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C O L L A B O R A T I O N

ISSUE 1

MAGAZINE


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C O L L A G E : E R N E S TO A R T I L LO


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR FIFTY8 is my heart and soul. I hope this issue fires your passion to create. The amazing contributors have created work that is not only revealing but meaningful to our times. We are in a world of change and fear. Fear of change and of the future. We mask what we really want to say with what we think we should say, and I find beyond all that is the opportunity to create and collaborate. By collaborating we can discover something new with our own eyes and move forward. The unique and talented contributors to this issue span the world. Spain, Italy, Paris, New York, Toronto, Montreal, Switzerland, Brazil, Texas, Brussels, and more. Artists Alessandro Puccinelli, Casey Vange, Javier Verdugo, Kasia & Remi, Jürgen Heckel & Ruben Tomas were open to the idea of collaborating with us to discover and construct something original for FIFTY8 with the exciting design eye of Atelier Olschinsky, who I couldn‘t appreciate enough. These incredible artists have their own point of view and share an interest in the vision of FIFTY8. FIFTY8 is about a state of mind. We aim to engage a new generation of design conscious individuals and visionaries. It‘s a new community, respectful of the past but conceived for the modern times. FIFTY8 showcases beautiful digital content featuring refreshing young and experienced talent from all over the world. BILLY ROOD billy@fifty8magazine.com

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C O L L A G E : E R N E S TO A R T I L LO


P H OTO G R A P H E D B Y B I L LY R O O D / B I L LY R O O D .C O M F E AT U R I N G N I K AY L A W I T H FA C TO R W O M E N . S T Y L I N G B Y FAV I A / F O R D A R T I S T S . H A I R B Y C A R O L W O O D / F O R D A R T I S T S M A K E U P B Y N I K A VA U G H A N / F O R D A R T I S T S . E D I TO R I A L D E S I G N B Y AT E L I E R O L S C H I N S K Y


CONTENTS 10 COLLAB JAVIER VERDUGO 18 THE STRANGE & THE BEAUTIFUL NADIA WICKER 28 PLAUSIBLE REALITY DAVID TRAUTRIMAS 38 TERRESTRIAL TRANSMISSION ANDY DENZLER 52 CONNECTION PUZZLE LUCAS SIMÕES 70 TEMPORAL FORM ANSEN SEALE 82 FASHION COLLAGE ANJELA FREYJA 88 BALANCED SYNTHESIS ERNESTOR ARTILLO 106 WASTELAND PETER OLSCHINSKY 116 ALESSANDRO PUCCINELLI + FIFTY8 128 JÜRGEN HECKEL + FIFTY8 138 TORSI KLAUS KAMPERT 144 ASSETS OF BEAUTY B I L LY R O O D + F I F T Y 8 152 SYSTEM CRASH B I L LY R O O D + F I F T Y 8 158 CHROMATISM CASEY VANGE + FIFTY8 164 SIX LEE SS13 + ERNESTO ARTILLO 170 CORSAIR B I L LY R O O D + F I F T Y 8 180 EPICENE REMI KOZDRA & KASIA BACZULIS + FIFTY8 188 BLIGHT RUBEN TOMAS + FIFTY8

F I F T Y 8 M A G A Z I N E / 20 13 / B I A N N U A L / I S S U E I C O V E R B Y:  E R N E S TO R A R T I L LO /  E R N E S TO A R T I L LO .C O M

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FIFTY8 / INTERVIEWS JAVIER VERDUGO NADIA WICKER DAVID TRAUTRIMAS ANDY DENZLER LUCAS SIMÕES ANSEN SEALE ANJELA FREYJA ERNESTOR ARTILLO

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Mo d el : A l exa n d ra F / FOR D Mo d el s Chi ca go


JAVIER VERDUGO MOTION GRAPHICS DESIGNER

WHAT DOES COLLABORATION MEAN TO YOU? Collaboration means freedom for me, we live in a world where money rules everything. But then you have some personal project you want to do, some passionate work that you would like to share with people but you can‘t afford to pay all the workers you would need to make it happen. So you look for people with passion who are interested in your idea and then, money disappears because they like their job and they like having fun making the project. 

Sometimes I need help from a work colleague when I want to make a personal video and sometimes work colleagues call me for the same purpose. In my opinion there are two different types of work, the one that you do just to pay the bills, and the one that you make for passion, and this is when collaboration comes to us and makes things happen.

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YOU MENTIONED PASSION AND PERSONAL WORK AND FREEDOM. DO YOU THINK YOU NEED TO HAVE ALL THREE OF THESE COMPONENTS TO CREATE YOUR BEST WORK?

WHEN CREATING THIS ORIGINAL PIECE OF WORK FOR FIFTY8 INSPIRED BY THE IDEA OF COLLABORATION, CAN YOU TELL US WHERE THIS IDEA CAME FROM AND HOW YOU WANTED TO COMMUNICATE IT VISUALLY?

I would add a fourth component, and it would be time. For example, in this video I couldn’t make all I had in mind because of the computer’s render timing and the deadline, so I was forced to loose some quality in order to have the video ready on time.

When you collaborate with other people, each one has different skills and passions, and also different personalities. With this concept on mind, I started working on the typography, so every single letter had to be different from the rest but at the same time they had to have something in common, sharing a part of them with the following letter.

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WHAT DO THE MOVEMENTS AND VISUAL IDEAS IN THIS FILM SAY ABOUT COLLABORATION?

I worked with Lucas Bolaño, who I‘ve worked with previous in the past. I gave him all the freedom to choose the tempo and musical style. Once I gave him the low quality render, he worked his magic and created what you hear now.

The first moment in which you start a project everything is black, there is nothing more than darkness (first scene), but then, when you start working and adding content, the ideas start getting clear and this is why every scene has more light than the previous one. Also, ideas are always in movement. So I tried to represent this in every scene of the video.

DO YOU CREATE BEFORE YOU SCORE OR VISE VERSA? I tend to create video before creating the music composition, in some cases you need to start with a tempo to make it easier for audio and music. But when they provide you with the audio and music first it makes it interesting. Since music and rhythm give you a different way of creativity.

THE MUSIC IS BEAUTIFUL AND EFFECTING IN THIS PIECE, CAN YOU TELL US WHO WROTE IT AND HOW YOU WORKED WITH THEM?

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HOW DOES THE COLOR INFLUENCE THIS IDEA? I SEE THAT THE COLOR IS MOST OF THE MOVEMENT THAT KEEPS THE BLACK FORMS IN MOTION AND ALMOST AS IF ITS BRINGING IT TO LIFE?  CAN YOU SPEAK MORE TO THE USE OF COLOR WITH THE BLACK?

BEFORE YOU STARTED YOUR JOBS AT THESE COMPANIES AND FREELANCE, WHY DID YOU WANT TO DO MOTION GRAPHICS? When I was a kid in the nineties I loved watching 3D FX films and 2D animations but I thought I would never be able to do that kind of work unless I worked in a big Hollywood company. I was born in Seville (Spain), which is a beautiful city with lots of historic monuments and old traditions but I felt it was very classic for me. After all, if I wanted to study Fine Arts in Seville, the best professional opportunities would be related to religion topics or restoration. For this reason I decided that I wanted to study in a city with better

In this video the black color represents the things we all have in common, and the other colors represent the opposite, the things that make us different. I tried to represent this with different colors and different states of matter. The color in the letter ‘C’ is like a river, in the letter ‘O’ like electricity, in the letter ‘L’ like ice, the next ‘L’ like honey and so on.

