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www.FAITHpub.com September 2018 / $2.50

SEPTEMBER 22, 2018 JOIN US FOR THE DIOCESAN ASSEMBLY

• EUCHARISTIC PROCESSION • INSPIRING PRESENTATIONS • ALL DIOCESAN MASS


FROM THE BISHOP

ARE YOU JOINING US at the Breslin Center on Sept. 22? This will be our third Diocesan Assembly since we began our efforts to respond to Jesus’ call to us to announce the Gospel of the Lord. The first one in 2014 focused on our clergy and parish employees and their desire to build up the Household of Faith: our parishes. The second one in 2015 brought these same folks and many more lay volunteer leaders to seek ways to bring back our Lost Sheep. I know each of us has been praying for someone to come home to the Church. This last assembly is for 10,00015,000 of you, our faithful Catholics to see how we might change the

Carlson Productions

culture around us and – perhaps – in our own hearts. our own hearts.

BISHOP EARL BOYEA

is the fifth bishop of the Catholic Diocese of Lansing @BishopBoyea

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Our diocesan mission is the same: “We exist to form communities of missionary disciples, who go announce the Gospel of the Lord.” This is what Jesus has asked of us and, weak and sinful as we are, we want to be equipped to respond to him generously. We will begin that Saturday morning with a eucharistic procession for 3.5 miles from the cathedral to the Breslin Center in East Lansing. We don’t expect everyone to participate in that part of the day. But for those of you who can join us, we want to present the joy of our Lord and of our faith to our community. We really believe that Jesus is Lord – Lord of our lives and Lord of our world. Let him reign!

FAITH Magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018 | WWW.FAITHPUB.COM

KEN LUND

JOIN US SEPT. 22 AT THE BRESLIN CENTER Then the afternoon will be a series of presentations to motivate us to become better disciples of Jesus than we already are. We will close with the Sunday Mass that evening so that we can be sent back to our parishes with renewed boldness and filled with the Holy Spirit. The theme that has been developed for this day is that we were made for happiness. This may seem a bit gimmicky to some, but there is a deep truth here. God made us for himself and he has loved us so much that he sent his Son to become one of us, to die for us and to give us his Holy Spirit. Why? So that we might be happy with him forever in heaven. When I arrived in Lansing 10 years ago, one of the reporters asked me what my vision was. The first thing that came to my mind was “to get everyone to heaven.” That is what the Father in heaven wants for us, so that should be our first aim – happiness with God. But there should be a burning desire in each of our hearts not just to share in this happiness, but to want this same happiness for those we love and, even, for all peoples of the earth. However, as Paul wrote to the Romans (10:14): “But how are men to call upon him in whom they have not believed? And how are they to believe in him of whom they have never heard?” My sisters and brothers, join us on Sept. 22 so that more of us will be able to fill this gap, this breach, and announce the Gospel of the Lord to all.


SEPTEMBER 22, 2018 REGISTER NOW AT MADEFORHAPPINESS.ORG 3


FROM THE EDITOR

EVANGELIZATION looks like many things THE FOCUS FOR this edition of FAITH is the upcoming third diocesan assembly, "Made for Happiness." The work of our diocesan assemblies has flowed from Bishop Boyea's pastoral letter to the people of our diocese. It is Bishop Boyea's fervent hope that all of us will become better formed and equipped to share the message of the Gospel with all those we know – our fellow Catholics, those who are searching for deeper faith and those who have fallen away from the active practice of their faith. In short, the work of each of the assemblies has been focused on helping each of us to become better evangelizers. Yet, for most average Catholics, the idea of being called an evangelizer can make us incredibly uncomfortable.

looks like many things. At its core, though, is our willingness to put our faith to practical daily use in visible ways that go beyond our gathering for Mass on Sunday.”

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FAITH Magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018 | WWW.FAITHPUB.COM

feel isolated if she comes to Mass alone – and evangelization took place. Evangelization can look like the couple who helps out around the church several days a week. They are happy to do odd jobs that need to be accomplished, like painting a wall in the parish offices, fixing a broken towel dispenser in a restroom, and just making sure that things around the parish are wellcared for and in good working order. They don't expect any recognition for what they do, they just love doing it because they love God and they love their parish. Jesus is a model of service for them, and they have decided to make use of their retirement years by being of service to others in FATHER the best ways they can while DWIGHT EZOP they can. Others in the parish is the editor of notice their quiet service and FAITH Magazine find ways to do the same. Soon, and pastor of a little network of volunteers has St. Mary Parish, formed to make sure that all sorts Charlotte and of odd jobs around the parish St. Ann Church, are taken care of – relieving the Bellevue staff of extra work and easing Email: editor@ the worries of their pastor – and FAITHpub.com. evangelization took place. These are all true stories, and my point in sharing them is this: evangelization looks like many things. At its core, though, is our willingness to put our faith to practical daily use in visible ways that go beyond our gathering for Mass on Sunday. When we do this, people inevitably notice and are drawn to simple actions of prayer and service. Often, their faith is reinforced, strengthened and nourished. Sometimes, new faith is found or old faith is rekindled. The goodness of the Gospel is lived – and that is evangelization. And so, our journey in FAITH continues. T.Gennera

Evangelization

I suppose part of that discomfort comes from thinking that in order to be an effective evangelizer we have to be willing to stand in the city square with our Bible in hand and an accusatory index finger pointed at passersby. Or perhaps the image of evangelizer that comes to mind for some means that we are expected to go door-to-door, distributing religious pamphlets or tracts to our neighbors. These are some images of evangelization, but they are not the only ones. Evangelization can look like a family who sits down together in a restaurant to share a meal. As their appetizers arrive, they pause and quietly pray grace together, making the sign of the cross and then praying the traditional prayer, "Bless us, O Lord..." As the family is praying grace, a couple at an adjacent table happens to notice them. The couple approaches the family and a discussion ensues. It turns out that a member of the couple's extended family is gravely ill and hospitalized nearby, and the couple is in town to be with their loved one. Because they saw the family praying grace, they felt compelled to ask them to pray for the well-being of their loved one, and for peace and strength for their family. The family members assured the couple of their prayers – and there was evangelization that took place. Evangelization can look like a caring employee who recognizes that a co-worker seems to be having a bad day. She sits down at the co-worker's work station and asks if there is anything she can do to help make things better. As the discussion unfolds, the co-worker shares that she has been away from Church for some time because she was divorced a number of years ago. The fellow employee encourages the co-worker to make an appointment with the pastor of the local parish to discuss the possibility of beginning the annulment process. She also encourages her co-worker to sit with her family, knowing that she might


INSIDE SEPT. 2018

COVER STORY FATHER MIKE GIVES US A PREVIEW OF HIS ASSEMBLY TALK P. 14

P. 16

2018 ASSEMBLY

6 work life How can I have a higher level of happiness at work?

 parenting Help your kids be holy

7 marriage matters  Five keys to a

happier marriage

10  What is a Eucharistic Procession?

12 in the know with Father Joe Why do I need a relationship with Jesus to be happy?

14  Father Mike gives us a preview of his assembly talk

P. 17

16  Jennifer will talk about family life at the assembly

17  At the assembly, Deacon Oney will explain how to be open to the Holy Spirit

YOUR STORIES

26 my story Reigniting men’s Catholic faith – That Man is You coming to a parish near you

PRAY FOR US! All: Heavenly Father, you alone are the source of hope for all humanity. Send your Holy Spirit to help each of us answer the call of the New Evangelization to deepen our faith, grow in confidence to proclaim the Gospel and boldly witness to the saving grace of your Son, Jesus Christ. Bless us as we gather for the Diocesan Assembly on September 22 to deepen our commitment to Christ’s call to announce the Gospel of the Lord. Priest: Lord, send out your Spirit, Assembly: And renew the face of the earth.

PLUS 18 culture Discovering the cross with sweetsmelling basil

Priest: Our Lady of Guadalupe, Assembly: Pray for us. Priest: St. John Paul the Great, Assembly: Pray for us.

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YOUR LIFE WORK LIFE

PARENTING

How can I have a higher level of happiness at work?

Help your kids be holy

Q

How can I have a higher level of happiness at work?

A

What’s more important than happiness? Believe it or not – nothing! The catechism declares that God has embedded the longing for happiness in every human heart. St. Augustine, an expert on happiness, wrote: “We all want to live happily; in the whole human race there is no one who does not assent to this proposition, even before it is fully articulated.” Thomas Aquinas adds: “Man cannot live without joy.” So your question is right on target. Here are three of 12 principles. More to come later.

