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LA’S MAGAZINE ON ART, DESIGN, ARCHITECTURE & FASHION

ISSUE 8

JORGE PARDO • LUC LEESTEMAKER • ARCO MADRID • REDCAT EMERGING LA • ART ABOUT TOWN • LA ART & DESIGN DIRECTORY


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PHOTOGRAPHY: TIMOTHY DUNHAM


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CONTRIBUTORS MASTHEAD Publisher Chris Davies Associate Editor Peter Frank Managing Editor Aparna Bakhle-Ellis

JACKI APPLE Jacki Apple is a Los Angeles-based visual, performance, and media artist, designer, writer, composer, and producer whose work has been presented internationally. Her writings have been featured in numerous publications including THE Magazine LA, The Drama Review, Art Journal, and High Performance. She is a professor at Art Center College of Design.

SHANA NYS DAMBROT Creative Director Chris Davies Art Direction & Design Shout Design Group Paul Soady Contributing Writers Jacki Apple Shana Nys Dambrot Peter Frank Lanee Neil Andie Villafañe Alissa Walker Dale Youngman Fashion Editor Anyes Galleani Contributing Photographer Ted VanCleave Account Executive Renee Smith Dale Youngman Production Associate Allem Ramirez

Shana Nys Dambrot is an arts writer and curator based in Downtown LA. Her fine art & design reviews, features, and interviews have appeared in regional, national, international, and online publications including Modern Painters, ArtReview, Art Ltd, ARTnews, Whitehot Magazine, The Believer, tema celeste, Art Asia Pacific, and Juxtapoz. She is currently the LA Managing Editor at Flavorpill.com.

PETER FRANK Peter Frank is Senior Curator at the Riverside Art Museum, Associate Editor for Fabrik and is also the Associate Editor for THE Magazine LA. He was born in 1950 in New York, where he served as art critic for The Village Voice and The SoHo Weekly News, and moved to Los Angeles in 1988.

VERONICA GONZALEZ Veronica Gonzalez was born in Mexico City and raised in Athens, Ohio and Los Angeles. After getting a degree in art history she studied writing at NYU and while in NY co-edited Inflatable Magazine, a zine which enabled her to work with many of her artschool heroes, including Dan Graham, Lawrence Weiner, Chris Kraus and Lynne Tillman. In 2005 Veronica began rockypoint press, which produces books of truly collaborative artist/writer pairings in association with 1301PE Gallery in LA.

EDITORIAL & ADVERTISING LANEE NEIL Editorial editorial@fabrikmagazine.com Advertising ads@fabrikmagazine.com Contact 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 Tel 310 360 8333 info@fabrikmagazine.com http://www.fabrikmagazine.com

INFORMATION Fabrik is published bi-monthly by Fabrik Magazine, Inc., 269 S. Beverly Drive, Suite 1234, Beverly Hills, CA 90212. Contents cannot be reproduced in part or in full without the written permission of the copyright holder. The opinions expressed are those of the artists and writers themselves and do not necessarily reflect the opinion of Fabrik Magazine, Inc. Copyright © 2010. All rights reserved. PRINTED IN LOS ANGELES

Lanee Neil is a Los Angeles-based writer who uses her craft to pursue her passions; travel, culture and enriching quality of life. Lanee has traveled extensively through Europe, Asia, Costa Rica and Russia and is currently working on a photojournalistic documentation of her time spent in India. As a lifestyle consultant, she is a contributing writer to Yogi Times.

ANDIE VILLAFAÑE Andie Villafañe is a multicultural art contributor and curator living in Los Angeles. She writes the gallery previews for Citizen LA, serves as art liaison for The RAY magazine, and keeps tabs on the art world with her artspotting blog.

ALISSA WALKER Alissa Walker writes about art, design, architecture and cities for publications like Fast Company, GOOD and Dwell, as well as on her own blog, Gelatobaby.

DALE YOUNGMAN Dale Youngman is a freelance curator and writer who has been living in LA for 15 years. Her raison d’être is to reverse the paradigm of the starving artist, one at a time.


CONTENTS 10

IconocLAst: Jorge Pardo LA’S MAGAZINE ON ART, DESIGN, ARCHITECTURE & FASHION

ISSUE 8

26 Profile: Luc Leestemaker 44 Special Report: A Tale of Two Cities: Los Angeles at ARCOmadrid 56 Through the Lens: REDCAT JORGE PARDO • LUC LEESTEMAKER • ARCO MADRID • REDCAT EMERGING LA • ART ABOUT TOWN • LA ART & DESIGN DIRECTORY

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Hot & Cool LA: Beverly / La Brea

80 Re:Focus: Emerging LA Artists

ON THE COVER

‘Acrylic, Polycarbonate Lamp.’ Image Courtesy Jorge Pardo Sculpture

84 Downtown Hub: Cobb Building 87 Directory: LA Art & Design Directory 90 Art About Town: Peter Frank’s Exhibit Highlights 105 Artist and Gallery Showcases PHOTO: © JORGE PARDO SCULPTURE


UNTITLED • 2004 • GLASS, POLISHED BRASS, GLASS PEARLS BLASTED BRASS, LIGHT SET OF 7 HANGING LAMPS: TWO: 58 X Ø 49 CM; TWO: 25 X Ø 44 CM; THREE: 54 X Ø 35 CM COURTESY NEUGERRIEMSCHNEIDER, BERLIN


SHIFT&FLOW

WORDS VERONICA GONZALEZ IMAGES COURTESY JORGE PARDO SCULPTURE


ICONOCLAST

We take snapshots, as it were, of the passing reality…we may therefore sum up...that the mechanism of our ordinary knowledge is of a cinematographical kind. — HENRI BERGSON

THE HOUSE ON THE HILL The Making of Americans, Gertrude Stein tells us, is written “like a cinema picture made up of succession and each moment having its own emphasis that is its own difference and so there was the moving and the existence of each moment as it was in me” (Lectures in America, 198). Stein, like the new medium she refers to, was actively engaged in an art that took on the idea of motion as determining perception not just in physical but also in psychic reality; the existence of each moment as each moment being significant too, but only when seen as a part of the motion, inseparable, a continuous present. The fluidity of time, and of the transformation that occurs in the flow of existence are vitally important, are, in fact, what make us vital. In a conversation with Jorge Pardo last night, he told me of a period in his life when he spent his evenings watching films with George Porcari, his roommate of the time, a mutual friend, and a reel film buff. Two or three a night. And, of course, this engagement, all of these films, began to inform his work, not in any directly correlative way, not as any simple correspondence, but thus: he began, he says, to think about his sculpture filmically. How is it that film moves us, takes us through time, effects our selves, our thinking about ourselves, in relation to these motive arbitrations, mediations on motion? How is it that a work of art can do this on a small scale, which becomes large - all encompassing - because of its wider implications; how is it that a Jorge Pardo lamp can make us aware of our motion around its particularity, space made electric, but then make us look at any lamp we view after it and see it differently too, in the way that Godard can do that with, say, a cup of coffee viewed from above once we've seen Two or Three Things I know About Her and heard his voice-over speaking of the ambiguous relation between the personal and the social? Between time and the eternal. We think of Oscar Wilde and his insistence that Life Imitates Art, again, not in any simply relational mode, but because art informs the way we perceive the life around us. It directs the way we look, as it did for the young narrator in H.D.’s The Gift (which she beautifully referred to as autobiographical fantasy) who is never again able to see the world the same way once she has experienced her fist play. And then we must admit that we know this is going on all the time, every instant of experience shifting the me I was the moment before. In his short (one page) essay “Borges and I,” Jorge Luis Borges, the man, ponders the other Borges, the writer Borges. He makes a distinction between the two, claims that he sees his, the other Borges’, name in biographical dictionaries, tells us that he recognizes himself less in his books than in many others. He concludes the work, in typical Borgesian fashion, by throwing the whole essay, and our relationship to it, into question when he tells us: I don't know which one of the two of us is writing this page. We realize that this is a good way to think about Pardo’s work: We must commence to think about shifting relationships between the work and ourselves, and those other things in art and life which we consider after we’ve 12

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UNTITLED • 2009 • 844 X 844 X 445 CM • PLYWOOD, SILKSCREEN ON PLYWOOD, STEEL, FABRIC, COLORED CORRUGATED METAL


ICONOCLAST

seen the work, and the selves we have become through seeing it. And once we admit this lack of a center - for how can that which is constantly shifting have a center - we have really to ponder what it is Jorge means when he insists on process. There is, of course, the process that Jorge goes through when he begins to think about how to approach a work. The house, for instance. He visited the site. Again and again. And this is not a romantic thing, nothing to do with the sublime. This was about the specifics of the space. Trying to be there, see and experience the hill. Appreciate where it rises, dips, curves, falls. What it looks out on. What it is like to stand up there. The house is - at least partially - about poeticizing the experience of the space. It is a house that works with what was already here (I am writing what you are reading from inside it now); it hugs the landscape; the house's dips and falls and curves are present because they were already here…. And this is a house that works along with you, takes its woody finger and pokes and prods at you. But it doesn't prod knowingly, for it is looking too. It looks in on itself through every window, as if it is also trying to be there, move through itself, experience its house-ness not as a finished product, but as a process, something which occurs and re-occurs, as Borges’ Borges is always making (through questioning) himself. You really do move through the rooms here, by the way; there are stairs you climb, not simply as a staircase, but as a library, an independent space. Except that as soon as you pause you realize that these steps are bound to lead you somewhere you might want to be so that you move on, through them. There are hallways that become arterial (though, again, complex and self-directed places in and of themselves) before opening up to big but never complete (as they are always looking out and into the other) spaces. The view afforded of that room there from this one here alters both that one and this. But notice how those lamps, the bottoms of which I could only see from down there, change when looked at from up here. How and where their luminescence bounds and bounces and alights. We also have to imagine, however, that you may not move through a room. You could just stubbornly sit on this chair, the floor, or that sunken sofa; nevertheless, even in your terse immobility you would always be confronted by a window that is looking back at you, forcing and questioning your gaze at the same time. We have to nod along with Pardo as we begin to understand that process is not just what he, the artist, is involved in during the creation of the work, but what each of us is engaged in too, every time we approach the work. And so we have to ask ourselves: What does it mean to look at something that moves and doesn't finish. That does not promote an end, an absolute. What does it mean to look at something that loops and loops and loops?

» JORGE PARDO’S HOUSE, LOCATED ON SEA VIEW LANE ATOP A HILL OVERLOOKING LOS ANGELES, BEGAN AS A WORK OF ART THAT WAS EXHIBITED, ON SITE, FOR FIVE WEEKS IN 1998 BY MOCA. © JORGE PARDO SCULPTURE.