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opportunities. I first tried to move to London but it didn‘t work. I started looking for other colleges around Spain in order to study Arts and finally I found this university in Madrid. It wasn‘t Arts; it was more than this, so I traveled to Madrid to get more information about that school and they showed me the student‘s reel. I never imagined I could create animations in a easy and funny way until that day.

Salvador Dalí. There are films like Matrix or Studio Gibli‘s films (Princess Monoke, Chihiro) or Akira (Katsuhiro Otomo) that inspire me a lot as well. I also love animes, 2D and 3D animation films, Pixar, Disney, Paramount.  Hitchcock‘s films, and the credit titles from Saul Bass and Kyle Cooper. A good novel can also be a good source of inspiration.

TELL US YOUR PROCESS WHEN YOU CREATE, EX DO YOU PLAY MUSIC, DRINK, ETC WHAT PULLS THE INSPIRATION?

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU? There are many artists that I like and who inspire me, if I had to choose five I would say: Vincent Van Gogh, Diego Velazquez, Katsushika Hokusai, Joaquín Sorolla and

There are a lot of things which help me when I create, sometimes I need to watch a film or go for a walk with my dogs. Sometimes going to

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WHAT ATTRACTS YOU?

the gym gives me the solution I need, or sometimes I get inspired when trying to sleep at night. I think my best solution is to focus on the problem I need to solve and to stop thinking when I get stuck. I draw a lot. The pencil is my best tool when I need more ideas.  My workflow is quite simple, like I said, I grab a pencil and I start drawing sketches of first thoughts. I try to capture any possible idea on the paper, and try to see how the scenes are going to be and how much time it will need. I make sketches of the logo, idea, or objectives and then I make a storyboard. When I work with more people these steps are very important in order to optimize 3D work and high-end production. 

Working as a freelance is one of the best things I have chosen in the last three years. I could still be working in a company eight hours a day, making projects for a boss who I don‘t have anything in common with, doing videos I don‘t like. But I chose this way despite the difficult moments we are going through right now. We are experiencing a huge recession in Europe, this year it‘s been the worst for me. Finding a job is harder and harder every year. Companies closing, politicians reducing the country financing to companies, and the unemployment rate increasing everyday. To be a freelance at the moment is very risky but on the other hand I like this freedom, working on

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personal projects and using my spare time to improve my skills and knowledge. I would like to create my own company but this is time to save money and survive, at least in Spain. Of course there are more things that attract me like films, books, friends, family, my dogs and so on.

I think a good image can teleport you to new worlds, new experiences, new feelings. I think this is where their potential reside on.

DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER INTERESTS BESIDES MOTION GRAPHICS? At this moment I‘m working on a video game as a personal project. I am creating the pilot and I hope to be able to sell it to any

WHY DO YOU THINK IMAGES ARE POWERFUL?

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videogame company in order to get the financing to produce it in my own workplace.

mentioned before, and a video for some friends who are creating a typography website, where you can share typographic photos of signboards and places you watch in the street. I‘m also working on a personal project of a videoclip of a beat boxer musician, you can watch the teaser here (https://vimeo.com/45437005).

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY? About professional projects, I‘m working on a project for a musical festival in Rome (Italy).  About personal projects, I‘m working on a personal project for FIFTY8, the video game I

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NADIA WICKER PHOTOGRAPHER, 32, FRANCE WORKING ON SELF PORTRAITS

T H E S T R A N G E & T H E B E A U T I F U L

HOW DID YOU BEGIN YOUR CAREER?

WHY PHOTOGRAPHY/ART? I used to draw and paint when I was younger. I know that some of my pictures remain inspired by painting in one way or another. Maybe I was just impatient and I needed to create immediately with a camera!

I started as a makeup artist and one day I decided to create my own pictures. First I started with models, fashion, beauty and portrait work. I then quickly worked with my own face. I didn‘t know that it would be the most important part of my work! I then began to learn lights and techniques. I was my own guinea pig! My pleasure in self-portraits grew because I realized I didn‘t have to set any limits with myself. I was free to do whatever I wanted, no matter if it hurt or what! I loved the freedom to experiment.

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND HOW DID YOU END UP IN PARIS? I grew up in a very small village in Alsace with less than 500 people. Nothing more than a milk diary and a baker! I remember I never imagined it possible to leave this place before I heard about art. I did one year in makeup school and a couple of months later I decided to move to the big City! I stayed for two years

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name, who shaped the first humans with some clay. My fascination for the clothing extravagance, the painting and the movement, led me to create this work of heroines, warriors and fanciful queens.

and then I went home, taking the train when I had to work. I finally decided in December to move in Paris.

YOU HAVE A VERY UNIQUE STYLE WHERE DOES THAT COME FROM?

TELL US ABOUT YOUR HONORABLE MENTIONS FOR THIS PROJECT?

Thank you very much!! It‘s hard to believe it so it‘s very hard to answer that question!

Oh this was a big surprise! When I ended up with this series I told myself I would never show it until she gets something special. Some people motivated me to try contests (thanks to them) and I decided to propose Nuwa. She received four mentions in four different categories, I was so happy!

WHAT INSPIRED NUWA? When I was younger I modeled for some stylists and they made me dream with all their creations. I guess it began there… Nuwa is a series of imaginary characters, in reference to the creative goddess of the same

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TELL US YOUR PROCESS WHEN YOU CREATE, EX DO YOU PLAY MUSIC, DRINK, ETC WHAT PULLS THE INSPIRATION?

OUR FIRST ISSUE IS ABOUT COLLABORATION; CAN YOU TELL US WHAT THAT MEANS TO YOU AND WHY YOU THINK IT‘S IMPORTANT TO YOUR WORK?

I should try taking pictures being drunk! Seriously, most of the time I‘m working and playing music. Hearing the music gives me the inspiration. I‘m the kind of the obsessed girl who can listen to the same song a thousand times. When this happens, it helps me to take images with my camera.

Without collaborations I wouldn’t be here talking to you! It helps learning about our work, about people, ourselves, about what we want, it‘s important.

WHY DO YOU THINK IMAGES ARE POWERFUL?

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU?

It‘s something I can‘t really explain. I find images powerful because the reaction is immediate. You have one second to please or not. One second is enough to judge one picture. But in one second, you love it or not, you‘re obliged to get an emotion.

There are not only artists but also things and emotions. But if you want to know, the last artist who inspired me was Stromae and his song Formidable.

WHAT ATTRACTS YOU?

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY?

The strange, and the beautiful.

I‘m actually working for some artists who send me pictures of them, and I combine their universe with mine. I just finished my last series, Ghost Park, and I’m beginning a new one.

