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Top shots WINNING IMAGES FROM AUSTRALASIA’S RICHEST AMATEUR PHOTO COMP

Presented by

PLUS • Runners Up and Top 20 in each category revealed • What the judges said

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February 2018

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EDITOR’S NOTE

ESTABLISHED IN 1950 EDITORIAL Editor: Mike O’Connor mikeoconnor@yaffa.com.au Contributing Editors: Mick Fletoridis, Rob Ditessa, Drew Hopper, Anthony McKee and Saima Morel. ADVERTISING National Sales Manager: Jodie Reid (02) 9213 8261 jodiereid@yaffa.com.au Advertising Production: Kristal Young (02) 9213 8301 kristalyoung@yaffa.com.au

Some of the winners and runners-up from the 2017 Photographer of the Year. Images from top left to right: Jordan Robins, Matthew Tuffield, Donald Yip, Kristyn Taylor, Tim Fan, Yunis Tmeizeh, Clement Chua, Steve Allsop and Anthony Lawrence.

SUBSCRIPTIONS WEB: www.greatmagazines.com.au CALL: 1800 807 760 EMAIL: subscriptions@yaffa.com.au SUBSCRIPTION RATES 1 year/12 issues $99.00 1 year PLUS (print + digital) $108.90 Overseas 1 year NZ A$105 ASIA A$115 ROW A$150 Customer Service Manager: Martin Phillpott Australian Photography is published by Yaffa Media Pty Ltd. ABN 54 002 699 354 17-21 Bellevue Street, Surry Hills, NSW 2010. Ph: (02) 9281 2333 Fax: (02) 9281 2750 All mail to:

THE PHOTO ISSUE MIKE O’CONNOR, EDITOR

GPO Box 606, Sydney NSW 2001 Yaffa Photographic Group includes: Australian Photography, Capture, www.australianphotography.com www.facebook.com/ australianphotographymag Publisher: James Ostinga Marketing Manager: Sabarinah Elijah Marketing Executive: Emilie McGree Production Director: Matthew Gunn Art Director: Ana Maria Heraud Studio Manager: Lauren Esdaile Designer: Stéphanie Blandin de Chalain All editorial contributions should be sent to editor@australianphotography.com Australian Photography welcomes freelance contributions. Please check with the editor before submitting your story. Editorial guidelines are available via email and include full details on all requirements for story and image submissions. Please note that stories should be embedded in the body of the email, or supplied as email attachments in text format (.txt), rich text format (.rtf) or Microsoft Word format (.doc). Ideally, images should be supplied in JPEG format (.jpg) with a separate list of captions. JPEG compression should be no lower than 9/12 (75%). Digital images should be supplied at a resolution of 300ppi, at a physical size of at least 20cm and not larger than 42cm on the longest side.

ISSN 0004-9964

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ere it is, the wrap-up of our prestigious annual photo competition, Photographer of the Year presented by Panasonic. Purely by the numbers, 2017 was our biggest yet; the most entries, with more than 2,100, and the most categories and judges, with eight and 15, respectively. We kept the categories fundamentally the same for this year, but for the first time we did open the door to professionals in our Pro Photo of the Year category. Despite this, the competition remains at its heart an amateur photography competition, and one we believe highlights the very best work of non-professional photographers in Australia and New Zealand. It also happens to be a useful bellwether of trends in photography. We had expected to see an influx of drone shots in 2017 based on the sheer number of great drone images appearing on our instagram feed, but were surprised to see that the traditional landscape, and seascapes in particular, continue to be the most popular subjects for most people’s photography. In fact the landscape category, representing nearly a quarter of all the entries received, is miles ahead of any other in terms of popularity. In terms of subject matter, traditionalists might be sad to hear that piers took a big dip in popularity, while we saw a new generation of photographers exploring mountains and forests with great success. In the other categories, we also saw a noted decline in what we’d call traditional street

photography, alongside a real embracing of minimalism and architectural abstracts. So some changes, but also some challenges. We’ve banged the drum on this already, but we’d love to see more of you thinking about what it means to enter a cohesive series. Many portfolios this year were upset by just one image that just didn’t gel with the others, or explored a theme or genre we’d love to have seen studied in a little more depth. At the sticky end of the competition our judges often found themselves weighing up just one or two portfolios for line honours, so even the smallest details can make a difference. But even taking these minor quibbles into account, we’re stoked to see the quality of entries is getting better and better. The line between our sister publication, Capture magazine’s Australia’s Top Emerging Photographers, and Photographer of the Year, is about as thin as it could be – the work of amateur photographers is as strong as many pros and emerging pros. Finally the reason we can produce a special issue like the one you’re holding in your hands is because of your support of Photographer of the Year. Thank you to all of you who entered, and we can’t wait to see your entries in 2018. ❂

| 3 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


22 WILDLIFE AND ANIMAL

Presented by

For the first time in the competition’s history our overall winner came from the Wildlife and Animal category. Check out the top 20 finalists this year.

21 THE RESULTS: 2017 PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR With more than 2,100 entries comprising more than 10,000 images, the results are in for the 2017 Photographer of the Year.

40 TRAVEL Easily the most challenging category for our judges this year, travel continues to challenge our perceptions about what Travel photography is and can be.

46 BLACK AND WHITE Stunning architectural abstracts and mesmerising minimalism: these are the best Black and White images of 2017.

62 PRO PHOTO OF THE YEAR Yes, we know Photographer of the Year is an amateur photo competition! But we also know we’ve got many readers who’d love to enter and couldn’t before. Here’s their best work.


28 LANDSCAPE Our most popular category with some truly astounding portfolios this year, the Landscape category is jam-packed with stunning shots.

DEPARTMENTS 6 BEHIND THE LENS Motion is transformed into a mind-bending timewarp by Sydney’s David Sark.

8 QUICK SNAPS The latest news and products from the world of photography.

14 YOUR BEST SHOT Take a look at the best images from our ‘Adventure’ photo competition.

70 APS GALLERY AND COLUMN News, views and images from the Australian Photographic Society.

34 PEOPLE AND PORTRAIT

78 FUJIFILM IMAGE DOCTOR

With one incredible portfolio after another spreading from street to traditional studio portraiture, these are the best People and Portrait images of the year.

Saima Morel critiques a selection of readers’ images, and picks the winner of the Fujifilm Finepix SP-2 printer.

52 JUNIOR Always a strong indication of future trends in photography, these are Australasia’s brightest lights and most talented youngsters.

58 PHOTO OF THE YEAR Photography at its purest; your best single image taken in the last year. Any subject, any theme, these are our judges’ favourites from a hugely diverse pool of entries.

COVER This month’s cover was taken by Jordan Robins, the overall winner of 2017 Photographer of the Year. A portfolio of four images taken at the Great Barrier Reef helped him bag the highest award. See more on page 22.


BEHIND THE LENS

MOTION SICKNESS PHOTOGR APHER: DAVID SAR K

I’ve previously captured movement a number of times through various long exposure techniques but never from a moving vehicle. However, on a recent trip to Japan the opportunity arose when my travelling companions and I boarded the Rainbow Bridge monorail in Tokyo. It was towards the end of our month long trip and I almost didn’t go as I was feeling fatigued after shooting for almost 30 days. It was the the kind of day that sweat appears in areas on your body that have never experienced sweat before, and after a day of shooting on the streets in the hot and humid Tokyo summer, it was such a relief to be greeted by the crisp air conditioned carriage. Suffice to say there were many local eyes on us when we boarded the carriage, dripping and carrying heavy camera kits in tow as we made our way to the front. The monorail is perfect for achieving this kind of shot as it is driverless with windows at both ends. To take the shot I pushed my camera lens, with

lens hood attached, hard against the window to eliminate the reflections from inside the carriage and sat on the floor to help keep the camera as steady as possible as I didn’t have a tripod with me. It was a bit hit and miss as I experimented with the length of the exposure as the monorail went through extremely bright stations and almost black areas during the journey. In the end I found that exposures of around 1-2 seconds gave quite an interesting and dynamic result especially as we rounded corners and I think the movement of the monorail really enhances the flowing feel of the final image. CANON 5D MKIV, 16-35MM LENS. 2S @ F4, ISO 250. David Sark is a street photographer based in Sydney. See more of his work at Davidsark.com and on instagram @_davidsark. | 6 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


SPONSORED BY

| 7 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


QUICK SNAPS

QUICK SNAPS KUVRD LAUNCH UNIVERSAL LENS CAPS IF you’re looking for a universal lens cap to replace that one you lost and never got round to replacing, the new Kuvrd universal lens cap might be just the ticket. Unlike regular lens caps, the Kuvrd is both dustproof and waterproof, and being made of silicon, can keep your lenses safe while stretching to fit most lens diameters from 60mm to 150mm. Uniquely, if stretched over the front and back of your lens, the Kuvrd creates a shock absorption effect which will in turn protect its contents, making it perfect for covering your lenses that might sit loose in a bag or pocket. You can also stack Kuvrds on top of themselves and on your lenses to increase bump protection. Versatile and compressible, the Kuvrd can be stored in your wallet, pocket or bag. The Kuvrd is available through a Kickstarter campaign for US$30. Since the project’s inception it has raised $131,000 of it’s $3,264 goal.