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ICONOCLAST

ONE AND FORTY CAMERAS

But when the self speaks to the self, who is speaking? – the entombed soul, the spirit driven in, in, in to the central catacomb; the self that took the veil and left the world – a coward perhaps, yet somehow beautiful, as it flits with its lantern restlessly up and down the dark corridors. — VIRGINIA WOOLF If you have been reading carefully, you have noticed the repetition of the word motion. You may have been annoyed by it. But Stein says that there is no such thing as repetition, only insistence. So that that repetition of motion, is itself a motion, an insistence. This is how Jorge's work works. The house looks at itself, speaks to itself. There are pinhole cameras that do this too. While still a student, Jorge became interested in what happens when pictures are taken, presented. Questions of object and subject were surely at hand, subject and viewer. So he began to make things which could take pictures of themselves. There was a styrofoam cup, kind of smushed, wrapped in black masking tape, placed in front of a mirror, where it took a picture of itself taking a picture of itself, tattered subject and object both. There is something sweetly pathetic in this cup standing in front of the mirror in a men's room, regarding itself, taking stock, and making record of the moment, with the urinals a constant reminder to the bodily behind it. We understand and are moved by its shabby selfregard, for have we not all had those moments of quiet, often wretched, introspection in front of a bathroom mirror? There was a table, each piece: leg, leg, leg, leg, top, having taken a picture of itself separately and individually, as the cup had, and then all of these five pieces banged together by Jorge, so that it was transformed and unified now, a table, sitting squarely in the middle of Bliss Gallery (Fall, 1987), surrounded by photographs of itself which it had taken in a mirror before it had become one, so that it is never only one, but always the sum of its parts. There were plastic owls, a ham, shoes, an attempt at himself (He painted his entire body black and tried to make himself into a camera.), more cups, more owls, and…. And in all of these works we are presented with objects that look at themselves looking at themselves, so that they are being and observing, speaking and listening, at the same time, ad infinitum so that subject and object and viewer are always creating each other in the moment that they are being created; and because of this circularity of the work, we come to see, there is no fixed moment, no Meaning ascribed, understanding is always deferred, and thus never Understanding, but something else, something more like process, a union. And the fact that this work, the pinhole camera, was repeated (insisted on) in various forms, 30 or 40, Pardo affirms, further questions a uniqueness, an absolute and full (closed) experience; there is no fixed moment. So that again we have to ask ourselves: What does it mean to be presented with work which loops and loops, looking at itself forever and ever, not finishing, flowing, like time itself, that fluidity. 16

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UNTITLED (TOM BORGMAN) • 2009 • 40 X 27 X 4 INCHES, ACRYLIC, MAHOGANY, MDF, FLUORESCENT LIGHTS


ICONOCLAST

THE FLOW

Imagination is an almost divine faculty which, without recourse to any philosophical method, immediately perceives everything: the secret and intimate connections between things, correspondences and analogies. — CHARLES BAUDELAIRE Already a century ago, Henri Bergson lamented the primacy of scientific analytical thought, the triumph of the enlightenment, which form of knowledge he termed geometric order. Geometric order, he defines, relies on knowledge acquired through a breaking up of a whole into artificial units which can then be understood through laws or patterns applied from without. For many of us this type of knowledge, which he also termed the intellect, is the only way we trust our understanding of the world outside. But for Bergson there was another way of knowing: one based on vital order, which depends on the temporal and thus cannot be broken up and is known through what he calls the intuition. The intuition can grasp a succession and a “growth from within” he tells us (Matter & Memory, 35). Additionally, Bergson believes in the interconnectedness of all things, not just in the wholeness of objects but in the wholeness of all “… does not the fiction of an isolated material object imply a kind of absurdity, since this object borrows its physical properties from the relations which it maintains with all others and owes each of its determinations, and, consequently, its very existence to the place which it occupies in the universe as a whole? (Matter & Memory, 24). Finally, time, it seems absurd he must remind us, can not be moved through, back and forth and back, in the way the spatial can. This is the great distinction between the vital and geometric orders, the intellect and intuition. For, if each instance is itself and cannot be relived, then how can objects in time be pulled out and “known”. This we see as somehow related to Gertrude Stein's insistence that there is no repetition, I repeat. In each moment that we think we know, that moment is already gone. In the moment I speak, the I is past. Often, when pressed about his work, Jorge will speak of contingencies. He uses that exact word: “I was interested in the contingencies of this or that problem. I asked myself, what would happen if…” What would happen if an artist set up a movie theater as a sculpture, so that films could be projected back to back and the viewers of these films would become a part of the work for the period of time they spent viewing their films? In “The Oliver”, Jorge set up a public sculpture, a dual movie theater, in a bucolic field in the middle of a park in Braunschweig. Within the one irregularly shaped structure, a sculpture which he composed to look like a crystal, all lit up and glowing from the inside, and which Jorge refers to as a tent (a connotation that carries in it the impermanent, transient quality of the structure, and thus an acknowledgment of temporality, time), he set up two projection screens at a distance of sixty feet from each other, back to back. Among other things, here he seems to be taking on 18

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OLIVER, OLIVER, OLIVER • 2009 • 15 X 9.4 X 4.1 M • PAINTED STEEL STRUCTURE, COLORED MAKROLON, PAINTED BIRCH WOOD, PAINTED WOOD, 2 TEXTILE SCREENS, 2 PROJECTORES, 2 DVD/VCR PLAYERS, FILM LIST BY JORGE PARDO

an essential problem of our contemporary way of understanding the world. This is that we no longer need to define and comprehend the difference between things, subjects or objects, for this difference is always there for us; the problem now seems to be in the connecting, the relationship. The important contemporary question is not, how is this separate, but how does this relate, how is it connected. Film is a perfect place for the posing of this question, for in editing, of course, this is the central concern. How things are put together is of primary importance, affects (creates?) the whole. And, as in film thus in life,our ability to make connections, to move between things and come away with something which will then lead us to something else is vital. In “The Oliver,” which takes this problem of connection one step further than a single projection could by setting two films back to back, Jorge takes this on. Yet this issue of connection has further implications than can be simply illustrated through film and the motion of the still, because for connection to be meaningful there has to be a connecting body, an active participatory someone for whom the motion, the connections, carry import. In his artist's statement for the project Jorge states: “My role as an artist is to try and make clear and explicit that art is not the space of film or passivity… but rather that art can inhabit and produce the space of active, social, reflexive and poetic reflection in the present tense, in other words it is a tool for the reconsideration of anything and everything, like film, but different.” Web fabrikmagazine.com

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ICONOCLAST

MUSEUM BENCH • 1990 • MAPLE, MAHAGONY, DRY WALL SCREWS, WOOD GLUE, LACQUER, WOOD PUTTY, 40.6 X 182.9 X 40.6 CM

In the end for Bergson, film was never able to mirror our thought processes, for time can not, in fact, be broken down into these independent pictorial elements - the film still. Jorge seems to take this idea on, for in his sculpture it is not the films which are primary, but the experience of the tent itself, the experience of experiencing it, in whatever form this may occur. A passerby, seeing the tent with its luminous films running inside, is as vital to the work, as much a potential participant, as those inside viewing the films. As Jorge puts it, the audience of the films “will always be at the mercy of and the potential subjects of any passerby's leisurely whims. Within these whims are some interesting stories, I hope.” For, finally, film can run alongside us, thrill us, even, but its fluidity is a myth, and though there are films which do not call on us to be passive, which function as art, film itself can not do what we do in our essential lack of fixedness, which is to approach and quicken and slow and connect, and flow. Perhaps in the end this is why process centered art is so vital, because it engages the part of us that does not need to break things down, that part of us which Bergson terms the intuition; it draws us in and poses questions, inhabits space alongside us and in engaging us encourages us to do what - at our best - only we can do. From December 2007 through March 2008, the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) Miami presented a major midcareer survey of Jorge Pardo's work. This essay, reprinted with permission by Veronica Gonzalez, was previously published in the exhibition catalogue, Jorge Pardo: House (Dec. 4, 2007), by Bonnie Clearwater, Veronica Gonzalez, and Ruba Katrib.

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“The Ancelle, Arlington Heights”, 30" x 40" Archival Pigment Print © 2009 Jim McHugh

Jim McHugh – Let’s Get Lost May 22 through June 30, 2010 Timothy Yarger Fine Art 354 N Bedford Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90210 • 310.278.4400 info@yargerfineart.com • www.yargerfineart.com


GETTING CREATIVE:

ART AS A WAY OF LIVING AND WORKING Fabrik Editor Peter Frank sits down with painter Luc Leestemaker, author of his just-released book, “The Intentional Artist: Stories from My Life.”

WORDS PETER FRANK IMAGE PLATES COURTESY & COPYRIGHT © LUC LEESTEMAKER FINE ART PORTRAIT PHOTOGRAPHY BJOERN KOMMERELL


PROFILE

Peter Frank: It’s unusual for an artist to write his own book, especially when that book is not about art. You’ve written a kind of book that we see fairly frequently. It’s an attitude-shifting book, a self-help book (to give it the worst possible label), but for an artist, as opposed to a business man or inspirational speaker or any of that, to do this kind of book is unusual, and remarkable... but at the same time, you are indeed something of a businessman and an inspirational speaker. Luc Leestemaker: Well, I think that’s exactly one of the motivations behind writing a book for me. I feel that artists are pushed way too much into little boxes where they need to behave, in their little studios, and are trained to behave in one way or another, and I feel that should be over with. That’s a very old model, and was not actually the original model of the artist if you go back to the Seventeenth century. This [newer] model has clearly not really worked, [except for] a very select few. I mean, the percentage of artists actually able to make a living, let alone a comfortable living, doing their work is, I think, less than one percent. So it’s not working. And I think artists need to be real, active members of society. So one of the inspirations and motivations behind writing the book for me was to show that it can be done in a different way. If the artist makes himself more active in the world, it will probably be better for his work, I think, and it will also make him a better communicator, and therefore he has a better chance to make a living off his work. PF: Would you even say that, if the artist is participating and communicating more successfully with his or her society, that society benefits as well? LL: Of course. I think we’re in a time where society shows that it really needs creative input from an artist to function better…I see it where corporations actually bring me in to give them consulting;…they don’t need me to do strategic sorts of business thinking. They just want out-of-the-box thinking. The creative way of thinking is the way of the future. If computers will soon be taking over all our other organized ways of thinking, that’s the one part that computers still won’t be able to do. I think it will be an incredibly valuable asset that artists can offer to the world. But they need to first change their own frame of mind about what it is to be an artist. PF: What you’re saying is, if you take the computer out of the businessman, what’s left is the artist. And as a result, artists themselves have to become more comfortable with the computer in us, that part that wants stability, that part that wants regularity, that part that wants facts and computations. The left brain. And the artist as the right brain has to work with the left brain of society. LL: I think it’s almost a form of laziness… I think the artist is almost encouraged to become some sort of autistic member [of society]. Artistic is autistic when you see what sort of behavior is encouraged in art schools. By the way the whole idea of an art school is a little bit of a joke to me, because I don’t know when this idea started, that you become an artist by going to school, I mean, the problem with [art school] is that intellectually, stuff is stimulated without actually opening up real curiosity about life, which I think is real art. 28

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HAIKU 54 • 54 X 54 INCHES


PROFILE

And so I’m making the case for making art really about perception and conception, and creating conceptual life, instead of conceptual art. By which I mean to look at art and life as something that is so much broader than just what sort of product are you going to create or what idea are you going to use. First look at art itself as a way of living, you know, before you even make anything, a way of thinking. Making a painting to me is just the application [of] a certain way of thinking that expresses itself first. You know, who am I as a human being, what do I want to express. To lock yourself away in your studio is so strange, because the whole reason for wanting to make art is to put a message in a bottle and throw it out into the ocean and hope somebody’s going to get what you’re doing. So why not help that process a little bit and, you know, see who’s out there. You’re not on an island as an artist, you don’t have to be, you can go out there in the world, and [use the] incredible communication tools now available to make yourself known globally. People come up with all these examples, you know, the poor Vincent van Goghs and all these [great artists who died in obscurity], I very seriously doubt that van Gogh would not be very active in the world. When you look at his letters you see how incredibly eager and desperate he was to communicate with anybody who would talk to him about his art. If Vincent van Gogh were alive today, he would use every single social medium in the book to communicate his work to the world. PF: He would have a blog. LL: Absolutely. If you look at his letters, he was the biggest blogger in the world, even at that time. PF: Did you come to Los Angeles, did you come to America, as an artist, and if you didn’t, what were you doing in Holland and why did you come here? LL: I think the artist part was like a little rosebud inside of me at the time that I came over. I started out as an artist very early, coming from a long lineage of painters in my family in Holland. However, those paintings I saw growing up in the house around me were very constrained, still lifes, landscapes, all according to the rules. So when I started painting at age 16, 17, a punk living in a squatted home with huge rolls of wallpaper and black paint [at hand], I think what happened is that I almost immediately dove into my unconscious, and used that as an expression, and it scared the shit out of me. So I realized that I wasn’t ready for that at all, because I think that to go into real art, it’s sort of high voltage, you know, you need to understand what you’re dealing with, because you dive down into the cellar and you need to also find your way back again when you’re done with the session. And I don’t think you’re ready for that at 16. So I backed off from that and chose other fields of [creativity] that had to do with communication. Communication was always the key for me. I got into writing, theatre, copywriting, did all that for a while and actually ended up, through this drive of communication, [establishing] a company in Holland that was linking cultural institutions and artists with corporations in a period when the government was starting to retract their subsidies and grants. It was a whole open field there, teaching these two very different worlds to communicate with 30