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P L A U S I B L E R E A L I T Y DAVID TRAUTRIMAS DIGITAL ARTIST

DAVID, PLEASE TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF AND WHAT YOU DO FOR A LIVING?

WHAT STARTED YOUR VISUAL CURIOSITY? As a high school kid my friend and I had this really bizarre experimental audio project called Mrs. Sagan, named after the wife of famed cosmologist Carl Sagan. We wanted to make a cover for our album, so using the family macintosh, a scanner, and photoshop version 2 we digitized in the body of a tabloid model and replaced her head with that of Carl Sagan‘s, creating Mrs Sagan. This first experience with image manipulation was the genesis of my interest in digital based art.

I make my living by selling artwork through private galleries and working on public art commissions. I also do a bit of freelance work studio assisting or fabricating for other artists.

HOW DID YOU BEGIN YOUR CAREER? After graduating art school I had a job with summers off, during which I‘d work my ass off creating new work to show in group exhibitions and various other venues. By the time I finished that job I had enough momentum behind my work to have it support me financially.

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND WHERE ARE YOU LIVING NOW? I currently live in Toronto, and I grew up a few hours east of the city in Belleville Ontario.

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WHERE DOES YOUR TASTE AND EYE COME FROM?

WHAT ATTRACTS YOU? Precision and depth. Without unnecessary complexity.

I spent a lot of time doing my own thing as a kid, often taking things apart and trying to fix and or build new things out of them. I think my taste is an extension of a life long interest in the creative possibilities of commonplace objects.

WHAT KIND OF COLLABORATING DO YOU DO WITH YOUR WORK? My practice is a very solitary one, so I don‘t have much to say as far as collaborations go. That‘s not to say I don‘t reach out to other people for their insights into what I‘m doing. I always like to consider alternative viewpoints, and more than once my work has benefited from acting upon them.

WHAT INSPIRES YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY/SCULPTURE WORKS? Combining mid modern design aesthetics with retro futurism to create an alternate but plausible reality.

DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER INTERESTS BESIDES ART/ PHOTOGRAPHY?

TELL US MORE ABOUT THIS REALITY YOU CREATE WITH YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY?

Collecting mugs, making homemade pickles, cycling, and road trips to name a few.

It relies heavily on real world objects or architecture, none of which fully express the structures or environments that I‘d like to see, so I use those things to create a reality I‘m interested in seeing.

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY? Snow banks. Hundreds and hundreds of photographs of snow banks. To date I have no idea what the outcome will be.

TELL US YOUR PROCESS WHEN YOU CREATE, EX DO YOU PLAY MUSIC, DRINK, ETC WHAT PULLS THE INSPIRATION?

WHAT IS THE LAST BOOK YOU‘VE READ?

Above all I need a space to call my own, I don‘t do well in shared environments. Music is a constant, drinking not so much. Exercise is a big help too, I find spending an hour doing laps in a pool is a great way to generate ideas or work through creative problems.

The Wind up Bird Chronicle by Haruki Murakami

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU?

WHAT IS YOUR PHILOSOPHY ON LIFE?

WHAT ELSE DO YOU WANT TO EXPERIENCE IN LIFE? To bowl a perfect game, both 5 and 10 pin.

Too many to list them all, but to mention a few: Alex Colville, Gregory Crewdson, Bernd & Hilla Becher, Ed Rusha, Stephen Shore…

Don‘t fall in love with a car, the more you hate it the better it will run.

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TERRESTRIAL TRANSMISSION GLITCH PAINTINGS BY ANDY DENZLER

SWISS ARTIST ANDY DENZLER COMBINES A VARIETY OF MEDIUMS IN HIS ART PRACTICE, INCLUDING PAINTING, PRINTING, GRAPHIC DESIGN, SCULPTURE, AND DRAWING. HIS WORKS MOVE BETWEEN ABSTRACTION AND REALITY, USING THE CLASSICAL APPLICATIONS OF OIL PAINTING TO BROACH THE SHIFTING LINES BETWEEN FICTION AND REALITY. DENZLER‘S PIECES ARE SNAP-SHOTS OF EVENTS THAT TAKE PLACE IN THE SPAN OF MERE MOMENTS, DISTORTED IN THEIR MOVEMENTS, THEIR TIMEFRAME ARTIFICIALLY SMEARED AND ELONGATED INTO FROZEN ETERNITIES LIKE THE OSCILLATING FRAMES OF A VHS TAPE HOVERING ON PAUSE. ANDY, PLEASE TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF AND WHAT YOU DO FOR A LIVING?

something was hovering beneath the surface of the paint. It’s as if I’ve pressed the fastforward on a video machine, then hit the pause button, so reality comes to a stand-still. I speed up and slow down the paint. What remains is a distorted moment—classically painted, oil on canvas—which, upon closer inspection is very abstract, but from distance looks real.

I’m a visual artist. In art school I spent a lot of time playing with audio-visual gear – mostly photography and film. One day when I was experimenting in painting with abstract composition, I saw colour fields appear on the canvas, like what you get with long exposure time in photography. The effect was as if

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2166, Vreneli vom Guggisberg, 2013, Oil on canvas, 140 x 120 cm


HOW DID YOU BEGIN YOUR CAREER?

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND WHERE ARE YOU LIVING NOW?

I quit my day job as a graphic designer, set goals and put in long hours at the studio. I treated it like a full-time job – I still do. And then one day I got in touch with a gallery in Zurich that offered me my first show.

In Zurich which is still my home base after living abroad in different countries I mentioned before.

WHAT STARTED YOUR VISUAL CURIOSITY?

It evolved about ten years ago, when I moved from abstract to figurative painting. I began applying my painting technique to portraiture. At first I did a series of black and white sepia portraits, reinterpreting my own photography and film stills. Recently I’ve taken to isolating the movement in my paintings. The overall effect is less filmic, but more dramatic. There’s more tension and distortion. I wanted to create a painting that looked like a found object. Multimedia-based a disturbance of pictorial content by painterly sensitivity and rhythmical accents. These glitch paintings are influenced by the media, my work is marked by the memories of a media world in which black and white television still reigned supreme, like terrestrial transmission with image disturbance if you think about the first moving images from the moon.

WHERE DOES THIS GLITCH PAINTING COME FROM?

When I was sixteen, I was reproducing original works of Warhol, Basquiat, Schnabel, Clemente, Picasso and Monet for a famous Swiss art dealer in the 80’s. These reproductions were used for art books or print material. In 1981 few had heard of Basquiat. I could not understand what he was doing; it irritated and fascinated me at the same time. When I was nineteen I moved during apartheid to South Africa for one year. These experiences left a big impression on me. One year later as a photographer in the Swiss army I had the opportunity to work with all different kinds of audio-visual equipment, like video and photo material. I was interested to experiment with different techniques. Later I lived in L.A., NY and London. All these experiences left strong influences on my own personal life and work as an artist to this day.

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2101, Ophelia II, 2012, Oil on canvas, 120 x 140 cm


2110, Beneath the Wide Suburban Sky, 2012, Oil on canvas, 120 x 140 cm


2082, Touch, 2012, Oil on canvas, 120 x 140 cm


WHAT INSPIRES THESE WORKS?

existence. For me as an artist it’s important that the paintings I create are believable. Jean Baudrillard argues; we no longer “imagine” in the same sense as before; both the imagined and the real are equally hyper-real.

