2022 Annual Report

Page 1

2022 ANNUAL
REPORT
Delivering the trusted technology solutions our customers use to help American agriculture thrive. 02 04 05 06 10 11 12 14 20 Notes to Financial Statements Letter from the President and Chair of the Board Board of Directors Senior Leadership Team Management’s Discussion and Analysis Report of Management Report of Audit Committee Report of Independent Auditors Financial Statements

Letter from the President and Chair of the Board

Over the past year—while many industries faced increased complexity and change–the Farm Credit System saw solid loan growth and earnings due to strong demand and increased commodity prices. During this period of growth for the System, Farm Credit Financial Partners (FPI) capitalized on improving technological capabilities for our customer-owners. We drove improvements to execution of our technology strategy, while also focusing on becoming nimble and responding to changing business needs with precision and speed.

A critical component of our ability to execute with speed and agility is the alignment of FPI’s customerowners on our shared vision. In 2022, FPI worked closely with our Board of Directors to drive alignment on our vision and roadmap to achieve collective success. We collaboratively developed guiding principles to guide FPI and ACA cross-functional teams on our approach to the delivery, design, and execution of technology solutions to support our vision.

In line with our guiding principles, we also spent time exploring out-of-the-box functionality of our platforms with the goal of prioritizing organizational and process changes over technology customizations. While many of the cloud-based systems within our AgWorx by FPI ecosystem were built on commercial banking standards, which are at times disparate from the unique needs of Farm Credit, there are benefits to adopting these systems as they were built. By capitalizing on the functionality of our systems, we can implement enhancements, integrations, and new business capabilities quicker, while also avoiding increased technical debt.

Leveraging platforms out-of-the-box also equips our customer-owners to realize the future benefits of the integration platform that FPI spent 2022 preparing to implement. Once implemented, our integration platform will provide customer-owners with the ability to expand business capabilities by providing streamlined integration with other systems, platforms, and data sources.

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As we continued to execute other multi-year initiatives in 2022 that will allow us to deploy at speed—including data modernization and removing dependencies on legacy platforms—we also focused on taking an increasingly collaborative approach with our customer-owners as new solutions are implemented. By bridging the gap between IT and the business through cross-functional teams that include representatives from both FPI and our agricultural credit association customers, we can leverage diverse skills and perspectives to create innovative solutions driven by business input and achieve optimal outcomes.

In 2022, FPI also completed our final implementation of the Wolters Kluwer Expere legal document solution for all customer-owners, and additional enhancements to the Online Banking platform. In addition, FPI supported two mergers, one including a technological integration with one customer-owner and a nonFPI cooperative association. The second, a merger between two customer-owners including a financial integration to aid the technical merger—which will include core business applications, systems, and data— beginning in 2023.

As we look ahead to 2023 and beyond, we are excited to continue to drive forward our collective vision for the future with a strong focus on excellence in our execution. FPI and our customer-owners are positioned to leverage technology as a competitive advantage and address pressures through the strategies we will continue to implement this year. We are proud of the success of the System this past year and will continue to focus on our mission of delivering the trusted technology solutions our customers use to help American agriculture thrive.

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 3

Board of Directors

4 2022 ANNUAL REPORT
AARON S. JOHNSON President and Chief Executive Officer Farm Credit Illinois JOHN BARCELOS Chief Risk Officer AgWest Farm Credit MICHAEL J. REYNOLDS Chair of the Board Chief Executive Officer Farm Credit East RYAN BERG Senior Vice President and Chief Operations Officer Farm Credit Illinois J ESSICA FYRE Vice Chair of the Board General Counsel and Chief Operations Officer AgCountry Farm Credit Services DAVID BARBIERI Chief Information Officer AgWest Farm Credit MARCUS L. KNISELY President and Chief Executive Officer AgCountry Farm Credit Services MARK D. LITTLEFIELD President and Chief Executive Officer AgWest Farm Credit TOM NAKANO Chief Financial Officer AgWest Farm Credit BRIANA BEEBE Chief Operating Officer Farm Credit East

Senior Leadership Team

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 5
BOB PASSINI President and Chief Executive Officer SCOTT BERARD Executive Vice President Chief Customer Officer and Secretary of the Board MARY MAZZA Senior Vice President Human Resources JIM MCCORMACK Executive Vice President Chief Technology Officer JAMIE MANNING Chief of Staff and Communications SCOTT ROUSSEAU Executive Vice President Chief Financial Officer and Treasurer JOHN STABILO Executive Vice President Infrastructure and Application Delivery

Management’s Discussion and Analysis

INTRODUCTION

The following discussion summarizes the financial position and results of operations of Farm Credit Financial Partners, Inc. (FPI, or the Company ) as of and for the year ended December 31, 2022. Comparisons with prior years are included. The discussion and analysis should be read in conjunction with the accompanying financial statements, footnotes, and other sections of this report. The accompanying financial statements were prepared under the oversight of our Audit Committee. The Management’s Discussion and Analysis includes the following sections:

• Business Overview

• Year in Review

• Results of Operations

• Liquidity and Funding Sources

• Ownership and Capital

• Governance

• Forward-Looking Information

BUSINESS OVERVIEW

Farm Credit System Structure and Mission

FPI operates as part of the Farm Credit System (the System or Farm Credit), which was created by Congress in 1916 and has served agricultural producers for over 100 years. The System’s mission is to provide sound and dependable credit to American farmers, ranchers, and other agricultural producers and farm-related businesses through a member-owned cooperative system. FPI serves System association lenders in providing a comprehensive technology platform, support, and related services. The Farm Credit Administration (FCA) is the System’s independent safety and soundness federal regulator and was established to supervise, examine, and regulate System institutions.

Our Structure and Focus

For over 25 years, FPI has supported the Farm Credit mission and agricultural credit associations (ACAs) through technology delivery. FPI’s investments in its technology and services portfolio have yielded a suite of technology solutions and services tailored for Farm Credit. Our vision is to equip its customers-owners

with tools that enable them to succeed in a competitive landscape.

Consistent with other Farm Credit institutions, FPI is organized as a cooperative, with ownership comprised 100% of Farm Credit ACAs. This cooperative model facilitates alignment between customer needs and owner governance and direction.

YEAR IN REVIEW

Farm Credit has a rich, mission-based history of supporting rural communities and American agriculture. To support this mission and address increased pressures the financial services industry and FPI’s customer-owners face, the organization has shifted its strategy in recent years to become a service delivery organization and valueadded systems integrator. This shift will allow FPI’s customer-owners to meet competitive pressures and changing business needs—when and where they appear—by building technology systems that enable speed, flexibility, and expansion of business capabilities through integration with other systems.

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This strategic shift has led to FPI’s

next generation of products and services: AgWorx by FPI. AgWorx by FPI leverages market leading commercial software from industry leaders such as Salesforce®, nCino® and Fiserv® to offer a set of technology solutions: AgWorx Customer, AgWorx Lending, AgWorx Financials and AgWorx Insights. These technology solutions support capabilities for our customerowners such as customer relationship management, lending, online banking, loan servicing, financial, security, data, and productivity tools.

In 2022, FPI made progress on several multi-year initiatives, including preparation of a commercial integration platform and the development of initial Application Programming Interfaces (APIs), which lay the groundwork for streamlined integration with other systems. For FPI, this project also included training staff on this new operating model, bringing IT and business closer together to drive innovation and flexibility.

Other key implementations in 2022 included the Wolters Kluwer Expere legal document solution for multiple customer-owners, and additional enhancements to the Online Banking platform. Implementations and upgrades were also completed in the infrastructure, security, and disaster recovery spaces. FPI also supported three mergers, two of the projects were completed during the year and included technological mergers between customer-owner and nonFPI cooperative associations. The third included a merger between two customer-owners with initial groundwork laid for the technical merger portion, which will begin in 2023 and include core business applications, systems, and data.

As we continue to execute on current initiatives and plan upcoming

implementations with our customerowners, we are excited and optimistic for the future. On our continued journey to modernize our technology platforms, we will continue to mature our deployment of our technological solutions through an API-led approach, enabling innovation through modernizing capabilities and providing speed and flexibility for our customer-owners to support their customer-members and the Farm Credit mission

RESULTS OF OPERATIONS

During 2022, FPI achieved our financial objectives including net income materially in line with our breakeven target. Carefully managed operating expenses, capital spending, and project spending supported FPI’s successful operational and financial performance for the year. Cash balances ended the year in excess of plan and liquidity is projected to remain sufficient to complete future initiatives related to product implementations and the modernization of legacy systems, while continuing to provide the top-level customer and production support our customer-owners rely on.

Revenue

2022 revenues were $69,650k. Revenues increased by $6,227k, or 9.8% from 2021 levels with the majority of this increase, $4,611k related to custom services revenues. Core service fees comprise $56,372k, or 80.9% of total revenues and increased by $1,616k over 2021.