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LANDSCAPE 12 • 2009 • 50 X 50 INCHES


PROFILE

each other. And so what started out as an idea grew into a fairly large corporation, with [constant pressure]. Secretaries would bark at me when I just tried to go for a walk in the park, which made me realize that something had gone terribly wrong. This was about the time that I just felt that Holland really was too small [to allow me to explore] my own creativity, so when the opportunity arose [to move to L.A. with an actress girlfriend], I basically just packed up and left. So in a way I’ve always felt I was more of a cultural refugee than an economic refugee. And I felt that gave me choice when I came here. I think that makes a huge difference. When you look at economic refugees, they come out here and they take every single bit of culture that they came from with them and as soon as they arrive, they start rebuilding that. For me, living in L.A. and America became a real conscious process into seeing how far I could go into peeling away the onion layer and de-conditioning myself and getting the culture out of me and see what’s left when the culture is gone, because it’s actually very little. We are mainly defined and conditioned through our cultures, I realized. That sort of became the process for me and in that process, after I finished my novel (in Dutch, which in Los Angeles might as well have been ancient Greek), I had the strange sudden thought, ‘you used to paint, why don’t you try that again.’ It was almost like I did an audition for myself. The moment the paint hit the canvas, I just knew I had found what I had been looking for all my life, but now I could go and explore this, as far from Holland as I could possibly get, on my own terms, using the history that was genetically already in me to my advantage but creating an expression that was really based on my own journey. So… the West Coast has been an incredible gift to me in really giving someone in his mid-30s a complete chance to hit the restart button, throw away whatever is useless, and use what’s inside of you that’s valuable but be able to start using it in a conscious way, in a free way. PF: I know you spent a little time in New York but you say that it was the West Coast that allowed you this freedom to return to your family roots, to your DNA. Do you believe, had you remained in New York, that you might have been thwarted in that? LL: I felt when I lived in New York…it was strange because I’d always been extremely excited by New York, and after I had spent 5 years in L.A., I thought that was going to be the prize, you know. Yet when I arrived there, I felt that it was almost a suburban city compared to L.A., because it was so structured. And very quickly I realized that I [had returned to] something that I had left behind, which was this very structured [life in ] Europe, in Holland, where everything is already set in certain scenes and ways where you’re allowed to do this but not allowed to do that. And I felt that New York had that much more than what I had experienced in Los Angeles. It took me a long time, when I arrived in Los Angeles, to become comfortable here, because I kept looking for the center of town the first half-year. But the day that I discovered it was 32

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SOLIQUOI 60 • 2008 • 60 X 48 INCHES


HAIKU 76 • 54 X 54 INCHES


PROFILE

sort of a virtual city and that I could decide myself what the center was and I could change that at any moment, I felt an incredible sense of freedom, and a realization that I could really define my own life here. Going to New York, I suddenly realized that instead of going further, I was going backwards, towards Europe. And I wasn’t interested in that at all. PF: That sense of potentially infinite possibility, as you say ‘the virtual city,’ does that influence get into your art at all? LL: Yes. I think it does. I don’t know exactly how it does. Maybe because the whole structure and the way L.A. is laid out is so removed from any European city. That’s what allowed me to start bringing back structures and ideas that I had learned in Europe but this time in a non-threatening way, because they weren’t defining or limiting me anymore. It’s such a vast reservoir here that it’s not limiting you. Then, [these structures and ideas] really become little markers that you can use to define yourself. And so, that immense freedom and the space that L.A. offered gave me that room to start playing with the tools that before had been very limiting for me in Europe but now could finally become useful and functional. PF: So, in a sense, you’ve been able to find your European voice in Los Angeles the way you couldn’t have in Europe. LL: Exactly. In that sense I almost feel like I became again that adventurer that the Dutch once were, in the 1500s and 1600s when they took their ships and went out all over the world. But these cultures in Europe got very lazy, they became a bit like museums, and they started to treasure more what they have than what might be new and on the horizon. I just always felt that curiosity, even as a small kid in Holland, I just didn’t feel comfortable there, I felt it was very limiting in what it had to offer me. It manifested itself in family, in culture, in school, in everything, and I tried to fit in. Finally, I literally realized one day that I just didn’t fit. I’ve always felt more comfortable living in the States than I ever did growing up in Holland. It’s just the sense of space here that is so much more comfortable to me…that I love. People come here from Europe and they say to me how can you live in a city like this? It’s so ugly and there’s no structure. Well, these are exactly the things that I need to breathe and be able to explore and to find myself. And what better place to do that for an artist than a place that’s not structured, that’s not rigid? PF: If it’s ‘ugly’ and unstructured, it’s a BYO situation. BYO beauty, BYO structure… LL: Exactly. The entire interview, including Luc’s discussion of his artwork and people's reaction to it, is online at: http://www.fabrikmagazine.com/luc-leestemaker-interview

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SATURDAY, APRIL 17, 2010 • 12:30 PM–10:00 PM THE MIRACLE MILE ART WALK IS PROUD TO PARTNER WITH THESE PARTICIPATING GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS:

WILSHIRE GALLERIES A+D Museum. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6032 Wilshire Blvd. Ace Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5514 Wilshire Blvd. ACME Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Edward Cella Art + Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6018 Wilshire Blvd. Craft & Folk Art Museum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5814 Wilshire Blvd. Daniel Weinberg Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Korean Cultural Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5505 Wilshire Blvd. LACMA . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Lawrence Asher Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5820 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 100 Marc Foxx Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Mark Selwyn Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6222 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 101 Peter Mendenhall Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Steve Turner Contemporary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6026 Wilshire Blvd. Creative Photography Workshops

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6022 Wilshire Blvd.

Clark Oshin Gallery at The Icon . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5450 Wilshire Blvd. Sophia Louisa Projects at Phantom Galleries LA. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5412 Wilshire Blvd.

LA BREA/BEVERLY Alitash Kebede Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 S. La Brea Ave. Ann 330 Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7319 Beverly Boulevard Couturier Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 166 N. La Brea Ave. DNJ Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 1/2 N. La Brea Ave. Fahey/Klein Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 148 N. La Brea Ave. Heaven on Earth . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7122 Beverly Blvd. Jack Rutberg Fine Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 357 N. La Brea Ave. Merry Karnowsky Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 170 S. La Brea Ave. Michael Kohn Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8071 Beverly Blvd. Perrell Fine Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145 N. La Brea Ave. Photographers Gallery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 145A N. La Brea Blvd. Richard Telles Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7380 Beverly Blvd. Stephen Cohen Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7358 Beverly Blvd. The Loft at Liz's . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 453 S. La Brea Thomas Paul Fine Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7270 Beverly Blvd. Tobey C. Moss Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7321 Beverly Blvd. Voila! Gallery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 518 N. La Brea Ave.


OTHER GALLERIES Adamson-Duvannes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 484 S. San Vicente Gallery 825 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 825 N. La Cienega Blvd. Gallery Brown . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 S. Orlando Ave. Left Coast Galleries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8304 West 3rd St. MAK Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 835 N. Kings Rd. Schindler House Country Club, Los Angeles. . . . . . . 805 S. Genesee Ave. Buck House by R.M. Schindler Otero Plassart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 820 N. Fairfax Avenue Gemini GEL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8365 Melrose Ave Papillon. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8272 Melrose Ave. THE APRIL 2010 MIRACLE MILE ART WALK IS SPONSORED BY:

Mid City West Community Council Greater Wilshire Neighborhood Council LACMA Fusicology www.mopla.org www.bearflagwines.com FOR MORE INFORMATION:

www.miraclemileartwalk.com www.midcitywest.org


EDWARD CELLA ART

+ ARCHITECTURE


A TALE OF TWO CITIES:

LOS ANGELES AT ARCOmadrid WORDS ALISSA WALKER IMAGES COURTESY AND COPYRIGHT © BAMBÚ

DANIEL JOSEPH MARTINEZ CREATED A SITE-SPECIFIC PIECE WHICH ANNOUNCED L.A.’S PRESENCE ON THE CALLE DE ALCALÁ IN MADRID.


ARCOmadrid INVIGORATED WHAT COULD HAVE BEEN A DOWNMARKET 29TH YEAR WITH A BOLD BREAK FROM TRADITION. INSTEAD OF CHOOSING A COUNTRY FOR ITS CULTURAL EXCHANGE PROGRAM, THE ART FAIR CHOSE LOS ANGELES, A YOUNG, COMPLICATED CITY WITH WHOM ITS’ CITY’S FATE WAS PERHAPS MOST HISTORICALLY INTERTWINED. »


SPECIAL REPORT

During a particularly bleak week in February, the two cities seemed similar on the outset: cranes poised in mid-construction over two populations facing unprecedented economic hardship and crushing unemployment. But the state of their art was very different. Members of L.A.’s art community arrived in Spain exhausted from campaigning for Cultural Affairs funding and still reeling from rescuing a museum from the edge of collapse; in Madrid, the line for an Impressionist show at the Fundación Mapfre ran for several blocks along the Paseo de la Castellana on a Saturday morning, and even when general admission tickets were a mind-boggling 32 Euros, Spain’s contemporary art fair remained the highest-attended in Europe. For a week, the spectacle of L.A.’s 60 artists descending upon 11 institutions across the city gave Madrileños and Angelenos a chance to compare their cultural values on opposite ends of the Spanish diaspora. For cities with so much in common, it seemed they had not been properly introduced before. “Because not a lot of Los Angeles art has been shown in Madrid,” said Christopher Miles, co-curator with Kris Kuramitsu, of the Panorama: Los Angeles program, “and there's been limited participation of L.A. galleries in ARCO in the past, and because it seems a lot of people in Madrid have not traveled to Los Angeles, there was this consistent curiosity about the art and the city. I think for many people it was about measuring the art against whatever had shaped what they imagined Los Angeles or L.A. culture to be like.”

RUBEN OCHOA’S EXPANDED INFRACTION SHOWS CONCRETE PALLETS WHICH HAVE BEEN HEAVED UP BY SOME UNSEEN

46

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One venue that addressed those myths was Invisible City, an exhibition of ten artists that served as a sort of visual essay on L.A.’s urban problems. At a panel discussion, Karla Diaz and Mario Ybarra Jr. presented a moving, bilingual spoken-word companion accompaniment to their work Police and Thieves (only to have an older Spanish man make a rambling statement that he didn’t appreciate art that memorialized L.A.’s gangs and riots). A mile north from L.A.’s violent past, people could confront another L.A. stereotype, our idealized modernism, on display in Julius Shulman’s Los Angeles, the Getty Research Institute’s first traveling show curated by Christopher James Alexander. At this Shulman-inthe-round, with his photographs ringing a four-story century-old water tower, a Spanish architecture student excitedly pointed out the familiar black-and-white beams of Case Study houses and the expansive, glittery flats of Hollywood. Panorama: Los Angeles also gave hundreds of Los Angeles artists, gallerists, scholars and curators a chance to test the veracity of claims that L.A. is a new world art capital of the world. Carlos Senda, of the prestigious Galeria Senda in Barcelona, said Panorama helped to affirm that ranking in his mind. “I would say that L.A. is already a place to take into consideration for the pole position… It seems in a few years it will definitively climb to the very top as it interfaces with all the creations from Asia and their emerging markets.” For Josephine Keller, of Dublin-based Rubicon Gallery, having L.A. as a featured city influenced her decision

PRESSURE FROM BENEATH, EVOKING SIDEWALKS WHICH HAVE BEEN BUCKLED FROM TREE ROOTS OR SEISMIC WAVES.

