe

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Parkland Manitoba


ExpErt Advice Responsive Web Design to Boost Your Business

convenient for your visitors, easy to manage for you, and saves you money in the long run. Five Reasons WhY You neeD a Responsive WeBsite

Richard Bankert Owner Richard Bankert Web Design Box 970, Dauphin, MB 204.648.4952 www.richardbankertwebdesign.com

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here once was a business that wanted to give away $1,000 — free, no strings attached. So, they made a poster and put it up all over town. Unfortunately, the text on the poster was so small no one could read it and the images so large only a corner was showing up on the page. So even though they had an amazing offer, they had zero response. Do you have an amazing offer, but zero response from your website? Today, 55 per cent of the Internet is viewed on mobile devices[1]. Responsive web design allows you to properly display your content, regardless of the device that your customers are on. This means your website is displayed properly across any device, with no need for a mobile website or app. When your website is updated, your content is updated everywhere. It is

1. Google recommends it. With 70 per cent of Internet searches going through Google[2], we want to make sure we are building websites that Google likes to list in its search results. Google developers recommend using a responsive website design because they are faster to index, require no redirections, and have a single URL. 2. Improved search engine rankings. We spend a lot of time improving our websites so they will rank higher in the search engines. When you have a desktopfriendly site, a mobile-friendly site, and maybe even an app, you are potentially creating duplicate content - which search engines hate. It also means you have to spend three times the effort to keep all your sites updated. 3. Better user experience. When a visitor arrives at your website, you want to ensure they can get the information they need efficiently. Whether it is an online purchase, a contact number or a quote form, responsive designs allow you to adjust your content to fit their device so it always is easy to read, easy to navigate, and easy to make purchases on.

4. Stay ahead of the competition. We want our businesses to be able to reach today’s customers. With not as many businesses using responsive web designs, you can get ahead of them by converting your website now. Leave it and your customers will find your competitor’s site. With an ever-growing number of mobile and tablet users, the importance of responsive web design has never been higher. 5. Make more sales. According to BrandSpark, 54 per cent of Canadians have used smartphones to make a buying decision.[3] Is your website ready for that kind of mobile use? Customers are using their devices to compare prices, research products and make purchasing decisions, wherever they have cellular or Wi-Fi coverage. By not having a responsive website, you are not catering to the large portion of your target market, and in the process are losing money and business. [1] http://money.cnn.com/2014/02/28/ technology/mobile/mobile-appsinternet/

http://searchengineland.com/getready-yahoo-slip-10-percent-searchshare-191779

[2]

http://mobilesyrup.com/2014/01/ 15/54-of-canadians-have-used-theirsmartphone-to-make-a-purchasedecision/

[3]

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The

ClassiC Convertible By Rebecca Schneidereit

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axonomically, the label “convertible lover” encompasses a range of people and passions. There are hard-top lovers and soft-top fans. There are those who value a vintage pedigree, and those seduced by straight-off-the-lot sparkle. There are domestic devotees, and acolytes of glamorous imports, and owners who pride themselves on paint jobs in a thousand shades. But all of them are “convertible lovers.” They love the way a convertible looks and feels, its inimitable combination of Hollywood glitter and heartland bravado. For confirmed convertible lovers — and those just discovering their charms — Fine Lifestyles offers this retrospective: a glance at the convertible’s origins and the current state of affairs.

Way Back When European auto artisans, Peugeot, smashed the metaphorical bottle of champagne on the prow of the convertible; their hard-topped 601 Eclipse hit the streets in 1934, and for nearly 40 years afterwards, demand for convertibles was both extreme and enduring. From the first models to the modern era, the convertible’s desirability was uniquely democratic. Unlike the limo or pickup truck, its allure crossed class and gender. Ingrid Bergman drove a convertible in Alfred Hitchcock’s 1946 nail-biter, Notorious; Patrick McGoohan manned a model in 60s spy drama deconstruction, The Prisoner. From Grease’s Danny Zuko to Mad Men’s Don Draper to Barbie herself, the convertible never ceased to transcend boundaries.