T. GENNARA

1. Buddy-up with God. The highest happiness is in the soul. The deeper your relationship with Christ, the higher your happiness – in every, and all circumstances. Research JIM BERLUCCHI shows that having an on-the-job is the executive best friend at work is critical for director of the happiness in the workplace. God Spitzer Center is your closest, kindest, smartest, for Visionary most reliable, ultimate and eternal Leadership. friend. He is the essence of happiness and perfectly happy in his own infinite beatitude. Never leave home or punch in without him (pray every morning). Fraternize with him on the job. And make friends with others (love thy neighbor) at the same time. 2. Own your own. Why hand your happiness over to someone or something else? Certainly you can enjoy the external pleasantries and positives of your work and workplace. But immediately and ultimately you’re in the driver’s seat for your happiness. Don’t hand the keys or wheel over to your boss, co-workers, customers or circumstances. Stay free and self-possessed. 3. Practice the virtues. Virtue = Happiness. The Boy Scouts cite 12: trustworthy, loyal, helpful, friendly, courteous, kind, obedient, cheerful, thrifty, brave, clean and reverent. Not a bad checklist for happiness at work or in life. 6

FAITH Magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018 | WWW.FAITHPUB.COM

BY SHERI WOHLFERT

M

Y DAD ALWAYS TAUGHT us that if we borrowed something, no matter what it was, we should return it in better condition than it was when we borrowed it. I’m pretty sure that applies to our children, too. Before our first baby was born, my grandma told me that the children I would bear weren’t mine – they were a precious gifts on loan from the Father. It was our primary responsibility, as parents, to help them get to heaven. Grandma’s thinking may seem a bit countercultural today. The world might have us think our primary task is to get our kids on the most prestigious teams, the most elite dance troops or into the most impressive schools. While we’re aiming for first string, first chair and top score, Jesus is begging us to show our children that nothing is more important than giving him first place in our lives. Holiness, simply put, is oneness with God. Here are a few things we can do as parents to make good on our responsibility to help our kids grow in holiness and give the Lord first place. • Pray with and for your kids every day. It’s hard for kids to understand the importance of Jesus and his Church if we rarely talk about it. • Do as I do! Our kids imitate what we model. They need to see us pray, read Scripture and trust in the Lord. We are teaching lessons when we’re cut off in traffic, talking about the frustrating coworker at dinner or putting an envelope in the Sunday collection. • As you travel to games, concerts, recitals and events, make sure to include some trips to the really important places like Sunday Mass, eucharistic adoration or even a quick stop to rest from the noise and chaos in a quiet, peaceful church. As Christians, we know Jesus is with us always, but a special stop to sit in his eucharistic presence is good for the soul. It also shows our children that Jesus is important enough to stop for. • Say no to the things that don’t point your kids to heaven. That could be screen activity, movies, music or friendships. Their holiness is more important than your popularity. • Point them to the holy ones. The world sets before our children people who don’t always use their gifts and talents to glorify God. Since moving into a cave to shelter our kids from all of that isn’t very practical, we can shower them with stories of the holy men and women of our faith. Many of the saints lived crazy, amazing, adventurous lives and their stories are interesting and inspiring. Put them before your kids to serve as heroes and role models. “Holy enough” is not a thing. Holiness is a continuous journey toward the Father. As we help our children grow in holiness, we will find ourselves growing, too – and that is a very good thing!


MARRIAGE MATTERS

MAKE YOUR MARRIAGE YOUR #1 PRIORITY. Your marriage should be more important to you than advancing your career, increasing your wealth, beautifying your home, enjoying your pastimes, having fun with your friends or even volunteering at your church. The quality of your life is the quality of your relationships, and your most important relationship is the one with your spouse.

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SUFFER WELL AND REGULARLY. Die to yourself, every day and unconditionally, that is, even if your spouse is not. Here’s one example: Never pass up a good opportunity to keep your mouth shut. However delicious the hurtful words on the tip of your tongue might taste, hold them back for the love of God and your spouse. Your marriage will be blessed. This doesn’t mean being a doormat. You might also need to …

2

LEARN HOW TO COMMUNICATE BETTER. For some people, communicating effectively is easy. For the rest of us, help is available. Sometimes a therapist is needed, but in many cases it’s just a matter of relearning. Try reading a book such as The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate. Successful professionals never stop learning. Be a professional about your marriage.

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FIVE KEYS TO A HAPPIER MARRIAGE BY STEVE AND BRIDGET PATTON

DITCH THE PORN. Jesus warned, “You have heard it said, ‘You shall not commit adultery.’ But I tell you that anyone who looks at a woman lustfully has already committed adultery with her in his heart.” (Mt 5:27-28). Pornography has become normalized, but it remains a gravely sinful form of adultery. Moreover, it corrodes intimacy and destroys marriages. Getting rid of it will improve your marriage.

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BE GRATEFUL. Research in positive psychology shows that people are not so much grateful because they are happy as they are happy because they are grateful. Likewise, the happiest marriages are those in which the spouses, regardless of their fleeting feelings, habitually express gratitude to God and to one another. They live the wisdom of a prayer offered by every priest at every Mass: “We do well always and everywhere to give you thanks.”

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GETTY IMAGES

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2018 ASSEMBLY

CAPACITY: 15,000 PEOPLE! OTHER ATTRACTIONS

procession 9:00 - 11:30 A.M.

presentations

RELIGIOUS DISPLAYS Shroud of Turin Eucharistic Miracles Our Lady of Guadalupe Sacred Relics

1:00 - 4:30 P.M.

Mass

4:30 – 6:00 P.M.

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A LSO

INFLATABLES LAWN GAMES BRESLIN FOOD CONCESSIONS


MADE FOR HAPPINESS DIOCESAN ASSEMBLY SCHEDULE

INSPIRING SPEAKERS AND MUSIC Prepare to be inspired by nationally acclaimed speakers as they share their messages of the profound happiness only God can bring. And celebrate the pinnacle of our faith with thousands of others at the all-diocesan Mass with Bishop Boyea and all the priests and deacons of our diocese.

Father Mike Schmitz is a priest for the Diocese of Duluth, Minnesota. He currently runs the Newman Center at the University of Minnesota-Duluth and is also the Director of Youth and Young Adult Ministry for the diocese. He is known nationally for his inspiring homilies, consistent hilarity and genuine coolness. Father Mike is quickly becoming a Catholic household name in America. Jennifer Fulwiler is a writer, speaker, radio show host, wife and mother of six children. Raised in a household without any faith, she had a profound epiphany as an adult that led to her entrance into the Catholic Church. In her pursuit to find the meaning of life, she discovered true happiness. Her favorite genres of music are Gregorian chant and gangsta rap. Deacon Larry Oney, a permanent deacon for the Catholic Archdiocese of New Orleans, serves at Divine Mercy Parish in Kenner, Louisiana. With a passion for sharing the faith, he leverages humor, joy, Scripture, love and personal insight to speak to people’s hearts and encourage them to live Spirit-filled lives.

EUCHARISTIC PROCESSION

9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Begins at St. Mary Cathedral

9:00 a.m.

Passes Church of the Resurrection (the halfway point of the route)

Between 9:50 a.m. and 10:15 a.m.

Arrives at Breslin Center

11:30 a.m.

BRESLIN CENTER ACTIVITIES

7:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m.

Doors open

7:00 a.m.

Religious Displays

All day

Concession Areas

All day

Catholic Vendors and Exhibitors

All day

Sacrament of Reconciliation

8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.

Live feed of the Eucharistic Procession (main stage)

9:00 a.m. to 11:30 a.m.

Games and Activities for Youth

All day

Concourse Entertainment

Throughout the day

Adoration and prayer (main stage)

11:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Lunch break

12:00 p.m. to 1:00 p.m.

Childcare (preregistration required)

12:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

ASSEMBLY PRESENTATIONS

1:00 p.m. to 4:30 p.m.

ALL DIOCESAN MASS

4:30 p.m. to 6:00 p.m.

PARKING & SHUTTLE SCHEDULE $10 cash per car parking at the Breslin Center

Gates open at 6:30 a.m.

Free Shuttle Service to Cathedral for Eucharistic Procession

7:00 a.m. to 9:30 a.m.

Free Shuttle Service to Church of the Resurrection

9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

BRESLIN CENTER POLICIES

Father Joe Krupp In addition to serving as pastor of Holy Family, Grand Blanc, Father Joe is a columnist for FAITH magazine, answering questions about the faith while infusing theology with humor. According to his public Facebook page, Father Joe is the Winner of the Award for Excellence in delicate floweriness.

MAY NOT BRING: • B ags (purse, handbag, book bag, diaper bag or cooler) • F ood or bottled water

Bishop Earl Boyea is the eldest of ten children and is the favorite of his parents, much to the chagrin of his siblings. He was ordained to the priesthood in 1978 and Pope Benedict XVI named him the fifth Bishop of Lansing in 2008.