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SPECIAL REPORT

ONE OF 11 INSTALLATIONS AROUND THE CITY, THE INVISIBLE CITY EXHIBITION ADDRESSED LOS ANGELES ISSUES AT THE DRAMATIC MARBLE-CLAD INSTITUTO CERVANTES.

to return to ARCOmadrid for the third year. “I used it as a theme,” she said, choosing artists and pieces with L.A.-specific values like flux and movement, playfulness and process. At the convention center, L.A.’s 17 galleries were given premiere real estate in the center of one hall, denoted by a hot pink stripe that ringed each vendor’s booth. In a chocolate-hued gallery at the center, Christopher Grimes served as the contingency’s veteran. “ARCO has been one of the most important fairs for us because we are able to reach clients from all over the world,” said Grimes of his 16 years of bringing his program to Madrid. “There was a great deal of press coverage at the fair for Los Angeles this year, perhaps because there is a dynamic in L.A. that you don’t see present anywhere else right now, other than Berlin.” That attention proved fruitful for four-year-old gallery Cherry & Martin, whose Mary Leigh Cherry noted they sold all three pieces by Erik Frydenborg and several of Mari Eastman's drawings. Brian Butler of 1301PE also noticed an intense interest in L.A. work. “I’ve never seen so many people taking photos,” Butler said of the response to his pieces by Diana Thater, Kirsten Everberg and Jorge Pardo. “People just wanted to be a part of it.” A fascination with video art boosted the program of curator Paul Young, which included Hironaka & Suib and Rebeca Méndez but Young, like some other Spanish attendees, hoped to see more classic L.A. artists: “More Mike Kelley and Ed Ruscha,” he offered. Young also bemoaned the seemingly random, center-less exhibition. He curated a series of David Lynch films, but never fully understood where they were screening or how far away it was (an ironically appropriate problem for Los Angeles). But maybe that was the point. “There’s no way that we could be completely inclusive, since art in Los Angeles is quite 48

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ADRIA JULIA’S NOTES ON THE MISSING OH DECONSTRUCTS THE HOLLYWOOD MYTH WITH UNGLAMOROUS FOOTAGE OF LOCATIONS AND ACTORS FROM A FAILED BLOCKBUSTER FILM.

multifaceted,” said Kuramitsu. “We simply tried to highlight some of the work that we thought would pique international interest in the art of our city and prompt visitors to the fair to find out more on their own about LA’s art.” So Panorama: Los Angeles was not a golden-lit nostalgia-fest but a hot pink line pointing towards the future. On the fair’s last night, a satellite exhibition at the Madrid’s most exciting art space in the city affirmed that tack. At the Matadero, a massive former slaughterhouse in south Madrid, the collective Fallen Fruit planned prepared to plant 60 public fruit trees, Doug Aitken’s video installation The Moment suspended its LED screens reflecting onto the polished concrete floor, and performance artist team My Barbarian parodied what’s perhaps L.A.’s best-known cultural export, the Oscars. This dynamic multi-leveled event added an electric, diverse close to the citywide survey. “I think Los Angeles has become a very complete city for art,” Miles said, back home in L.A. “All the pieces are in place. I think there's a lot of hope and tenacity in the art scene here despite the tough times we're in.” There were tough times, too, in this colorful, dirty, complex, all-too-familiar Spanish city, which, too, had itself been rocked by violence in the not-too-distant past. But Madrid has managed to dismantle the freeways that had once split their urban fabric, successfully revitalize an ignored river channel, and—to the astonishment of all Angelenos in attendance—convert this a blighted industrial complex into what may well be the largest municipal-funded art space in the world. As My Barbarian ended their symbolic Spanish colonialism-inspired dance in the Matadero, it was clear that the L.A. contingent was not just bearing gifts, but finding something here we could take home with us as well. Web fabrikmagazine.com

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THROUGHTHELENS WORDS JACKI APPLE IMAGES COURTESY OF REDCAT

IN SIX SHORT YEARS REDCAT (ROY & EDNA DISNEY CAL ARTS THEATER) HAS EARNED THE DISTINCTION OF BECOMING LOS ANGELES’ MOST INNOVATIVE PRESENTER OF CONTEMPORARY INTERDISCIPLINARY PERFORMING AND MEDIA ARTS BY BOTH LOCAL AND INTERNATIONAL ARTISTS. LOCATED ON SECOND STREET IN DISNEY HALL’S BACK SOUTHWEST CORNER, THE THEATER NOT ONLY FOSTERS COMMUNITY AROUND CHALLENGING VISUAL AND SONIC FORMS AND IDEAS, IT ALSO FACILITATES A LIVELY DISCOURSE IN ITS LOBBY AND BAR, WHERE AUDIENCE MEMBERS AND ARTISTS ENGAGE IN ENERGETIC EXCHANGES FOLLOWING THE PERFORMANCES. Executive Director Mark Murphy describes REDCAT’s mission as twofold – “to introduce and expose L.A. audiences to the most progressive works being made by artists from around the world, and to expand the reach of local artists. In order to participate in the worldwide conversation they must be aware of both current directions in the field and historical precedents.” This is reflected in the range of disciplines and cultural diversity of REDCAT’s programming. It encompasses multimedia, theater, music, dance, and cinema plus conversations with artists and writers on subjects such as “The Lost Origins of the Essay,” (April 25) and “The Spiritual Crisis in Contemporary Black Arts, Politics, and Psychoanalysis.” (May 4). Murphy explains the curatorial philosophy as one of “discovering new languages, new ways to tell stories, new ways to see and hear.” He seeks works that push the interface between form and content, break down boundaries between media, evolve new forms out of traditional ones, and represent a multiplicity of cultures both geographically and sociologically. REDCAT is equally committed to premiering works from 21st century American experimenters, emerging newcomers, and established masters such as Richard Foremen, Meredith Monk, and Yvonne Rainer, as well as Latin American and Asian companies that reflect L.A.’s cultural make-up. REDCAT’s inaugural season October 2003 opened with Memorandum by Dumb Type, Japan’s acclaimed multimedia collective known for its technical virtuosity, and hypnotic visual and sonic environments that explore the dissonance and dislocation of contemporary life. On an entirely different note, Eiko and Koma’s deeply moving staging of Cambodian Stories in 2006 combined live painting, ritual, and dance created by ten art students from Phnom Penh, to tell the story of a young generation coming to terms with their tragic past and embracing their future with hope. Murphy also supports the remounting of historic seminal works by the original artists. In 2009, Anna Halprin’s first “collective creation” – the radical 1965 postmodern dance Web fabrikmagazine.com

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CLOUD EYE CONTROL – “UNDER POLARIS”. PHOTOS BY EUGENE AHN

work “parades & changes,” was reinterpreted in collaboration with Anne Collod, with music performed live by her original collaborator, electronic pioneer Morton Subotnick. “Contemporary art can’t be made in a vacuum. You have to know where your origins are,” Murphy declares. Despite the minimalist aesthetic, watching the dancers repeatedly undress and dress while performing pedestrian tasks was as profoundly moving and inspiring for a new audience as it was forty-five years ago. And as contemporary! REDCAT has recently become the West Coast home for the Wooster Group – New York’s preeminent radical theater troupe, known for pushing textual and technological boundaries for thirty-five years. In their 2009 production of La Didone, they simultaneously staged Cavalli’s 1641 Italian opera and Mario Bava’s 1960s cult sci-fi film Terrore Nello Spazio, juxtaposing parallel themes of invasion and cultural conflict, loyalty and guilt. Performers clad in silver spacesuits traversed both worlds at a dizzying rate via the digital circuitry of the ever-present. They recently restaged their politically volatile 1984 piece North Atlantic. And coming up, in December 2010, is the premiere of Vieux Carre, Wooster’s sexually provocative interpretation of Tennessee Williams’ last play. Simultaneously, REDCAT supports the development of new talent and helps promote it beyond the confines of L.A. “I like to think of myself in the import/export business,” Murphy laughs. Cloud Eye Control, a local collaborative group composed of multi-media animator Miwa Matreyek, director Chi-Wang Yang, and performer/ composer Anna Oxygen was first showcased in REDCAT’s NOW festival which presents short works by young artists. Their recent full-length work Under Polaris, a hybrid of live performance and animated media that explored the perils of climate change and the survival of human history, exemplifies Murphy’s view of this decade’s emergent form — “ensemble visual theater that synthesizes cinema, music, live action, new technologies, and contemporary concerns.” Another collaborative group that embodies this approach is Caden Manson’s Big Art Group (NY) 2009, whose interplay of media driven sensory overload and frenetic live performance result in an experimental form that defies categorization. With a very different aesthetic, composer David Rosenboom and poet Martine Bellen’s international collaborative ground-breaking opera A Counterpoint of Tolerance Ah! 58

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staged in 2009 by Travis Preston, maximized REDCAT’s mission of a synthesis of radical form and radical content. Ah! placed robotic and interactive musical technologies at the service of global music, multi-lingual poetry and Buddhism, rather than visual overload. The result was an exhilarating transcendent symphony of sound, space, light, text, and image, an immersive environment in which the audience formed the outer rim of a mandala of performers. The website, mobile media, and an interactive, multi-touch BriK table in REDCAT’s lobby invited the audience to contribute words and sounds to be integrated into the whole. Alpert-Award winning poet / fiction writer Carl Hancock Rux’s solo oratorical performance work represents what Murphy sees as the other emerging direction in performance - “a move away from the in-your-face autobiography of oppression” that characterized identity politics of the 1990s, to a more “sophisticated, intellectual and symbolic approach… more CARL HANCOCK RUX complex and universal” in its cul“POESIA NEGRA: RACE, SEX AND THE MYTH tural representations. Rux’s critical OF THE AMERICAN MYTOPIA” analyses of our cultural mythologies in Poesia Negra: Race. Sex, and the Myth of the American Mytopia draw upon the rich evolution of African American oral traditions, literature and music from the Harlem Renaissance to jazz to hip-hop (April 22-24). REDCAT’s equally adventurous music and film programs are directly linked to its parent organization Cal Arts. Curated by the Music School’s faculty committee, it emphasizes visiting artists in residence who develop new works including world music, jazz, and electronics, and any number of genre-crossing hybrids. It includes annual series such as Mark Trayle’s Web fabrikmagazine.com

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THE WOOSTER GROUP – “LA DIDONNE”. PHOTO BY STEVEN GUNTHER

EIKO & KOMA & COMPANY – “CAMBODIAN STORIES”


“A COUNTERPOINT OF TOLERANCE AH! INTERACTIVE OPERA NO-OPERA” 2009. PHOTO BY SCOTT GROLLER

ANNA HALPRIN AND ANNE COLLOD, WITH MORTON SUBOTNICK 2009. PHOTO BY STEVEN GUNTHER


THROUGHTHELENS

STEVE HOROWITZ AND THE CODE ENSEMBLE ” THE TAKING OF PELHAM ONE TWO THREE” WITH “INVASION FROM THE CHICKEN PLANET” 2010. PHOTO BY STEVEN GUNTHER

CEAIT (Center for Experiments in Art, Information and Technology) Festival, a raucous sonic event of electronics and laptop computer-generated music, field recordings, electro-accoustic atmospherics, and live improvisation. John Schneider’s Harry Partch ensemble concerts feature an array of custom-built microtonal instruments. The June event will conclude with Partch’s Even Wild Horses, with African and Latin polyrhythms, tenor saxophone and sung excerpts from Rimbaud’s A Season in Hell. The resident California Ear Unit will be performing Lou Reed’s Metal Machine Music in April. The Monday night Film series, curated by Steve Anker and Berenice Reynaud, integrates a similar spread of established and newer artists, both international and local. It includes animation, narrative, documentary, abstraction, and film/performance hybrids, that represent experimental cinema from the 1960s avant-garde to current innovators, many of whom are present at the screenings. The series provides a rare opportunity to see non-commercial cinema art not otherwise easily available, by filmmakers such as Ken Jacobs, Kenneth Anger, Chris Langdon, Jennifer Reeves, whose dual-projection April 26th performance will be accompanied by live music, plus the May 10th world premier of “Starting to Go Bad” by eminent L.A. master Pat O’Neill. For more information, visit http://www.redcat.org 62