ABOVE Late 50s Merceds Benz 300SL RIGHT BMW Z4, Chevrolet Corvette Stringray

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CLOCKWISE 58 Buick Limited, 2003 Ferrari Spider 360, 1969 Chevrolet Camaro, Astin Martin DB9

Throughout the 50s and 60s, a number of celebrated convertible masterpieces (including the Alfa Romeo Spider and Chevrolet Corvette) were unveiled. The period’s playfulness was reflected in the vehicles’ shape and detailing: the Austin-Healey Sprite was all but anthropomorphic, and Janis Joplin (who penned cappella 60s anthem “Mercedes Benz”) possessed a Porsche Type 356 C so extravagantly ornamented it’s now a museum piece. Unfortunately, disco wasn’t the only disaster convertible lovers had to endure in the 70s. What was arguably North America’s most decadent decade paradoxically saw steep deterioration in convertible marketability. However, popularity catapulted again in the 80s, with the 1982 Chrysler LeBaron among comeback forerunners. The LeBaron isn’t universally beloved: Web2Carz’s Tim Healey proclaimed models up to 1985 among the “Top Ten Worst Convertibles of all Time”. Nevertheless, CAKE’s 2001 hit “Short Skirt, Long Jacket” demonstrated that the LeBaron had garnered sufficient household recognition to be namechecked in a pop song two decades later. The “second wind” of the 80s and 90s fueled successful convertible designs capable of rivalling mid-century models, and nowadays, it may be mostly the nostalgia factor separating “new school” convertibles from their forbearers’ legendary status. But the clock’s always ticking: at this point, even nostalgia can’t be far away. IF yOU WanT One If you’re considering purchasing a convertible, well — congratulations on your timing. A variety of exciting models, crafted by numerous manufacturers, are offered for 2014. Price points vary, as always, but turning the plunge into a splurge ensures you’ll

make a splash. Here are a few options that live up to the convertible legacy. BMW. This German creator’s 6 Series Cabriolet is decked with extras, from LED lights to Bang & Olufsen acoustics. But it’s the Cabriolet’s artistry (“inspired by the elegance of flowing water”, according to BMW) that’s unforgettable. Ferrari. The 458 Spider has received umpteen commendations (from the Robb Report’s “Best of the Best Convertible” to Top Gear China’s “Best Driver’s Sports Car,” both 2012), so we’re not ashamed to confess what really sold us: the custom-matched travel bags. Mecedes-Benz. Whoever names Mercedes-Benz’s inventions has a sense of humour. The roofless heater is dubbed the “AIRSCARF”; the tint mechanism is the “MAGIC SKY CONTROL”. Both features (and more) are attached to Mercedes-Benz’s SL-Class and SLK-Class convertibles. Vintage. Like the violin, the convertible’s prestige can escalate with age. Apply the usual rules for purchasing pre-owned: find a trustworthy source, and confirm that your chosen vehicle is safe and reliable, even if it looks flawless. You don’t want a car so cool it takes a smoke break on the highway. Those who look askance at “pre-owned” may want to reconsider in the case of convertibles. With convertibles, the universal second-hand slam — “you don’t know where it’s been” — is part of the point. Did your roadster sail down the freeway, Beatles on the radio, beach day-bound? Was it served milkshakes and French fries by skated waitresses at an original drive-thru? Did it ferry a business mogul, musician or athlete to deals, gigs or games? A tinge of mystery is the finishing touch on a car that’s already irresistible.


ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE

Liv i n g t He

Good Life in Roblin By Rebecca Henderson

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ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE

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ush greenery and pristine lakes can be considered understatements in the town of Roblin, Manitoba. This is because three provincial parks and one national park surround the town, along with an abundance of small streams, rivers and lakes and an array of wildlife, which spread across the area. “I can’t imagine living anywhere else,” says Ben Brodeur, who moved with his wife to the town of Roblin after spending their holidays there and experiencing its natural beauty firsthand. It’s no surprise that Brodeur works as the economic development officer for Roblin. Brodeur cites the town of Roblin’s parklike settings that make it such a desirable place to live. Known as the Jewel of the Parkland, Roblin is located amid five crisscrossing valleys and is spoiled by

