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OCTOBER 2013

A F F I L I AT E S L E T T E R The official newsletter for FEMS Affiliates

Infection as common denominator of microbiology and food science New thematic issue Now online: is now online!

We are pleased to announce the EMF pre-conference workshop Infection diagnostics and Infection biology during the EFFoST Annual Meeting on 12 November 2013 with:

Also in this issue:

• Marco dalla Rossa, EFFoST Chair Welcome and focus on EFFoSTFEMS EMF interactions • Jean-Claude Piffaretti, Switzerland, FEMS President – Laboratory diagnostics in clinical and food microbiology: trends and quality assessments • Jan van Impe, Belgium - Towards next generation predictive models: a systems biology approach relevant for food microbiology • Eliora Ron, Israel – The impact of the EHEC epidemic of 2011 • Cesare Montecucco, Italy – Safety aspect of food associated microorganisms • Brian B. Rudkin, UK – Peptide aptamers: precision tools for dissecting signaling pathways • Tone Tonjum, Norway – Microbes and aging

Publications Page Highlighted articles: Beverages Grants Corner FEMS Fellowship Grant FEMS-ASM Grant FEMS-ESCMID Joint Fellowship

Preview of Brian Rudkin’s presentation on Peptide aptamers

Register To register for this event please contact FEMS Central Office by email. For visitors of the EFFoST Annual Meeting, joining the workshop is free of charge. EMF and EFFoST EMF, The European Microbiology Forum is a platform of the Federation of European Microbiological Societies (FEMS) for communication, interaction and promotion of microbiology. It has been privileged for several years now to have a cooperation with EFFoST organizing shared events.

Society Page SIMGBM UK Yeast Day Sweden Deadlines FEMS-Sponsored Meetings Microbiology TidBits

Corrigendum On the cover of our previous issue, the building where the 40th FEMS Council meeting was held was named as the building of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine. In fact it is the main building of Lviv National University.

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Highlighted article FEMS Letters

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Did you know? People who are cultivating their own kefir often refer to it as their pet.

Water kefir, a healthy low alcoholic beverage? Kefir is a water-sucrose-based beverage, fermented by a symbiosis of bacteria and yeast to produce a lightly carbonated, acidic, low alcohol drink. Sequencing-based analysis of this drink can attrib- The authors comprehensively review these topics. ute to identify the microorganisms responsible for Of particular interest they note it may be posthe potentially health promoting qualities of kefir. sible to restore the benefits associated with the consumption of raw milk and specific microorganThis analysis resulted in the finding that both waisms therein, through the re-introduction of these ter and grain were dominated by Zymomonas an microorganisms after processing. ethanol-producing bacterium that amongst othQuigley et al. ers can produce levan and has antitumor effects. Volume 37, Issue 5, pages 664–698, September 2013, Also, lactic acid bacteria (Lactobacillus, LeuconosDOI: 10.1111/1574-6976.12030 toc), acetic acid bacteria (Acetobacter and  Gluconacetobacter) and Bifidobacteriacae were found. A notable number of yeast genera not traditionally Highlighted article associated with water kefir was found. FEMS Yeast Research Marsh et al. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/1574Coexisting populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae 6968.12248/abstract strains in cachaça The authors’ analysis demonstrates that different types of strains coexist in cachaça fermentations: Highlighted article wine strains, exhibiting alleles related or identical FEMS Reviews to those present in European wine strains; native strains, containing alleles similar to those found Microbiota of Raw Milk in strains isolated from traditional fermentations Milk is a highly nutritious food that can be obfrom Latin America, North America, Malaysian, tained from a variety of animal sources as well as Japan or West Africa; and their intraspecific humans, for human consumption. The high nutri- hybrids or ‘mestizo’ strains, heterozygous for both ent content of these milks, provides an ideal envi- types of alleles. Wine strains and hybrids with high ronment for the growth of many microorganisms. proportions of wine-type alleles predominate in These microorganisms enter milk from a variety Southern and South-Eastern Brazil, where cachaça of sources and, once in milk, can play a number of production coexists with winemaking. roles, including both promoting health and causing disease. The high frequency of ‘wine-type’ alleles in these regions is probably due to the arrival of wine immigrant strains introduced from Europe. However, in North and North-Eastern states, regions less suited for winemaking, wine-type alleles are much less frequent because ‘mestizo’ strains with intermediate or higher proportions of ‘native-type’ alleles are predominant. Badotti et al. DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12108

P U B L I C AT I O N S PA G E

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Highlighted article FEMS Pathogens and Disease

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Getting thirsty...