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THIS PAGE: SUMMER 2004 • 60” X 60”. MIXED MEDIA ON CANVAS NEXT PAGE: SUMMER 2005 • 60” X 60”. MIXED MEDIA ON CANVAS


INQUIRIES: 323-469-0093 | LUCLEESTEMAKER.COM


K enneth Gregg Fine Photographic Art for Interior Design 831-625-3027 | www.photographicart.com


Bayou #10 from The Hidden Voyages Project

ROB LANG www.roblangphotography.com phone: 917 608 2208


Timothy Nolan Jaime Scholnick Osvaldo Trujillo AXIS MUNDI March 20 - April 18, 2010

207 W. 5th Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 Wed. - Sun., noon - 6 p.m. 213.806.7889 www.cb1gallery.com

Lorenzo Hurtado Segovia by Deborah Calderwood April 24 - May 23, 2010


HOT & COOL LA

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WORDS LANEE NEIL

BEVERLY/LA BREA

CUBE CAFÉ AND MARKETPLACE

GIBSON STUDIO

Alex Palermo, owner of Cube Café and Marketplace, started his food reign in Los Angeles with humble beginnings — selling fresh pasta like his mom made. Divine Pasta Company was such an overwhelming success with the at-home cooks, grocery stores and restaurants that he was inspired to open a full service Italian restaurant and market with the same mission as the pasta company- fresh, authentic and homemade. In a city where restaurants come and go like the newest celebrity, Cube has remained one of the best places over the years to enjoy consistent high-quality Italian food. They use produce from the farmer's market and meats raised humanely without the use of antibiotics. And as a refreshing change to outrageous bottled water prices of most restaurants, they happily offer triple filtered sparkling or still water free of charge. Try their locally made burrata cheese, braised baby octopus appetizer, crispy thin black truffle and fried egg pizza and of course their seasonal handmade pastas. No matter if you stop by for some gourmet nibbles for a party or you simply want an elegantly executed, no-fuss meal, Cube delivers every time. 615 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-939-1148 Monday-Saturday 11 am-10:30 pm www.cubemarketplace.com 74

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Gary Gibson, LA based interior commercial and residential designer, artist, and product designer, combined all these elements and opened Gibson Studio in 2000. It incorporates his personal and design aesthetic — stainless steel and brass, woods from walnut to mahogany; and upholstered pieces that provide the perfect combination of comfort and unique design. Expanding on his belief that all products are necessary elements to create a comfortable environment, he has added to his repertoire a collection of Tibetan rugs for L.A. based Aga John Rugs. Via his interior design background and studio, he continues to create interiors for clients that are timeless and classic, but at the same time comfortable and usable. Gary explains his approach to design, “Spaces that are not just to be looked at. Contrasting surfaces, colors, and textures that excite the eye are always the goal." As excitement and play are central to the art, accessories and furniture found in his shop, from vintage to one-of-a-kind, you'll surely be inspired by a visit to Gibson Studio. 7350 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-934-4248 www.garygibson.com

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MINOTTI LOS ANGELES

TAR PIT BAR

Minotti, an Italian furniture design company for over 50 years, creates modern minimalist-oriented furnishings using exotic woods of American cherry and Italian walnut. In February 2004, Minotti Los Angeles opened in the heart of the design district making history as the first Minotti flagship showroom in the world. In collaboration with the acclaimed Architect-Designer Rodolfo Dordoni, Minotti has become an international brand of luxury Italian furnishings. A visit to Minotti LA is like a whirlwind home décor shopping tour throughout Italy without ever using your passport. If you're perplexed where to hang that gorgeous crystal chandelier by Lolli e Memmoli or place the sensuous sculpture by Milan based artist Mauro Mori, don't worry, they offer complimentary design consultations. Other highlights of showroom are the Murano glass lighting by Venini, sterling silver accessories by De Vecchi, linens by Osvaldo Santi and even fur items by Ecru.

Appropriately named after the street it's located on, Tar Pit is the latest sophisticated cocktail bar of the neighborhood, right next door to Cube. Opened by Campanile's Mark Peel and Audrey Saunders of New York's Pegu Club, Tar Pit's drink menu is creatively strong. Tar Pit is shaking up unique mixers like the Lil' Gig of yellow charteuse, tequila and Thai basil or the Jamaican Firefly of house made ginger beer, dark rum and lime juice or the favorite - Palm Frond of green chartreuse, lemon myrtle-infused gin, muddled mint, and a lemongrass stalk as a straw. With no windows to reveal its décor, one must venture in to experience the art deco space of white leather banquettes, ornate chandeliers, and a black marble bar glistening like a presidential limousine. Mixologist Audrey Saunders describes it as a "40s supper club, with some neo-tropical drinks and some Old Hollywood swellegance.” Vintage dinner menu items make a comeback as well featuring Shrimp Louis, Steak Diane and a seafood Newburg.

8936 Beverly Boulevard Los Angeles, CA 90048 310.278.6851 www.minotti-la.com

609 La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-965-1300 www.tarpitbar.com

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RE:FOCUS: EMERGING LA ARTISTS

HOT&COOLLA

EMERGING/LA WILLIAM CRISWELL WORDS DALE YOUNGMAN Billy Criswell is an LA-based sculptor and painter working in both new and found materials. He recalls his first paintings at age 5, and realized then that it was all he ever wanted to do. It was an escape for him, as his family moved often, and it allowed him to create his own world, where he could express himself without approval from anyone. But approval has not been hard to come by these days, as his works are found in many prominent collections and national publications, in more than a dozen shows, and with representation in multiple galleries. In his current JUMP series, he has created two and threedimensional works that challenge our perceptions of light, space, and form. The works appear to be caught between implosion and explosion, push and pull, collapse and release. The observer is left to decide if they are moving in, or out, through negative space. He states, “A major part of my relationship to the world is through my work – I often dream of flying, and my current work seems to want to resist gravity.” His long-term goal is to create more public installations, especially large scale sculptural works - the bigger the better. It is while making art that he feels totally comfortable and secure with himself and his place in the world. And the world is better because of it. Prints from his JUMP series will be included in an upcoming show at the International Print Center in Chelsea, NY. Criswell is also the recipient of a 2010 Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant. Billy Criswell is represented by www.freshpaintart.com. www.williamcriswell.com

DAVID A. KNUDSEN WORDS DALE YOUNGMAN David A. Knudsen (AKA DAK) began shooting pictures at age 7 and has never stopped. Seeing the world through his eyes - and his lens- gives one pause at the beauty he captures and the details most of us seem to miss. Studying architecture in college led to that becoming one of his favorite subjects, and also his best-selling series “Reflections on Architecture,” which features reflections of buildings in neighboring facades. Preferring to handle his production himself, DAK set up a digital print studio at his home in West LA, where he produces all of his gallerywrapped canvases by hand— from printing, to UV-coating, to stretching and finishing. All his giclees feature a special edge-treatment that makes the work seem to pop off the canvas. It is this kind of attention that makes one take a second and third look at the work, which can turn as simple an object as a group of street cones into a dynamic abstract print. Capturing unusual light formations, streaming blurred traffic, or the simple, organic beauty found in the textures and patterns of nature, his innovative work is in numerous high-profile corporate and individual collections. Exhibited in over twodozen shows since he began DAKshots in 2005, his view on life is one that enhances those lucky enough to own his work. DAK is one of four artists now being featured at Fabrik Projects, at 912 East 3rd Street, in downtown LA, by appointment only, through April. Call 213-458-3735 for more info. www.dakshots.com 80

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RICK ROBINSON WORDS SHANA NYS DAMBROT If you want a story, Rick Robinson’s got stories for days. In business (billboards), he charmed, challenged, cajoled, boasted, courted, and pioneered. But when it came to his personal work (of a parallel fine art career), he claimed he wasn’t really that attached; he only ever told people he trusted what his art really meant to him. “I believed the people who said I wasn’t a real artist, whatever that means, and there was no plan. I think I was afraid of screwing up; and now I’m not.” Truly, he’s got no reason to fear – with widely read publications and accolades from his industry and the art world from LA to Europe, where he recently missed an exhibition, featuring new pieces at Cologne’s BauRaum Galerie, because it opened the same day the high-profile cross-town project How Many Billboards? debuted at the MAK Centre here at home – an impressive rock-star dilemma made more so by the full-circle his patronage of this acclaimed public art (aka billboard) project represents. His personal art tends to be intimate, rough-hewn, and pared to the point of abstraction, especially compared with the attention-grabbing scale of his job, a dichotomy born of reductive syntax and impassioned, spontaneous gesture. “My whole life, all I wanted was to serve both the public and my muse. And now I know for sure that the shared root of it all – the collision of primitive communication and Pop aesthetics, the ages-old urge to make noise and make a mark, the championing of creative freedom and progressive social policy – can be ambiguous, funny, and credible all at once. It’s a paradox folks, best learn to live with it. Rick Robinson obviously has.

SEAN SOBCZAK WORDS ANDIE VILLAFAÑE Born and raised in the mid-west, Sean Sobczak moved to Los Angeles to pursue a career as a professional chef. In the summer of 2001, he attended the Burning Man Arts Festival for the first time. Deeply inspired by the boundless creativity he experienced that week, he returned to Los Angeles and began working on his first sculptural creation: a six foot tall, illuminated seahorse which would be the cornerstone of an elaborate 33-foot long mobile installation for the following summer's festival. By the time he completed the project, Sean knew he had found his life's calling in sculpture. He has since created dozens of large-scale pieces including a life-size octopus with its tentacle wrapped around a car door and a 25-foot long two-headed dragon, all of which reside in his live/work studio at the Brewery Artist colony. Composed of lights, wire and meticulously hand-sewn fabric that covers the steel frame of each piece, Sean's elaborate pieces are often inspired by the fluid aesthetic of marine life and by his affinity for welding curves. In his latest endeavor, “The Convergence Series‚” Sean's work evolves from spectacular to sophisticated with seven starburst designs that double as wall sculpture and light fixture. Measuring 4 and 5 feet in diameter, the backlit compositions create dramatic shadow effects that incorporate the wall or ceiling. Sean explores light and shadow-casting with an arrangement of geometric and organic shapes that are the result of his mastery of scale and proportion, and his innate understanding of rhythm, emphasis and unity between the parts and the whole. “Luminosity,” Sobczak's recent solo show, dazzled more than 9,000 downtown Los Angeles art-lovers with twenty-five figurative and abstract works that embodied a universe of enchantment and delight. Web fabrikmagazine.com

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DOWNTOWNHUB WORDS LANEE NEIL

LIFE CHANGE DESIGN: SKID ROW SKID ROW HOUSING TRUST (SRHT) has done it again. Just a block away from the high-priced Toyko lofts in downtown Los Angeles, the crisp white and Mediterranean blue Charles Cobb Apartments designed by Kivotos Montenegro Partners, Inc. are slated to open this month. But this time, they have expanded, or rather internalized their mission to create peaceful, visually pleasing living conditions from the inside out. In their monumental twenty year history of creating supportive permanent housing for Los Angeles' homeless, never before have they focused on interior design. In the words of the American author Bernard Malamud, “The purpose of freedom is to create it for others.” And SRHT is facilitating freedom for 76 chronically homeless adults by not just offering shelter but providing modern furnished apartments, a communal kitchen, an eco-friendly landscaped rooftop, a garden courtyard and access to social services. Skid Row Housing Trust Special Projects Director, Molly Rysman, explains the reason why sound design is paramount for successful supportive housing. “Design has always been integral to the Trust's work. We have always believed that our residents deserve to live in well-designed and functional homes, but traditionally our emphasis on design had been limited to our collaborations with architects.” For SRHT’s ribbon-cutting inauguration of the stunning Carver Apartments last fall, they partnered with local interior designers to design four rooms inspired by 84