Operating Expenses

Operating expenses totaled $69,717k in 2022 as compared to $63,125k in 2021 for an increase of $6,592k, or 10.4%. The primary drivers of the operating expense increase are rebilled, non-Core service expenses included in the Purchasedservices and Salaries- and- employee -benefits line items which are recovered through custom service revenues. These costs account for $4,611k of total operating expense growth and are related to three primary areas:

1. Increased adoption of FPI’s AgWorx platform – As FPI continues to transition away from legacy on-premises solutions toward a cloud-based environment, increased customer adoption and new implementations of AgWorx Customer, Lending and Insights

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 7

solutions drove increased cloud services costs.

2. Continued investment in the AgWorx platform – FPI continues to invest in the modernization of our platform and underlying products and services. During 2022, key investments were made in our integration platform, legal document solution, the modernization of our AgWorx platform, and in the supporting infrastructure and security areas.

3. Mergers and other special projects – During 2022, FPI worked on three merger-related projects for our customers as well as other targeted custom projects.

From a financial statement line-item perspective, salary and employee benefit expenses increased by $2,066k over 2021, primarily due to a 6 employee increase in average year over year headcount as well as increased labor costs in the competitive hiring environment of 2022. The increased headcount primarily supported the merger and special projects during the year. Purchased Services costs increased by $3,272k as compared to 2021. The drivers of this increase are cloud services costs related to increased adoption and project costs

related to the continued investment in FPI’s technology platform. Occupancy and equipment costs increased by $788k or 7.0% over prior year due to additional amortization costs as additional new technologies are placed into service. Partially offsetting the increased amortization is a decrease in hardware depreciation due to our shrinking on-premises footprint. Other Operating Expenses increased by $466k or 11.9% as employee travel and training costs returned to pre-pandemic levels. Also contributing are increased insurance and audit costs

Other Income and Expense

FPI is reporting other (expense)/income of $216k for the year. This expense is driven by the Company’s reflection of ASU 2017-07 and the reporting of other components of net periodic pension cost in this section of the statement. While service costs, which are reported in the salaries and employee benefits line of the statement of operations, represent the value of expected pension benefits to be earned during the year, the other components of net periodic pension cost include the annual interest cost on the projected benefit obligation less the expected return on plan assets plus the amortization of any prior service costs and actuarial gains and losses. Additional details are available in footnote 13 – Employee Benefit Plans.

Our income tax provision for the year of $99k is due to a combination of our 2022 tax provision and the difference between our prior year provision and actual taxes filed.

Net Income

The 2022 net income is $50k as compared to a prior year net income of $8k.

LIQUIDITY AND FUNDING SOURCES

FPI operates with the following primary sources of funding:

1. Revenue for core services.

2. Revenue from custom and other projects.

3. Capital funding from owners.

In addition, FPI maintains a $3.75 million line of credit with CoBank. This line renews annually on July 31.

Funding levels are established and approved annually during the budget planning cycle. Capital funding is planned over a three-year cycle and reviewed annually.

The capital plan identifies key strategic projects and related funding sources. Completion of these projects is positioning FPI to effectively meet

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technology demands and creating business value for our customer-owners.

OWNERSHIP AND CAPITAL

As of December 31, 2022, FPI had five customer-owners with stock investments totaling $27.8 million.

Total equity on December 31, 2022, equaled $25.7 million, $1k less than in 2021. Changes in the equity section of the balance sheet include an increase in the accumulated other comprehensive loss line item of $51k offset by current year net income of $50k. The accumulated other comprehensive loss reduction is due to a reduction in FPI’s defined benefit pension plan liability during the year.

FPI’s Board approved capital plan provides for continued investment in FPI’s strategic initiatives and ongoing investments in operations, controls, and information security over the 2023-2025 periods.

GOVERNANCE Board of Directors

FPI’s Board of Directors is comprised of two senior executives of each customer-owner, including the CEO or CEO-designee. FPI’s Board operates under a committee structure. The committees include:

Audit Committee

The Audit Committee is composed of one Board member from each customer-owner with one Committee member elected as the Chair and one elected as Vice Chair. The Audit Committee responsibilities include, but are not limited to:

• Oversight of the internal controls related to the preparation of annual shareholder reports.

• Review and assessment of the impact of accounting and auditing developments on the consolidated financial statements.

• Establishment and maintenance of procedures for the receipt, retention, and treatment of confidential and anonymous submission of concerns, regarding accounting, internal accounting controls or auditing matters.

• Oversight of the Company’s internal audit program, the independence of the outside auditors, the adequacy of the Company’s system of internal controls and procedures, and the adequacy of management’s action with respect to recommendations arising from those auditing activities

Human Capital Committee

The Human Capital Committee is responsible for the oversight of employee compensation. The Human Capital Committee is composed of one Board member from each owner ACA with one Committee member elected as the Chair and one elected as Vice Chair.

The Committee reviews, evaluates and approves the compensation policies, programs and plans for senior officers and employees including benefits programs.

FORWARD-LOOKING INFORMATION

Our discussion contains forward-looking statements. These statements are not guarantees of future performance and involve certain risks, uncertainties and assumptions that are difficult to predict. Words such as “anticipates,” “believes,” “could,” “estimates,” “may,” “should,” and “will,” or other variations of these terms are intended to identify forward-looking statements. These statements are based on assumptions and analyses made in light of experience and other historical trends, current conditions, and expected future developments. However, actual results and developments may differ materially from our expectations and predictions due to a number of risks and uncertainties, many of which are beyond our control. These risks and uncertainties include, but are not limited to fluctuations in the economy, the relative strengths and weaknesses in the agricultural credit sectors and in the real estate market, and the actions taken by the Federal Reserve in implementing monetary policy

• Oversight of the financial reporting risk and the accuracy of the annual shareholder reports.

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 9

REPORT OF MANAGEMENT

The financial statements of Farm Credit Financial Partners, Inc. (the Company) are prepared by management, who is responsible for their integrity and objectivity, including amounts that must necessarily be based on judgments and estimates. The financial statements have been prepared in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. The financial statements, in our opinion, fairly present the financial condition of the Company. Other financial information included in this 2022 annual report is consistent with that in the financial statements.

To meet our responsibility for reliable financial information, management depends on accounting and internal control systems designed to provide reasonable, but not absolute assurance that assets are safeguarded and transactions are properly authorized and recorded. Costs must be reasonable in relation to the benefits derived when designing accounting and internal control systems. To monitor compliance, the Company’s internal auditors perform audits of accounting records, review accounting systems and internal controls, and recommend improvements as appropriate. The financial statements are audited by RSM US LLP, our independent auditors, in accordance with auditing standards generally accepted in the United States of America. The Company is also examined by the Farm Credit Administration.

The chief executive officer, as delegated by the Board of Directors, has overall responsibility for the Company’s system of internal controls and financial reporting, subject to the review of the Audit Committee of the Board of Directors. The Audit Committee consults regularly with management and meets periodically with the independent auditors and internal auditors to review the scope and results of their examinations. The Audit Committee reports regularly to the Board of Directors. Both the independent auditors and the internal auditors have direct access to the Audit Committee.

The undersigned certify that the 2022 Annual Report to Shareholders and information contained herein is true, accurate and complete to the best of our knowledge and belief.

March 14, 2023

March 14, 2023

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FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS

REPORT OF AUDIT COMMITTEE

The consolidated financial statements were prepared under the oversight of the Audit Committee (Committee). The Committee is composed of a subset of the Board of Directors of Farm Credit Financial Partners, Inc. (FPI). The Committee oversees the scope of FPI’s internal audit program, the approval, and independence of RSM US LLP (RSM) as external auditors, the adequacy of FPI’s system of internal controls and procedures, and the adequacy of management’s action with respect to recommendations arising from those auditing activities. The Committee’s responsibilities are described more fully in the FPI’s Internal Control Policy and the Audit Committee Charter.

Management is responsible for FPI’s internal controls and the preparation of the consolidated financial statements in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America. RSM is responsible for performing an independent audit of FPI’s consolidated financial statements in accordance with generally accepted auditing standards in the United States of America and to issue a report thereon. The Committee’s responsibilities include monitoring and overseeing these processes.

In this context, the Committee reviewed and discussed the audited consolidated financial statements for the year ended December 31, 2022, with management. The Committee also receives from RSM the matters required to be discussed by Statements on Auditing Standards. Both RSM and FPI’s internal auditors directly provide reports on significant matters to the Committee.

The Committee approves all non-audit services provided by RSM, if any. In 2022, RSM was not engaged for non-audit services.

Based on the foregoing review and discussions, and relying thereon, the Committee recommended that the Board of Directors include the audited consolidated financial statements in the Annual Report for the year ended December 31, 2022 and for filing with the FCA.

March 14, 2023

Members of the Audit Committee:

Aaron Johnson, Vice Chair

John Barcelos

Jessica Fyre

Michael Reynolds

March 14, 2023

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 11

Audit Committee

Farm Credit Financial Partners, Inc.

Opinion

We have audited the financial statements of Farm Credit Financial Partners, Inc. (the Company), which comprise the balance sheets as of December 31, 2022, 2021 and 2020, the related statements of operations, comprehensive {loss) income, changes in equity, accumulated other comprehensive loss and cash flows for the years then ended, and the related notes to the financial statements (collectively, the financial statements).