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unparalleled natural scenery due in part by the majority of provincial and national parks that are only a half an hour away. “There’s such variety year round,” says Brodeur. “In the summer there is camping, hiking, boating and beaches; in the fall there is hunting, quading. The fishing’s really good here — we catch big fish all the time; and in the winter there is snowmobiling and down-hill skiing.” Duck Mountain Provincial Park (MB) is a 25-minute drive north from the town of Roblin and home to the spring-fed waters of Blue, Childs, Wellman and Singuish Lakes. Tall forest trees line the clear, still waters, which are great for summer activities like boating, canoeing, swimming and scuba diving. Forty minutes northwest from Roblin is Duck Mountain Provincial Park (SK), home to Madge Lake, and an hour east

from the town is Riding Mountain National Park — a popular outdoor recreation destination known for its beautiful forest lands and herds of bison that graze its fields. Twenty minutes south from Roblin is Asessippi Provincial Park, along the Lake of the Prairies. Due to the production of big walleye, Lake of the Prairies was rated number five on Canada’s list of best walleye fishing destinations. In the wintertime, the hills are layered with glistening snow that makes them an ideal destination for skiing and snowboarding at Asessippi Ski Area and Resort. For those who like to camp at Asessippi or either of Duck Mountains’ Provincial Parks, Roblin is a great place for campers to regroup and pick up any supplies that diminished during their trip. The town of Roblin also has many exciting areas of


fireworks and family amusement, the super-fun free-everything provided Soap Box Derby returns to impress adults and entertain kids. The Roblin Chamber of Commerce’s first annual Rumble in Roblin show n’ shine kicks off the Agricultural Society’s Fair weekend in August. The Ag-Society is extremely excited to host its second annual, and increasingly popular event, the Lil’ Britches Rodeo, which gives kids the chance to chase pigs, ride sheep and milk goats while rustling up dust at the old agricultural grounds. entertainment like a 112-foot water slide for the kids and a movie theatre, which makes for a perfect activity to escape to on a rainy day.

holidays, as well. Roblin only gets a small break in the spring before the population of 3,284 gears up for the summertime festivities.

“We have so many amenities and opportunities in the town of Roblin — a lot of tourists concentrate on experiencing the campsites, and then discover the hidden gems when they decide to explore,” says Brodeur.

Known as the fly-fishing capital of Manitoba, The town of Roblin will host its third annual Bug Chucker Cup in May. People from all over the world will come to compete. After last year’s successful Centennial Celebrations and family events, this year’s Canada Day in the town of Roblin should not be missed. Along with live entertainment, free events,

There are many special activities and events that happen during the summer

“The town of Roblin is much more than its summer, fall and winter attractions,” says Brodeur, citing that many residents enjoy using the sports arena, curling rink, baseball diamonds and aquatic centre with a junior Olympic-sized swimming pool. With a child care centre, and elementary and high school, Brodeur says the town of Roblin has all the trappings for raising a family, plus a beautiful view. “What’s better? You have all these amenities and you live in the Parkland.” For more information on the Town of Roblin, please visit www.roblinmanitoba.com.

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ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE

Serving & Supporting Roblin and Area By Tobie Hainstock  Photos Jenna Faye Photography of Roblin

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ocated in the bustling town of Roblin, NorthStar Insurance and Real Estate offers full insurance, real estate, and Autopac services to the Parkland region, including Inglis, Russell and Grandview. “We carry a full line of insurance packages for the home, business or cottage,” comments Ryan Keown, branch manager and real estate salesperson. NorthStar also carries recreational vehicle packages as well as packages for farmers and fisherman.

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The NorthStar Insurance and Real Estate team is comprised of residents of Roblin and the surrounding area who know the people well. Sales Associates Melissa Moffit, JoAnn Zimmer, Sara Eys and Account Administrator Gwen Becker take the time to get to know each client on an individual level. Everyone at NorthStar wants their customers to have a complete understanding of the insurance they have and need. “It’s our initiative to meet with

our clients and discuss their insurance needs so they are educated about any claims and what their insurance covers,” Keown adds. Keown notes that when it comes to claims and other services, NorthStar Insurance staff members go out of their way to offer service during non-office hours. “We feel it’s important to offer our clients our time because we care about their personal needs,” he remarks.