My inspiration comes from many places but mostly observation of everyday people. I always have a camera close by using digital or analog cameras like a sketchbook for new ideas. I also enjoy portraying people but not in a staged way. Film has a strong influence, too. In fact, I’m somewhat of a film addict. The rawness of Andy Warhol’s screen tests have influenced me. Julian Schnabel’s “The Diving Bell and the Butterfly”, “Short Cuts” by Robert Altmann, “Songs from the Second Floor” by Roy Andersson and the Cohen Brothers are all on my current short list. I seem to have an obsession with time. To capture a moment in time which begets a narrative that the viewer can complete. I like to raise questions. Issues of modern society that nag away at me. By asking questions, my perception of the world finds its way into my paintings. Applying distortion to parts or across a composition one not only feels time or the stoppage of time through the movement, but is invited to project ones’ own narrative or emotions. Time also plays a role in how a piece takes shape – in my distinctive technique and process of subtraction. Because I‘m painting wet-on-wet with thick layers of impasto, the process is very time-sensitive.

TELL US YOUR PROCESS WHEN YOU CREATE, EX DO YOU PLAY MUSIC, DRINK, ETC. WHAT PULLS THE INSPIRATION? When visitors or sitters for my portraits come to my studio, I guess they feel immediately comfortable. The interior is important for my work. I’m using the studio as a stage for my compositions like a musician.

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU? Warhol is omnipresent and the most influential postmodern artist. There are so many old masters like Velasquez, Goya or Tizian I appreciate.

WHAT ATTRACTS YOU? A good song, a great composition, a poem, humans, a face-to-face encounter.

OUR FIRST ISSUE IS ABOUT COLLABORATION; CAN YOU TELL US WHAT THAT MEANS TO YOU AND WHY YOU THINK IT‘S IMPORTANT TO YOUR WORK?

TELL US MORE ABOUT THIS REALITY YOU CREATE WITH YOUR WORK?

Currently I’m working on a new concept for my next museum show in Nanjing, China. Nei Xiao/Wai Bao, IN&OUTsource, examines the concept, structure, and narrative of “to out-source”. Like many other artists I’m collaborating with other creative people, photographers and filmmakers to find new ways or forms of source material.

It‘s about aesthetics and the refined sensual pleasure that “painting” as a generality has to offer. There is no difference if I’m decomposing the landscape of nature or human figure as portrait. My paintings emphasize the relation between the human nature, and figure accentuates the human existence as surface

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2132, Ophelia III, 2013, Oil on canvas, 180 x 150 cm


2078, Hiding, 2012, Oil on canvas, 140 x 120 cm


2081, Something Waits for You to Breathe Again, 2012, Oil on canvas, 140 x 120 cm


f 2174, Ghost in Me, Oil on canvas, 80 x 70cm

2178, Decision, 2013, Oil on canvas, 80 x 70 cm


2133, Purple Leaves Fall into the Water, 2013, Oil on canvas, 170 x 180 cm


WHY DO YOU CREATE? WHY DO YOU PAINT?

same time I’m preparing international shows in USA, China and Germany.

I like the process of painting. It is liberating and evocative at the same time. I just have to paint every day in my studio except Sundays. Mostly, I paint conceptually for a particular project or show. What interests me usually, what’s happening in the world at the moment, like my “American Paintings” Exhibition in New York 2005 after Bush was reelected, or the “Insomnia” Show in Lisbon 2007. This way of working starts with finding an intense angle on the theme. Then researching source material like new media, as well as my own films and photos.

WHAT IS THE LAST FILM YOU‘VE SEEN? Caravaggio (Derek Jarman, Tilda Swinton).

WHAT ELSE DO YOU WANT TO EXPERIENCE IN LIFE? Building my dream house and finding time and inspiration to create a historical masterpiece.

WHAT IS YOUR PHILOSOPHY ON LIFE? Live fast, love hard, die young.

DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER INTERESTS BESIDES ART/ PHOTOGRAPHY?

LAST THING THAT MADE YOU SMILE? I was brushing my teeth and suddenly the water was turned off.

My friends, music, nature, movies, sports, my summer house in the south.

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY? At the moment I’m developing a new series of large oil paintings and a new edition of graphic prints, heliogravure in black and white as studies based on my original paintings. At the

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C O N N E C T I O N P U Z Z L E LU C A S S I M Õ E S I N D E P E N D E N T A R T I S T

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TELL US ABOUT YOUR BACKGROUND IN ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN?

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND HOW DID YOU END UP WHERE YOU ARE TODAY?

I graduated in architecture and urbanism (I studied in Brazil and in Italy) but my works of art came after university. Today I believe that my artwork still places me in the realm of architecture. The two areas crossover, their boundaries often blur. My formal education is in architecture. I have worked on residential, commercial and school projects, for example, and I still work on projects for friends once in a while. In architecture, which comprises the technical and artistic realms, a drawing is more than a drawing; it is the intent that something concrete will materialize through the construction process. However, long before this type of drawing, as a child, I used to draw and paint as if it were my job, my purpose. Perhaps this yearning to have drawing as my destiny is what led me to architecture. And perhaps my education as an architect redefined the meaning of art for me and opened new paths to explore. In my work, the materiality of the supporting medium is important. The process of making the support a part of the work is achieved through the experiences it is subjected to, such as burning, cutting, distorting, diluting, which, at its most extreme, can destroy the subject. This is perhaps the same pleasure a child has when dissecting a frog in science class.

I’m Brazilian; I was born in 1980 in a small city at the countryside. For 10 years I have worked and lived in São Paulo, and I still consider that I am beginning my work...

TELL US ABOUT YOUR STYLE AND WHERE THAT COMES FROM? I don‘t believe I have a “style.” I actually try to free myself from this idea, and as an architect “style” is a dangerous word. Each work I make is a new experiment, it is free to happen in the search using the most interesting ways to get to a meaning, so the support, the way it’s done, it is all language to be considered when the work is finished. That‘s why I try not to be linked to only one method.

TELL US ABOUT YOUR FIRST BIG BREAK? I don’t consider it as a big break, but my work that have been mostly shown and published are the ones from the unportratis series, that I began in 2010. In this series of works I invited intimate friends over to tell me a secret as I took their portrait. However, my intention was not to hear their secret, but to capture the expressions of each one at the moment they revealed their secret. I also asked each one to choose a song for me to listen to in my earphones while I photographed them. And, after the photo session, I asked each one if the secret had a color, and these are the colors the portraits carry. From this photo shooting session I chose 10 different portraits to cut

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TELL US YOUR PROCESS WHEN YOU CREATE, EX DO YOU PLAY MUSIC, DRINK ETC...WHAT PULLS THE INSPIRATION?

and overlap. The experience of this portrait shooting session is the one of being present in a really intimate moment, when someone reveals a secret for himself (once I’m not listening to the secret), this moment of putting an unsaid event into works make them act in a really personal way, sometimes of shyness, seriousness or happiness. I’m present there, making the photos, but the music in my headphones takes the reality out of it, I’m just watching this moment and the music I‘m listening is the only clue I have from that secret. So each experience is different from another. Everything influences the final work; the place, the mood of the day and the emotions of the person I choose to photograph. So if someone is feeling uncomfortable with that I feel uncomfortable too.