Green tea health benefits Green tea is a popular drink worldwide. Its consumption has been suggested to prevent the development of a variety of diseases, including diabetes, hypertension, cancer and cardiovascular diseases. Its effects are attributed to its abundant and biologically active catechin, epigallocatechin3-gallate (EGCG), which has antioxidative and antiinflammatory effects. Studies have indicated that chronic inflammatory responses and oxidative stress conditions for example chronic infection with a periodontal pathogen, such as Porphyromonas gingivalis, is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis. This Translational Research study demonstrates the ability of EGCG, apolyphenol extract from green tea, to protect against Porphyromonas gingivalis-induced atherosclerosis. Yu Cai et al., Pathogens and Disease DOI: 10.1111/2049-632X.12001

Highlighted article FEMS Ecology Bacterial invasion potential in water In drinking water (DW) and the distribution systems, bacterial growth and biofilm formation have to be controlled both for limiting taste or odour development and preventing clogging or biocorrosion problems. After a contamination with undesired bacteria, factors like nutrient availability and temperature will influence the survival of these invaders. Invasion experiments with P. putida in oligo- to eutrophic waters showed the requirement of both a carbon and phosphate source for survival of P. putida. Experiments in surface water indicated the concomitant importance of the present indigenous microbial community of the specific water sample on the survival of P. putida. Van Nevel et al. Volume 85, Issue 3, pages 593–603, September 2013, DOI: 10.1111/1574-6941.12145

...for more? Try these articles on sake, wine, coffee, drinking water and lager. Improved sake metabolic profile during fermentation due to increased mitochondrial pyruvate dissimilation Agrimi et al. FEMS Yeast Research, DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12120 Not your ordinary yeast: non-Saccharomyces yeasts in wine production uncovered Neil P. Jolly, Cristian Varela & Isak S. Pretorius FEMS Yeast Research, DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12111 Adaptive evolution of the lager brewing yeast Saccharomyces pastorianus for improved growth under hyperosmotic conditions and its influence on fermentation performance Ekberg et al. FEMS Yeast Research, DOI: 10.1111/1567-1364.12038 Influence of coffee (Coffea arabica) and galacto-oligosaccharide consumption on intestinal microbiota and the host responses Nakayama and Oishi FEMS Letters Volume 343, Issue 2, pages 161–168, June 2013, DOI: 10.1111/1574-6968.12142 Bacterial diversity in drinking water biofilms Randy P. Revetta et al. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/15746941.12170/full P U B L I C AT I O N S PA G E

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Meeting 30th National Meeting of the Società Italiana di

Microbiologia Generale e Biotecnologie Microbiche (SIMGBM) The 30th SIMGBM National Meeting has been held in the beautiful island of Ischia (Italy) on 18-21 September 2013. The meeting was very successful thanks to its international dimension, with many speakers from several European countries and 233 participants, half of which were young researchers. English was the official language of the meeting.

During the meeting, Prof Paolo Visca (FEMS delegate for SIMGBM), illustrated to participants the main missions of FEMS, its activities and opportunities offered by FEMS to European Microbiologists (see picture). The detailed congress program is available at the SIMGBM website.

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UK Fungus Day On 12 and 13 October, the British Mycological Society, one of the FEMS Member Societies, in partnership with the Society of Biology ‘Biology week’ sponsored the inaugural UK Fungus Day to raise awareness of fungi and fungal science. Over 57 events were organised by academics collaborating with field mycology experts, including: visiting a fungarium • quilting and weaving using natural fungi dyes • guided tours of fairy rings, waxcaps and tree rotting fungi • cooking • photography • symphonic poem and overture • fashion inspired by mycelium and mould • making a fungus fruit body fly • sending messages through mycelium • a map of the UK with mycelial blocks representing the key event venues for UK Fungus Day • academics describing how they study fungi that affect crops • bread dough making activities • story telling • forays

At the 30th SIMGBM National Meeting (from left to right): Prof. B. Colonna (SIMGBM President and Congress co-organizer), Prof. P. Visca (FEMS Delegate and Congress co-organizer), Prof. E. Ricca (SIMGBM Secretary and Congress principal organizer).