TOP JoAnn Zimmer, Sara Eys and Melissa Moffit, Sales Associates AbOve LeFT Karen Goraluk, authorized official/real estate agent AbOve RIGHT Ryan Keown, branch manager and real estate salesperson

As a real estate office, NorthStar offers friendly service and a genuine knowledge of the area. Karen Goraluk, authorized official/real estate agent, covers a large area including Roblin, Russell, Inglis, Binscarth, Lake of the Prairies, Child’s Lake and Grandview. Goraluk is a local resident, which gives her the ability to fill potential buyers in on the history of the property they are looking at. “I can help home buyers find their dream cottage,” she says. Offering homespun personalized service is important to Goraluk; her friendly demeanor is matched by her years of experience and expertise in the industry. Goraluk is quick to point out all of the unique qualities of living in the scenic Asessippi Parkland area. Goraluk adds that all properties are available to view on both www.north-star.ca, and www.mls.ca websites.

As long time residents of Roblin and the surrounding area, it is important to everyone at NorthStar Insurance and Real Estate to play an active role in the community. “We place a lot of importance on community involvement,” states Keown. On a personal level, Keown is very active as a baseball and minor hockey coach as well as sitting on committees such as the 2013 Centennial Committee and being chairperson of the Spruceside Manor Senior Housing Committee. “Being part of the community is a great way to meet people and develop trusting relationships,” he says. Goraluk agrees, as she is also a person with a long history for community involvement. By serving with such organizations as the Inglis and District Community Club, Asessippi-Parkland Tourism Committee

and more, she has a vested interest in her community. “It gives me personal satisfaction to see the development of the community,” she notes. On a corporate level, NorthStar is also very supportive of local sports and events, providing sponsorships and volunteers throughout the year. The entire team at NorthStar Insurance and Real Estate is proud to work, play and serve in the Roblin area.

NorthStar Insurance and Real Estate 227 Main Street Roblin 204.937.8357 www.north-star.ca www.mls.ca

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ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE

Summer Fun IN ROBLIN By Rebecca Henderson Photos Julie Shiner and Courtesy of the Roblin and District Chamber of Commerce

rUMBLe iN roBLiN

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ot rod enthusiasts should leave Aug. 8 open on their calendars, because the Roblin and District Chamber of Commerce is having its first ever show n’ shine car show. The Rumble in Roblin, which kicks off the annual Roblin Fair, is a classic car and motorcycle show. Chamber of Commerce President Keith Fast says, “We’re going to block off all Main Street and line up the cars.” “We’ve also invited car clubs from all over Manitoba and Saskatchewan,” continues Fast. “Including our own local hot rod community.”

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The local hot rod community will also be there to hand out awards for best of show and people’s choice (voted by the public). The Rumble in Roblin is free to enter and Fast says those who want to show off their specialty hot rod should come for 5 p.m. so volunteers can find a spot for their vehicle. Fast says the Rumble in Roblin will correspond with Moonlight Madness — when all the shops in town open up late and have specials on for the evening. The long-running fair starts Friday, Aug. 8, 2014, with the Rumble in Roblin and Moonlight Madness, and continues with a parade on Saturday. The parade will have horses, dignitaries and old cars and tractors that make their way through the

town of Roblin. Also on Saturday is the Little Britches Rodeo, an Agricultural Society event where kids can pig scramble and tie goats. Fast says there will also be a reptile show with lizards, an animal petting zoo and pony rides for the kids. At night, the local hockey arena hosts a dance where 2013 Swan Valley Credit Union Talent Stage Winner Steven Jesmer will serenade the crowd. Tickets can be bought at various businesses in town or at the door. “It’s a weekend of family fun. We’re always looking for fun and different ways to attract and show what the town of Roblin has to offer.” Last year, the town of Roblin celebrated its centennial anniversary with a 10-day


celebration that included a show by the Royal Canadian Air Force Snowbirds. Needless to say, the celebration attracted a huge crowd, which was very exciting for the local community. “The Rumble in Roblin will go on rain or shine,” says Fast— and he encourages everyone to stay for the whole weekend and explore the Jewel of the Parkland. “You won’t be disappointed.” For more information, please visit www.roblinmanitoba.com.