It’s not a linear process, I usually have many ideas, and write down many of them, make croquet, etc, but a lot of these ideas do not go further than this. The ones that keep reverberating in my mind are the ones that I continue, so I make tests, models, try materials and that’s how the process goes, with many other things that cross this idea’s path. I never know how this first idea will end, and usually I’m happy when the result is really different from the initial idea. There is always music, the rest varies.

WHAT DOES COLLABORATION MEAN TO YOU? Collaborations are a nice way to practice the author’s solution. To create a work that has no real author, that belong to a group of people but none of them themselves would get to this specific result. I enjoy this experience a lot. And I try to practice it as much as I can.

WHAT INSPIRES THIS WORK? The inspiration comes from the impossibility of resuming a person in a single image, a single portrait. One of the reasons behind the unportraits derived from the document photos that identify us to a government. Here in Brazil, the documents that identify us carry a 3cm x 4cm photo. These photos that bureaucratically identify us in the documents are those that tell the least about us as individuals. That is why the size of the unportraits and un-memories is 30cm x 40cm, it is a size 10x larger than the 3x4 photos and require 10 layers to create.

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU? I like the work of many artists, but that doesn’t mean I inspire my work over their work, what inspires me most is life, the experiences with friends, lovers, anonymous person, etc. But I like the works of Nuno Ramos. Waltercio Caldas, Gui Mohallem, Juan Betancurth, Felix Gonzales-torres, Theo Firmo, James Turrel.

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WHAT ATTRACTS YOU?

WHAT‘S THE LAST SONG YOU LISTENED TO?

New things! Maybe, the false idea of being contemporary. Knowing that time exists in many different layers.

Miriam Makeba – the retreat song.

FAVORITE BOOK?

YOUR WORK IS VERY CONSTRUCTIVE BUT COMBINES A LOT OF DISTORTED ELEMENTS, WHY IS THAT?

I don’t believe “favorite books”, the last one I read and really likes id called “Ó”, from Nuno Ramos.

NIGHT OR DAY?

It’s my way of intervening over a fixed meaning, and with that, create a whole new meaning and reaction over it.

Night.

LAST THING THAT MADE YOU LAUGH?

WHAT FASCINATES YOU? Things that are ugly and beautiful at the same time.

My 2-month niece playing with my dad.

DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER INTERESTS BESIDES ART?

Andrey Tarkovsky – Stalker.

FAVORITE FILM? SHOES OR SANDALS?

Art is not my main interest, I prefer philosophy, anthropology, architecture, films, literature, science, but in the end it all approaches to art. My idea of an artist is not the one that carries a great knowledge, but the one that create powerful works to recreate feeling, ideas and knowledge.

Shoes.

FAVORITE FOOD? The ones I cook with my friends.

FAVORITE QUOTE? I might sound a petulant, but it is not. But I don’t like quotes…

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY? In my case the personal and professional are almost the same, right now I’m trying to slow down and give a break on creation, this year I have already participated on 13 exhibitions, 3 of them solo shows with different works. I hope I can spend my time reading, watching films, talking to friends, etc.

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TEMPORAL FORM ANSEN SEALE PHOTOGRAPHER

ANSEN, PLEASE TELL US A LITTLE ABOUT YOURSELF AND WHAT YOU DO FOR A LIVING?

WHAT STARTED YOUR VISUAL CURIOSITY?

I‘m an artist and a commercial photographer. I live and work in San Antonio, Texas. While it may not be the Mecca of Contemporary Art, it has an incredible amount of “corazón” for the arts. Our community is incredibly supportive of all things creative and I truly believe that SA and it‘s culture is really on the rise, nationally and internationally.

My close friends in high school made movies. We were the original Super-8 crowd. This is the reason I went to Trinity University to pursue a film career. While there, I discovered the visual fine arts and decided that my future lay there.

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND WHERE ARE YOU LIVING NOW? I grew up in McAllen Texas, ten miles from the Mexican border. My family still lives there.

HOW DID YOU BEGIN YOUR CAREER?

WHERE DOES YOUR VISUAL STYLE COME FROM?

At home growing up, my mom always maintained a “make-it” drawer -- a place my brothers and I could go to get materials and inspiration for any creative project we were involved in. Old alarm clocks, marbles, string, dis-used eyeglasses, felt, batteries, tape, a blue glass jar...anything cool that my parents thought might be turned into something like art.

My father was the conductor of the symphony in our area for 30 years. My mother is the poet laureate of Texas. I really had no other course but to become an artist. Of course, as an artist, I had to do something unique. So I became a visual artist.

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THE SUBJECT OF MY PHOTOGRAPHY IS TIME. IT‘S A DIFFICULT THING TO SEE, BUT THE OBJECTS IN THE IMAGES REFLECT TIME IN THEIR MOTION.


WHAT INSPIRES YOUR SLITSCAN PHOTOGRAPHY?

the second dimension of the picture plane (X) over time. The images are time exposures in one dimension and snapshots in the other. Only moving or changing objects register clearly. Still objects are rendered only as lines across the picture plane. This is the opposite of what you would expect with traditional photography where moving objects are blurred and still objects are clear.

The subject of my photography is time. It‘s a difficult thing to see, but the objects in the images reflect time in their motion.

WHAT IS SLITSCAN PHOTOGRAPHY? Here‘s a super-nerdy explanation of what‘s happening inside my camera: My camera exchanges the horizontal spatial dimension of X with the dimension of Time. This is done by imaging only the Y axis (a vertical line of pixels) of the same scene over and over again, up to 500 times per second. The internal processor of the camera arranges these pixel columns side by side, building up

YOU INVENTED A MODERN DIGITAL VERSION OF THE PANORAMIC CAMERA, CAN YOU PLEASE EXPLAIN TO US WHY YOU DECIDED TO DO THAT?

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TRUE CREATIVITY COMES FROM A SYNTHESIS OF LEFT AND RIGHT BRAINS, YIN AND YANG, EFFORT AND RELAXATION. IT‘S THE COMBINATION OF THESE FORCES THAT UNLEASHES THE BEAST.