LEICA ANNOUNCE LIMITED-EDITION RED M (TYP 262) LEICA have announced their latest limited-edition camera release, with the announcement of 100 Leica M bodies with red anodized top and base plates. In a press release, the company say the new M makes a bold statement, although with pricing at $10,000, it’s not the only thing that’s striking. The new cameras are technically identical to the existing M (Typ 262) and continue to offer no video or live view modes. If you’re a completist, Leica says the body will match the red 50mm F2 APO Summicron-M lens that it launched in 2016 in similar tiny numbers. The red anodised M bodies are on sale now in Australia. For more information, visit au.leica-camera.com

MEMISTORE PROVIDES ON-CAMERA STORAGE FOR TWO MEMORY CARDS ARE YOU one of those people who always loses memory cards? New storage device Memistore  might be just what you were after. The nifty little device provides splash-proof storage on your camera, connecting via the tripod thread or hotshoe. The idea behind Memistore is you’ll never misplace your camera (well, probably) so storing cards on it is the best place for them. The tripod version of the device sits flush under the camera (between the camera and tripod, if you are using one) and rotates out to provide access to two SD cards. To bring the device to market, Memistore is hoping to raise A$63,000 in funding on Kickstarter. If the fundraising is successful, the first shipment to retail backers is scheduled for May of 2018. For more information,  search for ‘Memistore’ at kickstarter.com. | 8 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


QUICK SNAPS Focal Length: 400mm Exposure: F/9 1/2000sec ISO: 200

PERTH PHOTOGRAPHER AUCTIONING OFF 1,000-STRONG VINTAGE CAMERA COLLECTION CAMERA collector Ashley Heuchan has seen many changes in photography over his 50 years in the business. “Digital and mobile phone cameras are great,” he says, “but there is a magic about film, processing, and the incredibly engineered cameras that used them that is hard to describe.” His love of the format has led to a nearly lifelong obsession and a collection of more than 1,000 cameras, with the second lot scheduled for auction on Australia day. With many professional and art photographers refusing to move away from film cameras, especially those made by Leica, the market for vintage cameras is booming. “The romance of film cameras is captured by the greats such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Rosenthal, Liebowitz, Ansel Adams, David Bailey, Litchfield, Helmut Newton, Karsh and the great war photographers like Robert Capa whose work graced the pages of Life magazine. There are dozens of others,” he says. Unfortunately for Heuchan, the size of his immense collection has finally become too much. They were on display for some time in his Murray Street, Perth business, but space became a problem and when he retired from the business, they went into storage for many years. “Even now, as I go through hundreds of boxes, I am amazed at what I find,” he says. Featured in the first auction lot was one of the very first Nikon cameras

made post-war, as General MacArthur re-engineered the Japanese economy to a peacetime one. Still bearing the engraved ‘Made in Occupied Japan’ on its baseplate, only about 400 ever made it to market. It sold for $6,500 (excluding a 10 per cent buyers premium). Another was a production model of the very first 35mm single-lens reflex camera – made in Russia by Gomz and dubbed the ‘Sport.’ Numerous Leicas from 1930 up to the 1980s were featured, including two M6s from 1987 that had never been unpacked and were still in their original sealed boxes. Each sold for $1,900. And Heuchan’s favourite? “That would have to be the Compass,” says friend Andy McCourt, who is helping Heuchan run the auction. Made in Switzerland in the 1930s by watchmaker Jaeger Le Coultre, “You have to see it to believe it,” he says. The second wave of auctions of Heuchan’s collection starts on Australia day, 26 January. You can view and bid on the collection at www. collectablecameras4sale.com/.

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This rare Nikon One camera with 1:2 5cm (50mm) Nikkor-H lens and original ‘Made in Occupied Japan’ markings sold for $6,500. It is estimated that only 400 were delivered from post-war Japan.

18-400mm F/3.5-6.3 Di II VC HLD (Model B028)

For Canon and Nikon mounts Di II: For APS-C format DSLR cameras

www.tamron.com.au | 9 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


QUICK SNAPS

WINNING IMAGES FROM NAT GEO NATURE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR 2017 ANNOUNCED

TOP TO BOTTOM: Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan’s grand prize winning image of an orangutan in Indonesia; Mona Vale Pool from above by Todd Kennedy; Blue-filtered strobe lights stimulate fluorescent pigments in the clear tentacles of an anemone in Hood Canal, Washington, by Jim Obester.

NATIONAL Geographic has revealed the winners of their annual Nature Photographer of the Year contest. The Grand Prize and Nature Photographer of the Year title went to Jayaprakash Joghee Bojan of Singapore, who captured an orangutan crossing a river in Indonesia’s Tanjung Puting National Park. More than 11,000 entries were received this year, with Bojan bagging $10,000 in prize money, in addition to his image being included in an upcoming issue of National Geographic. Speaking about the shot, he said to Nat Geo: “Honestly, sometimes you just go blind when things like this happen. You’re so caught up. You really don’t know what’s happening. You don’t feel the pain, you don’t feel the mosquito bites, you don’t feel the cold, because your mind is completely lost in what’s happening in front of you.” Sydney’s Todd Kennedy, the winner of the Travel category in our 2016 Photographer of the Year competition, was the first place winner in the aerials category with a drone shot of Mona Vale Pool, while Stanwell Park’s Matthew Smith was a People’s Choice winner. You can see all the winners and runners-up at australianphotography.com. | 10 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


QUICK SNAPS

ADOBE ANNOUNCE LAST STANDALONE VERSION OF LIGHTROOM ADOBE have released the final standalone version of Light-

COSINA OFFICIALLY KILLS OFF CLASSIC ZEISS LENSES IN a blow for lovers of classic Zeiss glass, Zeiss Japan have announced that production of a number of Zeiss Classic SLR lenses has ceased. The Zeiss Distagon T* 15mm f/2.8, 18mm f/3.5, 25mm f/2, 28mm f/2, and 35mm f/1.4 as well as the Zeiss API-Sonnar T* 135mm f/2 lenses will all be discontinued. Zeiss replaced their Classic SLR lens series in 2015 with the new line of Milvus lenses, specifically designed for DSLRs, although had continued to support the classic lenses until this announcement. If you’re concerned that more of the beautiful Zeiss glass could also be on the way out, rest assured it’s probably safe for now. In December, Zeiss CEO Michael Kaschke described 2017 as the “most successful fiscal year” in the German-headquartered company’s history. At €5.35 billion, sales were up 10 per cent year-on-year last year, helped by the Zeiss semiconductor business.

CORRECTION IN the last issue (Australian Photography, January 2017, “Off the beaten track”, p45), we incorrectly attributed a story about Mongolia’s Golden Eagle Festival to photographer Andrew Peacock. The story was written by Lisa Pagotto.

room, version 6.14, and in a blow to many users who have avoided joining Adobe’s subscription model up until now, the company have announced the software will receive no future updates. When Lightroom CC and Lightroom Classic were introduced in October, Adobe announced that the final version of Lightroom 6 was coming out “towards the end of the year.” This latest update has fixed minor bugs and as usual, expanded camera compatibility, however Adobe has also included a note that there will be no more updates: “Lightroom 6.14 is the last perpetual, standalone version of Lightroom. “While you may continue to purchase and use Lightroom 6 with a perpetual license, Adobe will no longer provide updates to the software. Consider upgrading to the Creative Cloud Photography plan to get the latest updates in Lightroom Classic CC and the all-new Lightroom CC, and ensure that the software works with raw files from the newest cameras.” As dpreview.com wrote in December 2017, if you have no intention of updating your camera in the near future, Lightroom 6 may still continue to be a suitable option for image editing. However if you do have plans to buy a camera either released around the date of the final update or after it, Lightroom 6 may not support it. Future OS upgrades from Microsoft and Apple could also lead to compatibility issues as well. ❂

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| 12 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


YOUR BEST SHOT

YOUR BEST SHOT ADVENTURE

The secret to capturing ‘Adventure’ comes down to putting the viewer into the image you're capturing. A broad brief as it’s not quite a landscape, not quite an action shot and not quite a portrait – it's a little bit of everything. Here's our favourites for the month.

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MICHAEL COLLISON Foggy paddle adventure EDITOR’S COMMENTS Michael Collison says this photo was taken on an early morning kayaking trip at Tallowa Dam, Morton National Park. “I’ve been traveling down here from Sydney for the past 15 years with my father and I’ve never seen it this foggy before,” he says. “For this shot I made sure to steady my kayak and used a fast shutter speed to minimize any camera shake and just waited for my Dad to enter the frame to give the scene a foreground interest.” There’s a lovely balance to this shot helped by your careful framing and just enough of the hill in the background being revealed to give a sense of scale. What works so well is there is a sense of journeying into the unknown: the very essence of adventure.

TECHNICAL DETAILS Canon 6D, Canon EF 70-200mm 2.8L lens. 1/400s @ f6.3, ISO 100. Cropped and converted to B&W in lightroom with adjustments made to whites, blacks, clarity and contrast.

Thanks to the team at Blonde Robot, Michael Collison has won a brilliant Peak Design Everyday Sling 10L camera bag valued at $269.95. The ultimate lowprofile, quick-access day bag for gear minimalists, the Everyday Sling 10L redefines what a single-shoulder sling bag can be. The ideal bag for photographers who want to travel smarter and lighter.

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MATT ANTHONY Morning mountains EDITOR’S COMMENTS After an early rise and hike up to the summit, Matt Anthony says he took the opportunity of the light casting onto the hills in the distance and got his friend to stand on the ridge to really present the scale of the environment. “Though I forgot my gloves this morning I managed to hold the camera steady enough to take this shot,” he says. There’s scale here with the figure in the foreground, but there’s also a wonderful sense of space in the framing that comes with leaving plenty of space above your subjects. The beautifully soft tones help seal the deal.

TECHNICAL DETAILS Canon 60D, Canon 70-200mm lens. 1/200s @ f4, ISO 160.

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YOUR BEST SHOT

DELWYN HANNS Perfect morning HOW I DID IT I took this photo as my husband and I were kayaking on a recent trip to Alaska. The clouds lifted and the morning was perfect with wonderful sunrays over the water.

TECHNICAL DETAILS Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark II, Olympus 12-40mm Zuiko lens, 1/400s @ f11, ISO 200. Processed in Lightroom and Photoshop.

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Focal Length: 24mm Exposure: F/2.8 1/6sec ISO: 400

MATTHIEU LIMINANA Soaring on high HOW I DID IT It’s not easy to travel from point A to point B in Kenya. and for long distances you’d better be equipped with a decent 4WD or a small plane. Landscapes are amazing from above. There’s no extremely advanced landing ground, just a long strip of land. The minute you land, children pop up from nowhere to welcome you and observe the small plane.

TECHNICAL DETAILS

SP24-70 F/2.8 G2

Art is subjective. Performance is not... Exquisite performance. Meticulous details. Your world never looked this beautiful.

Canon 5D Mark III, Canon EF 24-70mm f/2.8 L USM lens. 1/2000s @ f9, ISO 1600.

BRAD SMITH Road to adventure

HOW I DID IT I toured Romania in June and was lucky enough to drive the Transfagarasan Road on the first day it opened. It was voted by Top Gear the “Best Road in the World” and it certainly was an adventurous day!  