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ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE for outstanding talent, every kid who participates in the rodeo walks away with a prize. Last year, Butler says they were expecting 20 or so kids to participate, but instead more than 60 kids showed up from across Manitoba and even Saskatchewan. This year, they are preparing for 100 kids and sending out pamphlets ahead of time to register for the event, although no one will be turned away without pre-registering. Each individual rodeo activity is $2 per kid, but that also goes into collecting prizes for every kid who participates, as well as vouchers for the concession stands. The Little Britches Rodeo happens Saturday Aug. 9, 2014. “It’s a great event that’s been embraced by the community through volunteer work and donations,” says Butler. “And we hope this event inspires kids to do more agricultural activities.”

LittLe Britches rodeo It’s time to tip your cowboy hat at the Agricultural Society’s second annual Little Britches Rodeo. The Little Britches Rodeo will have a full day of kids pig scrambling, wild goat milking and mutton busting after the parade at the annual Roblin Fair. Local Pastor Heath Butler says, “As far as I know, in Manitoba, we’re the only rodeofocused all day event for kids. Instead of parents dragging their kids along, it’s kids who are dragging their parents along!”

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Yet, parents seem to enjoy the Little Britches Rodeo as much as their kids. “It’s really encouraging to hear adults, while at the rodeo, recall memories of their childhood growing up on the farm,” he says. Parents even started suggesting activities for this year’s rodeo too. Butler says it’s one of the reasons why steer riding and breakaway roping (a special rope that breaks right away when a kid catches an animal) were added to the mix. The Little Britches Rodeo is all about family fun, and while prizes are offered


ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE

IT’S THE DEALER THAT MAKES THE DIFFERENCE

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Come and see us…we will make it worth the trip!

Highway #5 East, Roblin 204.937.2113 | 800.305.3313 www.crosstownmotors.com

CROSS-TOWN SINCE 1924


ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE

Fishing FOR A GOOD TIME By Rebecca Henderson Photos Julie Shiner and Courtesy of the Roblin Shell River Economic Development

Investing in a new fly-fishing rod may be in order for this year’s annual fly-fishing competition, the Bug Chucker Cup. Plenty of 16-lb. Markosky trout were released in Bench Lake for participants this year, adding to the possibility of becoming a Master Angler many times over.

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t was a collaborative effort to bring the Markosky trout here,” says Ben Brodeur, economic development officer who consults the Bug Chucker Cup committee on marketing, promotion and advertising. “We worked with Clear Spring Trout Farms and Silent Valley Cottage owners, Percy and Shirley Schepp, who own the property surrounding Bench Lake. We released the specially cultivated Markosky trout in Bench Lake for this event.”

The Bug Chucker Cup uses four lakes that surround the town of Roblin: Bench Lake, Twin Lake, Percy Lake and Goose Lake, which have some of the highest and most varied concentrations of trout in Canada. Furthermore, the lakes are close enough in proximity that it makes the town of Roblin an ideal place to fish and hold world class events like The National Fly Fishing Competition, which chose the town of Roblin to host in 2003 and 2010. Brodeur says the town will also host again in 2017. Participants have doubled since it began three years earlier. The Bug Chucker Cup is a non-profit event where proceeds from the cup are put into sustaining and growing healthy fisheries. Participants from all ages and skill levels have the chance to catch and take home the grand prize of $100 and free entry into next year’s tournament. Brodeur anticipates the cup will continue to grow over the next few years and they are prepared for it. “We’re grooming our lakes and keeping our waters in top notch shape,” he says. Brodeur says the cup is about enhancing participants’ experiences through sharing knowledge and catching big fish. Twin Lake, Manitoba’s best Tiger trout fishery, is known for its rare and tenacious Tiger trout population — which have now grown to about 28 inches long and are well over Master Angler size. Integrating Markosky trout into Bench Lake, which are pushing World Record sizes, is to continue creating exceptional experiences when catching big fish in the competition. “Fly-fishers are of a different breed,” says Brodeur. “It’s personal gain in the Bug Chucker Cup because it isn’t about large payout — you have to have determination to catch these kinds of fish.” This is one of the reasons why the Bug Chucker Cup is an attraction not only to the locals, but also to people from all over the world. Everyone’s interested in catching and