During the 1990s, I decided that I would create a camera to make a 360 degree panorama for virtual tours. First, I did it with film (because digital didn‘t exist back then) and then with a digital camera. While testing the digital camera, I discovered that the image that was created by accident was a lot more interesting that a normal photograph. So I set about to refine the aesthetic and develop a vision of “slitscan”.

slitscan camera sees the world. For the most part, photographers have applied their craft to the imitation of the real world. The camera has been used to capture a frozen slice of time, arresting a single instant from its place along the flow of the time line. Rather than suspending a single moment, my photography examines the passage of time. To accomplish this, a single sliver of space is imaged over an extended period of time, yielding the surprising result that unmoving objects are blurred and moving bodies are rendered clearly. The model in the studio must move in order to be captured. This is un-manipulaed photography in the purist sense-- a form of photography where abstraction is the norm,

TELL US MORE ABOUT THIS REALITY YOU CREATE WITH YOUR PHOTOGRAPHY? It‘s important to understand that my images are not manipulated. This is the way the

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not the exception. Instead of mirroring the world as we know it, I believe this camera records a hidden reality. Like a microscope or telescope, the machine expands our ability to perceive more about the nature of reality. The apparent “distortions” in the images all happen in-camera. So, when the real world is this beautifully bizarre, manipulation is unnecessary. I tease out this unusual reality lurking just beneath the surface of our everyday visual experience in the same way the cubist painters created dynamic tension by exploiting the interplay between what the viewer expects and what she gets. As photography is traditionally the rendering of real-world objects in two dimensions, that same creative tension arises in my work because, in effect, it discards the horizontal dimension and substitutes for it the fourth dimension, time.

painters: Dalí and Magritte for their sheer weirdness, Lichtenstein, Motherwell, Still and all the cubist painters. Even though my work looks like surrealism, I believe it is more akin to Cubism. For instance, the nudes in my work, seen from multiple perspectives and different points in time, imply a possible root in Cubism. But while the contorted figures of Cubist paintings are familiar and accepted, the more modern medium of photography sets it apart from its ancestors. Because the works are not paintings but unedited photographs, we cannot pretend that the disfigured bodies and twisting landscapes are products of an overactive, artistic imagination. The strange world recorded by my camera is not made up, but exists right in front of us everyday. While it is easy to become caught up in the technology behind the images as well as their scientific implications, I believe it is important not to overlook their aesthetic value. After all, no matter how the images challenge our perceptions of the world, it is the pure, immediate visual impact of the composition that really hits us as we stand before any work of art.

TELL US YOUR PROCESS WHEN YOU CREATE, EX DO YOU PLAY MUSIC, DRINK, ETC WHAT PULLS THE INSPIRATION? There‘s the technical side which requires lots of brain-power….and then there‘s the creative side that requires lots of attention to the intuitive side. I don‘t believe that artists can attain or attribute their muse to a substance or a state of being. True creativity comes from a synthesis of left and right brains, Yin and Yang, effort and relaxation. It‘s the combination of these forces that unleashes the beast.

WHAT ATTRACTS YOU?

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU?

Believe it or not…nature and beauty. I know that in today‘s art world, that‘s totally un-cool to admit. But despite the rather “un-real” nature of my work, I still rely on nature for my inspiration. It might not be kittens and sunsets, but I view nature in terms of mathematics, insect parts, weather patterns, wood grain, snakes having sex or whatever!

There are some photographers that I appreciate, but more influential are perhaps

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OUR FIRST ISSUE IS ABOUT COLLABORATION, CAN YOU TELL US WHAT THAT MEANS TO YOU AND WHY YOU THINK IT‘S IMPORTANT TO YOUR WORK?

WHY DO YOU THINK IMAGES ARE POWERFUL? Images have a language all their own. It‘s a visual vocabulary that stimulates our reptilian brains.

Photography is ALL about collaboration. Really. Any photographer that thinks their work is all their own is totally kidding themselves. Everything we do, everything we see, everything we think...is all borrowed. Sorry, but it‘s true. To borrow a recent phrase from the news, “you didn‘t build that.” You got it (at least in part) from Adams, Stieglitz, Steichen, Lee, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Man Ray, Irving Penn, Harold Edgerton, Elliot Erwitt and every other photograph that went before you. The more I study the history of Art, the more humbled I become in thinking that I‘m doing anything original. Another point of collaboration is in the actual taking of the picture. The model in front of the camera is like the musician that plays my composition; she adds her own interpretation to my basic instructions on how to move. Dancers make the best models because they can control their movements.

DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER INTERESTS BESIDES ART/ PHOTOGRAPHY? Within the world of art and photography, there is so much to do. I do enjoy film, cooking and a good peaty Scotch. I purchased a CNC machine about a year ago for a public art project, and I‘m enjoying learning how it works and exploring what all I can do with it.

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY? I am working on a large commission for a hospital here in San Antonio. It is a wall of LED panels, 150 feet long that reacts to the people passing by. I‘m also growing a company to help public artists and art administrators get together. It‘s called PublicArtist.org.

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PHOTOGRAPHY IS ALL ABOUT COLLABORATION. REALLY. ANY PHOTOGRAPHER THAT THINKS THEIR WORK IS ALL THEIR OWN IS TOTALLY KIDDING THEMSELVES.


IMAGES HAVE A LANGUAGE ALL THEIR OWN. IT‘S A VISUAL VOCABULARY THAT STIMULATES OUR REPTILIAN BRAINS.


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FASHION COLLAGE ANJELA FREYJA CREATIVE MULTIMEDIA DESIGNER

HOW DID YOU BEGIN YOUR CAREER?

University there and then came to Montreal to continue into Art School.

I‘ve been doing design for as long as I can remember. My dad is a computer scientist so we always had great computers, even when we didn‘t have much of anything else. I would draw for hours on MS Paint. I made my way into PaintShopPro when I was 11 and Photoshop in high school. I started coding when I was 12. Seriously nerdy! But I love it and it‘s the only thing that I‘ve always known I wanted to do as a career.

YOU HAVE A VERY UNIQUE STYLE WHERE DOES THAT COME FROM? I was hired to work in the photography department for a fashion company in 2010. I retouched e-commerce photos for 2 years, all day, everyday. It was boring and not what I wanted to be doing. I started working with photos in a different way as a sort of escape, to channel creativity in a job that wasn‘t really creative. Now I work full-time as a designer (not in photography!). So I do photo collage and editing for enjoyment. I also studied Philosophy and Polisci in University, I think that reflects in my work as well.

WHY GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART DIRECTION? It just comes naturally. I really love it. Especially art direction. I love when I can get a project and run with it. It‘s creation, communication and strategy. I love putting those things together. It‘s a puzzle. You should‘ve seen my room when I was 14…you couldn‘t see the walls, the whole thing was covered in finished puzzles.

WHAT INSPIRES YOUR COLLAGE WORK? I love fashion photography and styling. It‘s glamorous and fun and can make you feel so good. But there is also a dark, shallow side of the industry. As a photo retoucher, you really become familiar with it. I‘d spend all day stamping out moles, beauty, “imperfections,” bringing in thighs, painting out “bad skin,” it gets to you. I like for my collages to be glamorous and also dark. Although I will say my work these days has been more fun.

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND HOW DID YOU END UP IN MONTREAL? I grew up in St. John‘s, Newfoundland. It‘s a small island on the east coast. As far east as you can go! I lived there until I was 19. It‘s a beautiful place, very inspiring. I went to

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TELL US YOUR PROCESS WHEN YOU CREATE, EX DO YOU PLAY MUSIC, DRINK, ETC WHAT PULLS THE INSPIRATION?

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY? Right now I‘m the senior designer at POP Montreal. It‘s a 6-month contract. It‘s a big job, a lot of work. Great lessons. I can‘t wait to add it to my portfolio. I have so much to update but no time these days.