MAY BRING: • S trollers (to be left with a platform attendant) • C ameras (without cases) • S eat cushions (no pockets, pouches, or zippers) • M edically necessary or child care items in clear one-gallon plastic bags 9


2018 ASSEMBLY

What is a EUCHARISTIC PROCESSION? T

HE EUCHARIST is the source and summit of the whole Christian life. A eucharistic procession, therefore, is a public witness of

the veneration toward the most holy Eucharist, conducted through public streets. It takes place in this way: A consecrated host – that is, the real and substantial presence of Jesus Christ: body, blood, soul and divinity – is placed within a monstrance, which is then lifted and carried by a priest who leads the faithful in procession. Like a pilgrimage, a eucharistic procession normally starts at one holy place and ends at another. This earthly journey reminds the Catholic faithful of their spiritual journey toward eternal life with God. 2018 DIOCESAN ASSEMBLY

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Eucharistic processions first became a popular practice in the life of the Church during the celebration of Corpus Christi, traditionally celebrated on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday. The idea for this solemnity is attributed to St. Juliana, who lived in the 13th century. As Pope emeritus Benedict XVI eloquently noted in a homily in 2007, “It was born for the very precise purpose of openly reaffirming the faith of the people of God in Jesus Christ, alive and truly present in the most holy sacrament of the

FAITH Magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018 | WWW.FAITHPUB.COM

Eucharist. It is a feast that was established in order to publicly adore, praise and thank the Lord, who continues ‘to love us to the end,’ even to offering us his body and his blood.” Though directly connected to the liturgical feast of Corpus Christi, eucharistic processions may take place at other appropriate times and places under the authority of the bishop and following liturgical norms. In several countries around the world, eucharistic processions incorporate the country’s rich cultural traditions. In Poland, for example, large crowds of people process in traditional Polish outfits with ornate decorations. For a eucharistic procession in Brazil, the streets are lined with colors, drums and colorful costumes. By processing with the Holy Eucharist in a reverent, prayerful and joyful manner, Catholics can honor Christ in the Eucharist and serve as witnesses to the intimate presence of God in the world and in each individual. Processions powerfully display the Incarnation, or God becoming human, and thus speak of his merciful love for all who journey to eternal life with him.


2018 ASSEMBLY

START

PARKING AVAILABLE AT THE BRESLIN CENTER Free Shuttle Service to St. Mary Cathedral for Eucharistic Procession beginning at 7:00 a.m. To join the procession halfway through, free Shuttle Service to Church of the Resurrection is available from 9:30 a.m. to 10:30 a.m.

Y L E O L O O H M O C C S DIU W A A T L S

C ST B AP AT U I E IL TO D L IN G

RY AL MAEDR . ST TH CA

W O L R A R T A I P P S OS H

M IC N A IG H

E TH N OF TIO CH EC UR RR CH ESU R

N

U

N

E

V A

SO RI

E

4 MILES FROM START TO FINISH. 1.5 miles from St. Mary Cathedral to Church of the Resurrection midway point.

MIDWAY POINT

AD O R

R

HA

B R C E E S N L T IN E R

FINISH

4-MILE LONG

EUCHARISTIC PROCESSION BEGINS AT 9 A.M. ST. MARY CATHEDRAL TO THE BRESLIN CENTER

BAGS, WATER BOTTLES, FOOD NOT ALLOWED

PLEASE VISIT MADEFORHAPPINESS.ORG FOR WHAT IS ALLOWED AT THE BRESLIN CENTER.

Join us for the largest Eucharistic Procession in the history of our diocese! Our four-mile journey from the Cathedral to the Breslin Center will be a public profession of our faith through the heart of Lansing as we follow Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament. Get important updates and have the program at your fingertips!

Download the Assembly App

• Text HAPPY to 88202 • If you already have myParish App, enter the app and tap the three horizontal lines on the top left. Then, tap FIND A PARISH and search for HAPPY.

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YOUR FAITH

Why do I need a relationship with Jesus to be

happy? Q

DEAR FR. JOE: I feel like I’m a pretty happy person – why do I need a relationship with Jesus?

T. Gennara

IN THE KNOW WITH FATHER JOE

FATHER JOE KRUPP

is a former comedy writer who is now a Catholic priest. @Joeinblack

12

A

I often find it helpful to start by agreeing on our terms, so let’s start by looking at the word “happy.” The dictionary defines happy as feeling or showing pleasure or contentment. I want to clarify this because of that word “feeling” in the middle of the definition. Often, that is where I get stuck. Most of us can’t help our feelings; they come, they go – some we can explain, others we can’t. To put it bluntly, as a general rule, we cannot control how we feel, only how we act. At the same time, certain things can certainly encourage happy feelings and I’m going to proceed on the assumption that this is what we are talking about: “Why will a personal relationship with Jesus encourage happy feelings in me?” With that in mind, I am going to share with you why being in a personal relationship with Jesus makes me happy. To me, the first thought that came to me is rather simple: I believe I need a relationship with Jesus to be happy because I was made to be in relationship with him.

FAITH Magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018 | WWW.FAITHPUB.COM

Let me break that down a bit. I am a Catholic, a Christian. Because of that, I believe that God is my maker. I believe that I am not a random occurrence, but an intended creation of our God. What was I created for? Well, as the catechism puts it, “The desire for God is written in the human heart, because man is created by God and for God; and God never ceases to draw man to himself. Only in God will he find the truth and happiness he never stops searching for.” If I do what I am made for, I will feel the rightness of it right down to my bones. I personally have experienced this and often meet others who have as well. I was made to know Jesus, to love him and serve him. I was created by love to be loved and I can’t be loved outside of a relationship. The second truth about a relationship with Jesus that makes me happy comes from Jesus’ talks and stories about the day of judgment. On more than a few occasions, Jesus gives an image of the moment of our judgment and in that, we learn that Jesus knowing us is the key. Let’s look at the example from Matthew 25. In this parable, Jesus is describing the Kingdom of Heaven as being like


a wedding feast. At the end of the story, there are people who do not get into the wedding feast, and the reason they are turned away is simple – Jesus, the bridegroom, says to them, “I do not know you.”

dedicate time and energy to knowing him better, to loving him and being loved by him and that makes me very happy.

(Mt 25:12)

(Sidenote here: I do not intend us to read this as an excuse to stay intentionally ignorant or stop growing in our knowledge of God. I hope that is obvious — if I don’t make the effort to know someone, I cannot deepen my relationship with them. It’s true for people, and also true for God.)

This makes me happy for a lot of reasons. Obviously, I’d like the moment of judgment to go well, that’s just common sense. But there is more to it than that. Look at what isn’t there at judgment – my rightness or my correctness. It’s about relationship and that makes me really, really happy. I mess up a lot. I have held ideas about God for years that I find out are wrong. I’ve been wrong in my words, in my actions and even in my thoughts. For each of these, I’ve asked God’s forgiveness, but I’m also aware that I can’t get to heaven by myself. Until Jesus gets me there (God willing!), I will always be more wrong than right about him. Imagine my relief, then, when I recognize that faith and happiness are first about embracing and maintaining a relationship with God. Then I will naturally grow (through his grace) in knowing and understanding him better. Until my judgment, though, I will always be more wrong about God than I am right. I can’t control that, because I’m a fallible, fragile human. What I will be judged on is what I can control – my effort to

Every day, every second, Jesus is extending his hand out to us and asks us to take it, to be in a relationship with him. We foster that relationship through personal prayer, the sacraments, reading about him, talking to him and listening to him. The more I learn of Jesus, the more I realize how extraordinary it is to be loved by him. The more time I spend reading of him, sharing my pain and struggles with him, the more I become convinced that we were made by love for love. St. Catherine of Siena put it this way: “All the way to heaven is heaven, because Jesus said, ‘I am the way.’” I pray we all embrace this wonder: the Author of love wants to be in relationship with us. May God bless our efforts to respond well to this call. Enjoy another day in God’s presence.

I believe I need a relationship with Jesus to be happy because I was made to be in relationship with him.”

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Real happiness is a joy that cannot be taken from us

2018 ASSEMBLY

Father Mike gives us a preview of his assembly talk

BY CARI ANN DELAMIELLEURESCOTT PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM GENNARA

14

What is happiness? For most of us, happiness means to feel good. In the ancient world, however, it meant to be good. “Sometimes we can imagine happiness will come when were done with our work or the challenge,” says Father Mike Schmitz of the Diocese of Duluth, Minn., and a speaker at the upcoming Made for Happiness Assembly. “What we recognize is we are rarely happier than when we are in the midst of a noble pursuit. To find out what God’s plan is for one’s life and to pursue it in the midst of trials, dangers and setbacks is real happiness.” Discovering God’s plan for his own life started when Father Mike was an adolescent. He was raised in the

FAITH Magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018 | WWW.FAITHPUB.COM

Catholic faith, but, like many teenagers, he found himself bored and turned off by the Church – no reason other than being Catholic didn’t mean anything to him until he had an encounter with Jesus. He had been told not to sin and was to follow the Ten Commandments. But he didn’t have a true understanding until he was about 15, when he realized he couldn’t save himself from his wrongdoings; he needed a savior.

Two things needed: Prayer and reconciliation Father Mike had a rosary hanging off his bedpost. He had seen his mother pray the rosary, and he knew he was supposed to pray the Our Father and Hail Mary, but he didn’t know where to start. “I asked my religious education teacher if I could borrow a booklet on praying the rosary. With the

CNS PHOTO/JAMES RAMOS, TEXAS CATHOLIC HERALD

Father Mike Schmitz, chaplain for Newman Catholic Campus Ministries at the University of Minnesota-Duluth, speaks at St. John Vianney Catholic Church in Houston May 5 during the National Catholic Bible Conference.


booklet in one hand and the rosary in another, I started praying, and Mary, from the beginning, was leading me to her Son.” At 10 a.m. on a Tuesday, which wasn’t during the designated reconciliation hours, young Mike got on his bike and rode to the nearby rectory. He knocked on the door and requested to go to confession. “Three things were clear in my mind when I stepped off the front porch of the rectory. The first was I was grateful that God had forgiven my sins. Second, if God wanted me to be a priest, I would hear anyone’s confession whenever they asked. And the third, this girl that just walked by looks really cute. Thus began the battle of God calling me to priesthood,” he says, laughing.