SP 24-70mm F/2.8 Di VC USD G2 (Model A032) For Canon and Nikon mounts Di: For full-frame and APS-C format DSLR cameras

TECHNICAL DETAILS Camera Olympus OM-D E-M1, Zuiko.M 12-40mm f2.8 Pro Lens. 1/30s @ f14, ISO 200.

| 17 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

www.tamron.com.au


YOUR BEST SHOT

HOW TO ENTER YOUR BEST SHOT IS OPEN TO AP SUBSCRIBERS AND APS MEMBERS. TO ENTER AN IMAGE IN THE COMP, CHECK THE COMPETITION THEMES AND INSTRUCTIONS BELOW AND EMAIL YOUR BEST IMAGE TO YOURBESTSHOT@AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

UPCOMING COMPETITION THEMES

APRIL ISSUE EYES

MAY ISSUE ARCHITECTURE

JUNE ISSUE THE BEACH

Deadline: January 31, 2018

February 28, 2018

March 31, 2018

HOW TO ENTER

JULY ISSUE BIRDS

AUGUST ISSUE MOUNTAINS

April 30, 2018

May 30, 2018

• Send your entry to yourbestshot@australianphotography.com • Include the name of the competition theme you are entering in the email subject line, for example ‘Birds’ or ‘Mountains’. • Please include the following details with your entry: your name, image title (if there is one) and 80-200 words about how you created your image. Please also include technical details including camera, lens, focal length, shutter speed, aperture, filter (if used), tripod (if used) and details of any software manipulation. • Entries may be submitted up to midnight on the evening of the specified deadline. • The winner will receive a prize from competition sponsor, Blonde Robot – www.blonde-robot.com.au

FOR THE CONDITIONS OF ENTRY AND IMAGE REQUIREMENTS VISIT: AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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THE WITNESS

Photo by: Luke Austin

LUKE AUSTIN captures landscape images using the Nikon full frame range. Nikon FX DSLR cameras and lenses represent the unrivalled quality of Nikon’s 100 year imaging legacy. With enhanced technology to inspire and enable storytellers in their pursuit of imaging perfection, the FX-format sensors allow you to capture more of your vision, expanding your shooting possibilities.

MyNikonLife.com.au


REALISE YOUR POTENTIAL

LUMIX G9. PHOTOGRAPHY WITHOUT LIMITS. Behind every great photograph is a great idea, and the new LUMIX G9 is designed to bring your great ideas to life. Make every second count and capture those remarkable moments at 60fps of high speed burst shooting. Create powerful images with the incredible detail of 80MP High-Res Mode. Discover new forms of creative expression with the freedom and mobility of 6.5 stops of image stabilisation. With the LUMIX G9, the only limit to your photography is your imagination. panasonic.com.au


PRESENTED BY

2017

PHOTOGRAPHER

OF THE YEAR BY THE AP TEAM

Twenty-four-year-old Jervis Bay photographer Jordan Robins has won the overall title of 2017 Photographer of the Year.

I

f you love the ocean as much as you love taking photos, it probably makes sense you might try and combine your two passions. That was the case for the winner of the overall title of 2017 Photographer of the Year, Jordan Robins, who first picked up a basic underwater camera while working at a diveshop as a teenager and realised he had a knack for photographing the underwater world. Fast forward a few years and now armed with a DSLR and an underwater housing, Jordan works part-time labouring at an events company but still finds time to seek out amazing underwater photography opportunities. For professional wildlife photographers and panel judges Steve and Ann Toon, the secret to the success of Jordan’s portfolio Tale of the turtle was his ability to give the viewer a peak into the underwater world. “Although we’re totally immersed in the sea in these images, along with the turtles, we never lose sight or a sense of the world above, and it’s this that adds the spark of magic,” they said. Now in its fifth year, the 2017 Photographer of the Year, presented by Panasonic, was open to amateur photographers in Australia and New Zealand and attracted more than 2,100 entries in 2017, a record number. This year photographers from both sides of the ditch competed for a prize pool valued at over $27,000 in cash and prizes. To enter, photographers submitted a portfolio of four images in any one of six themes (Landscape; Travel; Black and White; People and Portrait; Wildlife and Animal; and Junior), and also had the opportunity to enter their best single image in the popular Photo of the Year category. For the first time, we offered a new category, Pro Photo of the Year, although neither of the single image categories were eligible for the overall title.

For 2017 we also expanded our judging panel to 15 of our best and brightest professional photographers, Paul Hoelen, Rohan Kelly, Shannon Wild, Helen Whittle, Anthony McKee, Steve and Ann Toon, Drew Hopper, Douwe Dijkstra, Tanya Stollznow, Dylan Fox, Sally Brownbill, Tobias Titz, Nick Rains, and Richard I’Anson. Over the next few pages you can see our winners and runners-up for every category in the competition, along with a small selection of the top 20 images from every category. The full lists of top 20 finalists are also published on australianphotography.com. We would like to acknowledge our amazing sponsors for supporting the work of Australasian photographers and supporting Photographer of the Year. A huge thanks to our major sponsor Panasonic, and category sponsors WD, DJI, Momento, World Photo Adventures, The Brownbill Effect, Kayell/Elinchrom, Camera House and Eizo. Finally, to everyone who entered the competition this year, thank you. If this is your first time entering the competition, or any photography competition for that matter, we hope you enjoyed it. If the results didn’t go the way you hoped, don’t forget it takes a lot to put your work out there to be judged by a panel of professionals and, if anything, it’s even more admirable this year when the quality and number of entries were much greater than ever before. Putting aside the results, we really hope the process of compiling a portfolio of images that worked together as a set was valuable in your development as a photographer. And of course there’s always next time. The 2018 edition of the competition will open soon, so there’s plenty of time to start thinking about your portfolio now.

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WILDLIFE & ANIMAL

PRESENTED BY

JORDAN ROBINS OVERALL WINNER 2017 PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR WINNER 2017 WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR TA L E O F T H E T U R T L E

Jordan Robins’ outstanding portfolio is not only successful because of the technical challenges that come with shooting underwater, but also for its diversity and beauty. For the 24-year old Jervis Bay native, the series is simply an extension of his background in science and love for the ocean. “Some of the images had been taken on a windy morning, with small waves breaking over the dome of my camera,” he explains. “These images contrast the wild and rough conditions on the surface with the calm and peacefulness beneath.” With over-unders, detail shots and images for context, the result is a standout portfolio that wowed our judges and demonstrated the very best of underwater photography.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

Jordan’s beguiling turtle images mesmerised us completely by uniting both wildlife subject and wildlife habitat in a completely harmonious and visually appetising way. His opening shot of a turtle swimming away from the viewer did the trick of immediately inviting us in to the depths with him to look closer at his subject and we stayed captivated right through the portfolio and the colourful watery adventure. His skilful framing, combined with his mastery of the ‘under-over’ technique resulted in a series of shots where the surface of the water seems like a curtain Jordan is lifting to allow us land-lubbers a brief, but special peak at the turtle’s underwater world; magnificently showcasing his subject as a result. Although we’re totally immersed in the sea in these images, along with the turtles, we never lose sight, or a sense of the world above, and it’s this that adds the spark of magic here for us. – Steve and Ann Toon Underwater photography is not an easy subject, and especially when you introduce a dome port to capture over-under images like these, so I’m really impressed with these captures. Beautiful framing like this is not easy with such a dynamic subject and environment. – Shannon Benson PRIZE: Panasonic GH5 KIT with 12-35mm lens valued at $3,999, WD package valued at $599, plus $2,000.

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SPONSOR

| 23 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


WILDLIFE & ANIMAL

CLEMENT CHUA RUNNER UP 2017 WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR INTO THE DUSK

You might think that working on Sydney’s massive light rail project wouldn’t give you much time for hobbies like photography, but that’s not the case for Melbourne-based civil engineer Clement Chua. While working during the heatwave of January 2017 he was able to capture these astounding images of endangered grey-headed flying foxes at Sydney’s Centennial Park. At first he thought the small mammals were hunting until he realised they were coming up empty handed. “I Googled their behaviour and found out they dip into water to cool their body temperature down and to drink during hot days,” he explains. The strength of Clement’s portfolio lies in the combination of shooting a small, fast-moving subject in difficult lighting, while also having an awareness of how beautiful the results can be when it all comes together.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

It’s one thing being skilled enough to execute the tricky technical challenge involved in capturing images of a fast-moving, and very difficult, subject like this and another altogether, to nail and convey the sheer aerobatic beauty of that subject in a visually appealing way at the same time. Top marks to Clement for pulling this off. As a result we had total empathy for an animal enjoying cooling relief from a life-threatening heat-wave. Clement has not only delivered a master-class in action photography, his clever use of backlighting brought his subject, and the moment, vividly to life. We enjoyed much about this image sequence: the arc of golden water droplets, the water trail, the range of viewpoints, the light through the subject’s wings and that wonderfully-expressive, almost joyful mid-air leap that really held our gaze. – Steve and Ann Toon I know from experience how challenging flying foxes can be to photograph, especially at dusk. I’m also very impressed with the drinking behaviour captured, something not many people realise these bats do. – Shannon Benson PRIZE: $300.

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ZACH PARKER RACHEL SLOMAN

PETER ANSELL LOUISE WOLBERS

1. Jordan Robins Tale of the turtle 2. Clement Chua Flying into the dusk 3. Bronwyn Ellis Alaskan brown bears 4. Jordan Robins Between two worlds 5. Zach Parker Guidance 6. Rachel Sloman Botswana beauties 7. Anne Baker For the love of chimpanzees 8. Peter Ansell Giant cuttlefish spawning 9. Sharon Jones Wildlife of Antarctica 10. Louise Wolbers Bear cubs

11. Matthew Teston Seadragon portraits 12. Christian Spencer Emu landscapes 13. Robin Moon Wildlife and nature 14. Cara Pring Backlit big cats 15. D. Joshua Brunner Budgerigar swarm 16. Sally Hinton Elephants 17. Mandar Karleka Mountain gorillas of the Virungas 18. Kellie Butler Beautiful Tanzania 19. Jasmine Vink From the shadows 20. Jamen Percy The jaguar underworld

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ANNE BAKER

WILDLIFE: TOP 20


LANDSCAPE

TIM FAN WINNER 2017 LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

BEAUTY OF NORTH ISLAND OF NEW ZEALAND

Tim Fan is an amateur landscape photographer and fulltime mortgage lender based in Sydney. Since picking up his first DSLR just three years ago, he has honed his skills shooting landscapes around Australia and New Zealand. “I love nature and exploring new places, using my camera to catch those brilliant moments on the go,” he says. For this portfolio, he turned his lens on New Zealand’s North Island – a place he first visited in 2014 when, as he says, he was ‘still reading his camera’s menu’. Shot on a return trip three years later, these four winning images are the result. “The most memorable experience was shooting at the Three Sisters near New Plymouth,” he explains. “In order to get a nice water flow, we shot at high tide condition, and nearly swam back via the river mouth after sunset.” “I hope that the portfolio taken from this trip will present a different perspective of the beauty of New Zealand’s North Island.” he says.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

A strong collection of images that compliment each other. Beautiful use of colour in the right places complements the compositional elements, some of which have been creatively constructed, as seen with the leading lines made by the blurred waves crashing on the shore in the final image. A fantastic portfolio not just propped up by one photograph, but a selection that are all strong in their own right and all work together. – Dylan Fox An interesting variety of subject matter well captured in a variety of shooting conditions; nicely connected through the element of water ensured that Tim’s striking folio stood out. – Richard I’Anson PRIZE: EIZO Colouredge CS2420 Graphics Monitor valued at $1,690, plus $1,000.