Lots of things! I’m inspired by the mood of the fashion collection and photography. Life. Love. Surprise. Emotion. My boyfriend (and design partner!), Teodoro Zamudio also inspires me. I just do what I feel.

WHAT‘S THE LAST SONG YOU LISTENED TO?

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU? Gosh, so many! I love 2x4 in New York right now. Stefan Sagmeister. Chrystel Livolsi‘s photography is really beautiful. Also everything coming out of San Francisco is really great right now.

Phedre - Ancient Nouveau.

WHAT ATTRACTS YOU?

NIGHT OR DAY?

COLOR! I love minimalism but right now, definitely color!

Day. I am most creative in the morning.

FAVORITE BOOK? Sirens of Titan by Kurt Vonnegut. Or Sweet Tooth by Ian McEwan. Both amazing authors.

LAST THING THAT MADE YOU LAUGH?

DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER INTERESTS BESIDES GRAPHIC DESIGN/ART DIRECTION?

My boyfriend Teo. He is spanish and learning english. I love some of the ways he uses english and it always make me laugh. I am always surprised by how fast he learns.

Yes definitely. I‘m very interested in business management right now and the psychology of client/designer relationships. I‘m learning a lot. Also architecture and interior design.

FAVORITE FILM? The Shining.

SHOES OR SANDALS? Shoes!

FAVORITE DESIGNER? Céline, Prada, Manish Aurora and Balmain.

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BALANCED SYNTHESIS E R N E S TO

A R T I L LO


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HOW DID YOU BEGIN YOUR CAREER?

in the magazine I felt cold so I remade it in order to get closer to my personality and away from fashion itself. Though a lot of times the results of my collages is a new image that extends even more than its value as a fashion image. That’s why I collaborate a lot with designers, magazines or fashion brands.

I started painting when I was a child. I used to go to painting lessons with a great group of old ladies. I learned more about their lives than about painting. In that time my father made me write topics everyday. My first text, when I was 8, was about friendship and written with huge round letters. I hated doing that then but now I appreciate it so much because I learned how important it is to write about your thoughts. Then I started taking pictures. I remember I won a prize in school for photographing flowers. It is very funny because now I use them a lot in my compositions. I used to go to theatre, play volleyball and have equestrian lessons. I think this is how everything started. Growing in a great family that supported me to try so many different things and make me think that I could do whatever.

WHERE DID YOU GROW UP AND HOW DID YOU END UP WHERE YOU ARE TODAY? I’m from Málaga in Andalucía, the south of Spain, where spontaneity and emotions are everywhere, so imagine how sensitive I could be… But now I live in the capital of Spain, in Madrid, a city with a very strong character, actually we could say Madrid is like this Penelope Cruz crazy characters (as Maria Elena in Vichy Cristina Barcelona or Raimunda in Volver) you have to deal with her everyday and you hate her sometimes but she is so generous that you have to just love her.

WHY DESIGN/COLLAGE?

TELL US ABOUT YOUR STYLE AND WHERE THAT COMES FROM?

I‘ve watched my father doing collage since I was a child but I didn‘t start to explore the technique until three years ago. I found out collage was great because you literally break/ cut with imagery (even if they are my own) that I like aesthetically but you feel far from your emotions. You create new compositions with a more personal meaning. This is what happened with fashion for example. When I shot a fashion editorial and then saw the result

I like to feel relaxed but excited when I see my work. In my personal life, it is very similar; I look for the balance but how to break it too. When I have that feeling, then I think the work is done. I look for that moment when emotions make reason more fragile.

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TELL US ABOUT YOUR FIRST BIG BREAK?

OUR FIRST ISSUE IS ABOUT THE IDEA OF COLLABORATION; TELL US WHY YOU THINK IT’S IMPORTANT AND HOW IT INFLUENCES YOUR WORK?

Well I think my first big break was when I decided to do just what I felt I had to. To work on my own and focus my creativity in the projects and its direct relationship with the ones I work. This year I made the cover of Elle Collections UK, which has been a beautiful project for me. I created a fashion version of “The Garden of Earthly Delights” by Bosch. It was very exciting when they asked me to make this cover and I wanted to do something very into my style. Mixing fashion and old art has always been in my work, so I started working with this idea and the result was this crowded and surrealist fashion composition.

I collaborate all the time with people and I love the close relationship I create with them. For me it is very interesting to create a space where both, the client that you are working with and yourself feel comfortable. My deal is to achieve the emotion when they see the first test; I like to make them feel that I have put emotions in images to what they feel inside.

WHAT ARTISTS INSPIRE YOU? My inspirations are a weird collage too. I love ancient portraits and sculptures but also modern artists like Matisse, Picasso or Soroya. I was brought up in a family where tradition matters so Spanish culture and folklore, religion, flamingo… are always there too. Cinema and books are a huge inspiration for me and I don‘t understand life without music. Fashion has a lot to say too but being honest, the people around me inspire me the most. What I feel for my family, friends or loves are my best artistic tools.

WHAT PULLS YOUR INSPIRATION? I try to put my flat in order. I feel like if the space is in order, my head will be as well. Then I put music, its always there; very often I get up in my chair and dance a bit as if I was in a video clip or in a concert. I drink a lot too. Water always. Nothing to do with alcohol or drugs to pull the inspiration, that sounds very bohemian, but from my point of view to look for the inspiration out of your consciousness is for cowards.

WHAT ATTRACTS YOU? Sincerity, courage, weakness, women, men, sex and food.

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DO YOU HAVE ANY OTHER INTERESTS BESIDES PHOTOGRAPHY/GRAPHIC DESIGN?

FAVORITE BOOK? “Letters to a Young Poet” by Rilke.

NIGHT OR DAY?

I write very often, I love to cook when I have time and I attend flamingo dance lessons.

Day.

WHAT ARE YOU CURRENTLY WORKING ON PROFESSIONALLY AND PERSONALLY?

LAST THING THAT MADE YOU LAUGH? Gabriel waking up.

I’m working on a pair of fashion brand campaigns, advising a cosmetics company in terms of image and creative strategy, and finishing the images for a Dutch orchids‘ brand and collaborating with different magazines. Personally I am working on how to make my self develop into a better person.

FAVORITE FILM? Many or none.

SHOES OR SANDALS? Shoes.

FAVORITE DESIGNER?

WHAT‘S THE LAST SONG YOU LISTENED TO?

Raf Simons.

“A Change is Gonna Come” by Sam Cooke.