A setback in his pursuit Still unsure if God was calling him to the priesthood, Mike graduated from a Catholic college with a degree in theology. His experience was good in many ways and rough in others, he says. His studies led him to Central America to work as a missionary teaching religion. Despite being surrounded by the faith, he didn’t understand the teachings of the Church on hot-button issues. “It left me embarrassed about the Church, and that embarrassment led to resentment and hatred,” he says. God had other plans for Father Mike, and he was guided to people who could answer the tough questions. “God cracked into my heart and enlightened my mind,” Father Mike explains. “He repaired me to be able to say ‘yes’ to his invitation to the priesthood.”

A ministry enveloped in happiness Once ordained, Father Mike spent some time in a parish. For the past 13 years, though, he has been assigned as the director of youth ministry for the Diocese of Duluth and the chaplain for the University of Minnesota Duluth. In 2007, University of Minnesota students approached Father Mike and asked him to put his homilies on podcasts and different media platforms. He started recording the homilies, and the students uploaded them to the internet. This led to people outside of the diocese inviting him to participate in different projects and conferences, including recording weekly videos for Ascension Presents, which is an evangelistic platform that provides faith-filled videos and podcasts. The content for his videos comes from a variety of sources, including questions students ask him, current events such as immigration and things that come to mind like “When is Your Bedtime?” “I noticed all of these students are tired, and then I reflected on myself and questioned why I can’t get to bed on time,” he says. “It led me to reflect on that in a deeper way and make a video.”

When he’s asked a question repeatedly by his students, he often tests his responses before recording the video. Sometimes they make sense; other times, his responses need adjustments. “One of the main things that has resonated in my ministry has been the desperate need for spiritual fatherhood, and that has become – more or less – the heart of all that I do.” What does spiritual fatherhood mean to him? Being present. Whether he’s guiding his students, working with youth ministers or reaching a bigger audience through online platforms and weekend conferences, Father Mike says God is now asking him to be present.

Made for happiness In the post-modern world, Father Mike says we don’t necessarily have control over our happiness because, for so many of us, our happiness is based on our circumstances. He continues: “In the ancient world, happiness was deeply associated with virtue, which can be exercised and grow regardless of circumstance. If we root our happiness in circumstances, then our happiness will always be fragile. But if we root it in virtue, it will be resilient. “A virtue is something that is, in some ways, objective,” Father Mike says. “Take justice, for example. There is a big question and debate of what justice is. Do we agree that it is good to be just? Yes, but we have to figure out what it is to be just. It’s the cart before the horse. When it comes to virtues, it is recognized, it is rooted in what is good for human flourishing.” Because humans are free agents in this world, our happiness is not happenstance, he explains. When you bring in God’s grace and the reality of the Holy Spirit, our happiness takes on an entirely different elevation. That elevation is called joy. What kind of joy is he referring to? “It’s not just normal joy,” he says. “It’s a joy that cannot be taken from us.”

One of the main things that has resonated in my ministry has been the desperate need for spiritual fatherhood, and that has become – more or less – the heart of all that I do.”

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Having a holy family looks different for everyone Jennifer will talk about family life at the assembly

G

ANGSTA RAP AND GREGORIAN CHANT – not a combination you would necessarily consider

harmonious, but when it comes to Jennifer Fulwiler’s favorite music, you can’t beat the two. “It shows how multidimensional people of the faith are,” she says, laughing. A wordsmith, radio host and mother of six, Jennifer wasn’t raised Catholic. In fact, she was brought up as an atheist, but her father encouraged her to seek truth and question assumptions. Like many atheists, Jennifer believed in being a good person, but she found she couldn’t defend a morality based on kindness and love objectively. She began questioning the origins of goodness and love when she stumbled upon the book The Case for Christ, by Lee Strobel, which opened her eyes to the possibility that Jesus might be more than she thought. “It was clear to me I couldn’t interpret the New 16

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Testament for myself,” she says. “I would ask Christians about the Trinity because I didn’t see it spelled out in the Bible. There were as many answers as there were people, but the idea of God instilling a Church with his authority made a lot of natural sense to me.” In her search for truth, Jennifer and her husband embraced God’s calling to join the Catholic Church and have a big There is absolutely a place family. Because of their upbringing, she says, for using your gifts in the “It’s the blind leading the midst of family life. That’s blind when it comes to going to look different raising our children as for everyone.” Catholics.” Upon entering the Church, Jennifer thought being a good Catholic mom meant she should put her gifts and passions on hold until her children were older. But, if she were going to continue to be open to God’s call for a big family, she couldn’t suppress God’s gifts. “There is absolutely a place for using your gifts in the midst of family life,” she says. “That’s going to look different for everyone. For some people, it’s a paying job. For others, it’s doing something in the home. The key is thinking outside the box and finding creative ways to use your gifts to honor your vocation and keep your priorities in the right place.” People often ask her how she managed to write her book, One Beautiful Dream, and take care of six kids. The answer is simple: Writing is her “blue flame,” her charism, her gift. It doesn’t feel like work; it fills her with energy. “That’s how you know you’ve found your blue flame. It might feel like work to others, but it doesn’t feel like that to you,” she says. “I couldn’t have taken on something that felt like work. Writing gave me more energy that I could then turn around and share with my family. When she’s not homeschooling her children or writing, Jennifer reaches out to Catholics through the Jennifer Fulwiler Show on SiriusXM’s Catholic radio station. Embracing the station’s mission of being a lifestyle channel from the Catholic perspective, Jennifer keeps her show light and entertaining with different guests, including a Christian rapper and a group that promotes incorporating insects into your diet. “By being honest with my own imperfections through my speaking engagements, my show and my social media outlets, I hope people will be inspired to not beat themselves up about their own imperfections,” she says. Jennifer uses her blue flame to encourage us to think and pray about the unique family culture we are called to have. “It’s easy to compare ourselves at church and on social media, but having a holy and thriving family is going to look different to each family,” she says. “The name of the game is to be the people God is calling you to be as a family.” BY CARI ANN DELAMIELLEURE-SCOTT


initiatives: prayer, New Evangelization, urban evangelization, international outreach and ecumenical harmony. One of the main things Deacon Oney teaches about is the first Pentecost and the descent of the Holy Spirit upon the apostles. The Holy Spirit came suddenly and didn’t send a text message or email to warn us, he explains. The Holy Spirt came suddenly as tongues of fire over the heads of the disciples. “The gift and the miracle of this Pentecost event was that people heard one another in their own language,” he says. “It was a powerful thing, and I love to note that Mary was there in the Upper Room with the apostles, as is indicated in Acts 1:14. She had already experienced the Holy Spirit at the Incarnation of Jesus, but she was again filled with the Holy Spirit at Pentecost, and we can be filled more than once as well. “At our baptism, we receive the ‘indwelling Holy Spirit’ and the Holy Spirit is poured out again at confirmation – that is also the ‘indwelling’ Holy Spirit. However, we can all be filled with the Holy Spirit more than once,” he says. Deacon Oney refers to this as the “infilling” Holy Spirit. He continues: “As the Scripture says, there is one baptism (Eph 4:5), but many fillings. (Eph 5:18 and Acts 13:52)

Discover God's plan for happiness in your life At the assembly, Deacon Oney will explain how to be open to the Holy Spirit

“W

HEN GOD SAYS that he has a plan and purpose for our lives, he really means it. God is not trying

to hide that purpose from us. God wants us to discover our purpose, or our divine mission – to enter it and to walk in that divine mission.” That’s the message from Deacon Larry Oney, a permanent deacon in the Archdiocese of New Orleans. Deacon Oney is one of five scheduled speakers at the Made for Happiness Diocesan Assembly in Lansing on Sept. 22. An author of several books and a frequent guest on Catholic television programs, he is known across the globe for his dynamic preaching style; messages of hope and purpose; and praying for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit. He is the founder and president of Hope and Purpose Ministries, a nonprofit ministry that participates in the New Evangelization through preaching, teaching, leading retreats and parish missions, and helping people foster the baptism of the Holy Spirit. The ministry focuses on five main

“The Holy Spirit is the animator upon the earth today in the body of Christ. In Acts 1, Jesus told the disciples to wait for the promise of the Father, who is the Holy Spirit.” Deacon Oney explains. “We have the Holy Spirit in us by virtue of our baptism, and so he is alive in us. But we have to open ourselves up to give him permission to act and move in us and through us. It is a reality that the Holy Spirit speaks, anoints, acts, moves, appoints, – and empowers. “We, as a Catholic-Christian people, have authority and power to continue the work of evangelization upon the earth,” Deacon Oney says. “That is why Jesus told the disciples to wait for this outpouring of the Holy Spirit of which the Father promised. In Luke’s Gospel, John the Baptist says that Jesus ‘will baptize you with the Holy Spirit and fire.’ (3:16) “I love what Pope Paul VI says, that the Church exists to evangelize. The principal work of the Church is to evangelize. And the only way we can really evangelize is by the power of the Holy Spirit. Because the Scripture says, ‘Not by might, and not by power, but by my spirit, says the Lord.’ (Zec 4:6) “By the power of the Holy Spirit, God calls us to be receivers, healers and deliverers. We must meet people where they are and offer them a fresh encounter with the person of Jesus Christ and the person of the Holy Spirit. “As Catholics, we are called to testify to what God has done for us. He loved us even when we were still sinners, and he has redeemed us by his blood. He has breathed his breath over us to give us strength to tell the Good News of his life, death and burial. “God wants to strengthen us to go out and share the Good News. God always wants to pour out his love and mercy in a fresh way. “I believe that God is saying to us, it is time for the body of Christ that has already been empowered, anointed and appointed to get busy and go forth with the work of evangelization in the power of the Holy Spirit!” BY CARI ANN DELAMIELLEURE-SCOTT

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DISCOVERING THE CROSS WITH SWEET-SMELLING BASIL

CULTURE

FOR CATHOLICS, making the sign of the cross is second nature. We do it upon entering and exiting a church, during Mass and at home before and after prayers. For me, growing up, it was even a custom on my dad’s side of the family to make the sign of the cross on each of my relative’s foreheads upon greeting them at a family gathering. And I have since passed on that very tradition to my own family.