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ROBLIN TOWN FEATURE learning new techniques to master fish. “We have participants who come from England and the United States to participate.” “There are lots of big fish here,” says Bill Pollack, chairman of the Bug Chucker Cup. “Fly-fishing enthusiasts who come here will participate in one of the best still water flyfishing events in Western Canada.” All Bug Chucker Cup participants need is a rod and floating device, which can be any device as long as it’s without a gas motor. Fly-fishing skills are also a non-requirement at the Bug Chucker Cup. Brodeur says the tournament has an array of partakers with different skill sets and knowledge regarding the sport. Brodeur says participants with higher skill levels often share their knowledge with those who are just starting out in fly-fishing. “Because we’re not giving away boats or big purses, and we’re open to all skill levels and pairings, there’s a nice camaraderie among participants and they want to see each other do well.” The Bug Chucker Cup concludes with a banquet dinner of home-style food and top-level entertainment, which many locals join in on. Like last years’ stand-up comic, Big Daddy Tazz, this year, Just for Laughs’ Dean Jenkinson will entertain the crowd with quick wit and good humour. “It makes an experience for people who come out.” The banquet dinner includes an awards ceremony as well honouring first ($100), second ($75) and third ($50) place. There’s also an award for Bad Person too, which is made for the participant who breaks too many rules! A total of 30 teams participated in The Bug Chucker Cup this year, which took place from May 29-30 in the Town of Roblin Manitoba. For more information, please visit www.bugchuckercup.com PREVIOUS PAGE Double header rainbow trout TOP–BOTTOM Rainbow trout, male tiger trout, female tiger trout

Roblin Shellriver Economic Development www.bugchuckercup.com

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CLEAR LAKE FEATURE

Discover

RIDING MOUNTAIN NATIONAL PARK By Trina Annand Photos Ken Frazer and Courtesy of Parks Canada

As Canadians, we often take the astounding natural beauty of our country for granted. From shore to shore a complex series of ecosystems unfold, giving the country some of the most amazing national parks in the world. At Riding Mountain National Park, Clear Lake and its surrounding areas, there are unique treasures to explore for tourists and locals alike.

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CLEAR LAKE FEATURE

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elcoming more than 300,000 visitors yearly, Riding Mountain clearly leaves a lasting impression. With more than 700,000 acres to explore, filled with history, culture, vast natural beauty and extraordinary wildlife, there is something for everyone at the park — whether you’re taking a short day trip or a week long vacation. “The park has a lot of diversity in wildlife, vegetation and experiences for our visitors. At the end of the day we want them to connect with this place and to want to protect it forever,” says Richard Dupuis of Parks Canada. Within a mere hour of exploration, visitors can see elk, bison, moose, white tailed deer and black

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bears. More patient visitors may even catch a glimpse of the majestic cougar and lynx.

aim to instill a greater appreciation and awareness of nature and the environment.

For visitors looking for a guided educational experience, the Friends of Riding Mountain have created a series of programs that cater to all ages. The Junior Naturalist and Young Explorer programs teach natural and cultural heritage, as well as survival skills, through workshops, hikes and experiments. The Eco Science Camp introduces students in Grades 7-9 to environmental and science-based issues, where they are paired with researchers, educators and Parks Canada staff. There are even a variety of adult programs with half-day and weekend workshops that

The Deep Bay Residency Program offers visitors a more cultural and artistic approach through their Meet the Artist events. Between May and October, 14 artists will call the park home and will engage visitors through performances, presentations and even hikes that inspire them. This year’s participants range from dancers and musicians, to sculptors and videographers. These unique events allow people a rare glimpse into how new works of art are created, and inspire future generations to combine artistic creativity with natural inspiration.


There are a variety of architecturally significant sites in the Riding Mountain National Park, as well. The East Gate Registration Complex is a nationally significant example of the Rustic Design tradition developed in the 1880s in Canada’s national parks. Constructed of indigenous materials by local craftsmen who were hired as part of the Federal government’s Depression Relief Program, the gate recently celebrated its centennial. The Park Theatre shares these unique construction techniques and is the only log cinema built in a Canadian national park. Visitors can also explore the cabin of Grey Owl, a well-known spokesman/ advocate for conservation in Canada who once lived in the park.