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LANDSCAPE

ANDY SMITH RUNNER UP 2017 LANDSCAPE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

SEASCAPES

Passionate nature lover, adventurer and self-taught landscape photographer from NSW’s Mid North Coast, Andy Smith was our landscape category winner in the 2016 edition of Photographer of the Year. His entry for 2017 once again demonstrates his love of atmospheric, moody shots and an uncanny ability to capture perfect compositions. “I love all types of landscapes but feel most at ease when shooting seascapes,” he says. His portfolio is a collection of his favourite seascapes from his hometown, Port Macquarie, and New Zealand.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

Andy’s excellent folio instantly caught the eye thanks to really well composed images featuring a strong point of interest captured in beautiful light. The folio is also pleasing for its consistent mood, manifest through the muted colours and long exposures to blur the water. – Richard I’Anson A powerful selection of photographs that seamlessly flow together to create a stunning body of work. Strong compositions perfectly complemented by moody atmospheres and a very high level of post production. Putting all these aspects together makes for photographs that have a unique style, one that certainly helps the collection stand out. – Dylan Fox PRIZE: $300.

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TIMOTHY MOON

DANILO BERNINI

JARRAD PARKER JAMEN PERCY

LANDSCAPE: TOP 20 11. Murray Fox Storms 12. Joshua Vince Abandoned 13. Jingshu Zhu Milky Way 14. Jarrad Parker Risen 15. Heesoo Chung Epic New South Wales coastline 16. Helen Holdsworth Moutains of Patagonia 17. David Birch Kokoda remembered 18. Min Xiong Liang mr 19. Alan Coligado Silent witnesses 20. Mark Brierley Rebirth

JORDAN ROBINS

1. Tim Fan The Beauty of North Island, NZ 2. Andy Smith Seascapes 3. Timothy Moon Burnt Scrub 4. Jarrad Parker 182 fly by 5. Jordan Robins Oceanscapes 6. Jarrad Parker From where I stand 7. Eduardo Martinez Natural textures 8. Jamen Percy Aurorascapes 9. Danilo Bernini Frozen in time 10. Fei Shi Exploring Pakistan

| 32 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


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PEOPLE & PORTRAIT

YUNIS TMEIZEH WINNER 2017 PEOPLE AND PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

C O N E Y I S L A N D 17

Yunis Tmeizeh says he’s always looked at everyday life as if it were a composition. He has a love for candid photography, and says he uses a journalists’ or sports photographers’ technique of a fast shutter speed in his quest to seek a poetic interpretation of a scene. His striking, layered portfolio is the result of an excursion to New York’s Coney Island, a place he describes as a mecca for candid photography of the kind he loves. Captured in summer, he says “It is rich with everyday characters and a vibe that was buzzing with people just letting loose.” The result is a series of interesting characters captured in intriguing moments, encouraging the viewer to return again and again as new layers are revealed. Shot up close and with a deliberate approach, there’s much to explore. What’s happened and what’s about to happen; it’s all up for interpretation in this standout portfolio.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

These great candid moments capture the heart and soul of the place and the people that inhabit it. The decision to go with black and white allows the expressions of the subjects to come through without the distraction of colour. Overall a fantastic documentary series. – Drew Hopper Yunis’s series is very interesting to investigate. You can see that he made an effort to get close to the people in the images and has a great ability to interact with them. I love all the little stories in the images which the viewer can explore. – Tobias Titz

PRIZE: Camera House voucher valued at $1,000, plus $1,000 cash.

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PEOPLE & PORTRAIT

ANTHONY LAWRENCE RUNNER UP 2017 PEOPLE AND PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

REMOTE TRIBES OF THE OMO VALLEY, SOUTHERN ETHIOPIA

A love of Africa was the spark that kicked off Melbourne specialist Obstetrician and Gynaecologist Anthony Lawrence’s photo journey, and one that’s also bagged him the runner-up title in the people and portrait category this year. Picking up a camera on his first trip to Africa in 2008, Lawrence travelled from his hometown of Melbourne to Ethiopia in January of 2017 and was particularly taken by the remote tribes of the Omo Valley, which he’s managed to capture with a subtle beauty in this powerful series that combines posed and candid images to give an insight into the daily life and cultural events of the Omo tribe. “These diverse tribes all have a natural beauty and elegance enhanced by their individualised use of body paint, scarification and dramatic adornments,” says Lawrence. “The combination of these features with the remote and harsh environment they live in produce compelling and emotive portraits.”

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

This is a beautiful series of portraits showing tribal life in Southern Ethiopia. These images are perfectly composed with rich, vibrant colours and tones which allows the viewer an intimate snapshot of these extraordinary lives. A true connection between the photographer and the subject stands out in these images, all of which work superbly together as a series. – Helen Whittle A very well composed series of photographs. Tony Lawrence was able to capture the people of the Omo valley candidly while also showing their beauty and dignity. – Tobias Titz PRIZE: $300.

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KAJAL KRISHNA ANTHONY LAWRENCE

BILJANA JURUKOVSKI LUKE MAYZE

1. Yunis Tmeizeh Coney Island ‘17 2. Anthony Lawrence The remote tribes of the Omo Valley, Southern Ethiopia 3. Brett Ferguson Old masters collection 4. Luke Mayze Desires 5. Josh Withers Waiting for a break 6. Kajal Krishna Sammy & Lucy: The dream world 7. Biljana Jurukovski Beauty inspired by nature 8. Anthony Lawrence Mt Hagen Sing Sing 9. Luke Mayze Passion 10. Simone Cheung Portrait of an interracial marriage

11. Robin Yong Whispers innocence 12. Jason Rosewarne Raw emotion 13. Rebecca Lowe Look beyond the face and you will see me 14. Valeria Zavyalova Leraz 15. Bhagiraj Sivagnanasundaram Towards the New World 16. Luke Mayze Men 17. David Boon Local legends 18. Theresa Lee Flair On A Wee String 19. Merryl Kemp Age does weary them 20. Lara Gilks My backyard theatre

| 38 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

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TRAVEL

KRISTYN TAYLOR WINNER 2017 TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

ACROSS THE PASS

Kristyn Taylor’s portfolio Across the pass was the product of an extraordinary trip to the Ladakh region of Northern India in April 2017. “Snow had severed the telecommunication cable linking the region of Ladakh, in the Indian Himalayas, to the rest of the world and it had not yet been repaired,” she explains. “With the weather still inclement, two guides and I prepared to cross the Khardung La, the highest motorable pass in the world accessible to civilians. On this occasion, Khardung La was snowed in, so we took the Chang La route instead. Over the course of a month I criss-crossed these two magnificent passes four times, skirting landslides, avalanches and white outs.” Along the way, Taylor was able to visit areas that had seen few foreigners. “Sometimes we visited such remote areas that people were shocked to see me,” she remembers. “I met elders who remembered the old silk route of the Nubra. Being female I was able to bond, laugh and photograph shy Balti women. Always, their hospitality touched my heart.”

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

Travel photography is an interesting and often personal pursuit, so when one enters a series of images, you know it is going to evoke many different reactions and emotions for the judges. One thing that will always

ring true for a judge though is composition, aesthetic and content. Kristyn Taylor’s work shows a beautiful understanding of the people she chose to photograph. The image of the man and the camel/yak is simply stunning. It is evocative and educational at the same time and it really is a once in a lifetime kind of image. Kristyn has enabled the viewer to understand the people and their culture by shooting them in an outstanding environment and showing us their beautiful clothing and warm generous faces. The art to compelling images is always about how the images relate to each other in a story, and Kristyn has shown us a strong aesthetic across all four images along with a powerful storyline. – Sally Brownbill Kristyn’s portfolio captures the traditional lifestyle of the people as well as giving us a great sense of place. Her neutral processing helps keep the images simplistic in order for the essence of the people to shine through her work. Overall, an impressive portfolio that definitely has a wow factor to inspire the nomadic heart. – Drew Hopper PRIZE: World Photo Adventures tour valued at $7,000, plus $1,000.

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TRAVEL

DONALD YIP RUNNER UP 2017 TRAVEL PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

EUROPE & ASIA

An IT engineer by trade, you get the feeling Donald Yip is happiest when travelling and taking photos. “Some of the destinations I captured had been on my personal bucket list for nearly a decade, and to finally be there in person and photograph them was nothing short of a dream come true,” he says. Donald’s runner-up Photographer of the Year portfolio comprises images from some of the most stunning locations on the planet: Bagan, Myanmar; Santorini, Greece; Indonesia’s Ulun Danu Beratan Temple in Bali; and the Stari Most Bridge in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Judges commented on Donald’s ability to apply a fresh perspective to popular destinations through strong compositions and clever use of natural and artificial light.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

One of the great challenges for the travel photographer is to capture eye-catching images of wellknown and much photographed places. Donald has done very well to achieve this with his folio of well executed, classic travel photography. Importantly, each image is strong in its own right and all are well composed. However, the key is the beautiful light that adds an attractive and dynamic element to these familiar places. – Richard I’Anson. I liked the consistency of the styling of this image set which shows excellent use of the best available light, usually around dawn or dusk of course. Not only are the images well composed and clearly thought out, but using the combination of twilight and artificial streetlight has added a nice depth to their colour range. The image of Santorini is a standout, simple but perfectly executed. – Nick Rains. PRIZE: $300.