National and Regional Congress Grants

FEMS provides start-up grants to support National or Regional Microbiological Congresses. The start-up grant can be used by organisers in any respect that supports successful organisation of the meetings. The FEMS Central Office should receive the completed application form on or before 15 December 2014 (for congresses between 1 January and 30 June). S O C I E T Y F E AT U R E

The aim of this nationwide event was to spread mycological expertise and enthusiasm to those who know little about this fascinating and diverse kingdom of organisms. The British Mycological Society is a registered British Charity open to all who are interested in promoting and learning about the exciting world of fungi. It has member sections devoted to particular aspects of the fungal world including cutting edge research into many aspects of fungal science, the conservation and recording of fungi and the provision of educational resources for use at all ages and experience. www.fems-microbiology.org


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The Swedish Society of Microbiology The Swedish Society for Microbiology (Svenska föreningen för mikrobiologi, SFM) is a life science membership organisation for individuals interested in microbiological sciences. The mission of SFM is to support the progress and growth of microbiology in Sweden. SFM has currently about 280 members, located at universities, university colleges, research institutes and industry. The members of SFM represent a broad spectrum of subdisciplines, including general microbiology, molecular biology, microbial genetics, microbial ecology, microbial engineering, medical and veterinary microbiology, virology and immunology. In order to fulfill the demands of all the different fields, SFM makes an effort to have a representation in the board from most of the various subdisciplines and universities in Sweden. The present board consists of Åsa Sjöling (Gothenburg), Ulrika Lustig (Uppsala), Magnus Evander (Umeå), Anders Bergqvist (Uppsala), Claes von Wachenfeldt (Lund), Staffan Svärd, (Uppsala), Öjar Melefors (Stockholm) and suppleants Nora Ausmees (Lund), Jonas Warringer (Gothenburg), Stefan Roos (SLU Uppsala) and Per-Eric Lindgren (Linköping).

SFM is also supporting other research conferences and workshops as well as travel stipends to national and international meetings for graduate students. SFM represents Sweden in IUMS, FEMS, EFB and other international societies. SFM was founded in the early 1960s and joined FEMS in November 1974 on the first Council meeting where FEMS was founded. The second FEMS president was the Swedish professor Örjan Ouchterlony (1914-2004), professor at University of Gothenburg 1952-1980 where he founded the Department of Microbiology and Immunology. Since then many famous Swedish microbiology researchers have been, or are, members of SFM and the society is aiming to continue to attract scientists in the field of microbiology and to be a vehicle for development of high quality fundamental and applied research among Swedish microbiologists.

The main activity of SFM is the annual research meeting “mikrobiologiskt vårmöte” (Microbiology Spring Meeting) that is arranged together with the other two major microbiology societies in Sweden, the National Society for Microbiology (RFM) and the Society for Medical Microbiology (FMM). The spring meeting alternates between the Universities of Stockholm, Uppsala, Lund, Gothenburg, Umeå and Linköping and some of the newer universities and University colleges in Sweden. The meeting facilitates national collaborations between the members of the different societies and universities as well as with local hospitals. SFM, RFM and FMM share a common website where information about the societies can be found.

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FEMS Research Fellowship Applying for the Research Fellowship Grant? The deadline is almost due! Please apply before 1 December 2013. If you are applying, please complete the relevant application form available on the FEMS website with the following attachments:

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“We are the voice of microbiology.” Did you ever wonder why we use this metaphor? Is our voice there to be heard, to entertain or to dictate? To us, the purposes of our ‘voice’ are to discuss, inform, express and exchange thoughts and thus enhance science. We are happy to work together with partners like ESCMID and ASM in this respect.

• Curriculum vitae • Letter of reference • Letter of acceptance from the host laboratory • Research project proposal • Passport photograph Send your complete application as an electronic copy to grants@fems-microbiology.org and as a hard copy to FEMS Central Office before the deadline of 1 December 2013.

FEMS-ASM MäkeläCassell Grant The FEMS-ASM Exchange Program for Junior Faculty supports the reciprocal exchange of one member from each organization to present his/ her research at the other organization’s main conference and to engage in a short-term visit (1-3 weeks) to a host laboratory in direct continuation or anticipation of the meeting. The FEMS applicants should be microbiologists active in research, less than 36 years of age and presenting authors of an abstract at the ASM General Meeting. They should have been members of a FEMS member Society for at least one year before the application deadline. More detailed information, FEMS-ASM grant regulations and the application form can be found on the webpage.  The deadline for FEMS applications is on 6 January 2014. G R AN T S CO R N ER

About ASM The American Society for Microbiology is the oldest and largest single life science membership organization in the world. The mission of the American Society for Microbiology is to advance the microbiological sciences as a vehicle for understanding life processes and to apply and communicate this knowledge for the improvement of health and environmental and economic well being worldwide. Membership has grown from 59 scientists in 1899 to more than 39,000 members today, with more than one third located outside the United States. The members represent 26 disciplines of microbiological specialization plus a division for microbiology educators. (Source: ASM)

FEMS and ASM cooperation ASM and FEMS are committed to building collaborative relationships, based on their shared interests. Both organizations aim to strengthen the practice, education, and advocacy of the science.