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the tastes and interests of four current Skid Row Trust residents. “We were immediately impressed by the impact the interior design had on the apartments we provide. The Carver apartments were transformed from empty space into living, breathing homes. We are very excited to begin moving residents into the Cobb building and to see how the interior design contributes to their recovery,” says Rysman. The Cobb Apartments’ interior designer Suzanne Furst created warm and welcoming spaces throughout to encourage interaction and socialization. Art was a priority as Furst enthusiastically stated, “Being surrounded with beauty and light has a positive effect on your general outlook and well-being.” Wanting to bring the outside in, vivid mixed-media images of trees by the formerly homeless artist Pam Jacobs greet

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THE CHARLES COBB APARTMENT’S “CALUCO INNER COURTYARD”

the residents as they enter the lobby. The African accented community room in earthy orange and yellow tones framed by luxurious leather seating is stocked with games, cards and books. Communal areas on each floor are bathed in sunlight via skylights and accented with live greenery. The inner courtyard could be a luxury resort's outdoor area with its grand ocean blue umbrellas and sleek Indonesian teak benches donated by Caluco Furniture. The Cobb Apartments may just be the foundational 'design throughout' model for future projects as the next three years, Skid Row Housing Trust and Theresa Huang of Enterprise Rose Web fabrikmagazine.com

Fellowship Program will be studying effective supportive housing design. After working with thousands of formerly homeless people, SRHT is certain a well-designed living space does dramatically affect lives and soon they’ll be able to quantify just how much. For ways you can help Skid Row Trust, visit: http://www.skidrow.org CHARLES COBB APARTMENTS 521 S. San Pedro Street (Between 5th and 6th Streets) Downtown, Los Angeles

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Los Angeles

ART & DESIGN DIRECTORY Pacific Design Center Showrooms

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Art About Town by Peter Frank

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Art Gallery & Museum Directory

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Artist & Gallery Showcase

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PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

RUDIN G172 310-659-2388 arudin.com

CENTURY DESIGNER SHOWROOMS B425 310-652-5176 centuryfurniture.com

DURALEE FABRICS B601 310-360-0778 duraleefabrics.com

HOKANSON CARPET B613 310-657-8026 hokansoncarpet.com

ALMAR CARPETS INTERNATIONAL G277 310-859-1200 almarcarpets.com

CHOW'S ORIENTAL ARTS, INC. B433 310-659-6208

EBANISTA INC. G190 310-246-9170 ebanista.com

HOLLY HUNT B377 310-657-3776 hollyhunt.com

ECCOLA B211 310-360-5959 eccolaimports.com

INNOVATIONS M20 310-289-0100 innovationsusa.com

EDELMAN LEATHER G158 310-855-9355 edelmanleather.com

INTERNATIONAL DOWN AND LINEN B368 310-657-8243 internationaldownandlinen.com

ESPASSO B433 310-657-0020 espasso.com

ITALIAN LIVING/UMBRIA B455 310-775-8081 italianlivingumbria.com

EUROCONCEPTS BATH B119 310-652-3472 euroconcepts.com

J.H. MINASSIAN & CO. B139/B147 310-657-7000 jhminassian.com

EUROCONCEPTS KITCHEN B124 310-657-5391 euroconcepts.com

JANUS ET CIE B146/B193 310-652-7090 janusetcie.com

FORT STREET STUDIO B213 310-855-9832 fortstreetstudio.com

JULIA GRAY, LTD. B355 310-360-9457 juliagrayltd.com

GIATI DESIGNS B122 310-659-9924 giati.com

KNEEDLER FAUCHÈRE B600 310-855-1313

ARC-COM FABRICS, INC. B260 310-659-0376 arc-com.com ASHBURY HIDES B605 310-854-5499 ashburyhides.com ASID / LOS ANGELES B241 310-659-4716 asidla.org AST B409 310-659-9970 astfabrics.com ATELIER LAPCHI G176 310-967-0087 lapchi.com AUDIO VIDEO INTERIORS G280 310-657-0104 avinterior.com THE AVENUES M38 310-289-2534 avenuesartdesign.com BAKER KNAPP & TUBBS B525 310-652-7252 bakerfurniture.com BROWN JORDAN B445 310-659-0771 brownjordan.com BRUNSCHWIG & FILS B653 310-659-9800 brunschwig.com CBS SHOWROOM B450/B464 310-652-9180

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CJ MATSUMOTO M48 310-659-6343 COOPER-PACIFIC KITCHENS G299 310-659-6147 cooperpacific.com CORAGGIO TEXTILES B633 310-659-4295 coraggio.com COWTAN & TOUT B647 310-659-1423 cowtan.com CREATIVE ENVIRONMENTS B103 310-652-3713 CREST SIGNATURE LEATHER M33 310-854-0294 crestleather.com D' ESCOTO WEST, INC. M34 310-657-0562 descotowest.com DAKOTA JACKSON G170 310-659-7424 dakotajackson.com DAVID SUTHERLAND SHOWROOM B182 310-360-1777 davidsutherlandshowroom.com DESIGN BATH & HARDWARE B444 310-358-9669 designbath-hardware.com DESIGN SPEC FLOOR COVERINGS B418 310-859-8861 DONGHIA G196 310-657-6060 donghia.com Web fabrikmagazine.com

HAGAN FLYNN, INC. B435 310-659-2614 haganflynn.com

KRAVET B624 310-659-7100 kravet.com

HANASSAB ORIENTAL RUG IMPORTS B149 310-657-3674

LEE JOFA B639 310-659-7777 leejofa.com

HBF FURNITURE / HBF TEXTILES B270 310-652-5344 hbf.com

MAGNI DESIGN, INC B273 310-623-1623 magni.com

HERITAGE BOOK SHOP M46 310-659-3674

MARTIN PATRICK EVAN B457 310-652-2292 martinpatrickevan.com

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PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER SHOWROOMS 8687 MELROSE AVENUE, WEST HOLLYWOOD, CA 90069

MICHAEL TAYLOR DESIGNS B542 310-360-8118 michaeltaylordesigns.com

PASTON/RAWLEIGH/EVERETT M9 310-652-4060 seating-restaurant.com

S. HARRIS/FABRICUT/VERVAIN B470 310-358-0404 fabricut.com

WILDFLOWER LINEN G285 310-360-9899 wildflowerlinens.com

MICHAELIAN & KOHLBERG B502 310-360-8400 michaelian.com

PAUL FERRANTE B362 310-854-4412 paulferrante.com

THE SCHEFFEY GROUP B245 310-657-8922 thescheffeygroup.com

WILLIAM HAINES DESIGNS M32 310-288-0220 williamhaines.com

MICUCCI B209 310-360-7323 micuccicollection.com

PIERRE DEUX G152 310-657-9400 pierredeux.com

SCHUMACHER & CO./PATTERSON, FLYNN & MARTIN, ROSECORE B489 310-652-5353 fschumacher.com

WILLIAM SWITZER & ASSOCIATES B515 310-855-1135 williamswitzercollection.com

MIMI LONDON INCORPORATED G168 310-855-2567 mimilondon.com

PINDLER & PINDLER, INC. B530 310-289-0200 pindler.com

MONTANARI GROUP G281 310-659-5348 montanarigroup.com

POGGENPOHL U.S., INC. B188 310-289-4901 poggenpohl.de

MOURA STARR B547 310-854-9100 mourastarr.com

POTTERTON BOOKS G154 310-289-1247 pottertonbooksusa.com

NANCY CORZINE B305 310-652-4859 nancycorzine.com

PROVASI COLLECTION B460 310-657-3040 provasicollection.com

NASIM CARPETS B255 510-791-3035 OSBORNE & LITTLE B643 310-659-7667 osborneandlittle.com PACIFIC DESIGN SERVICES M60 310-360-6418 pacificdesigncenter.com PACIFIC HIDE AND LEATHER B447 310-657-9802 pacifichide.com PAFID B408 310-855-9808 pafid.com PANACHE DESIGNS B504 310-659-1700 panachedesigns.com

PRUDENTIAL CALIFORNIA REALTY G271 310-855-0100 prudentialcal.com QUADRILLE M21/M22 310-657-6070 quadrillefabrics.com

SOOFER GALLERY B226 310-659-3044 STARK & DARIUS RUGS B427 310-289-5200

GALLERIES CARL BERG PROJECTS

STARK CARPET CORPORATION B629 310-657-8275 starkcarpet.com SUMMIT FURNITURE, INC. B135 310-289-1266 summitfurniture.com

D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY JOHN HOUSHMAND & HOUS PROJECTS MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER PAUL YOUNG GALLERY

SUPERVISION B120 310-652-9510 supervisionav.com

SAM LEE GALLERY SEE LINE GALLERY WALTER MACIEL GALLERY

TAI PING CARPETS B400 310-652-3058 taipingcarpets.com

RALPH PUCCI WEST COAST B203 310-360-9707 ralphpucci.net

THE MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART (MOCA) Plaza 310-289-5223 moca.org

RAOUL TEXTILE LIBRARY G160 310-657-4931 raoultextiles.com

THEMA, LLC B300 310-659-8400 thema-llc.com

ROBERT ALLEN BEACON HILL B484/B499 310-659-6454 robertallendesign.com

THOMAS LAVIN B310 310-278-2456 thomaslavin.com

RODENBECK ASSOCIATES B200 310-659-1051 rodenbeck.com

VILLA SAVOIA M6 310-860-8978 villasavoiainc.com

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WOLF GORDON, INC. M5 310-652-1914 wolf-gordon.com

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ART GALLERY & MUSEUM HIGHLIGHTS

ARTABOUTTOWN WORDS PETER FRANK

CRAFT & FOLK ART MUSEUM Bold Abstractions: Textiles from Central Asia and Iran AND The Fool’s Journey: The History and Symbolism of the Tarot THRU MAY 9

From time immemorial, the Silk Road has tied together the various edges of the eastern hemisphere and allowed cultural and economic cross-pollination among the most disparate of civilizations. Any chunk of artifacture from this lifeline is going to be pretty juicy, but the textiles collected in “Bold Abstractions,” including objects produced between the mid-19th and mid-20th centuries along the Silk Road itself, provide a particularly delightful jolt to the eye. Whether produced for the body, the home, or the open air, these dyed robes, embroidered rugs, felt tent adornments, bejeweled utensils, and other objects bespeak a rich tradition of decoration at the same time as they provide inherent optical and tactile delight. Similarly, the elaborate deck of cards that comprises the Tarot has invited the invention of countless artists since its emergence in the Italian Renaissance. “The Fool’s Journey” collects examples of and variations on the standard Tarot as conceived and fashioned by anonymous artisans and contemporary visual artists alike. At the same time, the show opens up the meaning(s) of the arcane practice, demonstrating the sources of the imagery and their evolution across a tumultuous, often skeptical, but always responsive demi-millennium. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.cafam.org LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART (LACMA) Renoir in the 20th Century THRU MAY 9

If Pierre-Auguste Renoir is your aunt’s favorite impressionist, the works he painted in the lat90

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ter part of his career are, if anything, dealbreakers for her. Gone is his rich, glowing palette, his complex compositions, and his embrace of everyday life. Instead, the work he did after breaking with impressionism and turning toward a more classicized view of the world is filled with oranges and light browns, still lifes and solitary figures, and a self-consciousness about Art and Picture-making. The only thing left from the Renoir of downstairsbathroom posters is the light, nervous brushstroke, more feathery than ever. The portraits of Gabrielle glow fairly readily with a gentle erotic charm, but in our neo-prudish era even they are freighted by their dirty-old-man subtext. Well, this survey insists, get over it. Renoir’s later accomplishments are worth a look on their own, and, in bulk, the logic of their stylizations and, in particular, the mastery of their craft make them that much more persuasive and that much more attractive. Renoir’s harlequins and huntsmen and harem girls may have been tired motifs even when he painted them a hundred years ago, but he painted them really well. If you don’t like the pictures, look at the paint. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.lacma.org LOS ANGELES COUNTY MUSEUM OF ART (LACMA) American Stories: Paintings of Everyday Life, 1765-1915 THRU MAY 23