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THOMAS QUAN LUKE DAVID

RONALD FRITZ KIRSTY GREENLAND

1. Kristyn Taylor Across the Pass 2. Donald Yip Europe & Asia 3. Kirsty Greenland Travel 4. Thomas Quan Elemental 5. Kottapadi Karunakaran Travel 6. Robin Yong Venetian Masterpieces 7. Ronald Fritz Hang Son Doong 8. Nathan Shafter Italian Trails 9. Luke David Hong Kong 10. Luke Mackenzie European Escapade

11. Matthew Walker Pushkar Rajistan 12. Brad Smith Venice 13. Federico Rekowski Mungo National Park, Australia 14. Jason Freeman The Silo Art Trail 15. David Hicks The Old Currawinya Woolshed 16. Peter Franc Southwest 17. Mark Zaglas Road less travelled 18. Biljana Jurukovski Embracing culture and tradition 19. Trevor Holman Myanmar 20. Julien Folcher Across China

| 44 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

NATHAN SHAFTER

TR AVEL: TOP 20


YOU R T R AV EL CH ECKLIST for 2018

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BLACK & WHITE

MATTHEW TUFFIELD WINNER 2017 BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

SHAPES OF ARCHITECTURE

While we don’t know if Brisbane-based photographer Matthew Tuffield could win Photographer of the Year’s Black and White category with one hand tied behind his back, we do know he has done it on one leg. Tuffield captured his winning architecture portfolio on crutches during a week-long visit to Sydney and Melbourne while recovering from an ankle injury. With the help of two friends who generously lugged his camera gear all over town he managed to capture the four stunning images you see here. “Due to the exhaustion of trying to get around on crutches while capturing long-exposure images, I was not able to visit every location I had previously researched,” he says. It’s frightening to think what he could have achieved with two healthy pins.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

This mono series struck a cord with me. I’m a sucker for abstract architecture and this series shows consistent quality, stark contrast, an abstract look and feel, and I just love the dark mood and the drama. I in particular like the high contrast between the moving clouds and the strong sharp shapes of the buildings, it adds an extra dimension to this awesome series. – Douwe Djikstra Matthew Tuffield’s series ‘Shapes of Architecture’ shows the build form of Sydney beautifully. The use of long exposure and flawless processing of the images really brings out the significant elements of the architecture. – Tobias Titz Exceptionally pleasing to the eye, Matt has used the perspective and blurry atmosphere to give these images a feeling of drama, which is magnified by the deep contrasts. This unique series of architectural buildings shows that he has great technical knowledge of long exposure techniques. Extraordinary pictures of fineart architecture, like nothing I’ve seen before. – Helen Whittle PRIZE: Momento $600 gift voucher, plus $1,000.

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BLACK & WHITE

STEVE ALLSOP RUNNER UP 2017 BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

BEACH LIFE

Originally from central England but now calling the Sunshine Coast home, Steve Allsop works as a support person for people with mental illness. He somehow still finds time to raise a family and pursue his love of music, football and photography. His series Beach Life is an ongoing personal project photographing Noosa and the beaches of the northern end of the Sunshine Coast. He says he is conscious about producing deliberately minimal, sparse images accentuating wide open spaces and contemplation, while at the same time capturing people enjoying the coast. “When I leave the house with my camera I always try to visualise the end result I want to achieve, or sometimes, like my cat Watson, I just need to leave the house,” he says.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

This beautiful series of dreamy seascapes by Steve Allsop portrays a feeling of calm tranquility. Artisticly hazy, these perfectly composed black and white images give the viewer a deep appreciation for minimalism. Steve has produced a flawless and commendable series that is both unique and alluring. – Helen Whittle I love the stillness in this beautiful monochrome series. Steve has created a dreamy almost poetic look and feel. The soft tones and movement of the waves and sky emphasise the small human silhouettes which add a great sense of scale to the scene. You can almost feel the great wide open space beyond the edges of the frame. – Douwe Dijkstra PRIZE: $300.


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HAYLEY KOTZUR

ALAN COLIGADO JOSSELIN CORNOU

NEIL BRINK

1. Matthew Tuffield Shapes of architecture 2. Steve Allsopp Beach life 3. Alan Coligado Lean 4. Alan Coligado Marginal 5. Neil Brink Botswana hi key wildlife collection 6. Hayley Kotzur Exposed 7. Josselin Cornou The abyss 8. Alan Coligado Patterns 9. Peter Waters Black and white street 10. Gemma Farrell Bathtime shenanigans

11. Jordan Robins Beneath The surface 12. Peter Jovic Black and white 12. Bruce McDonald Impact 14. Rachelle Sharkie Body of flowers 15. Rachel Phillips Surreality 16. Harmony Dennison The strength within 17. Kristyn Taylor Meandering through Ladakh 18. Susie Thompson Simplicities 19. David Dahlenburg One week in The Flinders 20. Emma McPherson Arch angles

| 50 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

PETER WATERS

BLACK AND WHITE: TOP 20


JUNIOR

NIKOLAY MIROSCHNICHENKO WINNER 2017 JUNIOR PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR DAEMONS

Nikolay Miroschnichenko’s striking portfolio was a clear standout with our judges this year, demonstrating an understanding of visual storytelling that few other portfolios tackled. Born in Tvar, Russia, but now calling Canberra home, Miroschnichenko started taking photos in 2015. He says this sequence is about the demons young people face, showing they appear in every setting, scenario and space. “The blue and red represents the calm over the chaos that is going on in teenagers’ minds, bodies and society,” he explains. “Expressing the confusion in these colours allows the audience to feel a sort of stressed, impatient calm.”

JUDGES’ COMMENTS

Creating a series of images is a challenge, even for more experienced photographers; not only should each photograph be sympathetic to the other, but it also needs to present its own voice and perspective. Nikolay has produced a strong, evocative folio in which each photograph describes the life, anger and frustrations of a young person. Each image is strong on design, and the tri-tone evokes the night; a cold wash of darkness against the gloomy glare of manmade light. In the first image our hero almost seems to be standing near a dark mentor, a stranger from whom he might be gleaning advice. In later images we see movement, energy wasted in frustration and in the last frame we have the loneliness of a street corner at night. I do hope Nikolay’s life is not as gloomy as the images portrayed in this essay, but he does have a camera and potential as a visual communicator. Let’s hope he keeps moving onwards and upwards. – Anthony McKee Only after mastering the basics do photographers start to think about capturing something outside the box. Nikolay has done just that. He has not just captured a series of moments but enhanced the concept by adding effects that suited what he wanted to communicate in his images. Creativity beyond his young age. Great series. – Douwe Djikstra PRIZE: One-on-one consultation with judge Sally Brownbill including image appraisal and career guidance, valued at $750.

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JUNIOR

HARMAN SINGH HEER RUNNER UP 2017 JUNIOR PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR

ICELAND PAR ADISE

To be just sixteen years old and already a seasoned wildlife photographer is one thing. But when you decide to try your hand at landscape photography and find you’re pretty good at that too, well that’s something else entirely. Moving from his country of birth, Kenya, to Australia, just four years ago, Harman Singh Heer visited Iceland in April 2017 and captured this remarkable portfolio in just five short days. “From the magnificent waterfalls to the glorious Aurora Borealis, Iceland left me jaw-dropped,” explains Harman. After experiencing photography, I became confident in capturing landscape images and am now always looking for ways to improve my compositions so that I can give people unique perspectives to admire. The last few years have been an incredible journey for me as a young photographer.” We can’t argue with that.

JUDGES’ COMMENTS For the Junior category I thought this was a very mature series. All aspects of the incredible Icelandic landscape have been captured. It’s showing different techniques: he’s mastered long exposures, captured the Northern Lights, and added a sense of scale to the scenes and played with different angles. The series shows maturity beyond his young age. – Douwe Djikstra A mesmerising set of of images with each each image as powerful as the next. A great use of a variety of photographic techniques. Being a junior Harman has a great future, and I look forward to seeing more of his photos. – Rohan Kelly PRIZE: $100.


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JEDD PENKETHMAN

LACHLAN STARLING

RAPHAEL MASTERS

MICHAEL O’FARRELL

1. Nikolay Miroshnichenko Daemons 2. Harman Singh Heer Iceland paradise 3. Lachlan Starling Alone at sea 4. Jake Barac Roses – Digital manipulation 5. Henry Howard World of aviation 6. Elizabeth Honor Abandoned 7. Michael O’Farrell City of Sydney 8. Jedd Penkethman View from above 9. Raphael Masters Alchemy 10. Tanisha Wookey Illusions

11. Ben Holzwart Frames of everyday life 12. Will Pembroke Vivid Sydney 13. Kai Millen Kai’s photos 14. Michael O’Farrell Travel more 15. Nicholas Fantini Watercolours 16. Samuel Glancy Water flowing and a sunset 17. Isabel Matthews Colour and change 18. Sigrid Germon Shadows of Sydney 19. Irma Smith Lighthouse 20. Ben Cocklin Northern Denmark bunkers

| 56 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

JAKE BARAC

JUNIOR: TOP 20


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PHOTO OF THE YEAR

TIMOTHY MOON WINNER 2017 PHOTO OF THE YEAR

THE WAVE

They say that old habits die hard, and looking at veteran surfer Timothy Moon’s image The wave, it’s probably no surprise that a lifetime of surfing has begun to creep in to his new hobby of photography. Retiring from a career as an architect in 2016, Moon says he’s focussed his time since on drawing and painting, while also adding photography and digital art to his quiver of creative pursuits. The result is a passion for photography and surfing, perfectly emphasised in this stunning image of a colossal wave and the surfers who ride them. “My aim was to isolate a large wave, and try and capture the various encounters a surfer would have with it,” he says.