In our opinion, the accompanying financial statements present fairly, in all material respects, the financial position of the Company as of December 31, 2022, 2021 and 2020, and the results of its operations and its cash flows for the years then ended in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United

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Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor’s report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance but is not absolute assurance and therefore is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with GAAS will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control. Misstatements are considered material if there is a substantial likelihood that, individually or in the aggregate, they would influence the judgment made by a reasonable user based on the financial statements.

Auditor's Responsibilities for the Audit of the Financial Statements

Our objectives are to obtain reasonable assurance about whether the financial statements as a whole are free from material misstatement, whether due to fraud or error, and to issue an auditor's report that includes our opinion. Reasonable assurance is a high level of assurance but is not absolute assurance and therefore is not a guarantee that an audit conducted in accordance with GAAS will always detect a material misstatement when it exists. The risk of not detecting a material misstatement resulting from fraud is higher than for one resulting from error, as fraud may involve collusion, forgery, intentional omissions, misrepresentations, or the override of internal control. Misstatements are considered material if there is a substantial likelihood that, individually or in the aggregate, they would influence the judgment made by a reasonable user based on the financial statements.

In performing an audit in accordance with GAAS, we:

• Exercise professional judgment and maintain professional skepticism throughout the audit.

• Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, and design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks. Such procedures include examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements.

Identify and assess the risks of material misstatement of the financial statements, whether due to fraud or error, and design and perform audit procedures responsive to those risks. Such procedures include examining, on a test basis, evidence regarding the amounts and disclosures in the financial statements. Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the

• Obtain an understanding of internal control relevant to the audit in order to design audit procedures that are appropriate in the circumstances, but not for the purpose of expressing an opinion on the effectiveness of the Company's internal control. Accordingly, no such opinion is expressed.

• Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluate the overall presentation of the financial statements.

Evaluate the appropriateness of accounting policies used and the reasonableness of significant accounting estimates made by management, as well as evaluate the overall presentation of the financial statements.

Conclude whether, in our judgment, there are conditions or events, considered in the aggregate, that raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time.

• Conclude whether, in our judgment, there are conditions or events, considered in the aggregate, that raise substantial doubt about the Company's ability to continue as a going concern for a reasonable period of time.

We are required to communicate with those charged with governance regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit, significant audit findings, and certain internal control-related matters that

We are required to communicate with those charged with governance regarding, among other matters, the planned scope and timing of the audit, significant audit findings, and certain internal control-related matters that we identified during the audit.

Boston, Massachusetts March 14, 2023

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 13

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS, INC. Balance Sheets

AS OF DECEMBER 31, 2022, 2021, AND 2020

Commitments and contingencies (Note 16)

as of

14 2022 ANNUAL REPORT The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements
2022 2021 2020 Assets Current assets: Cash and cash equivalents 11,188,624 $ 7,247,272 $ 6,968,224 $ Accounts receivable 602,785 640,593 434,347 Prepaid and other current assets 5,818,952 7,985,470 6,032,250 Total current assets 17,610,361 15,873,335 13,434,821 Long-term assets: Fixed assets, net 1,738,941 2,130,977 3,947,420 Intangible assets, net 18,021,428 18,761,985 16,799,020 Operating lease right-of-use assets 9,636,175 -Deferred tax asset, net 1,011,171 1,076,602 1,667,454 Prepaid assets, long-term 132,697 205,491 507,767 Captive investment 642,980 683,876 623,401 Total long term-assets 31,183,392 22,858,931 23,545,061 Total assets 48,793,753 $ 38,732,266 $ 36,979,883 $ Liabilities Current liabilities: Accrued expenses and other liabilities 4,356,820 $ 4,650,349 $ 3,397,293 $ Accrued employee benefits 1,665,676 1,514,777 1,545,882 Current portion of deferred revenue 2,309,047 1,944,335 1,426,173 Current portion of operating lease liabilities 714,309 -Line of credit - - 109,146 Total current liabilities 9,045,852 8,109,461 6,478,494 Long-term liabilities: Accrued expenses and other liabilities, long-term 499,369 418,959 409,765 Accrued employee benefits, long-term 3,219,254 3,137,015 5,531,489 Deferred revenue, long-term 1,403,299 1,361,409 1,055,838 Operating lease liabilities, long-term 8,921,865 -Total long-term liabilities 14,043,787 4,917,383 6,997,092 Total liabilities 23,089,639 13,026,844 13,475,586
2,500,000
outstanding
December 31, 2022, 2021
2020 12,500,000 12,500,000 12,500,000 Class B preferred stock,
5,000,000 shares authorized, 1,950,000 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2022, 2021 and 2020 9,750,000 9,750,000 9,750,000 Class C common stock, $5.00 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized, 1,110,000 shares issued and outstanding as of December 31, 2022, 2021 and 2020 5,550,000 5,550,000 5,550,000 Accumulated other comprehensive loss (3,514,264) (3,463,380) (5,656,996) Accumulated earnings 1,418,378 1,368,802 1,361,293 Total equity 25,704,114 25,705,422 23,504,297 Total liabilities and equity 48,793,753 $ 38,732,266 $ 36,979,883 $
Equity Class A preferred stock, $5.00 par value, 5,000,000 shares authorized,
shares issued and
and
$5.00 par value,

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS, INC. Statements of Operations

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2022, 2021, AND 2020

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 15 The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements 2022 2021 2020 Revenue Core and custom services 69,649,525 $ 63,422,476 $ 63,273,375 $ Total revenue 69,649,525 63,422,476 63,273,375 Operating Expenses Salaries and employee benefits 33,773,647 31,707,946 29,749,423 Purchased services 19,621,602 16,349,979 16,959,204 Occupancy and equipment 11,951,752 11,162,925 11,412,721 Other operating expenses 4,370,202 3,904,409 5,029,724 Total operating expenses 69,717,203 63,125,259 63,151,072 Net (loss) income from operations (67,678) 297,217 122,303 Other (Expense)/Income Interest income 91,842 21,163 32,157 Interest expense - -Other components of net periodic pension cost 106,000 (324,000) (498,000) Other gains 18,867 - 1,031 Total other income (expense) 216,709 (302,837) (464,812) Income (loss) before income taxes 149,031 (5,620) (342,509) Income tax provision (benefit) 99,455 (13,129) (77,076) Net income (loss) 49,576 $ 7,509 $ (265,433) $

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS, INC.

Statements of Comprehensive (Loss) Income

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2022, 2021, AND 2020

16 2022 ANNUAL REPORT The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements
2022 2021 2020 Net income (loss) 49,576 $ 7,509 $ (265,433) $ Other comprehensive(loss) income: Net change in retirement plan liabilities (50,884) 2,193,616 566,579 Comprehensive (loss) income (1,308) $ 2,201,125 $ 301,146 $

CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS, INC.

Statements of Cash Flows

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2022, 2021, AND 2020

FARM
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 17 2022 2021 2020 Cash Flows from Operating Activities Net income (loss) 49,576 $ 7,509 $ (265,433) $ Adjustments to reconcile net income (loss) to net cash provided by operating activities: Depreciation and amortization 8,066,671 7,030,938 6,691,087 Loss on disposal of fixed assets - 131,166 138 Decrease in deferred tax asset, net 65,431 590,851 106,905 Changes in operating assets and liabilities: Increase (decrease) in accounts receivable 37,809 (206,246) (77,396) Decrease (increase) in prepaid and other assets 2,280,207 (1,711,418) 729,002 Increase in deferred revenue 406,601 823,734 1,679,384 (Decrease) increase in accrued expenses and other liabilities (213,119) 1,262,251 159,525 Increase (decrease) in accrued employee benefits 182,253 (231,964) 755,953 Net cash provided by operating activities 10,875,429 7,696,821 9,779,165 Cash Flows from Investing Activities Purchase of fixed assets (1,253,018) (667,136) (2,348,218) Proceeds from sale of fixed assets - 9,903Capitalized software development costs (5,681,059) (6,651,394) (8,667,918) Net cash used in investing activities (6,934,077) (7,308,627) (11,016,136) Cash Flows from Financing Activities Advances on line of credit with CoBank, ACB 3,851,434 3,584,603 3,429,228 Repayment of line of credit to CoBank, ACB (3,851,434) (3,693,749) (3,320,082) Net cash (used) provided by financing activities - (109,146) 109,146 Net increase (decrease) in cash and cash equivalents 3,941,352 279,048 (1,127,825) Cash and cash equivalents at beginning of year 7,247,272 6,968,224 8,096,049 Cash and cash equivalents at end of year 11,188,624 $ 7,247,272 $ 6,968,224 $ Supplemental Cash Information: Cash paid during the year for: Interest - $ - $ - $ Income taxes 100,421 $ 68,350 $ 42,000 $ Operating leases 910,979 $ - $ - $ Net change in retirement plan liabilities (50,884) $ 2,193,616 $ 566,579 $

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS, INC.