Americans are storytellers – which accounts for everything from the early emergence of American literature to the triumph of Hollywood. It also accounts for a dramatic flair in our picture-making, even – perhaps especially – when reporting on real life. Our painters know how to put the viewer in the picture, whether it’s an image of saving a sailor from a shark or of a husband and wife sharing a meal. Light is one thing painters as

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ART GALLERY & MUSEUM HIGHLIGHTS

diverse as John Singleton Copley, Thomas Eakins, and Mary Cassatt knew how to shape and focus; detail, whether handled by George Caleb Bingham, Winslow Homer, or John Singer Sargent, is also directed toward the projection of a vivid narrative experience. A collection of such persuasive pictures – some of which, at least, are among the iconic works of the American visual experience – is as exciting, and endearing, as anything Pixar can conjure. “American Stories” goes to great lengths to inform us of the painters’ extra-artistic intent. Like the Dutch artists who influenced them, and in accordance with their own society’s emphasis on righteousness and struggle with hypocrisy, American artists between the Revolution and World War I were preoccupied with virtues such as domesticity, piousness, and social harmony. But running throughout as well was a counter-stream that championed wildness, individuality, and social justice. It’s quite a ride. For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.lacma.org SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART

static technologies to bring our attention both to the subject matter and to the technologies themselves. In a certain way, Thater’s ultimate subject matter is how our machines re-orient how we see. “Between Science and Magic,” in fact, deals quite frankly in illusion – not just the illusion of the projected moving image, but in this case the illusion being perpetrated within that image, an illusion whose own art and craft is as old as humankind itself. To us, nothing represents “magic” more than a guy in tails with a wand pulling a white rabbit out of a top hat. Thater filmed a magician performing this classic sleight-of-hand in her studio, then projected the film onto an ornate stage and refilmed that projection – from two different cameras, one in motion that exposes not the magician’s artifice but the cameras’. No video or any other more contemporary recording method was used; the two projectors in the gallery space roll away making their characteristic, but now exotic, racket. As well, no animals were harmed in the process of making the work; indeed, in the repetition of the magician image, our attention shifts from the magician himself to the white rabbit he handles gently.

Diana Thater: Between Science and Art THRU APRIL 17

One of our leading “media artists,” Diana Thater overlays levels and generation of non-

For more information, please visit their website at: http://www.smmoa.org

THE SKETCHERS, 1914 JOHN SINGER SARGENT OIL ON CANVAS 22 X 28 INCHES VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, RICHMOND THE ARTHUR AND MARGARET GLASGOW FUND © VIRGINIA MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS PHOTO BY WEN HWA TS'AO ON VIEW AT LACMA THRU MAY 23

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS 1301PE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 938-5822 http://www.1301pe.com

ACME 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5942 http://www.acmelosangeles.com

ANGSTROM GALLERY 2622 S La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 204-3334 http://www.angstromgallery.com

18TH STREET ARTS CENTER 1651 18th St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-3711 http://www.18thStreet.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-5pm; Saturday, 1-5pm

ACUNA-HANSEN GALLERY 427 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 441-1624 http://www.ahgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm

ANNA HELWING GALLERY 2766 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 202-2213 http://www.annahelwing.com

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ADAMSON-DUVANNES GALLERIES 484 S. San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 653-1015 http://www.justpaintings.net Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't.

533 S. Los Angeles St. 2nd Floor Downtown LA, CA 213-627-1541 57 UNDERGROUND 300 C. So. Thomas St. Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-0218 http://www.57underground.com Thurs. by appointment, Fri.-Sun., 12pm-4pm A SHENERE VELT GALLERY 1525 S. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 552-2007 http://www.circlesocal.org A STUDIO GALLERY 4260 Lankershim Blvd. Studio City, CA 91602 (818) 980-9100 http://www.astudiogallery.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-4pm; Fri., 9am-12noon; & by app't.

ABACOT GALLERY 970 N. Broadway, Suite 201 (Mandarin Plaza) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-1599 http://www.abacotgallery.com ACE GALLERY BEVERLY HILLS INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 9430 Wilshire Blvd. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 858-9090 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm ACE GALLERY LOS ANGELES INSTITUTE OF CONTEMPORARY ART 5514 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 935-4411 http://www.acegallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

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AMBROGI | CASTANIER GALLERY 300-302 N. Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 652-5511 http://www.ambrogicastaniergallery.com Mon.-Sat., 10:30am-6:30pm AMERICAN MUSEUM OF CERAMIC ART 340 S. Garey Ave Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 865-3146 http://www.ceramicmuseum.org Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm

A+D ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN MUSEUM 5900 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 http://www.aplusd.org

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ALTERED SPACE GALLERY 1221 Abbot Kinney Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 452-8121 http://www.alteredspacela@aol.com

ANDLAB 600 Moulton Ave., #303 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 222-2225 http://www.ANDLAB.com/art Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm ANDREWSHIRE GALLERY 3850 Wilshire Blvd., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 389-2601 http://www.andrewshiregallery.com ANGELS GATE CULTURAL CENTER 3601 S. Gaffey St San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 519-0936 http://angelsgateart.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-4pm ANGLES GALLERY 22222 & 2230 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-5019 http://www.anglesgallery.com

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ANOTHER YEAR IN LA 2121 N. San Fernando Rd., #13 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-4000 http://www.anotheryearinla.com APPLEGATE GALLERY 3101-A Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-7600 http://www.applegallery.com ARC 2529 W. Magnolia, Burbank, CA 91505 (818) 848-9998 http://www.czappa.com Tues.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat., 9am-3pm ARMORY CENTER FOR THE ARTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 792-5101 http://www.armoryarts.org ARMSTRONG'S 150 E. Thrid St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-6464 http://www.armstronggallery.net Tues.-Sat. 9am-4:30pm, Second Saturday of month 9am-9pm ART CENTER COLLEGE OF DESIGN 1700 Lida St. Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 396-2446 http://www.artcenter.edu/williamson Tues-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., 12-9pm ART PIC 6826 Troost Ave. No. Hollywood, CA 91605 (818) 503-5999 http://www.artpic2000.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5pm ARTPEACE GALLERY 2317 W. Magnolia Blvd. Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 846-8688 http://www.artpeacegallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-5pm

ARTY 634 S. Main St. Downtown LA, CA 213-213-7829

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS ASIAN SPIRIT 8797 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-3888 http://www.asianspiritgallery.com

BILLY SHIRE FINE ARTS 5790 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 297-0600 http://www.billyshirefinearts.com

ASTO GALLERY 923 E. 3rd St., #107 Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 972-0995 http://www.astomoa.org

BLACK MARIA GALLERY 3137 Glendale Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 660-9393 http://blackmariagallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER:MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN WEST 4700 Western Heritage Way (in Griffith Park adjacent to L.A. Zoo) Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 667-2000 http://www.autrynationalcenter.org

BLK/MRKT GALLERY 6009 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-1989 http://www.blkmrktgallery.com Tues.-Fri., 11am-6pm; Sat., 12-6pm BLUEBIRD ART HOUSE 6747 Bright Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 696-9493 http://www.bluebirdarthouse.com

AUTRY NATIONAL CENTER: SOUTHWEST MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN Corner of Marmion Way and Museum Dr Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 221-2164 http://www.southwestmuseum.org

BLUM & POE GALLERY 2754 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-2062 http://www.blumandpoe.com

AVENUE 50 STUDIO 131 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 258-1435 http://www.avenue50studio.com AZTEC/NIGHT OWL ART GALLERIES 311 and 305 W. Foothill Blvd. Monrovia, CA 91016 (626) 574-0503 Weds-Sun., 1:30-5:30pm; Night Owl hours, 11am-1am BANDINI ART 2635 S. Fairfax Ave. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 837-6230 http://bandiniart.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm; & by app't. BARNSDALL ART PARK EXHIBITIONS 4800 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 644-6275 Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; first Fridays, 12-9pm

BOBBIE GREENFIELD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.bobbiegreenfieldgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm BONELLI GALLERY 936 Mei Ling Way Los Angeles, CA 90012 BOWERS MUSEUM 2002 N. Main St Santa Ana, CA 92706 (714) 567-3643 http://www.bowers.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-4pm; fourth Thursday of each month, 10am-8pm

BERT GREEN FINE ART 102 West 5th St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-624-6212 http://www.bgfa.us/

BRAND LIBRARY ART GALLERY 1601 West Mountain St. Glendale, CA 91201 (818) 548-2051 http://www.brandlibrary.org Tues. & Thurs., 12-9pm; Weds., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-5pm

BILL LOWE GALLERY 2034 Broadway Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-0184 http://www.lowegallery.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm; & by app't.

BUSCHLEN MOWATT GALLERIES 45-188 Portola Ave Palm Desert, CA 92260 (760) 837-9668 http://www.buschlenmowatt.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 11am-5pm; & by app't.

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CAL POLY POMONA DOWNTOWN CENTER 300 W. Second St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-0080 http://www.class.csupomona.edu/downtowncenter Tues.-Sat., 11am-8pm; 2nd Sats., 1-9pm CAL POLY POMONA KEITH & JANET KELLOGG 3801 W. Temple Ave Pomona, CA 91768 (909) 869-4302 http://www.csupomona.edu/~kellogg_gallery Tues.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Sat., 12-4pm CAL STATE L.A.--LUCKMAN GALLERY 5151 State University Dr Los Angeles, CA 90032 (323) 343-6604 http://www.luckmanfineartscomplex.org Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 12-5pm CALIFORNIA HERITAGE MUSEUM 2612 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8537 http://www.californiaheritagemuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-4pm CANVAS BOUTIQUE AND GALLERY 23410 Civic Center Way Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 317-9895 http://www.canvassneakersandgallery.com Sun.-Thurs., 11am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 11am-7pm

CARL BERG PROJECTS Pacific Design Center, Stes. #B315 & B380 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 www.carlbergprojects.com 323-286-9059 CARMICHAEL GALLERY OF CONTEMPORARY ART 1257 N. La Brea Ave West Hollywood, CA 90038 (323) 969-0600 http://www.carmichaelgallery.com Weds.-Sun., 2-7pm

CB1 GALLERY 207 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-806-7889 www.cb1gallery.com CENTER FOR THE ARTS, EAGLE ROCK 2225 Colorado Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90041 (323) 226-0949 http://www.centerartseaglerock.org

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS CHARLIE JAMES GALLERY 975 Chung King Road Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-0844 http://www.cjamesgallery.com CHERRY AND MARTIN 12611 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 398-7404 http://www.cherryandmartin.com CHINA ART OBJECTS GALLERIES 933 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0384 http://www.chinaartobjects.com CHINESE AMERICAN MUSEUM 125 Paseo de la Plaza Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-5240 CHRISTOPHER GRIMES GALLERY 916 Colorado Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 587-3373 http://www.cgrimes.com CHUNG KING PROJECT 936 Chung King Rd. (in Chinatown) Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1802 http://www.chungkingproject.com CIRCUS GALLERY 7065 Lexington Ave Los Angeles, CA 90038 (323) 962-8506 http://www.circus-gallery.com

CLASSIC ARTFORMS 9009 Beverly Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 273-6306

CREATIVE GALLERIES 3210 Helms Ave Culver City, CA 90034 (310) 837-4531 Mon.-Fri., 10am-7pm; Sat., Sun., 10am-6pm

COLLEGE OF THE CANYONS ART GALLERY 26455 Rockwell Canyon Rd Santa Clarita, CA 91355 (661) 362-3612 http://www.canyons.edu/offices/artgallery Tues.-Thurs., 11am-3pm; Sat., 10am-2pm

CREWEST 110 Winston Street Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-627-8272 info@crewest.com

COMMISSARY ARTS 68 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 990-9914 http://www.commissaryarts.com Thursday & Friday 12-5pm; Saturday 12-6pm; and by appointment COMPACT SPACE 105 E. 6th St Los Angeles, CA 90014 626-676-0627 http://www.compactspace.com COPRO/NASON GALLERY 2525 Michingan Ave., T-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 398-2643 http://www.copronason.com COREY HELFORD GALLERY 8522 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 287-2340 http://www.coreyhelfordgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

CRACK GALLERY

CIRRUS GALLERY 542 S. Alameda Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 680-3473 http://www.cirrusgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

204 W. 6th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-622-3493

CITY OF BREA GALLERY #1 Civic Center Circle Brea, CA 92821 (714) 990-7730 http://www.breagallery.com Weds., Thurs., Sun., 12-5pm, Fri., Sat., 12-8pm

CRAIG GALLERY 5723 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90019 (323) 939-0351 http://www.craiggallery.com Fri., Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't.