JUDGE’S COMMENT

When I look at photographs, I don’t want to see just another portrait or a landscape; I want to see and learn something new. Timothy Moon’s photograph captured our attention on multiple levels. Unlike most drone photographs which have become almost too familiar, Moon’s image is a momentary glimpse of an ever changing environment, and a small community that loves to live on its fringe. From the beach, a surf break appears as a line of white foam crashing along the horizon line, but from above we see it almost as organic: a giant, manta-ray like form surging across the frame. And on the edges of this monster are small, almost insignificant humans on surfboards, feeding off the energy of its form. The hard morning light cutting across this wave reveals swirls of white, evocative of an oil painting, while about the edges are beautiful greens and a hint of the sand that has been disturbed in the wave’s passing. The image was taken in the morning with the the sun’s angle giving good definition, but not too high in the sky where its brightness would burn out detail. – Anthony McKee PRIZE: DJI Osmo+ valued at $649, plus $1,000. | 58 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


SPONSOR

ZACHARY PARKER RUNNER UP 2017 PHOTO OF THE YEAR GUIDANCE

Zachary Parker describes himself as just an Aussie bloke lucky to be in the right place at the right time, but that’s probably underselling the skill required to succesfully capture a shot like this in a constantly changing and fluid environment like that off the coast of Tonga. Parker says the mother and calf were also accompanied by a male Humpback which was very calm and let the calf play and get close to the divers. “Mum however was always there to help it swim or assist it to the surface and keep the baby out of harm’s way, but at the same time let it come and investigate the weird little creatures around it.” The result is an image that’s not only one of Parker’s favourites, but striking in both the position of the whales and the crystal clear blue water. PRIZE: $300.

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JUDGES’ COMMENTS

A beautiful and intimate moment captured here, one of the pinnacles of wildlife photography. Coupled with the fortunate water clarity and lack of any distractions, this image is a beautiful example of these peaceful creatures. – Shannon Benson Photography is a powerful means of communication and this image of a humpback whale and her calf traversing the pristine waters of the South Pacific has it all. It has a captivating narrative, an evocative composition and is perfectly executed both compositionally and technically. Photographing underwater can be challenging with many issues that need to be addressed including focus, motion and lighting. Zach Parker has achieved this, producing an outstanding and beautifully crafted image. – Tanya Stollznow


JOSHUA CRIBB GRAHAM EARNSHAW

JASON EAGLE YONG ZHI LI

1. Timothy Moon The wave 2. Zach Parker Guidance 3. Michael Giannattilio Hold On! 4. Helen Holdsworth Fed Square, Fed Circle 5. Michael Giannattilio Old but gold 6. Graham Earnshaw Floating 7. Aidan Williams Le-noble 8. Jason Eagle Warp speed 9. Yong Zhi Li Females 10. Joshua Cribb Surfboat Sundays

11. Emma Porter Cycle of life 12. Zach Parker Family gatherings 13. Kristyn Taylor Novice monks 14. Corey Crawford Duplicate 15. Ashlee Gordon Antelope 16. Steve Wyper Sea of flames 17. Jon Curtain Window seat 18. Josh Shaw Searching for signal 19. Luke David Capoeira moves 20. Cameron Meacham Ocean painting

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HELEN HOLDSWORTH

PHOTO OF THE YEAR: TOP 20


PRO PHOTO OF THE YEAR

ROSEMARY ROSSI WINNER 2017 PRO PHOTO OF THE YEAR RAFFAELE THE BARBER

Successful portraits go beyond the physical to reveal something more profound about the subject, and by that measure, it should come as no surprise that freelancer Rosemary Rossi is our inaugural Pro Photographer of the Year winner. The scissors and neatly groomed hair tell us something of the sitter’s profession but at a deeper level there is a vulnerability and sadness in his expression. The juxtaposition with his apparently confident pose – chair straddled, hands resting casually on the chair back, eyes staring directly into the camera – only serves to heighten the mystery. In preparation for the portrait, Melbourne-based Rossi discovered that her subject had experienced a number of hardships in the weeks leading up to the shoot. “As he explained to me the difficulties he had been facing, I realised the strength of the person sitting in front of me; calmly participating in a photo shoot and openly discussing his heartbreak. This is an image of a strong spirited person.”

JUDGE’S COMMENT

The best portraits are those that go beyond a cursory smile to reveal something deeper, and even darker, of the subject. This is a well-presented portrait of a style-conscious gentleman who has no doubt added his own flair to the thousands of people whose hair he has cut. The blue background works well with the blue and green shirt, the grey waistcoat and the dark blue tones of Raffaele’s numerous tattoos. Despite the deep stare into the camera, it is the hands that become the central focus of the portrait: hands that work nimbly with those scissors to style and groom, all while listening to his clients’ countless stories, both trivial and serious. Although simple in its presentation, Rossi’s portrait is a sincere representation of a modern Australian; young, hard working, entrepreneurial, and no doubt burdened by his share of the world’s problems. – Anthony McKee PRIZE: Elinchrom ProTec 3 Head Rolling Case valued at $445 and Case Air Wireless Tethering System valued at $265, plus $1,000.

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SPONSOR

CLAIRE CLODE RUNNER UP 2017 PRO PHOTO OF THE YEAR BLUE GAZE

Claire Clode’s passion for photography began in high school and developed into a full-blown obsession at college where she says she just about “lived in the photography lab, processing film and developing photographs.” The Canberra-based mother of four now runs a newborn and family photography business and says she is fascinated by faces, “as they can tell a story without saying a single word.” Her striking portrait, Blue Gaze, impressed the judges with its simplicity, subtle lighting and the piercing blue eyes of the subject. “In this image I wanted to capture connection and emotion. When I took this image I wanted the viewer to be drawn in by the subject’s eyes and feel connected. The subject had had a hard day and I

| 63 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

wanted to capture the emotion and expression of the subject, which I felt matched the cold winter air.”

JUDGE’S COMMENT

“Wow, what is there not to like about this image? It’s beautifully edited, with crisp clear skin tones and perfectly subtle lighting. Claire has managed not to interfere with the simple beauty of her subject but has also managed to enhance those incredible eyes and ‘peaches and cream’ skin. The simplicity of the image makes it stand out from the crowd. I see this image as timeless. The elements I look for are all there, subject, composition, lighting and direction. – Sally Brownbill PRIZE: $300.


RAMBO ESTRADA BIANCA TURRI

ANNE SMITH

11. Tom Cannon Light at the end of the tunnel 12. Anne Smith Emu shenanigans 13. Willos Callaghan Fingal Heads turtle 14. Lucia Staykov Winter glow 15. Peter Sharp A bird is safe in its nest… 16. Camilla French Bush baby 17. Todd Kennedy Natural beauty 18. Rowena Meadows Glassy attachment 19. Philip Thurston Twisted in love 20. David Magro Field of stars

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ERIN KOSTOPULOS

1. Rosemary Rossi Raffaele the barber 2. Claire Clode Blue gaze 3. Bianca Turri 100 years young 4. Meaghan Paul Room with a view 5. Natalie Ord Currents 6. Anne Smith Australian darter chicks 7. Ethan Li Tommy & Pernile 8. Erin Kostopulos Up close and personal 9. Patricia Olazo Adra 10. Rambo Estrada Arataki Time Tunnel

NATALIE ORD

PRO PHOTO OF THE YEAR: TOP 20


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THE JUDGES

A huge thank you to our star-studded panel of photographers who judged your images this year.

DREW HOPPER

Drew Hopper is a travel and documentary photographer based in Australia, specialising in the Asia-Pacific region. His curiosity for different ways of living have influenced his desire to travel to new and unfamiliar places. Through his travels he has developed a photographic style that is unique, simple and compelling. Drew is a regular contributor to Australian Geographic, covering photo assignments throughout Australia. He also regularly contributes and writes for Australian Photography magazine and has been featured in numerous travel, photography and lifestyle magazines worldwide.

ANN AND STEVE TOON

Ann & Steve Toon are a UKbased, husband and wife team of award-winning, professional photographers with a specialist interest in the wildlife and wild places of southern Africa where they spend several months each year photographing and running photographic safaris. Their work is published in a wide range of magazines and national newspapers, both in the UK and abroad, and they are represented by several leading photographic libraries. They’ve also written three books, two on wildlife photography and one on rhinos. You can see more of their work on their website at toonphoto.com and follow their African adventures on their ‘Beat about the Bush’ blog at toonphotoblog.com.

ANTHONY MCKEE

Anthony McKee is a Melbourne-based writer and social documentary photographer. In 2014 he was named AIPP 2014 Australian Documentary Photographer of the Year. He has also won awards for his landscape photography. He has judged professional and amateur photography awards on both sides of the Tasman and in 2013 was made an Honorary Fellow of the NZIPP for his services to photography. He is a regular contributor to Australian Photography magazine.

SHANNON WILD

Shannon Wild is an Australian wildlife photographer and cinematographer based in Africa. As a passionate wildlife lover and conservation advocate, Shannon shoots for many organisations and non-profits worldwide and films for clients such as National Geographic and NatGeo Wild. She is also a published author with topics including wildlife photography as well as reptile ecophysiology, another personal passion.

TOBIAS TITZ

Based in Melbourne, Tobias Titz’s passion lies with portrait and documentary photography. He has collaborated extensively with remote indigenous communities and has work held in the Museum of Australian Democracy, Canberra. Tobias is the recipient of the Head-On Photographic Portrait Prize and the Moran Contemporary Photography Prize.

PAUL HOELEN

Tasmania-based photographer Paul Hoelen has won numerous accolades and awards for his images both nationally and internationally, including NZIPP Overseas Photographer of the Year (2012 and 2014), AIPP Tasmanian Professional Photographer of the Year (2011 and 2013) and AIPP Tasmanian Landscape Photographer of the Year (2011, 2012, 2013 and 2015). He is an AIPP Master of Photography and a Fellow of the NZIPP and judges regularly at state, national and international level.

SALLY BROWNBILL

Sally Brownbill stands at the forefront of the Australian photographic and creative industry. A trained commercial photographer, she is now one of Australia’s most highly respected creative intermediaries. A much sought-after judge, lecturer and keynote speaker, Sally has developed a professional reputation in Australia and overseas as the authoritative

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PRESENTED BY

voice on folio construction, career advice and editing images for exhibition and web. For more than 15 years, she has been running individual sessions with photographers and other creatives to guide them though image selection and career questions, along with being a great source of inspiration to help them reignite and realise their passion.