Statements of Changes in Equity

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2022, 2021, AND 2020

18 2022 ANNUAL REPORT The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements
Accumulated Class A Class B Class C Other Preferred Stock Preferred Stock Common Stock Comprehensive Accumulated Shares Amount Shares Amount Shares Amount Loss Earnings Total Balance as of January 1, 2020 2,500,000 12,500,000 $ 1,950,000 9,750,000 $ 1,110,000 5,550,000 $ (6,223,575) $ 1,626,726 $ 23,203,151 $ Net loss - - - - - - - (265,433) (265,433) Other comprehensive income - - - - - - 566,579 - 566,579 Balance as of December 31, 2020 2,500,000 12,500,000 1,950,000 9,750,000 1,110,000 5,550,000 (5,656,996) 1,361,293 23,504,297 Net income - - - - - - - 7,509 7,509 Other comprehensive income - - - - - - 2,193,616 - 2,193,616 Balance as of December 31, 2021 2,500,000 12,500,000 1,950,000 9,750,000 1,110,000 5,550,000 (3,463,380) 1,368,802 25,705,422 Net income - - - - - - - 49,576 49,576 Other comprehensive loss - - - - - - (50,884) - (50,884) Balance as of December 31, 2022 2,500,000 12,500,000 $ 1,950,000 9,750,000 $ 1,110,000 5,550,000 $ (3,514,264) $ 1,418,378 $ 25,704,114 $

Accumulated Other Comprehensive Loss

YEARS ENDED DECEMBER 31, 2022, 2021, AND 2020

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS, INC.
The accompanying notes are an integral part of these financial statements FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 19 Minimum Postretirement Pension Liability Liability Total Balance as of January 1, 2020 (5,909,317) $ (314,258) $ (6,223,575) $ Change in period 673,751 76,808 750,559 Tax effect of change in period (165,113) (18,867) (183,980) Balance as of December 31, 2020 (5,400,679) (256,317) (5,656,996) Change in period 2,897,113 (4,724) 2,892,389 Tax effect of change in period (700,924) 2,151 (698,773) Balance as of December 31, 2021 (3,204,490) (258,890) (3,463,380) Change in period (28,385) (20,831) (49,216) Tax effect of change in period (5,763) 4,095 (1,668) Balance as of December 31, 2022 (3,238,638) $ (275,626) $ (3,514,264) $

Notes to Financial Statements

NOTE 1 ORGANIZATION AND OPERATIONS

Farm Credit Financial Partners, Inc. (FPI or the Company) is engaged principally in providing information technology, financial services support, and other services to associations in the Farm Credit System (the System). Currently, FPI services associations funded through CoBank, ACB (CoBank), an agricultural credit bank in the Farm Credit System, as well as association customers of AgriBank, FCB a farm credit bank in the Farm Credit System.

The Farm Credit Administration (FCA) chartered FPI as a service corporation under Section 4.25 of the Farm Credit Act of 1971, as amended (the Act). The FCA has authority under the Act to charter and regulate Farm Credit System banks, associations, and service corporations. The activities of FPI are examined by FCA and certain actions by FPI are subject to the prior approval of FCA and FPI owner associations.

NOTE 2 SUMMARY OF SIGNIFICANT ACCOUNTING POLICIES

A. Basis of Presentation

The accompanying financial statements have been prepared in accordance with accounting standards set by the Financial Accounting Standards Board (FASB). The FASB sets generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) in the United States that the Company follows to ensure its financial condition, results of operations and cash flows are consistently reported. References to GAAP issued by the FASB in these notes to the financial statements are to the FASB Accounting Standards Codification (ASC).

B. Use of Estimates

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with GAAP requires management to make estimates and assumptions that affect the amounts reported in the financial statements and accompanying notes. Significant estimates include the valuation of deferred tax assets and liabilities, assets and liabilities associated with employee benefit plans, revenue recognition, and software development costs, and are discussed in these footnotes, as applicable. Actual results may differ from those estimates.

C. Cash and Cash Equivalents

Cash includes cash on hand and on deposit at banks. Cash equivalents are FPI’s investments in a short-term money market fund with a maturity of three months or less. The fund invests in U.S. dollar-denominated short-term debt obligations including securities issued by the U.S. Government or its agencies, bankers’ acceptances, certificates of deposit, time deposits from U.S. or foreign banks, repurchase agreements, commercial paper, municipal securities and master notes.

D. Accounts Receivable

Accounts receivable are stated at amounts management expects to collect on outstanding balances. FPI evaluates the collectability of its receivables based on its prior experience and assessment of potential future losses and does so through ongoing reviews of its aging analysis. The allowance for doubtful accounts balance at December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 was $0. Bad debt expense was $0 for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020.

E. Unbilled Revenue

At times, FPI performs services for customers in advance of invoicing for such services. These amounts are recorded as unbilled revenue, are included in prepaid and other assets in the accompanying balance sheets, and amount to $829,906, $865,008, and $373,108, at December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020, respectively.

F. Fixed Assets

Fixed assets are carried at cost less accumulated depreciation. Depreciation is computed using the straight-line method over the estimated useful lives of five to ten years for furniture and fixtures, and three to seven years for computer equipment and software. Gains and losses on dispositions are reflected in other operating expenses on the statements of operation. Maintenance and repairs are charged to operating expense and improvements are capitalized.

G. Software Development Costs

The Company is developing new products which the Company intends to offer as part of its core services and is developing significant upgrades and enhancements to its existing software as-a-service (“SaaS”) platform. The Company follows the guidance of ASC 350-40,

20 2022 ANNUAL REPORT

Intangibles – Goodwill and Other – Internal-Use Software, for development costs related to these new products. Costs incurred in the planning stage are expensed as incurred while costs incurred in the application development stage are capitalized, assuming such costs are deemed to be recoverable. Costs incurred in the operating stage are generally expensed as incurred except for significant upgrades and enhancements. Software development costs are amortized over the software’s estimated useful life, which management has determined to be three to seven years. Software development costs are included in intangible assets, net in the accompanying balance sheets and disclosed in more detail in Note 5.

H. Employee Benefit Plans

The funded status of pension and other post-retirement benefit plans is recognized in the balance sheets in long-term accrued employee benefits. Gains and losses, prior service costs and credits that have not yet been recognized through pension expense will be recognized in accumulated other comprehensive loss, net of tax, until they are amortized as a component of net periodic pension/post-retirement benefits expense.

Pension expense is based on an actuarial computation of future benefits using estimates for expected return on assets, expected compensation increases and applicable discount rates. Expected compensation increases are estimated based on historical and expected increases in the future. Increases in estimated compensation would result in higher pension expense while decreases would lower pension expense. Discount rates are selected based upon rates of return on fixed income investments currently available and expected to be available during the period to maturity of the pension benefit. Detailed rate assumptions are included in Note 13.

Effective January 1, 2005, the Company closed the existing defined benefit retirement plan to new participants. All employees hired on or after January 1, 2005 are participants in a noncontributory defined contribution plan. Participants in this plan receive a fixed percentage of their eligible wages in an investment account maintained for the employee. Costs for these benefits are recorded in the period in which they are incurred in salaries and employee benefits on the statements of operations.

Company employees are also eligible to participate in an employee savings plan. The Company matches a certain percentage of employee contributions with costs being expensed as funded. Costs for these benefits are recorded in the period in which they are incurred in salaries and employee benefits on the statements of operations.

The Company also provides certain health care and life insurance benefits to employees. Costs for these benefits are recorded in the period in which they are incurred in salaries and employee benefits on the statements of operations.

I. Income Taxes

The Company is organized as a C Corporation for Federal Income Tax purposes and files a Form 1120-C. The Company uses the asset and liability method of accounting for income taxes whereby deferred tax assets and liabilities are recognized for the estimated future tax consequences attributable to differences between the financial statement carrying amounts of existing assets and liabilities and their respective tax bases. The effect on deferred tax assets and liabilities of a change in tax rates is recognized in income in the period that includes the enactment date. The Company also reduces deferred tax assets by a valuation allowance if, based on the weight of available evidence, it is more likely than not that some portion or all of the recorded deferred tax assets will not be realized in future periods. This methodology requires estimates and judgments in the determination of the recoverability of deferred tax assets and in the calculation of certain tax liabilities. Valuation allowances are recorded against the gross deferred tax assets that management believes, after considering all available positive and negative objective evidence, historical and prospective, with greater weight given to historical evidence, that it is more likely than not that these assets will not be realized.

In addition, the Company is required to recognize in the financial statements, those tax positions determined to be more likely than not of being sustained upon examination, based on the technical merits of the positions as of the reporting date. If a tax position is not considered more likely than not to be sustained based solely on its technical merits, no benefits of the position are recognized. The Company recognizes interest and penalties as a component of the provision for income taxes in the accompanying statements of operations. The Company does not believe it has any material uncertain tax positions.

Interest and penalties paid were $18,843, $0 and $0 for the years ending December 31, 2022, 2021 and 2020. The Company is no longer subject to federal, state, and local income tax examinations by tax authorities for years prior to 2018.

J. Revenue Recognition

The Company derives revenue from core and custom services from its customers, all of which are lending associations in the Farm Credit

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 21

System. Core and custom services include credit delivery and management systems, core infrastructure and security, financial accounting and loan accounting services, management reporting, electronic commerce, legal support, and custom solutions, which include a retained technology services team dedicated to any specific projects required by the customer over a period of time which is typically one year.