SHANE FOLKERTSMA

T. Gennara

Making the sign of the cross is so important and powerful for many reasons. It reminds us that the true cross is an instrument of our salvation and that through our baptism, we belong to Christ. It is a spiritual weapon that can ward off Satan or assist in quelling any temptations we may be experiencing. But most important, it is an outward sign of our internal convictions that draws us nearer to the one true cross of our Lord and Savior. There is an upcoming feast day which commemorates the discovery of the true cross. The feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, celebrated Sept. 14, marks a series of historical events that all unfolded in the early fourth century. According to legend, St. Helena, Emperor Constantine’s mother, set out on a pilgrimage to MICHELLE Jerusalem to find the true cross of DIFRANCO Christ’s crucifixion. Upon finding is a designer and it, St. Helena had a church built on the busy mom of this site (also the location of Jesus’ three children. tomb), the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. Her son Constantine dedicated it in the year 335 A.D. There are many miracles and legends that surround the finding of the Holy Cross. One such legend has it that St. Helena had been praying and searching for days and then noticed a sweet-smelling aroma of green basil growing on a hillside. She gave instructions for her attendants to dig in that area, and then discovered the cross on which Jesus was crucified. I learned this story some time ago. Now, when I encounter basil in the garden, or feature it in a meal, I ponder its role in the finding of the true cross. There is no way to know if this legend is true. But if the fragrance of fresh basil brings one’s mind to the cross, it cannot hurt to perpetuate the story! So gather some of this sweet, aromatic herb and a few other ingredients and mark Sept. 14 as the day that will point us to the direction of the true cross of Christ. And may it also help us to remember that when we make the sign of the cross, we do so mindfully and give our entire self to God.

SALMON WITH PESTO 2 salmon filets 1 cup (packed) fresh basil leaves 2 tablespoons pine nuts (or almonds) 1 large clove garlic ¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil ¼ cup freshly grated parmesan cheese ¼ cup lemon juice 1 green onion finely chopped Salt and pepper to taste Lemon wedges for serving Preheat oven to 425 degrees. For the pesto, combine basil leaves, pine nuts and garlic in a food processor and process until minced. Slowly drizzle in the oil, 18

followed by the lemon juice, and process for another 5-7 seconds. Add the cheese and pulse just enough to combine (you may have to scrape down sides with a rubber spatula). Transfer the pesto mixture to a small bowl. Add the chopped green onions and salt and pepper. Mix until combined. On a baking dish coated with cooking spray, place salmon filets (skin side down). Spoon and spread half of the pesto mixture over the fish. Bake for 10 minutes and then baste (with a brush) remaining mixture over fish. Bake for an additional 2-3 minutes or until fish flakes with a fork. Serve with additional lemon wedges. This same recipe is excellent grilled!

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YOUR COMMUNITY

Tom Maloney appointed superintendent

ST. LOUIS CENTER DEDICATES NEW CHILDREN’S HOMES On June 12, the St. Louis Center, located in Chelsea, celebrated the dedication and opening of four new children’s homes – in the St. Louis Guanella Village – for children with intellectual and developmental disabilities. The new homes are specially designed for the needs of people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. One of the homes will be specifically for girls aged 5 to 18. Along with the four new homes that have opened, there are future plans for family and cottage homes for adults who need support services. In addition, they will be adding a center for building skills and training for jobs. More than 300 people came to the Mass on June 12 to celebrate the grand opening of the new homes. The Mass was celebrated by Bishop emeritus Carl Mengeling, along with several priests from the Servants of Charity Congregation. Following the Mass, there was a procession to the St. Louis Guanella Village, where Father Enzo Addari, executive director of St. Louis Center, and Bishop Mengeling cut the ribbon to officially open the new homes.

JIM LUNING

Bishop Boyea has appointed Tom Maloney as superintendent of Catholic schools for the Diocese of Lansing. Tom was one of five highly qualified candidates selected to interview for the position, and stood out as the one who clearly articulated a vision for Catholic schools in the Diocese of Lansing that is firmly aligned with Bishop Boyea’s mission. With 25 years of experience in teaching and administration at Lansing Catholic High School, Tom is a proven spiritual leader and a successful mission leader. He is married and has four children, two of whom are students at Lansing Catholic. Tom, who began in his new role on July 25, wrote a letter to the Lansing Catholic community, of which he has been a part for 31 years. In the letter, he stated, “From teacher and coach to assistant principal, from assistant principal to principal, and from principal to president – each transition has meant leaving behind something that I truly cherished and going forward into something that was uncertain and unknown to me. Each transition has led me into a deeper

relationship with Jesus and has furthered my conversion in a way that I cannot imagine would have happened otherwise. “It is with this hope and this thought that I humbly accept this new position and new challenge. I am so blessed to follow in the footsteps of two great leaders, Father Steve Mattson and Sean Costello. Because of them, and the great leaders we have around the diocese, our 29 Catholic elementary schools and four diocesan Catholic high schools are in a great position to continue and expand on the teaching and evangelizing mission of our Church and our bishop. I am excited to be part of that mission in a new way.”

SERVANTS OF GOD’S LOVE HAVE A PRESENCE IN FLINT As of mid-July, the Servants of God’s Love religious community has a presence in Flint. Sister Sarah Burdick, Sister Christina Frey and Sister Lisa Zelfa have moved into the convent at St. Matthew’s to help build the Catholic Community of Flint. As Father Tom Firestone, pastor of the Catholic Community in Flint, says, “I believe it is essential that we have a religious community here in our midst that will have a dedication to prayer each day on our behalf. I know many of you pray, but you also have other responsibilities, whereas this community of sisters makes prayer their prime responsibility. If Flint is to rise again, it must begin with prayer to our Risen Lord. So my dear people these sisters are here for you.” Bishop Boyea has given his blessing to the sisters to be here. He was expected to formally install their community and convent in Flint in late summer. According to Father Tom, “We must continue to renew our Catholic presence in Flint. I am grateful for the intercessory prayer of Mary, Mother of Flint. Our Lady is watching over us and bringing her Incarnate Son to bless us and give us peace. I will be more at peace knowing that the Servants of God’s Love will be with us in prayer.” 19


HELP WANTED!

Catholic school teacher and ministry opportunities are available with the Diocese of Lansing. Each employee is involved in spreading the faith and is vital to the spiritual and pastoral mission of the Church. To see available opportunities, visit dioceseoflansing.org/employment or contact Lisa Kutas at lkutas@ dioceseoflansing.org or 517.342.2511.

NEW PRIEST ASSIGNMENTS Bishop Earl Boyea announced the following pastoral assignments and transfers that were effective July 2, 2018: • Bishop-elect Gerald Vincke will be relieved of his position as pastor of Holy Family Parish, Grand Blanc and St. Mark Parish, Goodrich. • Rev. Joseph Krupp will become pastor of Holy Family Parish, Grand Blanc and St. Mark Parish, Goodrich. • Rev. Todd Koenigsknecht will become administrator of Sacred Heart Parish, Hudson and St. Mary on the Lake Parish, Manitou Beach.

YOUR COMMUNITY LOCAL NEWS

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ST. MARY SCHOOL IN MT. MORRIS CLOSING At the end of June, Father Roy Horning, pastor of St. Mary Parish in Mt. Morris, announced the closing of St. Mary Catholic School in the fall. In a letter to the parishioners, parents and staff of St. Mary, Father Roy expressed his sadness in the decision to “begin the process of consolidation.” He notes that the closing is due to economic struggles and the

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SUSANA CHAPA VARGAS IS NEW HISPANIC COORDINATOR FOR THE DIOCESE Q: What makes you passionate about this position as Hispanic coordinator for the diocese? A: Something that I really feel in my heart is that as a Hispanic, or as a person coming from Mexico, I had way more opportunities to have a good education than most of the Hispanics in the U.S. I am in the 2 percent of the population of Mexico that has a master’s degree, and this, for me, is a moral obligation to give back and help with what I have received. I really admire the Hispanic community here because they risk everything to come to the U.S. I really want to be able to see how we can help them and to understand what is deep in their hearts. Q: What is your previous experience or background working with the Catholic Hispanic Community? A: In Mexico, I was a part of the coordination of a missions group called Misiones de Guerrero. We used to go to tiny isolated communities in the State of Guerrero to evangelize. I also worked for the Pontifical John Paul II Institute in Mexico as a professor for undergraduate and graduate levels. Here in the U.S., I have been working a lot with the Hispanic community. I worked for Godfrey Lee Public Schools in Wyoming, Mich. There is a huge Hispanic community there. Then, I started working for San Juan Diego Academy in the same school district. I have also been working as a volunteer member for the Steering Committee for the Pastoral Plan for the Hispanic Ministry at the Diocese of Grand Rapids.