DOUWE DIJKSTRA

Douwe Dijkstra is a professional senior graphic designer based in Sydney. Born and raised in The Netherlands, he relocated Downunder in 2003 and now calls Australia home. Photography is a strong passion for Douwe and he picked up his first camera at the age of 12. Over the years his hobby has evolved from taking family snaps with his grandfather’s camera, to creating black and white fine art in the digital age. He recently started an Instagram account, @monochromevisions, marking a new chapter in his photography journey. Douwe prefers to shoot in monochrome. He simply finds it easier to capture the essence of a scene in black and white: colour is just a distraction. He won the black and white category of the 2015 Photographer of the Year.

HELEN WHITTLE

As well as being named Overall Winner of Australian Photography magazine’s Photographer of the Year in 2016, Helen was a finalist in The Voice Collection 2016 and runner up in the Photographer of the Year, Portrait category, in 2015. She is inspired by dramatic and natural light, and produces simple, emotive and authentic images. With a style consisting mainly of black-and-white, she sees beauty in the everyday.

ROHAN KELLY

Rohan Kelly grew up on a farm in Western Australia and, after a stint at university, returned to work on the family property. Picking up a camera for a holiday to Africa, he was hooked. He then moved to Perth to study photography, and got his first full-time job in 1998 at the Northern Territory News in Darwin. His first taste of international attention was in

1999 when East Timorese was evacuated to Darwin Airport during the election crisis. He also covered the 2000 Sydney Olympics as part of the News Limited national team of photographers and was a finalist in the Walkley Awards with his sports pictures. In 2001, he moved to Sydney to work at The Daily Telegraph and has since worked across all sections of the paper including time on the picture desk at the daily and Sunday Telegraphs. He won the nature category of the World Press Photo award in 2016.

NICK RAINS

Nick Rains has been a professional photographer for over 30 years, starting off in the UK with sports and commercial work before moving to Australia in 1990. Since then he specialised in landscape work, crisscrossing the country on assignments for many large book and calendar publishers including Explore Australia, Penguin and Australian Geographic. Nick still enjoys packing up his trusty 4WD and heading off into the wilderness for weeks at a time, driving tens of thousands of kilometres and camping out under the stars in a never ending quest for the perfect light. In 2002 Nick was named Australian Geographic Photographer of the Year and in 2014 Nick won the AIPP Travel Photographer of the Year category at the industry’s professional print awards. In addition to shooting book and magazine assignments, Nick also runs the Leica Akademie in Australia which instructs other photographers in the finer points of camera use and image making.

RICHARD I’ANSON

Richard I’Anson is a freelance photographer who has built a career on his twin passions for travel and photography. Over the past 33 years he has travelled the world, amassing a substantial and compelling collection of images of people and places in more than 90 countries on all seven continents. His images are published worldwide in books, magazines, newspapers, brochures, calendars, posters, cards and websites. Richard has published twelve books including five editions of the best-selling Lonely Planet Guide to Travel Photography, Lonely Planet’s Best Ever Photography Tips and the large format pictorials: Australia: 42

| 67 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


Great Landscape Experiences, Nepal and India: essential encounters. Richard was one of five photographers selected for the first series of National Geographic Channel’s television documentary Tales by Light (now on Netflix). He is a Master of Photography awarded by the Australian Institute of Professional Photography (AIPP) and represents Canon Australia as a Canon Master Photographer.

TANYA STOLLZNOW

Australian based wildlife photographer Tanya Stollznow spends several months of the year capturing images of the natural world in Africa, Asia and Australia. Tanya is skilled in capturing emotive, compelling images that allow the viewer to identify and connect to the subject. Through her imagery Tanya promotes interest and support for the conservation and protection of wildlife and their habitats, in particular the conservation of rare and endangered species in South Africa.

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DYLAN FOX

Dylan Fox is an award-winning Australian Landscape Photographer based out of Perth. Having always loved to travel and witness nature’s finest moments, it was only a matter of time before he started capturing them in the form of photographs. His aim is always to capture photographs that provoke emotional connections. For Dylan, the photograph must tell a story and truly captivate those that see it. In 2016 he was awarded first place in the nature category at the international black and white photography awards, has been a finalist in the ANZANG awards for the last three years and has been a runner-up in Capture magazine’s emerging photographer of the year competition. ❂

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APS GALLERY

THE KICKSTART

Discovering his local camera club was just the boost the APS’ Peter Kewley needed to revitalise his photography. WITH PETER KEWLEY

M

y interest in photography goes back many years to film and a variety of cameras that gave me the opportunity to learn the basics of Photography. Taking courses with an amateur photography group broadened my interest in film and darkroom processing, until a work imposed hiatus put the cameras away for a number of years. When I retired several years ago I was at a loose end so to speak, as there’s only so much you can do in a day! I decided to join the local Frankston Photographic Club and it was the best thing I have ever done. It re-energised my interest in photography and I jumped into digital head on, while

discovering Photoshop in later life also provided inspiration and the creative outlook that I needed. Joining a camera club opened many doors to not just new friendships but to the challenge of improving and growing my photography and the satisfaction of earning APS and FIAP distinctions. People ask me “what do you photograph” and I say “Oh, Landscapes mainly,” but when I review my images, there are of course a lot of landscapes that I enjoyed taking, but also still life, mono and creative work, and some that might bend the photograph a bit, but to me it is something that I created from a base image and I can get

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Hellissandur is a village on the northwest tip of the Snaefellsnes Peninsula in western Iceland. “Coming around the peninsula I sighted the church up on a hill overlooking the valley below,” says Kewley. “On the right hand side is a road and a house, so to get this shot I ventured into a paddock and looked back and up towards the church just as the clouds parted and the sun streamed down on to the church. Some call this ‘Gods Light’, but in this case I was helped a little bit by Photoshop. “The image has had a few versions in mono and in colour with heavy overlays on both. All three have won acceptances and awards in Nationals and International competitions. “Iceland is a magic place for photography, at least when the weather is being cooperative.” Canon 5D Mark III, 16-35mm F/2.8L lens. 1/30s @ f22, ISO 100.

satisfaction in knowing that I can create with the power of Photoshop and other post processing programmes. Recently I attended the APSCON convention in Forster NSW. APSCON provides a wonderful opportunity for APS members to come together and meet, listen, learn and get out and take photographs. A voyage around the lakes accompanied partly by a pod of dolphins was a fantastic opportunity to capture some great images, just as a post conference visit to a wooded pocket to follow a Bush Turkey for an hour was exciting. I just wish he would have stayed still long enough to get that ultra-sharp image!

Travels to Iceland, Utah, Death Valley and other exciting places have provided the material for good landscapes, but when travel is not possible, there are still opportunities all around that can be explored and captured. As photographers, we travel to take photos in other places, and people travel to our place to take photos that they can’t in their homeland, so anytime I get into a creative rut, I try to look around, look behind and look ahead. There are places, sights and vistas all around us, and it’s just a matter of taking the time to focus with a vision of what can be achieved.

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APS GALLERY

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP Iris; Aldeyjarfoss Iceland; The Goddess, Lightning Ridge.

ABOUT THE PHOTOGRAPHER Peter Kewley's photographic interests include landscapes, but also still life, mono and creative work.

THE AUSTRALIAN PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY Membership with the Australian Photographic Society (APS) caters for enthusiasts, amateurs and professionals in photography. The APS can help you improve your photography, increase your level of satisfaction and achievement with your images, and make lasting friendships with other photographers throughout Australia. All that is required is that you take two steps; the first, joining the society; the second, becoming involved in what it has to offer. Find out more about the APS at www.a-p-s.org.au.

| 72 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


APS FOCUS

THE ORCHID SHOW

CREDIT PETER MANCHESTER

Many people enjoy visiting their annual flower show, and while many photographers have tried photographing flowers in the wild, when it comes to photographing orchids inside, it becomes a challenge in itself. Here’s some tips to help. WITH PETER MANCHESTER

R

ecently I was asked to visit the local Orchid Society in Hobart to photograph their winning orchids and displays. I consider the orchid the most difficult flower to photograph. This is because the fusion of the male and female parts is a key identification feature of the orchid family, and as such it is vital to photograph the detail. The three sepals, the three petals, the complex labellum, stigmatic surface, and the column all need to be captured. The challenge here is the depth of field and available light. Most orchids are placed or grow in clusters or in close proximity to other orchids making them hard to isolate and eliminate from distracting backgrounds. The halls where flower shows are typically held often have bright and contrasty light and usually not much of it. Below are a few of my quick tips on photographing orchids indoors.

1

Carry a small piece of mattboard (black on one side, white on the oth-

er) and slip it behind an orchid to isolate it and provide a clean background. Orchids are very fragile flowers (for example Sarcochilus) so only do this if it does not disturb the orchid or surrounding plants

2

Experiment with aperture. Narrow apertures are necessary if you are trying to capture details. If possible move in close using a macro lens and shoot at apertures as high as f32. If using a telephoto zoom lens for a cluster of flowers, go for an aperture in the range of f8 to f11. Softer focus images shot at wider apertures are beautiful with orchids. Using a lower aperture will give a dreamy, soft background that can draw the eye to a soft ruffle of an orchid.

3

If Av mode is used, I mostly use exposure compensation of -2/3rds, with white balance set to Auto.

4 5

If you can, use a tripod as it will help you shoot at those narrower apertures. Move around to get your best background. Even if it is only a centimetre

or so, it could eliminate a hotspot or distraction from your background.

6

A macro ring light mounted on a macro lens, powered down and held off-camera, will help illuminate the flower and provide light in some areas with limited light. A ring light allows shooting handheld at higher apertures in less than ideal lighting conditions. It does provide nice even lighting that appears natural. I have found that with white and pink orchids the macro flash works very well.

7

A diffuser will help soften the bright sunlight coming through a window and the reflector can also help provide fill light to illuminate the deep inner structure of orchids. Orchid photography takes patience and lots of practice. Remember you can’t go back and redo the shot so take your time and get it right first time. Orchid photography is not easy, but with persistence you may be rewarded with an exhibition of your own having photographed these magnificent blooms. ❂

| 73 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM

ABOVE: Phaleonopsis. Panasonic DMCFZ200, 1/80s @ f2.8, ISO 100.


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IMAGE DOCTOR

IMAGE DOCTOR

Images need a pick me up? The doctor will see you now.