The Company recognizes revenue in accordance with ASC 606, Revenue from Contracts with Customers, which provides a five-step model for recognizing revenue from contracts with customers as follows:

• Identify the contract with a customer

• Identify the performance obligation(s) in the contract

• Determine the transaction price

• Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligation(s) in the contract

• Recognize revenue when or as performance obligation(s) are satisfied

The Company assesses the contract term as the period in which the parties to the contract have presently enforceable rights and obligations. Contracts are generally standardized and non-cancellable for the duration of the stated contract term. FPI has determined that its core services represent a series of promises which represent a single performance obligation. When FPI sells custom services, such services are generally negotiated separately from the core services. As a result, the Company has determined that it does not have contracts with multiple performance obligations. Such services are recognized over the period of performance under the input method. All revenues for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 as reported within the statements of operations, are recognized over time.

The transaction price is the amount of consideration to which the Company expects to be entitled in exchange for transferring goods and services to the customer. Revenue from sales is recorded based on the transaction price, which includes estimates of variable consideration. The amount of variable consideration included in the transaction price is constrained to the extent it is probable that a significant reversal of cumulative revenue recognized will not occur when the uncertainty associated with the variable consideration is subsequently resolved. At the inception of a contract, the Company expects the period between when it satisfies its performance obligations, and when the customer pays for the services, will be one year or less. As such, the Company has elected to apply the practical expedient which allows the Company to not adjust the promised amount of consideration for the effects of a significant financing component when a financing component is present. Payment terms on invoiced amounts are typically 30 days. The Company does not offer rights of return for its services in the normal course of business, and contracts generally do not include customer acceptance clauses. The Company also excludes from revenue governmentassessed and imposed taxes on revenue-generating activities that are invoiced to customers.

The timing of revenue recognition may not align with the right to invoice the customer. The Company records accounts receivable when it has the unconditional right to issue an invoice and receive payment regardless of whether revenue has been recognized. If revenue has not yet been recognized, a contract liability (deferred revenue) is recorded. If revenue is recognized in advance of the right to invoice, unbilled revenue is recorded. Balances as of December 31, were as follows:

Costs to obtain and fulfill a contract: In accordance with ASC 340-40, Other Assets and Deferred Costs, the Company has elected to apply the practical expedient and recognize the incremental costs of obtaining contracts as an expense when incurred if the amortization period for the assets that the Company otherwise would have recognized is one year or less. Therefore, the Company would capitalize the incremental costs of obtaining a contract with a customer if the Company expects the benefit of those costs to be longer than one year and amortize such costs over the expected benefit period.

The Company considered the relevant guidance under ASC 340-40 and did not identify any incremental costs of obtaining a contract which would require capitalization for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020. The Company does not pay commissions in connection with its contracts which would require capitalization under the provisions of ASC 340-40. Further, the Company did not identify other material contract acquisition and fulfillment costs where ASC 340-40 results in capitalization.

K. Leases

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASC Topic 842, Leases, to increase transparency and comparability among organizations related to their leasing arrangements. The update requires lessees to recognize most leases on their balance sheets as a right-of-use (ROU) asset representing the right to use an underlying asset and a lease liability representing the obligation to make lease payments over the lease term, measured on a discounted basis. Topic 842 also requires additional disclosure of key quantitative and qualitative information for leasing arrangements. Similar

22 2022 ANNUAL REPORT
2022 2021 2020 Accounts Receivable $ 602,785 $ 640,593 $ 434,347 Unbilled Revenue $ 829,906 $ 865,008 $ 373,108 Contract Liabilities: Deferred Revenue $3,712,346 $3,305,744 $2,482,011

to the previous lease guidance, the update retains a distinction between finance leases (similar to capital leases in Topic 840, Leases) and operating leases, with classification affecting the pattern of expense recognition in the income statement. The Company adopted Topic 842 on January 1, 2022, using the modified retrospective approach, which eliminates the requirement to restate the prior-period financial statements. Under this transition provision, the Company has applied Topic 842 to reporting periods beginning on January 1, 2022, while prior periods continue to be reported and disclosed in accordance with the Company’s historical accounting treatment under ASC Topic 840, Leases.

The Company elected the “package of practical expedients” under the transition guidance within Topic 842, in which the Company does not reassess (1) the historical lease classification, (2) whether any existing contracts at transition are or contain leases, or (3) the initial direct costs for any existing leases. The Company has not elected to adopt the “hindsight” practical expedient, and therefore will measure the ROU asset and lease liability using the remaining portion of the lease term upon adoption of Topic 842 on January 1, 2022.

The Company determines if an arrangement is or contains a lease at inception, which is the date on which the terms of the contract are agreed to, and the agreement creates enforceable rights and obligations. A contract is or contains a lease when (i) explicitly or implicitly identified assets have been deployed in the contract and (ii) the Company obtains substantially all of the economic benefits from the use of that underlying asset and directs how and for what purpose the asset is used during the term of the contract. The Company also considers whether its service arrangements include the right to control the use of an asset.

The Company made an accounting policy election available under Topic 842 not to recognize ROU assets and lease liabilities for leases with a term of 12 months or less. The Company does not have any leases with a lease term of 12 months or less. For all other leases, ROU assets and lease liabilities are measured based on the present value of future lease payments over the lease term at the commencement date of the lease (or January 1, 2022, for existing leases upon the adoption of Topic 842). The ROU assets also include any initial direct costs incurred and lease payments made at or before the commencement date and are reduced by any lease incentives. To determine the present value of lease payments, the Company made an accounting policy election available to non-public companies to utilize a risk-free borrowing rate, which is aligned with the lease term at the lease commencement date (or remaining term for leases existing upon the adoption of Topic 842).

Adoption of Topic 842 resulted in the recording of additional ROU assets and lease liabilities related to the Company’s operating leases of $10,027,617 at January 1, 2022. The adoption of the new lease standard did not materially impact consolidated net earnings or consolidated cash flows and did not result in a cumulative-effect adjustment to the opening balance of retained earnings. See Note 15 for further information regarding the Company’s leases.

L. Concentrations of Credit Risk

Financial instruments which potentially subject the Company to credit risk consist primarily of cash, cash equivalents, accounts receivable and unbilled revenue. The Company maintains its cash and cash equivalents with high credit quality financial institutions, and monitors credit risk with individual financial institutions and issuers. At December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020, the Company had cash balances at certain financial institutions in excess of federally insured limits; however, it has not experienced any losses in such accounts. See Note 17 for concentrations of revenue and accounts receivable.

M. Accumulated Other Comprehensive (Loss) Income

The Company reports comprehensive (loss) income for all changes in equity during a period from non-owner sources, including the related net income (loss). The accumulated other comprehensive (loss) income represents adjustments to the minimum pension liability, net of tax.

N. Captive Insurance Company

FPI accounts for its investment in the captive insurance company (Note 8) under the equity method of accounting. The carrying value of the investment is recorded based on FPI’s initial investment and adjusted for FPI’s share of the earnings.

O. Impairment of Long-Lived Assets

The Company reviews long-lived assets for impairment whenever events or changes in circumstances indicate that the carrying amount of such assets may not be recoverable. As of December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 there were no impairment losses recognized for long-lived assets.

P . Recently Issued or Adopted Accounting Pronouncements

In June 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-13, Financial Instruments—Credit Losses (Topic 326). Measurement of Credit Losses on Financial Instruments and issued subsequent amendments to the initial guidance in November 2018 within ASU 2018-19 and in April 2019 within ASU 2019-04 (ASU 2016-13, ASU 2018-19 and ASU 2019-04 collectively, Topic 326). Topic 326 requires an organization to measure all expected credit losses for financial assets held at the reporting date based on historical experience, current conditions, and reasonable and supportable forecasts. Topic 326 is effective for non-public entities for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2022. The Company is currently evaluating the impact of the pending adoption of Topic 326 on its financial statements.

FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 23

NOTE 3 PREPAID AND OTHER ASSETS

Prepaid and other assets consist of the following (as of December 31):

NOTE 4 FIXED ASSETS, NET

Fixed assets, net, consisted of the following (as of December 31):

For the year ended December 31, 2022, there were disposals of fully depreciated assets of $431,988. For the year ended December 31, 2021, there were disposals of $3,500,419 with a realized loss of $131,166 and proceeds of $9,903. For the year ended December 31, 2020, there were disposals of $988,322 with a realized loss of $138. Depreciation expense related to the Company’s fixed assets was $1,645,055, $2,342,510, and $3,275,393 for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020, respectively.

NOTE 5 INTANGIBLE ASSETS, NET

Intangible assets, net consisted of software development costs, as follows (as of December 31):

Software development costs are typically amortized over a useful life of three – seven years. Amortization expense associated with these assets totaled $6,421,616, $4,688,428, and $3,415,694 for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020, respectively. As of December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 there was $1,352,780, $1,532,683, and $4,895,133, respectively, capitalized that the Company was not amortizing, as these products were in the application development stage and not yet placed in service.