The jewel in Riding Mountain National Park is Clear Lake, with 29 km of picturesque shoreline begging to be explored and 14 different species of fish. Visitors can boat, fish, canoe, kayak, sail and swim in the crystal clear waters. “There is also nothing more refreshing than taking a swim in the lake. One of my favourite experiences at Clear Lake is taking a sunset boat tour of the lake. You get to enjoy a great meal with an amazing view, one of the best in the world in my opinion,” Dupuis says. Nestled on the shore of Clear Lake is one of the most unique features of the park — the townsite of Wasagaming, a quaint resort

town designed in the 1930s during the height of Autotourism, when people craved the experience of a good drive, enjoying the journey as much as the destination. With a service centre, cabins, cottages, shops, restaurants, Wi-Fi and even a theatre, the small town makes camping a little less rough. “Wasagaming functions as a jumping off point for people who want to explore the park. It allows people to have the comforts of home while still enjoying the wilderness, which makes it more appealing for many families,” says Dupuis. The townsite also functions as the location for several concerts and celebrations throughout the summer season, as well as the Riding Mountain Triathlon.

As a United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) World Biosphere Reserve — where people are encouraged to demonstrate better approaches to sustainability and conservation — the park is helping to make a brighter future. With mountainous terrain, lakes, rivers, mixed wood forest, eastern deciduous forest and rough fescue prairies, the park offers a variety of scenery to explore. Whether you are a lone explorer, a traveller who loves engaging with family and friends or someone looking for an amazing day trip, Riding Mountain National Park has something for everyone. What makes the park most unique is its ability to inspire us ecologically, historically and culturally, to make us aware of our place in the world and, as a result, encourage us to make the world a better place.

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CLEAR LAKE FEATURE

The Whole Dining Experience at

Siesta Café Photos Ken Frazer

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crase’s Mercantile has been the busy centre of downtown Wasagaming since 1938. A piece of Riding Mountain history, the building was the site of the town grocery store for more than 60 years, and is still owned by the family who originally developed it. It currently houses several retail spaces, including the Siesta Café. Siesta Café is more than just a coffee shop. The sophistication of the extensive menu board and the shine of the espresso machine are warmly complemented by the tones of the original wooden flooring. It was the first Internet café in the park, and has been boasting an extensive menu of coffee-based beverages and delicious baking for 12 years. A cosy outdoor patio under towering spruce trees offers a semisecluded space amidst the bustle of summer in the vibrant townsite. In addition to the upbeat café, there is an additional dining space nestled in the back of the building for a more private dinner experience. This year, the café will be under new management as Chef Blue Harland brings his talent and creativity to the Siesta. With more than 30 years experience in fine dining restaurants in Winnipeg under his belt, Chef Blue is excited to continue the tradition of the Siesta Café, while putting his own personal stamp on the business. “I’m looking forward to bringing in the best of the local, organic and seasonal tastes of the region... when people come

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LEFT Chef Blue Harland

to Wasagaming, they are looking for an experience that’s different than what they might have in the city. I want my food to be part of that experience for people,” he says. Eclectic in its cultural origins, the menu offers something for every appetite or time of day. The huge English breakfast boasts eggs, bacon, sausage, tomatoes, fried mushrooms and toast. As hinted at by the name of the café, you can have something more Mexican: breakfast burrito or huevos rancheros. Grab a salad or a sandwich and sit outside on the patio for lunch — a classic egg salad or ham and cheese, or be adventurous and go for the “stinky sandwich”: garlic sausage, red onion, blue cheese and grainy mustard. Chef Blue plans on varying the dinner menu throughout the season based on the availability of regional ingredients. Keep your eyes open for local treats, such as organic asparagus and strawberries, pickerel and locally farmed elk. And expect them to be paired with some wonderful wines for a truly fine dining experience in a beautiful natural setting. Siesta Café 130 Wasagaming Drive Wasagaming, Manitoba 204.848.4432