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FIFTY8 / NATURE PETER OLSCHINSKY ALESSANDRO PUCCINELLI JÜRGEN HECKEL

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ASSETS OF BEAUTY

PHOTOGRAPHER B I L LY R O O D / B I L LY R O O D.CO M + FIFTY8 MAKEUP LISA TRUNDA / FORD ARTISTS MODEL LEAH / FORD MODELS

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CHROMATISM PHOTOGRAPHED BY CASEY VANGE VANGEPHOTO.NET + FIFTY8 MODEL MATTHEW BREWER / FORD MODELS HAIR BY RYAN BURRELL / RYANBURRELLHAIR.COM MAKEUP BY RUBEN FLORES


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FIFTY8 / FASHION SIX LEE CORSAIR EPICENE BLIGHT

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Mo d el : Ma r i a n a / FOR D Mo d el s


SIX LEE SS13 + ERNESTO ARTILLO SIX LEE, FOUNDER AND CHIEF DESIGNER FOR THE BRAND SIXLEE AND THE FIRST CHINESE GRADUATES IN ONE OF THE MOST WELL-KNOWN FASHION DESIGN SCHOOLS, THE ROYAL ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS ANTWERP, BELGIUM IN 2009. AFTER GRADUATED, SIX MOVED TO LONDON FOR A COLLABORATION AT ALEXANDER MCQUEEN MENSWEAR TEAM. BY 2011, SIX SET UP HIS OWN BRAND AND AS AN ANTWERP-BASED MENSWEAR-FASHION DESIGNER. SIX LEE’S COLLECTION PRESENTED WITH THE TRADITIONAL BRITISH TAILORING-TRANSLATED IN CLEAN CUTS AND SHARP LINES COMBINED WITH SOFT COLORS, DREAMY & BOYISH DETAILS RESULT IN UNIQUE SILHOUETTES. AS WELL AS A NEW FRESH LEVEL WITH MODERN TWISTS AND NEW PROPORTIONS, TO MAKE A STATEMENT ON TRADITIONAL TAILORING. AS AN OVERLY ROMANTIC PERSON, SIX GETS INSPIRED BY THE MOST DIVERSE GENRES OF MUSIC AND FILMS. THE EMOTION HE PUTS INTO WRITING POEMS OR PRESSING FLOWERS, WILL BE FOUND IN EVERY SINGLE PIECE FROM HIS HANDS. CARRYING A TOUCH OF HIS LOVE-NEVER EVER DISAPPOINTING.

WHAT WAS THE MAIN INSPIRATION AND IDEA ABOUT THIS CAMPAIGN WITH ERNESTO?

I appreciate his artwork and I could see my work from his perspective.

WHAT DOES COLLABORATION MEAN TO YOU AS A DESIGNER?

About the campaign with Ernesto, I first saw his work online and I already fall in love with his art works right away, I used a lot of his images for inspiration of Spring Summer 2014. It‘s extremely complicating and sophisticated at the same time. I think we do have similar aesthetics, so I decided to send him an email and ask about the collaboration. The starting point of the collaboration was this idea of seeing my work from another aspect. As a designer, we have our own world. Sometimes its difficult for us to breakthrough it. I am very blessed I worked with Ernesto on this.

I am very happy about the collaboration. I think his works are amazing. I really like to share thoughts and stories with people I admire and appreciate. I‘m always surprised when I see the result of each collaboration, like something you would never accept yourself to create in a very good way. As a designer, I think a different kind of collaboration would make me want to learn things from different perspectives and different aesthetics.

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CORSAIR PHOTOGRAPHER B I L LY R O O D / B I L LY R O O D.C O M + FIFTY8 STYLING BRANDY KRAFT / ARTISTS BY TIMOTHY PRIANO GROOMING ANDREA SAMUELS MODEL GUO / IGNITE MODELS


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Sh i r t: Raf S i mons Bl azer : Ju l i u s Pants : Ju l i u s Sh oes : model ‘s own Neck l ace: Ul r i ka Ru ni u s Bel t: Commes des Garçons


Sh ir t: Ric k O we n s Pants : Commes d e s G arço n s Sh oes: mo d e l ‘ s own Hat: A nth ro p o l o g ie


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Sh i r t: Ju l i u s Pants : Commes des Garçons Sh oes : model ‘s own

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Sh ir t: Co mme s d e s G arço n s Gl as s e s : L in d a Far row Pro j e c ts To oth : s ty l is t‘ s own


Sh irt: Raf Simo ns Suit: Raf Simo ns Glas s es: sty lis t‘ s own


Sh i r t: Raf S i mons Bl azer : Ju l i u s Pants : Ju l i u s Sh oes : model ‘s own Neck l ace: Ul r i ka Ru ni u s Bel t: Commes des Garçons

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EPICE PHOTOGRAPHERS REMI KOZDRA & KASIA BACZULIS + FIFTY8 STYLING MAGDA PAŁUBA MODEL TANYA CHUBKO @ METROPOLITAN PARIS

coat: Leonnekederksen

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dress: Leonnekederksen, top: Issue de Secours Project, shoes: Zara

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top, mini skirt: Leonnekederksen, shirt: model‘s own


dress: Leonnekederksen, shoes: Christian Louboutin


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dress: Starkweather


top, pants: Fredfarrowbrittavelontan


BLIGHT

PHOTOGRAPHY BY RUBEN TOMAS + FIFTY8 STYLED BY MICHAEL MARSON H&M BY FLORENCE SAMAIN

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Rosemarijn Boolrap @ Be Models wears jacket Brioni, blouse Sandrina Fasoli, brooch vintage


Charlotte Jacob @ IMM wears swimsuit Sandrina Fasoli, bracelet Olivia Hainaut, shoes Nine west


Charlotte Goyvaerts @ IMM wears jacket Brioni, underwear ERES, tank T-by Alexander Wang, leggins Filippa K, sunglasses Balenciaga


Nadege @ IMM wears jacket Kris Van Assche


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Layna @ Dominique wears trousers See by Chloe


Charlotte Jacob @ IMM wears coat and belt Sandrina Fasoli, bracelet Olivia Hainaut


FIFTY8 MAGAZINE 2 0 1 3 / B I A N N U A L / I S S U E I PUBLISHER AND EDITOR-IN-CHIEF B I L LY R O O D CREATIVE DIRECTOR B I L LY R O O D ART & DESIGN DIRECTOR ATELIER OLSCHINSKY CONTRIBUTORS A L E S S A N D R O P U C C I N E L L I  ANDY DENZLER ANJELA FREYJA ANSEN SEALE DAVID TRAUTRIMAS ERNESTOR ARTILLO JAVIER VERDUGO JÜRGEN HECKEL KASIA BACZULIS & REMI KOZDRA KLAUS KAMPERT LUCAS SIMÕES NADIA WICKER PETER OLSCHINSKY RUBEN TOMAS © 2013 FIFTY8 MAGAZINE.   ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.   REPRODUCTION IN WHOLE OR IN PART WITHOUT PERMISSION I S S T R I C T LY P R O H I B I T E D.  

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Mo d el : A sht o n / FOR D Mo d el s Chi ca go


W E B S I T E – H T T P : // F I F T Y 8 M A G A Z I N E . C O M / B L O G –   H T T P : // F I F T Y 8 . T U M B L R . C O M / FACEBOOK – FIFTY8 / DIGITAL INSTAGRAM – @FIFTY8_DIGITAL TWITTER – @FIFTY8_DIGITAL A R T & D E S I G N – H T T P : // O L S C H I N S K Y . A T

Mo d el : Ma e / Ign i t e Mo d el s

FIFTY8 Issue I / Collaboration  

Fifty8 aims to engage a new generation of design conscious individuals and visionaries. Ours will be a voice of fewer words and powerful di...

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