Based on the current amount of intangible assets subject to amortization, including those not yet placed in service based on anticipated placed in service date, amortization expense is expected to be as follows for each of the years ending December 31:

24 2022 ANNUAL REPORT
Current assets: 2022 2021 2020 Prepaid vendor invoices $ 4,920,751 $ 7,067,347 $ 5,607,751 Unbilled revenue 829,906 865,008 373,108 Federal and state taxes 26,895 11,715 9,991 Other 41,400 41,400 41,400 $ 5,818,952 $ 7,985,470 $ 6,032,250 Long-term assets: Prepaid vendor invoices 132,697 205,491 507,767 $ 5,951,649 $ 8,190,961 $ 6,540,017
2022 2021 2020 Computer equipment $ 16,917,071 $ 16,976,616 $ 17,909,356 Computer software 13,074,021 12,237,265 12,278,609 Furniture and fixtures 121,467 77,647 1,936,847 30,112,559 29,291,528 32,124,812 Less: Accumulated depreciation (28,373,618) (27,160,551) (28,177,392) $ 1,738,941 $ 2,130,977 $ 3,947,420
2022 2021 2020 Software development costs $ 47,691,463 $ 42,010,403 $ 35,359,010 Less: Accumulated amortization (29,670,035) (23,248,418) (18,559,990) $ 18,021,428 $ 18,761,985 $ 16,799,020

NOTE 6 ACCRUED EXPENSES AND OTHER LIABILITIES

Accrued expenses and other liabilities consist of the following (as of December 31):

NOTE 7 ACCRUED EMPLOYEE BENEFITS

Accrued employee benefits consist of the following (as of December 31):

NOTE 8 CAPTIVE INVESTMENT

In conjunction with other System entities, the Company jointly owns the Farm Credit System Association Captive Insurance Company (the Captive). The Captive is an insurer that provides insurance services such as directors’ and officers’ liability, fiduciary liability, bankers bond and other property and liability insurance for member associations. The carrying value of the investment totaled $642,980, $683,876, and $623,401 at December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020, respectively. Premiums paid in those respective years to the Captive totaled $359,852, $329,988, and $270,538, respectively, and are included in salaries and employee benefits on the accompanying statements of operations. If FPI should terminate its interest in the captive, any contributed surplus will be returned within six months of the termination, subject to approval by the Board of Governors of the Captive.

2023 $ 6,739,671 2024 6,279,549 2025 2,914,699 2026 1,216,162 2027 588,935 2028-2030 282,412 Total $ 18,021,428
2022 2021 2020 Current liabilities: Bonus $ 2,658,611 $ 2,969,472 $ 2,269,133 Accrued expenses 1,471,159 733,331 692,019 Trade payables 203,874 835,299 405,498 Taxes payable 23,176 112,247 30,643 $ 4,356,820 $ 4,650,349 $ 3,397,293 Long-term liabilities: Bonus 499,369 418,959 409,765 $ 4,856,189 $ 5,069,308 $ 3,807,058
2022 2021 2020 Current liabilities: Annual leave $ 1,465,648 $ 1,320,420 $ 1,336,334 Self-insurance reserve 190,793 185,848 208,911 Payroll taxes 9,235 8,509 637 $ 1,665,676 $ 1,514,777 $ 1,545,882 Long-term liabilities: Pension $ 3,099,734 $ 3,017,396 $ 5,391,185 Post-retirement benefits 119,520 119,619 140,304 $ 3,219,254 $ 3,137,015 $ 5,531,489 $ 4,884,930 $ 4,651,792 $ 7,077,371
FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 25

NOTE 9 LINE OF CREDIT

The Company has a line of credit with CoBank, ACB to fund normal operations and capital expenditures. Under terms of the financing agreement with CoBank, which provides FPI with a $3,750,000 revolving line of credit, substantially all FPI’s assets are assigned to CoBank as primary collateral for funds advanced.

During the normal course of business, the line of credit is used to settle transactions between FPI and CoBank. Borrowings from CoBank outstanding as of December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 were $0, $0, and $109,146, respectively. Borrowings made and repaid during the year as part of the settlement process were $3,851,434 for the year ended December 31, 2022. During the year ended December 31, 2021, borrowings were $3,584,603 and repayments were $3,693,749. During the year ended December 31, 2020, borrowings were $3,429,228 and repayments were $3,320,082. Interest expense incurred to CoBank for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 was $0.

Interest on the unpaid balance is charged at a rate of 1.90% above the Daily Simple SOFR. The variable rate in effect at December 31, 2022 was 6.20%. The line of credit matures on July 31, 2023.

NOTE 10 INCOME TAXES

The (benefit) provision for income taxes consisted of the following (as of December 31):

The provision (benefit) for income tax differs from the amount of income tax determined by applying the U.S. statutory federal tax rate to pretax income as follows (as of December 31):

26 2022 ANNUAL REPORT
2022 2021 2020 Current: Federal $ 48,326 $ 92,167 $ –State - 2,626 –Total 48,326 94,793 –Deferred: Federal 31,731 (113,159) (62,963) State 19,398 5,237 (14,113) Total 51,129 (107,922) (77,076) Total provision (benefit) for income taxes $ 99,455 $ (13,129) $ (77,076)
2022 2021 2020 Federal tax at statutory rate $ 31,297 $ (1,731) $ (71,927) State tax, net 15,324 4,137 (11,149) Permanent difference 4,508 41 5,579 Accrual to return 48,326 – –Other - (15,576) 421 $ 99,455 $ (13,129) $ (77,076)

Deferred tax assets and (liabilities) resulted from the following (as of December 31):

Under the provisions of the Internal Revenue Code, certain substantial changes in the Company’s ownership may limit in the future a significant portion of the amount of net operating loss carry forwards which could be utilized annually to offset future taxable income and income tax liabilities. The amount of any annual limitation is determined based on the Company’s value and certain other factors on the date of ownership change.

Management has determined that it is more likely than not that the Company will recognize the benefits of federal and state deferred tax assets within the allowable time period and, as a result, has determined that no valuation allowance related to deferred tax assets is necessary as of December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020.

At December 31, 2022, FPI has federal net operating loss carry forwards of $7,312,179 and state net operating loss carry forwards of $2,875,061. Federal net operating losses will be available to offset 80% of taxable income for an indefinite period of time, until fully utilized.

The effective tax rates were 34.31%, 32.90%, and 22.50% for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020.

NOTE 11 FAIR VALUE MEASUREMENTS

The Company follows the guidance in FASB ASC 820, Fair Value Measurements and Disclosures (ASC 820), which defines fair value, and establishes a fair value hierarchy that prioritizes the inputs to valuation techniques used to measure fair value. The hierarchy gives the highest priority to unadjusted quoted prices in active markets for identical assets or liabilities (Level 1 measurements) and the lowest priority to unobservable inputs (Level 3 measurements). The three levels of the fair value hierarchy are described below:

Level 1: Inputs are quoted prices (unadjusted) in active markets for identical assets or liabilities that the reporting entity has the ability to access at the measurement date.

Level 2: Valuations based on quoted prices in markets that are not active or for which all significant inputs are observable, either directly or indirectly.

Level 3: Prices or valuations that require inputs that are both significant to the fair value measurement and unobservable.

To the extent that valuation is based on models or inputs that are less observable or unobservable in the market, the determination of fair value requires more judgment. Accordingly, the degree of judgment exercised by the Company in determining fair value is greatest for instruments categorized in Level 3. A financial instrument’s level within the fair value hierarchy is based on the lowest level of any input that is significant to the fair value measurement.

Fair value is a market-based measure considered from the perspective of a market participant rather than an entity-specific measure. Therefore, even when market assumptions are not readily available, the Company’s own assumptions are set to reflect those that market participants would use in pricing the asset or liability at the measurement date. The Company uses prices and inputs that are current as of the measurement date, including during periods of market dislocation. In periods of market dislocation, the observability of prices and inputs may be reduced for many instruments. This condition could cause an instrument to be reclassified between levels.

Assets and liabilities measured at fair value on a nonrecurring basis are recognized at fair value subsequent to initial recognition when they are deemed to be other-than-temporarily impaired. As of December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 the Company does not have any assets or liabilities subject to measurement at fair value on a nonrecurring basis.

2022 2021 2020 Annual leave $ 360,698 $ 391,835 $ 328,969 Pension 762,585 750,926 1,327,076 Operating loss carryforward 1,710,284 1,052,505 492,327 Post-retirement 29,391 29,788 34,535 Health reserve 46,955 46,281 51,430 Deferred revenue 913,613 823,220 611,004 Charitable contributions 135 130 130 Gross deferred tax assets 3,823,661 3,094,685 2,845,471 Depreciation (2,812,490) (2,018,083) (1,178,017) Gross deferred tax liabilities (2,812,490) (2,018,083) (1,178,017) Net deferred tax asset $ 1,011,171 $ 1,076,602 $ 1,667,454
FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 27

As of December 31, the Company’s fair value hierarchy for its financial assets that are carried at fair value was as follows:

Assets at Fair Value as of December 31, 2022

Money market accounts are included in cash and cash equivalents in the balance sheets, are classified within Level 1 and are valued based on quoted prices in active markets for identical securities. The fair value of investments in the Company’s employee benefit plans are included in Note 13.