“faith crisis” within the wider Church. Father Roy acknowledged that the closing will be difficult, especially for those families who have been a part of St. Mary Parish and School for generations. He also offered hope, and encouraged families to send their children to other Catholic schools in the area. St. Mary Church will honor the tuition assistance that was granted to families in need for whichever Catholic school families choose to attend in the fall.


USCCB STATEMENT ON COURSE OF ACTION RESPONDING TO ARCHBISHOP THEODORE MCCARRICK On Aug. 1, Cardinal Daniel N. DiNardo, archbishop of Galveston-Houston and president of the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops (USCCB), issued the following statement noting the steps the U.S. Bishops Conference will take in addressing the failures of the Church in protecting the people of God. “The accusations against Archbishop Theodore McCarrick reveal a grievous moral failure within the Church. They cause bishops anger, sadness, and shame; I know they do in me. They compel bishops to ask, as I do, what more could have been done to protect the people of God. Both the abuses themselves, and the fact that they have remained undisclosed for decades, have caused great harm to people’s lives and represent grave moral failures of judgement on the part of Church leaders. “These failures raise serious questions. Why weren’t these allegations of sins against chastity and human dignity disclosed when they were first brought to Church officials? Why wasn’t this egregious situation addressed decades sooner and with justice? What must our seminaries do to protect the freedom to discern a priestly vocation without being subject to misuse of power? “Archbishop McCarrick will rightly face the judgement of a canonical process at the Holy See regarding the allegations against him, but there are also steps we should be taking as the Church here in the United States. Having prayed about this, I have convened the USCCB Executive Committee. This meeting was the first of many among bishops that will extend into our Administrative Committee meeting in

September and our General Assembly in November. All of these discussions will be oriented toward discerning the right course of action for the USCCB. This work will take some time but allow me to stress these four points immediately. “First, I encourage my brother bishops as they stand ready in our local dioceses to respond with compassion and justice to anyone who has been sexually abused or harassed by anyone in the Church. We should do whatever we can to accompany them. “Second, I would urge anyone who has experienced sexual assault or harassment by anyone in the Church to come forward. Where the incident may rise to the level of a crime, please also contact local law enforcement. “Third, the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will pursue the many questions surrounding Archbishop McCarrick’s conduct to the full extent of its authority; and where that authority finds its limits, the Conference will advocate with those who do have the authority. One way or the other, we are determined to find the truth in this matter. “Finally, we bishops recognize that a spiritual conversion is needed as we seek to restore the right relationship among us and with the Lord. Our Church is suffering from a crisis of sexual morality. The way forward must involve learning from past sins. “Let us pray for God’s wisdom and strength for renewal as we follow St. Paul’s instruction: ‘Do not conform yourselves to this age but be transformed by the renewal of your mind, that you may discern what is the will of God, what is good and pleasing and perfect.’” (Rom 12:2)

The United States Conference of Catholic Bishops will pursue the many questions surrounding Archbishop McCarrick’s conduct to the full extent of its authority; and where that authority finds its limits, the Conference will advocate with those who do have the authority.”

JUBILEE CELEBRATION FOR CONGREGATION OF ST. JOSEPH SISTERS Eleven sisters from the Congregation of St. Joseph celebrated 50-, 60- and even 75-year jubilees on July 22 at Nazareth Center in Kalamazoo. Celebrations began Saturday evening with the traditional cabaret, at which several sisters entertained all with poetry, music and other special talents. The following day was marked by a Liturgy in Holy Family Chapel with Rev. Michael Howell presiding. After the homily, the jubilarians were invited by Sister Christine Parks, CSJ, a member of the Congregation Leadership Team, to renew their vows. After Mass, all were invited to the dining room for dinner. Standing (l-r), Sisters Lenora Benda and Mary Pung (60 years), Peggy Wessel, Janet Pewoski, Janet Fleischhacker, Ginny Jones (50 years) and Jan Popilek (60 years). Seated (l-r), Sisters Mary Hallock, (75 years), Ellen Mullally, Laura Smith and Rita Berby (60 years). 21


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HILLSDALE COLLEGE CATHOLIC SOCIETY PARTICIPATES IN BAGS OF HOPE PROGRAM

YOUR COMMUNITY LOCAL NEWS

Members of the Hillsdale College Catholic Society have undertaken the Bags of Hope program as an ongoing community service project. The items they collect are provided to the needy in Hillsdale County through the pantry at St. Anthony of Padua Catholic Church. If your Lenawee or Hillsdale county service organization would like to participate in the Bags of Hope program, contact Bea Cuthbertson at 517.879.0599 or bcuthbertson@ catholiccharitiesjlhc.org DON QUILLAN

CONSECRATION OF SYRIAC CATHOLIC CHURCH On June 30, St. Isaac the Syriac, Archbishop of Nineveh Syriac Catholic Church was consecrated. The consecration ceremony and the Divine Liturgy were celebrated by His Excellency, Mor Barnaba Yousif Habash, bishop of Our Lady of Deliverance Syriac Catholic Diocese in the United States. The new church is located at 1314 N. Ballard in Lansing. 22

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THINGS TO DO

SEPTEMBER CAFÉ EVENTS

Sept. 7, 5-11 p.m., Sept. 8, noon11 p.m. and Sept. 9, noon-5 p.m., Church of the Resurrection, 1505 E. Michigan, Lansing’s 84th Ox Roast Festival: Featuring the original ox roast sandwich and delicious homemade soup. Event includes children's games, baked goods, pub, hourly 50/50 drawings, raffles, silent auction and live entertainment. For more information, call 517.482.4749.

The Livingston Vicariate Men-on-Fire Ministry meets on the third Thursday of the month for 6:15 p.m. Mass, followed at 7 p.m. with a speaker for faith formation, spiritual growth and opportunities to encounter and engage the Trinity – followed by food and fellowship. For information, contact Rory Clark at 810.333.2746.

Sept. 9, St. Paul and St. Joseph, Owosso will host a parish picnic beginning with 11 a.m. Mass at Bentley Park, followed by food, fun and fellowship. Event includes a great playground for children. Parishioners are asked to bring a dish to share. For information, call the parish office at 989.723.4277. Sept. 9, 11 a.m., St. Mary Magdalen, Brighton continues to celebrate its 25th anniversary year with an outdoor liturgy and parish picnic on the parish grounds. For information, contact the parish office at 810.229.8624. Sept. 15, Shared Pregnancy Women’s Center Golf Scramble at College Fields, 3800 Hagadorn Rd., Okemos: 8 a.m., check-in and breakfast; 9 a.m., shotgun start; and 2 p.m., awards ceremony. Cost of $75 per player or $300 per four-person team includes 18 holes with cart, continental breakfast, lunch at turn, prizes and tax-deductible receipt. Register online at sharedpregnancy.org/events. For information, contact Aimee at development @sharedpregnancy. org or 517.622.3267. Sept. 16, after 8:30 a.m. Mass until noon, St. Agnes, Fowlerville’s Knights of Columbus Council 8605 will host their Autumn 24

Sept. 11, 7 p.m. and Sept. 16, 2 p.m., a new group of people seeking to learn about the Catholic Church will begin meeting at St. John Church and Student Center, 327 M.A.C. Ave., East Lansing. Please select the time you want to attend. For information, contact Pete Ries at 517.351.5460, ext. 1328 or pries@elcatholics.org. Sept. 11 and 13, ALPHA sessions begin at St. Mary Magdalen, Brighton for all adults: Tuesdays, 10 a.m.-noon and Thursdays, 6:30-8:30 p.m. Starts with a meal and conversation and continues with a video and small group discussions. Online registration at saintmarymagdalen.org and click on ALPHA or email alpha@ saintmarymagdalen.org. Wednesdays, Sept. 12 through Nov. 14, 7-9 p.m., in Fr. Mac Hall, Fulfilled: Uncovering

the Biblical Foundation of Catholicism DVD study series at St. Thomas Aquinas Church, 955 Alton Rd., East Lansing. Learn where the blueprint for the Catholic faith was laid out in the Old Testament and how Jesus fulfilled it in the New Testament. For more information or to register, please contact Al Weilbaecher at 517.351.5460 or al@elcatholics.org. Sep. 12, 6:30 p.m., St. John the Baptist Church, Howell will host Msgr. Ron Browne from the Archdiocese of Detroit, who worked on the miracle investigation for Blessed Solanus Casey completed earlier this year. He will talk about the saints in the Catholic Church, with specific stories about the path to sainthood for Blessed Solanus Casey. There will be a Q&A session at the end. All are encouraged to come and learn about this important cause for canonization. For information, call the parish office at 517.546.7200. Sept. 20, the Livingston Vicariate Catholic Council on Aging and Livingston County Catholic Charities will host at St. Joseph Parish, Howell a senior appreciation Mass celebrated by Bishop Boyea, followed by lunch. To make a reservation, contact your parish representative or call Mark or Jaynee at 517.545.5944. All community members 50+ are welcome. Sept. 28-30, Holiday Inn, Troy, a Worldwide Marriage Encounter enrichment weekend with registration online at wwme.org. For more information, contact Andrew and Alaina Wollner at 734.531.9191.