BY SAIMA MOREL

HERE COMES THE SUN

Donn Ledwidge said: “For the two weeks leading up to this morning, there had been rain clouds, so there was no dawn show. Colour for colour sake can be pretty boring, but this dawn was remarkable in its colour. Since the lookout is at 10,000 feet, the light was caught between two layers of clouds with just the rim of the volcano visible. Even the bus drivers in the car park were attracted to the view.” Yes, this is definitely spectacular, and you have pointed out the main issue with a lot of sunset (or sunrise) shots. What makes this even more extraordinary than just the colours is that it is an early morning scene, and I have seen many more good colourful sunset shots than the equivalent sunrise image. You are also right about the “colour for colour sake”. So many sunset scenes have a mass of colour but little content or subject matter. That said, I do think

that the nice bank of clouds at the bottom of the frame would have made much more of an impression if they had occupied more space in the frame and if there had been a stronger point of interest in the foreground, say a tree or a person or whatever. SAIMA’S TIP: A good point of interest in the foreground will help differentiate one sunset/sunrise image from another. TITLE: Haleakala dawn (Pre-dawn sky over the rim of the Haleakala Volcano, Hawaii) PHOTOGRAPHER: Donn Ledwidge DETAILS: Canon EOS 5D III, Canon 24-105L @ 24mm focal length, 1/160s @ f4, 400 ISO, handheld. RAW processing in Photoshop but no colour or saturation adjustment beyond jpeg conversion.

PUMP UP THE COLOUR

Jarrod Vessey said: “This photo was created by waiting for the right wave. The swell this day was not as good as it had been the previous days but I only brought my camera down on the last day. This was the only decent wave and it was just luck that I didn’t give up too early after all the time spent sitting on the beach in the sweltering heat. I set the camera to sport mode shooting continuous shots, then made the hard decision as to which photo was the best. I only took up photography a couple months before this photo was taken.”   If you had recently taken up photography, you were setting yourself some real challenges tackling sports photography. You are quite right to keep that shutter speed up, and just shoot heaps of pictures – preferably on days with better waves. You could even increase the ISO and use a narrower aperture such as f8 or f11 to improve sharpness and depth of field. Since this was the best wave that day, you were restricted in what you could do. The main issue with this shot is that it is too light. If it were darker, it would appear clearer, and you would get more punch in the colour as well, for a more dramatic effect.   SAIMA’S TIP: When starting out in photography, check out great images online to get an idea of what is possible and provide points of comparison for example colour and composition.

TITLE: The only shade in the ocean PHOTOGRAPHER: Jarrod Vessey DETAILS: Canon EOS 500D @ 250mm focal length, 1/4000s @  f5.6, 800 ISO | 78 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


TITLE: Standing guard PHOTOGRAPHER: Ian Peters DETAILS: NIKON Coolpix P900 @ 33mm focal length, 1/125s @ f4.5, 100 ISO

HIGHLIGHTS A LOWLIGHT

Ian Peters was having a coffee at the Mogo Zoo next to the Meerkat enclosure. He said it presented plenty of photo opportunities if you just sat quietly and took your time over your coffee. He wrote: “I took quite a few photographs of these delightful little creatures but I thought this one by far the pick of the bunch. He was indeed “standing guard” over all his companions and was not missing a thing.” Meerkats take their protective roles seriously and frequently stand with heads up listening for danger which means you have a good chance of capturing a strong body outline. This is a lovely shot, and the lines of hair are lovely and sharp. However, the contrast is too high and over-brightening in some of the whites means that detail has gone. That background also looks darkened with the result that the darkish nose is disappearing into it. My suggestion would be to lower the contrast and dodge around the eye area to make it stand out. SAIMA’S TIP: Long thin subject matter works well in the vertical format while wide, spreading content suits landscape. | 79 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


IMAGE DOCTOR

BLACKER BLACKS, WHITER WHITES

Elizabeth Brett liked this image because it was the result of an accidental discovery. She said: “I placed a glass on coloured paper, half in the sun and half in shade and was surprised by the reflections. I used a grey card for metering due to the high contrast level. I leant a little towards the high key end of the scale in post processing as I felt this best emphasised the delicate nature of the subject.” I understand the mesmerising effect of reflections and those sparkling lights, and the concept here is a lovely one, reminiscent of some of the work of the Australian photographer, Olive Cotton. The angled dividing line between the dark and light sections makes the composition an interesting one. The delicacy and prettiness is there in the little shapes, but all the grey makes the image more weedy rather than high-key. It would benefit overall with more contrast so the blacks (hardly any here!) went blacker and the whites went whiter. This would make the shapes stand out better. That doesn’t mean to go hard at the contrast, but just enough to highlight the patterns more. SAIMA’S TIP: Diagonal lines meeting the sides of the frame can make for dynamic compositions. PHOTOGRAPHER: Elizabeth Brett DETAILS: Nikon D3300 @ 26mm focal length, 1/20s @ f20, 100 ISO, Adjustments made to brightness, contrast and structure in Silver Efex Pro 2.

NAILED IT...ALMOST!

These beautiful little birds were shot by Russell Donkin in Perth Zoo’s walk-through bird enclosure. The heads and eyes of the birds are so sharp and crisp, and the tones in the feathers are beautiful. The background is also muted and soft and the composition with the branch angled into the corner of the frame works well. There is a ‘but’ however, but it was probably out of Russell’s control in this instance. If only the nail had been behind the bird and the apple in front of that broken end of the branch. The nail adds a jarring touch and those broken branches are not a winner either. You could try cropping some of that out-of-focus branch on the left side of the frame – ever so slightly. Nonetheless, it is still a lovely shot. SAIMA’S TIP: With images of wildlife, as with humans, getting the head and eyes in sharp focus makes them so much more appealing. PHOTOGRAPHER: Russell Donkin DETAILS: Canon EOS 7D Mk II, 200mm focal length, 1/60s @ f5, 200 ISO, sharpening.

| 80 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


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IMAGE DOCTOR

SOFTEN THE LIGHT

Daryl Fisher wrote: “When I saw this lady she had ‘that look’ which intrigued me. It’s something you often see but at times never have a camera in your hand. This time I was lucky, The way the back light fell on her hair was enough to break the hair line away from the background, and the gentle light falling on her face gave some depth to the image. I could have taken the tattoos off her fingers, but that would have been taking character away from her.” I am not sure what you mean by ‘that look’ but the model is certainly photogenic. Is it a fashion shot or a glamorous portrait – not that it really matters? It is sharp. The eye contact is strong, the catch lights in her eyes give her dimension and the three-quarter angling of her face is flattering. The plain background is safe and undistracting. All of these are positives. That said, some of those lighter areas are too light and have hence lost detail. Try shooting darker and don’t increase the contrast too much. Also try diffusing the light source or move it further away from the model. The shot also has a strong warm feel and the model’s skin tones are a little too yellowish as a result. You could adjust the white balance to reduce this. A good make-up artist would have been able to do make-up to suit the model and the lighting. SAIMA’S TIP: Even skin tones are key to good fashion and glamour portraits.

TITLE: What have you got? PHOTOGRAPHER: Daryl Fisher DETAILS: Nikon D7200, Tamron 24-70mm lens @ 60mm, 1/60s @ f3.2, 160 ISO, little bit of fill light on the face, no flash, handheld, tweaking of contrast with CS5.

A FUJIFILM SP-2 PRINTER VALUED AT $299!

C O M PE T I T

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• Email entries to: imagedoctor@ australianphotography.com with ‘Image Doctor’ in the subject line. • Include your name, image title and up to 150 words about how you created it. • Only one image per person per month. • Images must be saved in JPEG format. Maximum file size is 5MB. Include your name in the filename of the image. • An Australian address is required in order to receive the prize. • Employees of Yaffa Publishing or the sponsor are not eligible to win the prize. • The editor’s decision is final and no correspondence will be entered into.

TO

PH O

HOW TO SUBMIT AN IMAGE

ON

Thanks to Fujifilm, Donn Ledwidge has won a brilliant Instaxshare smartphone printer SP-2 valued at $299. The SP-2 printer lets you create Instax prints directly from your smartphone. The printer also allows you to print from your Instagram and Facebook accounts, or select the best shots from your phone’s library, and print via Wi-Fi. With a high-speed printing time of just 10 seconds and a new laser exposure system, the SP-2 is faster than ever. At the same time, printing noise is lower which makes your printing experience much more enjoyable. The Instaxshare SP-2 offers superb image quality and high resolution with print pixels of 800 x 600 dots at 320dpi, rendering beautiful skin tones, perfectly saturated colours, and detailed tonal gradations. The SP-2 measures 181 x 127 x 76mm and weighs just 247g.

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Find out more at fujifilm.com.au

| 82 | FEBRUARY 2018 | AUSTRALIANPHOTOGRAPHY.COM


© World Photo Adventures

JOIN US ON BEAUTIFUL FRASER ISLAND! “Fraser offers a bit of Africa in Australia. I say this as we use 4WDs as mobile hides and ‘get up close’ to all sorts of birds from eagles to feeding oystercatchers. We also enjoy magic sunrises on the eastern beach – which offers amazing shoot opportunities! At times dingoes are a special shoot and our many stops allow photographers to enjoy the challenge of shooting everything from ship wrecks to weird patterns, shapes and forms – with the chance to learn ‘how to tell a story’. We are the most experienced photo tour operator on Fraser Island as we have been working with Kingfisher Bay Resort for over 15 years. After visiting the island numerous times, I can say that it is one of the world’s best locations to improve your photography and have a lot of fun. You will be challenged each day to new creative levels!” – Darran Leal

August 26-31, 2018 Join the teams from World Photo Adventures and Australian Photography Magazine on World Heritage listed Fraser Island – one of the most photogenic locations on earth. You can join the tour with regular flights to Hervey Bay via Sydney or Brisbane. The first ever World Photo Adventures and Australian Photography tour in 2017 was a sellout, so don’t miss this special 2018 event. To book or find out more, visit worldphotoadventures.com.au.


IS PROUD

OF EACH AND EVERY ONE OF OUR CAMERA PEOPLE.

We are humbled and incredibly proud to announce the winner of the CAMERA HOUSE PHOTOGRAPHER OF THE YEAR COMPETITION “PETS AND ANIMALSâ€? CATEGORY AS DAVID SHIPTON FROM BUNDABERG CAMERA HOUSE =ou|_bv-l†vbm]-m7;Šru;vvbˆ;rb;1;;mা|Ń´;7 “WHO SAID ANYTHING ABOUT A HOOT?â€? This award has been proudly supported by our partner

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