NOTE 12 SELF-INSURED HEALTH CARE PLAN

FPI provides health care benefits to its employees through a multiple-employer insurance plan with CoBank, ACB (the plan administrator), Farm Credit East, ACA and the Federal Farm Credit Banks Funding Corporation The plan is responsible for the first $200,000 in claims per person per year, with stop loss and group reinsurance to protect against catastrophic claims. For the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 the Company has recorded expense, net of employee withholdings or contributions, of $2,378,954, $2,127,343, and $2,118,553, respectively which are included in salaries and employee benefits on the accompanying statements of operations. Included in accrued expenses and other liabilities in the balance sheets as of December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 are self-insurance reserves totaling $190,793, $185,848, and $208,911, respectively.

NOTE 13 EMPLOYEE BENEFIT PLANS

Employee Savings Plan

FPI participates in the CoBank Employee Savings Plan (Employee Savings Plan), a deferred compensation plan in which FPI matches a certain percentage of employee contributions. The Employee Savings Plan requires FPI to match 100 percent of employee contributions up to a maximum employee contribution of 6% of base salary. During the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 employer contributions charged to salaries and employee benefits were $1,303,650, $1,185,466, and $1,147,130, respectively.

Defined Contribution Qualified Retirement Plan

FPI participates in the CoBank defined contribution qualified retirement plan, a noncontributory, multiple-employer plan (Defined Contribution Plan). Under the Defined Contribution Plan, for employees hired January 1, 2005 and later, the employer contributes a percentage of each employee’s salary based on years of service, to an account maintained for the employee. During the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 employer contributions charged to salaries and employee benefits were $701,484, $652,030, and $639,845, respectively.

Defined Benefit Qualified Retirement Plan

FPI participates in the CoBank defined benefit qualified retirement plan (Defined Benefit Plan). The Defined Benefit Plan covers FPI employees hired before January 1, 2005. Benefits are based on years of service and compensation levels during the years of employment. It is the policy of the participating employers to fund at least the minimum required by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act (ERISA). FPI’s contributions during the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 of $329,663, $342,657 and $362,986, respectively were consistent with this policy. Plan assets are stated at fair value and are primarily invested in publicly traded stocks and bonds, real estate and contracts with insurance companies.

Post-Retirement Health Care Benefit Plan

FPI provides certain health care and life insurance benefits to employees if they reach normal retirement age while working for FPI (Post-Retirement Health Care Benefit Plan). The authoritative accounting guidance requires the accrual of the expected cost of providing post-retirement benefits other than pensions, primarily healthcare benefits, to an employee and an employee’s beneficiaries and covered dependents during the years that the employee renders service necessary to become eligible for these benefits. These accrued (benefits) expenses of $(20,930), $(25,410), and

28 2022 ANNUAL REPORT
Total Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Money market accounts $ 7,600,388 $ 7,600,388 $ – $ –Assets at Fair Value
Total Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Money market accounts $ 4,655,232 $ 4,655,232 $ – $ –Assets at Fair Value
2020 Total Level 1 Level 2 Level 3 Money market accounts $ 3,822,174 $ 3,822,174 $ – $ –
as of December 31, 2021
as of December 31,

$62,497, were classified as salaries and employee benefits on the accompanying statements of operations during the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 respectively.

The funding status and the amounts recognized in the balance sheets of FPI’s Defined Benefit Plan and Post-Retirement Health Care Benefit Plan benefits are as follows (as of December 31; $ in thousands):

Defined Benefit Plan 2022 2021 2020 Change in projected benefit obligation: Benefit obligation at beginning of year $ 38,522 $ 39,113 $ 35,154 Service cost 489 542 530 Interest cost 1,113 998 1,133 Actuarial (gain) loss, net (9,218) (348) 3,220 Benefits paid (1,135) (1,783) (924) Benefit obligation at end of year $ 29,771 $ 38,522 $ 39,113 Defined Benefit Plan 2022 2021 2020 Change in plan assets: Fair value of plan assets at beginning of year $ 35,504 $ 33,722 $ 29,755 Actual return on plan assets (8,028) 3,222 4,529 Employer contributions 330 343 363 Benefits paid (1,135) (1,783) (925) Fair value of plan assets at end of year $ 26,671 $ 35,504 $ 33,722 Funded status of the plan: Net amount recognized in the balance sheet in accrued employee benefits, long-term $ (3,100) $ (3,017) $ (5,391) Post-Retirement Health Care Benefit Plan 2022 2021 2020 Change in projected benefit obligation: Benefit obligation at beginning of year $ 120 $ 140 $ 155 Service cost 4 4 3 Interest cost 3 4 4 Actuarial loss (gain), net 52 33 (41) Plan participant contributions 48 57 82 Benefits paid (107) (118) (63) Benefit obligation at end of year $ 120 $ 120 $ 140 Change in plan assets: Fair value of plan assets at beginning of year $ – $ – $ –Employer contributions 59 61 (18) Plan participant contributions 48 57 81 Benefits paid (107) (118) (63) Fair value of plan assets at end of year $ – $ – $ –FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 29

The accumulated benefit obligation for FPI’s Defined Benefit Plan and Post-Retirement Health Care Benefit Plan are presented in the following table (as of December 31; $ in thousands):

The accumulated benefit obligation is the actuarial present value of the benefits accrued for service rendered to that date based on current salary levels. The projected benefit obligation is the actuarial present value of the benefits accrued for service rendered to that date based on estimated future salary levels.

Components of net periodic benefit cost and other amounts recognized in other comprehensive loss are as follows (as of December 31; $ in thousands):

The weighted average rate assumptions used to determine benefit obligations for FPI’s Defined Benefit Plan are presented as follows (as of December 31):

30 2022 ANNUAL REPORT Funded status of the plan: Net amount recognized in the balance sheets in accrued employee benefits, long-term $ (120) $ (120) $ (140)
Defined Benefit Plans Post- Retirement Health Care Benefit Plan 2022 2021 2020 2022 2021 2020 $28,127 $35,836 $35,930 $120 $120 $140
Components of Net Periodic Benefit Cost Defined Benefit Plan 2022 2021 2020 Periodic benefit cost: Service cost $ 490 $ 542 $ 530 Interest cost 1,113 998 1,133 Expected return on plan assets (1,897) (1,789) (1,651) Amortization of unrecognized: Prior service cost 123 123 187 Net actuarial loss 555 993 829 $ 384 $ 867 $ 1,028 Changes in plan assets and benefit obligations recognized in other comprehensive income Net actuarial (gain)/loss $ 707 $ (1,781) $ 342 Amortization of: Prior service cost/(credit) (123) (123) (187) Net actuarial (gain)/loss (555) (993) (829) $ 29 $ (2,897) $ (674)
2022 2021 2020 Discount rate 5.20% 2.95% 2.60% Expected return on plan assets 6.00% 6.00% 6.00% Rate of compensation increase 3.40% 3.40% 3.40%

The weighted average rate assumptions used to determine net periodic benefit cost for the Defined Benefit Plan are as follows (as of December 31):

The discount rates are calculated using a spot yield curve method developed by an independent actuary. The approach maps a high-quality bond yield curve to the duration of the plans’ liabilities, thus approximating each cash flow of the liability stream to be discounted at an interest rate specifically applicable to its respective period-in-time.

Plan Assets

The asset allocation target ranges for the Defined Benefit Plan follows the investment policy adopted by the retirement trust committee. This policy provides for a certain level of trustee flexibility in selecting target allocation percentages. The actual asset allocations at December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 are shown in the following table, along with the adopted range for target allocation percentages by asset class. The actual allocation percentages reflect the quoted market values at year-end and may vary during the course of the year. Plan assets are generally rebalanced to a level within the target range each year at the direction of the trustees. We establish the expected rate of return on plan assets based on a review of past and anticipated future returns on plan assets. The expected rate of return on plan assets assumption also matches the pension plans’ long-term interest rate assumption used for funding purposes.

The assets of the Defined Benefit Plan consist primarily of investments in various domestic equity, international equity, and fixed income. These funds do not contain any significant investments in a single entity, industry, country, or commodity, thereby mitigating concentration risk. No CoBank stock or debt, or that of any other System institution, is included in these investments. Investment strategy and objectives are described in the pension plans’ formal investment policy documents. The basic strategy and objectives as adopted in the investment policy are:

• Manage portfolio assets with a long-term time horizon appropriate for the participant demographics and cash flow requirements;

• Optimize long-term funding requirements by generating rates of return sufficient to fund liabilities and exceed the long-term rate of inflation; and

• Provide competitive investment returns and reasonable risk levels when measured against appropriate benchmarks.