Breakfast Feast in the Lothamer Parish Center. Don’t miss what is known far and wide as the best breakfast in town. For information, call the parish office at 517.223.8684. Sept. 21, 7 p.m., St. Mary Queen of Angels Parish, 4413 Morrish Rd., Swartz Creek, will host a euchre tournament fundraiser sponsored by its Knights of Columbus council. For more information, call 810.635.3684.

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Sept. 29, 6:30-8 p.m., “Talk on Transgenderism” by Dr. Janet E. Smith at St. Patrick Church, Brighton. Transgenderism is a phenomenon that is difficult to understand. This talk will explain the Catholic Church's response to the issue.


CATHOLIC SOCIAL SERVICES OF WASHTENAW COUNTY, 734.327.9717 or CSSWASHTENAW.ORG

CATHOLIC CHARITIES CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF JACKSON, LENAWEE AND HILLSDALE COUNTIES, JACKSON: 517.782.2551 or ADRIAN: 517.263.2191 or CATHOLICCHARITIESJLHC.ORG •S  ept. 13, 6:30 p.m., Catholic Charities of Jackson, Lenawee and Hillsdale Counties will hold its second annual Faith in Action fundraising dinner at Gene Davis & Sons Banquet Hall in Jackson, emceed by “Back in Black” Father Joe Krupp, pastor of Holy Rosary, Grand Blanc, and Father Tim MacDonald, pastor of the Queen of the Miraculous Medal, Jackson. Cost is $40 per person. For information, contact Beau Cuthbertson, development coordinator, at 517.879.0559 or bcuthbertson@catholiccharitiesjlhc.org. CATHOLIC CHARITIES OF SHIAWASSEE AND GENESEE COUNTIES, 810.232.9950 FLINT or 989.723.8239 OWOSSO or CCSGC.ORG •L  ooking for work? We can help! Job resource board, interview clothing and accessories and work clothing are available. Contact your caseworker for a referral. For more information, call 810.265.7025, ext. 713. •W  orld Class BBQ will hold its annual fundraiser for Catholic Charities. Pick up some delicious BBQ on the corner of North Saginaw and Pierson Road in Flint. All proceeds benefit Catholic Charities meal programs. For more information, check out our Facebook page. •G  arage sale leftovers? Donate your gently used rummage sale remains to Catholic Charities’ Community Closet, which provides free clothing, bedding, towels, furniture, appliances, household goods and toiletries to those in need. All donations are tax-deductible. Drop-off hours are: Monday-Friday, 9:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m. at Center for Hope, 812 Root St., Flint, or call the North End Soup Kitchen to schedule a pickup at 810.785.6911.

Free-will offering. For more information, call 810.229.9863. Oct. 14, 11:30 a.m., Hands of Mary Rosary Makers, an affiliated ministry of Immaculate Heart of Mary Parish, 3815 S. Cedar St. in Lansing, will host its annual fall gathering following the 11:30 a.m. Mass in the parish family center. Come share a potluck luncheon. All rosary makers and anyone interested in mission work is invited. Guest speaker: Sister Pat Newhouse, Sisters of Charity from

•S  ept. 23, 4-7 p.m., at Valley at Frutig Farms, 7650 Scio Church Rd., Ann Arbor, the Marnee & John DeVine Foundation’s fourth annual Cooking for a Cause fundraiser: Competing chefs lead a team of community leaders to bring you delicious entrees in a fierce competition. Tickets are $150 per person; all proceeds support CSSW. Tickets are available online at csswashtenaw.org/cooking-fora-cause-2018/. For information on becoming a sponsor, contact 734.971.9781, ext. 313 or development@csswashtenaw.org. LIVINGSTON COUNTY CATHOLIC CHARITIES, 2020 E. GRAND RIVER, STE. 104, HOWELL, 48843 517.545.5944 or LIVINGSTONCATHOLICCHARITIES.ORG •O  ct. 15–Dec. 7, Medicare Part D sign-up, information on the various plans available beginning in October. •L  CCC Substance Abuse Services: A drop-In substance abuse engagement group for people struggling with substance use/abuse is free and open to everyone. Group days are Monday, 6-7:30 p.m.; Wednesday, 10:30 a.m.-noon; and Friday, 10-11:30 a.m. 24-hour assistance available, call a substance abuse coordinator at 517.375.1652. For therapists trained and certified in substance abuse/ addiction treatment, call 517.545.5944. Community Mental Health offers the ACCESS program and provides screenings for substance abuse services. ST. VINCENT CATHOLIC CHARITIES, 517.886.1150 and 517.323.4734 or STVCC.ORG •S  ept. 4 and 18, 6:30-8:30 p.m., please join us at a Foster and Adoptive Parent Orientation that is cost-free and commitment-free. Registration is required to attend and is available on St. Vincent’s website. Orientations are subject to cancellation if there are no confirmed guests. For questions or to RSVP, contact Stephanie Stanley at 517.323.4734, ext. 1601 or Stanles@stvcc.org.

St. Martha Parish in Okemos. For information, call the IHM Parish Office at 517.393.3030 or HandsofMaryRosaryMakers@outlook.com.

RETREAT CENTERS

Nov. 13, 3 p.m., St. Patrick, Ann Arbor, in cooperation with St. Augustine Homeschool Enrichment Program, will host a talk by Dr. Dale Ahlquist on “G.K. Chesterton and Catholic Social Teaching” in the church hall, 5671 Whitmore Lake Rd. For information, call 734.662.8141.

Oct. 13, 9:30 a.m.-3 p.m., “The Martha–Mary Balance of Daily Life,” check-in, final registration and morning coffee/tea and snacks at 9 a.m. The retreat begins at 9:30 a.m. Feel free to bring your Bible and your spiritual journal, if you use one. Cost is $55 and includes lunch and materials.

ST. FRANCIS RETREAT CENTER, DEWITT, 866.669.8321 or STFRANCIS.WS.

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YOUR STORIES

Reigniting men’s Catholic faith That Man is You coming to a parish near you

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MY STORY

M

AYBE IT WASN’T AS DRAMATIC as the biblical story when Nathan reveals to King David that the man who has lost course

and betrayed God is not someone else, no, “That Man Is You.” (2 Sm

12:7)

But Mike DiCosola had his own moment of clarity and inspiration

at a trade show in Texas three years ago when he was looking for a program to bring back to his parish.

“I saw a lot of different options, but something drew me over to this very simple display,” recalls Mike referring to the That Man Is You presentation, which is one of the most popular series from the Paradisus Dei organization. “The deacon who was working the booth was so on fire about the program that it made an impression on me. Something told me this was it.” Back home, Mike presented the idea to his pastor at Our Lady of Consolation in Rockford, Mich., who picked up on his parishioner’s enthusiasm. Mike’s parish launched the program in the summer of 2015. Mike and other members of his core team posted up in the back of church after each Mass with their “TMIY” polo shirts. The core group signed up more than 100 men that summer. Three years later, the weekly TMIY meetings still regularly attract more than 60 men each Thursday morning. “I just think the timing was right,” says Mike, who is the director of mobile services and the myParish App at Diocesan Catholic Life in Grand Rapids. “It’s the men that we’ve lost. We are getting them together and having them ask the question: ‘Where did I lose it?’ Together, men are supporting each other and reclaiming their Catholic faith.” That Man is You, founded in 2001, addresses the pressures and temptations that men face in our modern culture, especially those relating to their roles as husbands and fathers. The

program incorporates current social and medical science with the teachings of the Catholic Church and the wisdom of the saints to develop the vision of man fully alive. The full program takes three years to complete, with each 90-minute weekly meeting divided into a 30-minute meal, 30-minute DVD presentation and a 30-minute small group discussion. “Those discussions sometimes go on for much longer,” notes Mike, who understands time constraints as the father of five children and the director of the myParish App, which is used by more than 3,000 parishes – and growing. “Each week has a different theme and kind of a different way of getting men to talk about issues that they normally don’t discuss,” he says. Mike is now a true believer in the That Man Is You program and encourages parishes across Michigan to work with their local Knights of Columbus and start the program. The secret, Mike says, is to convince skeptical (and busy) men to come to the first meeting. “The most exciting part of it for me is watching men get inspired,” says Mike. “You see people come in going through the motions, but this program is very downto-earth and it brings people in. I have seen men start to warm up, open up their minds and hearts and they end up on fire.” To illustrate that point, Mike uses the example of his friend’s experience with the program at his parish.

“My friend went to the first meeting with little expectations, just wanting to meet some of the guys as a new parishioner,” recalls Mike. “He had zero intentions of sticking around even for the small group sessions. But he was really captivated and intrigued by the content of the talk, so he stuck around for the small group session. “Here we are three years later and he is now a small group leader and core team member.” Now, Mike is excited about seeing hundreds, if not thousands, of men like his friend from all across the state re-ignite their Catholic faith. “We walk out of each meeting better men, better fathers, better employees,” says Mike. “It’s exciting to see Catholic men embrace their role as authentic male leaders.”