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CLEAR LAKE FEATURE

A Family Effort

Clear Lake Trading Post By Tori Stafford Photos Ken Frazer

T

he term ‘family owned and operated’ often brings to mind the idea of retail outlets where the staff is warm and welcoming, customers become friends and things are done the old fashioned way – with respect and a smile. Clear Lake Trading Post embodies just that. Owned and operated by Brad and Leanne Krieger, along with their son and daughter, Karlin and Kaylah, the Trading Post is located within Riding Mountain National Park. Overlooking the main beach in the small town of Wasagaming, Clear Lake Trading Post was purchased by The Kriegers in 2007. For the family,

who had spent countless holidays together at Clear Lake when the children were young, owning and operating the Trading Post was the perfect way to spend more time in the place they’d all grown to know and love. Once Karlin and Kaylah were off to their post-secondary studies, it also continued to serve as a place the family reunited annually – both children returning each summer to work at the Trading Post – and a place to meet new people and catch up with those they see each year, Brad expresses. “We’ve made some good friends through this business [both customers and staff], and our staff of approximately 15 each

season help us to keep the business running smoothly,” he says. “Having a retail store in a National Park where people vacation, everybody comes here in a good mood and we’re happy to be a part of that experience.” Clear Lake Trading Post serves the approximately 300,000 visitors to Riding Mountain National Park, as well as those who live in the Clear Lake area seasonally, Leanne expresses, noting that both Pratt’s Wholesale and Catalyst Credit Union have continually been driving forces in their business from the beginning. Since buying the business seven years ago, the Kriegers have taken note of their customers’ wants ABOVE Kaylah, Brad, Leanne, and Karlin Krieger

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FineLifestyles

Parkland Manitoba


“It is the friends we’ve made, the people we’ve met, dealing with friendly people in a national park!”

and needs, and expanded their product lines according. But one of the things that keeps bringing people back to the Trading Post time and again are the wonderful foods and baked goods available in their deli and bakery, Leanne says. “We are a full-line grocery store, but what we’ve become known for is our cinnamon buns, banana bread and our Clear Lake granola,” she says. Also popular are their ‘Beach Bun Lunches,’ the perfect brown bag lunch for the day at the beach, which includes a fresh deli sandwich made to order, an apple and a homemade cookie. Just steps away from the beach, Clear Lake Trading post offers almost anything beach-goers, campers and park visitors could want, including sleeping bags and camping gear, beach toys and barbecue accessories, and all of the little things that are often overlooked, from sewing kits to pet supplies. The Trading Post’s extensive clothing lines, which include outerwear, swimwear and footwear from a variety of high-end brands and designers, can outfit those of any size, and is constantly updated to stay abreast of the latest trends and technologies. “There is a great reward in the end for us,” Leanne expresses. “It is the friends we’ve made, the people we’ve met, dealing with friendly people in a national park!” Clear Lake Trading Post 144 Wasagaming Drive Wasagaming, Manitoba 204.848.2366 www.clearlaketradingpost.com

FineLifestyles

Parkland Manitoba

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CLEAR LAKE FEATURE

Explore the Possibilities at The Marina on Clear Lake

Relax, unwind and enjoy a cruise on the beautiful water of Clear Lake in Riding Mountain National Park. Step aboard the Martese at 1 p.m. or 3 p.m. for an afternoon cruise, or wait till evening and enjoy the sunset. Picnic lunch or appetizer cruises are available upon request. Looking for a peaceful dinner out? Reserve a spot on the Martese Dinner Cruise. Or consider having your next staff get together, bridal shower, corporate meeting or family reunion on a private charter aboard the Martese. Want to captain your own boat? Pontoon and fishing boat rentals are available, as well as paddleboats and kayaks. Call for reservations or for more information. Take a walk to the Marina and explore all the possibilities.

The Marina on Clear Lake Main Pier – Wasagaming, Manitoba Riding Mountain National Park 204.848.1770 | 204.867.7299 www.theclearlakemarina.com


Eileen and Ken Frazer have been creating beautiful family por traits from their Wasagaming studio for more than ten years. Whether you are a small family or are planning a family reunion or anniversar y celebration, Frazer’s can deliver. It is possible to view your images the morning after your photography session in their unique theatre. The Frazer’s also have a wide variety of iconic views of the Clear Lake area printed on archival canvas and galler y wrapped in the Scrace’s Mercantile building. Drop by and see what is new and feel free to visit als Make this summer the one to update your family por trait! the studio also.

130 Wasagaming Drive Wasagaming,MB 204-848-4015 1608 Lorne Ave. Brandon, MB 204-727-8884 ww www.frazerstudio.com

Fine Lifestyles Parkland Manitoba Summer 2014  
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