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FEMS-ESCMID Joint Fellowship FEMS and the European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases (ESCMID) have a joint initiative to foster outstanding research in microbiology by young European scientists. Every year each organization selects one individual among the recipients of their respective research fellowship programmes to receive an additional amount of € 1000. The fellows are chosen by the Boards of both organizations upon a two-way review process and are rewarded by this sum for their excellent research proposals. Due to its nature as a supplementary acknowledgement of excellent research, it is not possible to apply for this grant.

About ESCMID ESCMID is registered in Switzerland with offices in Basel. Since its founding in Germany in 1983, ESCMID has evolved to become Europe’s leading society in clinical microbiology and infectious diseases with members from all European countries and all continents. For more than 25 years, ESCMID has been an influential component in the professional lives of microbiologists and infectious disease specialists and now reaches more than 33’000 members and affiliated members around the world. (Source: ESCMID)

FEMS and ESCMID cooperation Microbiology ties our two European organisations together, with FEMS encompassing all fields in microbiology, ESCMID specialising in clinical microbiology and its related fields, including biomedical research on human pathogens, infectious diseases practice and chemotherapy, and control of communicable diseases.

ESCMID-FEMS Fellows 2013 This year’s FEMS-ESCMID Fellow is Dr. Balazs Vajna (below picture). The ESCMID-FEMS Fellowship is divided between S.J. Howard and A.R. Freitas. The FEMS-ESCMID Fellow 2013, Dr. Balazs Vajna is from Eotvos Lorand University, Budapest, Hungary. His study is called ‘Lignocellulose degrading activities and sporocarp formation of Pleurotus ostreatus in a mushroom production model system and the role of bacterial communities meanwhile’. Further investigation involving the interaction between oyster mushroom and the bacterial community should get into detail on the findings: • The dominant and inducible laccase and MnP coding genes were determined with RTQPCR method in the used mushroom production model system • The level of microheterogeneity within the samples was described • A significant decrease of bacterial activity was observed due to oyster mushroom colonization The research was carried out with a FEMS fellowship in the lab of the Ecogenomics of Interactions Team in Nancy, France, between March and June 2013. ESCMID-FEMS fellows 2013 are S. J. Howard and A. R. Freitas, each receiving € 500. Howard’s study is called ‘Pharmacodynamics of voriconazole against fusarium SPP and scedosporium apiospermum: identification of in vitro susceptibility breakpoints and targets for Therapeutic drug monitoring’. Freitas’ study is called ‘Identification of the risk factors promoting the emergence of Enterococcus faecium at the interphase between humans, foodborne animals and the environment’. G R AN T S CO R N ER

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DEADLINES 15 December 2013 1 June 2014 FEMS National & Regional Congresses Grants 6 January 2013 FEMS - ASM Mäkelä - Cassell Grant 1 March 2014 FEMS Meeting Grants (for meetings to be held in 2015) 1 April 2014 1 September 2014 FEMS Meeting Attendance Grants

FEMS-Sponsored Meetings, Spring 2014 2 3 M A R C H 2 014 12th European Conference on Fungal Genetics, ECFG12 Spain 3 0 M A R C H 2 014 Stalked alpha-Proteobacteria and Relatives: from Genes to Structure Germany

9 A P R I L 2 014 6th European Spores Conference United Kingdom

The FEMS Affiliates Letter is a production of FEMS Central Office

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MICROBIOLOGY TIDBITS Supervaccine preventing flu forever? If all goes to plan a new injection would stop the need for annual flu jabs and could save thousands of lives every year. It could prevent highly dangerous forms of the disease, like the Spanish Flu. The universal vaccine works by attacking proteins hidden within the virus which are common throughout harmful strains. After testing, the vaccine could be available from 2018. Source: Medical Daily

1 December 2013 15 June 2014 FEMS Research Fellowships

1 A P R I L 2 014 VIBRIO 2014 United Kingdom

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Collecting for Ocean Sampling Day “Let’s take marine research to the next level. The ocean needs you!” By crowdfunding and collecting samples worldwide, Ocean Sampling Day intends to explore the world’s oceans on a large scale. Crowdfunding will run until 10 November. Source: My OSD Immune system discovery Development of a vaccine against Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has taken a step forward with the Canadian discovery of how EBV infection evades detection by the immune system, causing infectious mononucleosis and cancers. The virus triggers molecular events that turn off key proteins, making infected cells invisible to the natural killer T (NKT) immune cells that seek and destroy EBV-infected cells. Source: Vaccinews Polio SGM issued a briefing for World Polio Day, including lessons for the development of vaccines. Source: SGM

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FEMS Affiliates Letter October 2013  
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