That Man is You, founded in 2001, addresses the pressures and temptations that men face in our modern culture, especially those relating to their roles as husbands and fathers.”

That Man is You

Richard Budd, director of marriage and family life for the Diocese of Lansing, works with the Michigan Knights of Columbus on family and marriage issues, and has been reaching out to Knights councils across the state, encouraging them to work with their parishes and launch the program this fall. He says of That Man is You: “This program is all about supporting and strengthening the role of the father in the family, No one is saying that this one program is going to be a cure-all, but it has worked well and had a profound influence in other places. We are hoping to provide this opportunity to Catholic men all over Michigan.” Contact your parish or local Knights council and ask if this program is coming this fall. For more information on the program, visit WWW.PARADISUSDEI.ORG/THAT-MAN-IS-YOU.

BY TOM KENDRA | PHOTOGRAPHY BY TOM GENNARA

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FaithFest18

WAS A GREAT SUCCESS FaithFest18, held on June 23 at St. Francis Retreat Center, was a great families to gather together and celebrate their faith in an atmosphere

SEAN ROSENBERG

success! This was a day for Christian

of upbeat, joyful participation. A record crowd of families and young people enjoyed a day of live music, social and recreational activities, food, fireworks and fun – all centered around a vigil Mass held under the stars. Parish and school groups, youth ministries, small groups or large apostolates – all are welcome to

Number of hosts distributed at Mass

reunite at FaithFest19!

2,500

VOL UN TEER Number of wristbands distributed

7,400

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FAITH Magazine | SEPTEMBER 2018 | WWW.FAITHPUB.COM

Number of volunteers

200+


Number of vendors 13 food vendors 30 ministry vendors

Number of bands

14

43

Number of hand-painted FaithFest18 rocks for kids under 11

350

Number of glow sticks for “Glow in the Dark”

Number of campsites (sold out)

38

750

SAVE THE DATE!

Number of priests hearing confessions

20

FaithFest19 is Saturday, June 22, 2019, at the St. Francis Retreat Center in DeWitt. • A one-day family festival of faith and music • Twilight vigil Mass with Bishop Boyea • Fireworks at dusk • Family activities throughout the day WWW.FAITHFEST.COM

PHOTOGRAPHY BY DON QUILLAN

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CREDITS

T H E

M A G A Z I N E

O F

T H E

C A T H O L I C

D I O C E S E

O F

L A N S I N G

www.FAITHpub.com September 2018 / $2.50

The Magazine of the Catholic Diocese of Lansing SEPTEMBER 2018 VOLUME 18: ISSUE 7

www.FAITHpub.com Most Rev. Earl Boyea PUBLISHER

Rev. Dwight Ezop

SEPTEMBER 22, 2018 JOIN US FOR THE DIOCESAN ASSEMBLY

• EUCHARISTIC PROCESSION • INSPIRING PRESENTATIONS • ALL DIOCESAN MASS

FIND US ONLINE AT FAITHPUB.COM

EDITOR AND CHAIRMAN

Pope Francis talks with a group of nuns after the General Audience at the Paul VI Hall in Vatican, Aug 1.

CONNECTING PEOPLE WITH JESUS AND HIS CHURCH WWW.FAITHCATHOLIC.COM

Patrick M. O’Brien

CATECHISM REVISED TO STATE THAT DEATH PENALTY ‘INADMISSIBLE’

PRESIDENT/CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

Elizabeth Martin Solsburg VICE PRESIDENT/EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Kayla Simon CREATIVE DIRECTOR

Ann Jacob MANAGING EDITOR

Cynthia Vandecar DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION AND CUSTOMER SERVICE

Marybeth Hicks MARKETING DIRECTOR

Patrick Dally ART DIRECTOR

Mike Jones DIRECTOR OF TECH AND DIGITAL MEDIA

POPE WATCH WHAT POPE FRANCIS HAS BEEN SAYING AND DOING RECENTLY

Michelle Hildebrandt CREATIVE DIRECTOR WEB

Lindsy Sambaer WEB AND DIGITAL MEDIA SPECIALIST

Jillane Job EDITORIAL ASSISTANT

Jim Berlucchi | Michelle DiFranco | Sheri Wohlfert | Tom Kendra | Father Joe Krupp | Steve and Bridget Patton | Cari Ann Delamelleure-Scott CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

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“Try reading the Gospel for at least five minutes every day. You will see how it changes your life.”

Rev. Charles Irvin FOUNDING EDITOR For advertising information, contact Tom Gaskin Call 517.853.7648 or email tgaskin@faithcatholic.com For subscription information: Call 1.866.76.FAITH

@Pontifex – July 15

On Aug. 2, Pope Francis approved a revision of the Catechism of the Catholic Church to clearly state that the death penalty is “inadmissible.” By taking this step, he is following the example of his predecessors, St. John Paul II and Pope emeritus Benedict XVI, both of whom expressed opposition to use of the death penalty. The catechism now will read: “Recourse to the death penalty on the part of legitimate authority, following a fair trial, was long considered an appropriate response to the gravity of certain crimes and an acceptable, albeit extreme, means of safeguarding the common good. “Today, however, there is an increasing awareness that the dignity of the person is not lost even after the commission of very serious crimes. In addition, a new understanding has emerged of the significance of penal sanctions imposed by the state. Lastly, more effective systems of detention have been developed, which ensure the due protection of citizens but, at the same time, do not definitively deprive the guilty of the possibility of redemption.” Pope Francis’ change to the text concludes: “Consequently, the Church teaches, in the light of the Gospel, that ‘the death penalty is inadmissible because it is an attack on the inviolability and dignity of the person,’ and she works with determination for its abolition worldwide.”

FAITHTM (USPS 019993) is a publication of FAITH Catholic, Diocese of Lansing, 1500 E. Saginaw St., Lansing, MI 48906-5550. FAITHTM is a membership publication of the Catholic Diocese of Lansing and is published monthly except for February and August. To purchase a subscription, log on to FAITHpub.com. If you have a change of address, please contact your parish. Periodicals postage paid in Lansing, MI and at additional mailing offices. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to FAITHTM, 1500 E. Saginaw St., Lansing MI 48906-5550. ©2017 FAITH Catholic. FAITH is a trademark of FAITH Catholic.

TO YOUNG PEOPLE: LOOK TO ROOTS TO BUILD A BETTER FUTURE

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In a video message to young people attending a youth assembly on the family in the Caribbean in July, Pope Francis said: “It's from your roots that you will get the strength to continue. None of us – neither you nor me – were manufactured in a laboratory; we have a history, we have roots. And everything we do, the results we achieve, the beauty we create in the future, all comes from those roots.”


TOP 10

REASONS TO GO TO THE ASSEMBLY

“The happiness you are seeking, the happiness you have a right to enjoy has a name and a face: it is Jesus of Nazareth, hidden in the Eucharist.” – Pope Emeritus Benedict XVI

1.  You'll see and meet people whose faith is alive and vibrant! 2.  Your own faith and relationship with Jesus will deepen and grow.

“People are made for happiness. Rightly, then, you thirst for happiness. Christ has the answer to this desire of yours.”

3.  You will hear some really great speakers. 4.  You will experience a vibrant liturgy and have access to the sacrament of reconciliation. 5.  There is no cost for admission to the Breslin Center.

– Pope St. John Paul II

6. There will be activities for children. 7. Professional child care will be available during the Assembly Gathering. 8.  You’ll have an opportunity to witness to your faith by walking in the Eucharistic Procession. 9.  You’ll be part of one of the largest gatherings of Catholics in the Diocese of Lansing. 10.

 ou’ll have access to exceptional Y Catholic resources offered by some of the nation’s most prominent Catholic vendors.

“We have a right to be happy and peaceful. We have been created for this – we are born to be happy – and we can only find true happiness and peace when we are in love with God.” – Saint Teresa of Calcutta

REGISTER NOW AT MADEFORHAPPINESS.ORG 31


Membership Magazine of the Catholic Diocese of Lansing 1500 E. Saginaw St., Lansing, MI 48906 Want to receive FAITH Magazine? Visit FAITHPUB.COM Follow FAITH Pub The Way to Happiness Is Jesus Find out more at DIOCESEOFLANSING.ORG Find a Catholic Church at MASSTIMES.ORG Serving Ann Arbor, Flint, Jackson, Lansing And Clinton, Eaton, Genesee, Hillsdale, Ingham, Jackson, Lenawee, Livingston, Shiawassee and Washtenaw counties

M A D E FOR H A P PINESS ASSEMBLY SEPT. 22 AT THE BRESLIN CENTER, EAST LANSING THE DAY’S AGENDA 9:00 a.m. – 11:30 a.m. Outdoor Eucharistic Procession Shuttle service to the Cathedral begins at 7 a.m. 1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Inspiring Speakers and Talented Musicians at the Breslin Center 4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. All Diocesan Mass (see page 9 for what is allowed in the Breslin Center)

REGISTER NOW

A L L C AT H O L I C S I N V I T E D

WWW.MADEFORHAPPINESS.ORG

procession 9:00 - 11:30 A.M.

presentations 1:00 - 4:30 P.M.

Mass

4:30 – 6:00 P.M.

September 2018  
New