The following tables present major categories of Defined Benefit Plan assets that are measured at fair value at December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020 for each of the fair value hierarchy levels as defined in Note 11 ($ in thousands):

2022 2021 2020 Discount rate 2.95% 2.60% 3.30% Expected return on plan assets 6.00% 6.00% 6.00% Rate of compensation increase 3.40% 3.40% 3.60%
Percentage of Plan Assets at December 31, Total Allocation Range 2022 2021 2020 Asset category: Domestic equity 29.3 -33.3% 30% 32% 32% Domestic fixed income 43.0 – 47% 45% 44% 39% International equity, Emerging markets equity and Fixed income 21.7 – 25.7% 25% 24% 24% Real assets – 0% 0% 5% 100% 100% 100%
FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 31
32 2022 ANNUAL REPORT As of December 31, 2022 Level 1 Level 2 NAV Total Asset category: Cash $ 36 $ – $ – $ 36 Domestic equity: Large-cap growth funds (1) 3,515 – – 3,515 Large-cap equity funds (1) – – 3,457 3,457 Small-cap growth funds (1) – – 1,023 1,023 International equity: International fund (2) 3,461 – 1,141 4,602 Fixed income Bond fund (3)(4) – – 12,061 12,061 Emerging markets: Equity and fixed income fund (5) 1,977 – – 1,977 Total $ 8,989 $ – $ 17,682 $ 26,671 As of December 31, 2021 Level 1 Level 2 NAV Total Asset category: Cash $ 8 $ – $ – $ 8 Domestic equity: Large-cap growth funds (1) 5,021 – – 5,021 Large-cap equity funds (1) – – 4,962 4,962 Small-cap growth funds (1) – – 1,487 1,487 International equity: International fund (2) 4,572 – 1,490 6,062 Fixed income Bond fund (3)(4) – – 15,445 15,445 Emerging markets: Equity and fixed income fund (5) 2,497 – 1 2,498 Real assets Hedge funds (6) – – 21 21 Total $ 12,098 $ – $ 23,406 $ 35,504

(1) Fund invests primarily in diversified portfolios of common stocks of U.S. companies in various industries, including consumer goods and services, information technology, healthcare, industrial materials, financial services and energy.

(2) Fund invests primarily in a diversified portfolio of equities of non-U.S. companies in various industries, including information technology, financial services, healthcare, consumer goods and services, energy and telecommunications.

(3) Fund invests primarily in a diversified portfolio of investment grade debt securities and cash instruments.

(4) Fund invests primarily in U.S. Treasury debt securities and corporate bonds of U.S. companies primarily in the financial services industry.

(5) Fund invests in equities and corporate debt securities of companies located in emerging international markets. Industries include energy, consumer goods and services, industrial materials, financial services and information technology. Fund also invests in the sovereign debt of various countries.

(6) Fund invests in diversified portfolios of stocks, bonds and various other financial instruments in a variety of industries including financial services, telecommunications, information technology, consumer goods and services, and healthcare.

Level 1 plan assets are funds with quoted daily net asset values that are directly observable by market participants. The fair value of these funds is the net asset value at close of business on the reporting date.

Level 2 plan assets are funds with quoted net asset values that are not directly observable by market participants. A significant portion of the underlying investments in these funds have individually observable market prices, which are utilized by the plan’s trustee to determine a net asset value at close of business on the reporting date.

NAV plan assets are funds with unobservable net asset values and supported by limited or no market activity.

Expected Contributions

FPI expects to contribute $304,938 to the funded, qualified Defined Benefit Plan in 2023. Actual 2023 contributions could differ from the estimates noted above.

As of December 31, 2020 Level 1 Level 2 NAV Total Asset category: Cash $ 37 $ – $ – $ 37 Domestic equity: Large-cap growth funds (1) 4,566 – – 4,566 Large-cap equity funds (1) – – 4,565 4,565 Small-cap growth funds (1) – – 1,597 1,597 International equity: International fund (2) 3,850 – 1,983 5,833 Fixed income Bond fund (3)(4) 6,976 6,322 – 13,298 Emerging markets: Equity and fixed income fund (5) 2,300 – 1 2,301 Real assets Hedge funds (6) – – 1,525 1,525 Total $ 17,729 $ 6,322 $ 9,671 $ 33,722
FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 33

Estimated Future Benefits Payments

FPI expects future benefit payments, which reflect expected future service, as appropriate, are as follows ($ in thousands).

The following table sets forth the funding status and weighted average assumptions used to determine post-retirement health care benefit obligations (as of December 31; $ in thousands).

NOTE 14 EQUITY

FPI is authorized to issue 5,000,000 shares each of Class A preferred stock - voting; Class B preferred stock - non-voting; and Class C common stock - non-voting all at a par value of $5 per share.

Each owner of Class A preferred stock is entitled to a single vote regardless of the number of shares owned, while Class B preferred stock and Class C common stock provide no voting rights to their holders.

A description of equities is as follows:

• Class A preferred stock (voting stock) is the last of the three stock classes to be impaired and the first of the three classes to be restored after impairment. This class of stock may be issued only to the bank serving the Northeast Region, the affiliated associations and nonaffiliated customers using core services.

• Class B preferred stock (nonvoting stock) is the second class to be impaired and the second class to be restored after impairment. This class of stock may be issued to Farm Credit System banks and associations under a program approved by the board.

• Class C common stock (nonvoting stock) is the first class to be impaired and the third class to be restored after impairment. This class of stock may be issued to the bank, the affiliated associations and nonaffiliated customers under a program approved by the board.

• Other classes and issues of stock shall be approved by the stockholders.

The preferred and common shares are not convertible. All shares are non-assessable and no further capital contributions are required. Dividends or patronage distributions may be declared by the Board at its discretion provided no class of stock shall be impaired. There were no dividends or patronage distributions declared during the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020.

In the event of liquidation or dissolution of the Company, any assets remaining after payment or retirement of all liabilities shall be distributed first to the holders of the Class B preferred stock, second to the holders of Class A preferred stock and third to the holders of the Class C Common Stock.

NOTE 15 LEASES

The Company leases real estate and equipment that have initial terms ranging from 2 to 10 years. Some leases include one or more options to renew, generally at the Company’s sole discretion, with renewal terms that can extend the lease term up to 10 years. In addition, certain leases contain termination options, where the rights to terminate are held by either the Company, the lessor or both parties. These options to extend or terminate a lease are included in the lease terms when it is reasonably certain that the Company will exercise that option. The Company’s operating leases generally do not contain any material restrictive covenants or residual value guarantees.

Operating lease cost is recognized on a straight-line basis over the lease term. Operating lease expense was $910,979 for the year ended

34 2022 ANNUAL REPORT
Year Expected Benefit Payments (Pension) 2023 1,789 2024 2,129 2025 1,813 2026 1,913 2027 2,372 2028–2032 10,407
2022 2021 2020 Accumulated benefit obligation $ 246 $ 225 $ 200 Net liability recognized in the balance sheet $ 120 $ 120 $ 140 Net periodic expense $ 38 $ 36 $ 44 Discount rate 2.95% 2.60% 2.60%

December 31, 2022. Total rent expense for operating leases was $726,869 for the year ended December 31, 2021. Weighted-average remaining lease term for operating leases is 16.71 years. Weighted-average discount rate for operating leases is 1.9%.

Future undiscounted cash flows for each of the next five years and thereafter and a reconciliation to the lease liabilities recognized on the balance sheet are as follows as of December 31, 2022:

Future minimum lease commitments, as determined under Topic 840, for all non-cancelable leases are as follows as of December 31, 2022:

NOTE 16 COMMITMENTS AND CONTINGENCIES

From time to time, the Company may be exposed to litigation relating to products and operations. The Company is not currently engaged in any legal proceedings that are expected, individually or in the aggregate, to have a material, adverse effect on the Company’s financial condition or results of operations.

NOTE 17 RELATED PARTY TRANSACTIONS

At December 31, 2022, FPI is owned by five Farm Credit Agricultural Credit Associations (ACA): AgCountry Farm Credit Services, ACA, Farm Credit East, ACA, Farm Credit Illinois, ACA, Farm Credit West, ACA, and Northwest Farm Credit Services, ACA. For the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020, the Company recognized revenue of $65,804,503, $59,769,469, and $59,880,699, representing 94.5%, 94.2% and 94.5 %, respectively, from transactions with its ACA owners. At December 31, 2022, 2021, and 2020, accounts receivable from such customers totaled $588,574, $638,526, and $417,844, representing 97.7%, 99.8%, and 96.2% of total accounts receivable outstanding at such dates. The Company’s revenue contracts with its major customers reflect a structure similar to that of a cooperative, whereby excess earnings are expected to be distributed to the customers, and excess losses are expected to be funded by the customers. No such distributions were made, or additional funding received for the years ended December 31, 2022, 2021, or 2020.

NOTE 18 SUBSEQUENT EVENTS

The Company has evaluated subsequent events through March 14, 2023, which is the date the financial statements were issued or were available to be issued. There are no such events to disclose.

Operating Leases 2023 $ 889,799 2024 809,031 2025 662,411 2026 612,101 2027 612,101 Thereafter 7,702,218 Total lease payments 11,287,661 Less imputed interest 1,651,488 Total lease payments $ 9,636,173
Operating Leases 2023 $ 889,799 2024 809,031 2025 662,411 2026 612,101 2027 612,101 Thereafter 7,702,218 Total lease payments $ 11,287,661
FARM CREDIT FINANCIAL PARTNERS 35
1500 Main Street, Suite 600 PO Box 15247 Springfield , MA 01115 413.271.8600 financialpartners.com
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