CLAREMONT GRADUATE 251 E. 10th St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8071

CRAIG KRULL GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6410 http:// www.artnet.com/ckrull.html Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

CLAREMONT MUSEUM OF ART The Packing House, 536 W. First St. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-3200 http://www.claremontmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-7pm

CREATIVE ARTS CENTER GALLERY 1100 W. Clark Ave Burbank, CA 91506 (818) 238-5397 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-8pm; Fri., 9am-4pm; Sat., hours vary

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CROSSROADS SCHOOL FOR ARTS AND SCIENCES 1714 21st St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't. CSU CHANNEL ISLANDS ART GALLERY 92 Palm Dr. Camarillo, CA 93010 (805) 437-8863 http://art.csuci.edu/gallery Mon.-Fri., 10am-4pm CSU FULLERTON ART GALLERY 800 N. State College Blvd. Fullerton, CA 92634 (714) 278-3262 http://www.arts.fullerton.edu/events Tues.-Fri., 12-4pm; Sat., 12-2pm CSU LONG BEACH UNIVERSITY ART MUSEUM 1250 Bellflower Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90840 (562) 985-5761 http://www.csulb.edu/uam Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm, Thurs., 12-8pm CSU NORTHRIDGE UNIVERSITY ART GALLERY 18111 Nordhoff St. Northridge, CA 91330 (818) 677-2156 http://www.csun.edu/artgalleries/ Mon.-Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-8pm D & D GALLERY 311 W. Seventh St. San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 831-2940 http://www.dandgallery.com Daily, noon-6pm D.E.N. CONTEMPORARY ART Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue, #B275, 2nd Floor West Hollywood, CA 90069 DA CENTER FOR THE ARTS 252 D S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 397-9716 http://www.dacenter.org

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS DANIEL CLAYTON GALLERY 513 N Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-5310 DANIEL HUG GALLERY 510 Bernard St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 221-0016 http://www.danielhug.com DANIEL SAXON GALLERY 552 Norwich Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-6033 DANIEL WEINBERG GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd., #8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 954-8425 http://www.danielweinberggallery.com DAVID KORDANSKY GALLERY 510 Bernard St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 222-1482 http://www.davidkordanskygallery.com DAVID PATTON LOS ANGELES 5006 1/2 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 478-1966 http://www.davidpattonlosangeles.com DAVID SALOW GALLERY 977 N. Hill St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 620-0240 http://www.davidsalowgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm DAWSON COLE FINE ART 313 N. Beverly Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 275-6060 http://www.dawsoncolefineart.com DBA256 GALLERY 256 S. Main St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 623-7600 http://www.dba256.com Mon.-Thurs., 8am-10pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-midnight DCA FINE ART 3107 Pico Blvd Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 396-8565 http://www.dcafineart.com DE SOTO GALLERY 2635 Fairfax Avenue Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 253-2255 http://www.desotogallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm & by app't

DEBORAH MARTIN GALLERY 209 W. 5th St, Los Angeles, CA 90013 213-428-6464 http://deborahmartingallery.com/info.html DEBORAH PAGE GALLERY 1028 Montana Avenue Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 458-4400 http://www.deborahpagegallery.com Tues.-Sun., 11am-6pm DEL MANO GALLERY 11981 San Vicente Blvd West Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 476-8508 http://www.delmano.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm DENENBERG FINE ARTS 417 North San Vicente Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 360-9360 http://www.denenbergfinearts.com DF2 GALLERY 314 N. Crescent Heights Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 782-9404 http://www.df2gallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

DIALECT 215 W. 6th St. #111 Downtown LA, CA 213-627-7599 info@downtowndialect.com DNJ GALLERY 154 1/2 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 931-1311 http://dnjgallery.net Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm

DUNCAN MILLER GALLERY 10959 Venice Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-2440 http://www.duncanmillergallery.com EARL MCGRATH GALLERY 454 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 657-4257 http://www.earlmcgrathgallery.com EDGEMAR CENTER FOR THE ARTS 2437 Main St Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 399-3666 http://www.edgemarcenter.org Mon.-Fri., 11am-5:30pm EDWARD CELLA ART+ARCHITECTURE 6018 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 525-0053 http://www.edwardcella.com Tues.-Sun, 11am-5pm EL CAMINO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 16007 Crenshaw Blvd Torrance, CA 90506 (310) 660-3010 http://www.elcamino.edu/commadv/artgallery Mon., Tues., 10am-3pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-8pm; Fri., 10am-2pm

EL NOPAL PRESS 109 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-239-0417

DOWNEY MUSEUM OF ART 10419 So. Rives Ave Downey, CA 90241 (562) 861-0419 http://www.thedmoa.org Weds., 3-7pm; Thurs.Fri., 1-5pm; DOWNTOWN ART CENTER GALLERY 828 S Main Street Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-7374 http://www.dacgallery.com DOWNTOWN ART GALLERY 1611 So. Hope St. Los Angeles, CA 90015 (213) 255-2067 http://www.downtownag.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm

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DRKRM. 2121 San Fernando Rd., #3 Los Angeles, CA 90065 (323) 223-6867 http://www.drkrm.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm Sun., 1pm-4pm and by appointment

ERNIE WOLFE GALLERY 1653 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 473-1645 EXPOSITION PARK MUSEUMS 900 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90007 (213) 763-3515 http://www.nhm.org FAHEY/KLEIN GALLERY 148 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 934-2250 http://www.faheykleingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm FARMLAB 1745 N. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 226-1158 http://www.farmlab.org Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS FEDERAL ART PROJECT 316 W. 2nd St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 http://www.dacgallery.com

FROGTOWN GALLERY 1625 Blake Ave Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 226-0356 http://www.romerostudio.net Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; & by app't.

FIFTY/24 LA GALLERY 125 E. 6th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-623-4300

FULLERTON COLLEGE ART GALLERY 321 E. Chapman Ave., Building 1000 Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 992-7434 http://art.fullcoll.edu Mon.-Thurs., Sat., 10am-2pm; Weds, 5-7pm

FIG 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-0345 http://www.figgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-5pm

FULLERTON MUSEUM CENTER 301 N. Pomona Ave Fullerton, CA 92832 (714) 738-6545 http://www.cityoffullerton.com/depts/museum Tues.-Sun., 12-4; Thurs., 12-8pm

FINE ART FACTORY 474 S. Raymond Ave., Suite 110 Pasadena, CA 91105 (818) 356-0474

GAGOSIAN GALLERY 456 N. Camden Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-9400 http://www.gagosian.com

FOUND GALLERY 1903 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 FOWLER MUSEUM AT UCLA 405 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 825-4361 http://www.fowler.ucla.edu Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm; Thurs. 12-8pm FRANK LLOYD GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., B5b Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-3866 http://www.franklloyd.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm FRANK PICTURES GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-0211 http://www.frankpicturesgallery.com FREDERICK R. WEISMAN MUSEUM AT PEPPERDINE UNIVERSITY 24255 Pacific Coast Highway Malibu, CA 90265 (310) 506-4851 http://arts.pepperdine.edu/museum FRESH PAINT 9355 Culver Blvd., Suite B Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-9355 http://www.freshpaintart.com Mon.-Thurs., 9am-6pm; Fri., 8am-12 noon; & by app't FRINGE EXHIBITIONS 504 Chung King Ct. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 613-0160 http://www.fringeexhibitions.com

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GALERIE MICHAEL 430 N. Rodeo Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 273-3377 GALERIE MOURLOT 8763 Rosewood Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 855-9581 http://www.galeriemourlot.com GALLERY 13: IRISH FINE ART 8302 Melrose Ave., Unit A West Hollywood, CA 90069 (323) 951-0303 http://www.gallery13.net Wed.-Sat 11am-6pm or call for an app’t. GALLERY 1927 at the Fine Arts Building 811 West Seventh St. Los Angeles, CA 90017 661-816-1136 http://www.gallery1927.com/ GALLERY 33 EAST 3202 E. Broadway Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 433-1496 http://gallery33east.com Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm G727 727 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-627-9563 http://www.gallery727losangeles.com GALLERY BROWN 140 S. Orlando Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323-651-1956

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GALLERY AT REDCAT 631 W. Second St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 237-2800 http://www.redcat.org GALLERY FILE 102 W. 5th St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 624-6212 Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm; 2nd Thurs., 12pm-9pm. GARY LEONARD TAKE MY PICTURE 860 S. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90014 213-622-2256 http://takemypicture.com GALLERY LUISOTTI 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0043 GALLERY NUCLEUS 30 West Main St Alhambra, CA 91801 (626) 458-7482 http://www.gallerynucleus.com GALLERY REVISITED 3204 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (626) 253-5266 http://www.galleryrevisited.com GEMINI G.E.L. 8365 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-0513 http://www.geminigel.com Mon.-Fri., 9am-5:30pm; Sat. by app't. GEORGE BILLIS GALLERY L.A. 2716 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 838-3685 http://www.georgebillis.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't. GEORGE J. DOIZAKI GALLERY 244 S. San Pedro St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-2725 http://www.jaccc.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat. & Sun., 11am-4pm GEORGE STERN FINE ARTS 8920 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (800) 501-6885 http://www.sternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-6pm GIDEON GALLERY LTD. 8748 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-4194

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS GLU GALLERY 7424 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-0510 http://www.glugallery.com Fri., 12-5pm: Sat., 11am-5pm; Sun., 12-5pm GLASS GARAGE FINE ART 414 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 659-5228 http://www.glassgaragegallery.com GLENDALE COLLEGE GALLERY 1500 Verdugo Rd Glendale, CA 91208 (818) 240-1000 http://www.glendale.edu/artgallery GR2 2062 Sawtelle Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90025 (310) 445-9276 http://www.gr2.net GREENFIELD SACKS 2525 Michigan Ave., #B6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-0640 http://www.greenfieldsacks.com GREY MCGEAR GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-0925 GRIER MUSSER MUSEUM 403 So. Bonnie Brae Los Angeles, CA 90057 (213) 413-1814 GRIFFIN 2902 Nebraska Ave Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 586-6886 http://www.griffinla.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't. HAMILTON GALLERIES 1431 Ocean Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 451-9983 http://www.hamiltongalleries.com Tues.-Sun., 12-7pm HAMILTON-SELWAY FINE ART 8678 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 657-1711 http://www.hamiltonselway.com HAPPY LION GALLERY 963 Chung King Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-1360 http://www.thehappylion.com

HARVEST GALLERY 938 N. Brand Blvd. Glendale, CA 91206 (818) 546-1000

IKON LIMITED FINE ARTS 2525 Michigan Ave., G-4 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-6629 http://www.ikonltd.com

HELFEN FINE ARTS 9200 W. Olympic Blvd., Suite 200 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 (310) 273-8838 http://www.helfenfinearts.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by appt. HENKEN GALLERY 120 S. Los Angeles St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-2505 http://www.thehenkengallery.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-10pm; Sun. by app't. HERITAGE GALLERY 1300 Chautauqua Blvd Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 230-4340 http://www.heritagegallery.com HIGH ENERGY CONSTRUCTS – SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill St., #180 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-7920 http://www.highenergyconstructs.com HONOR FRASER 2622 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 401-0191 http://www.honorfraser.com HOWELL GREEN FINE ART GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 107 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-3991 http://www.howellgreen.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6; & by app't. HUNTINGTON BEACH ART CENTER 538 Main Street Huntington Beach, CA 92647 (714) 374-1650 http://www.surfcity-hb.org/Visitors/art_center Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; Thurs., 12-8pm; Sun., 12-4pm HUNTINGTON LIBRARY 1151 Oxford Rd San Marino, CA 91108 (626) 405-2100 http://www.huntington.org I-5 GALLERY AT THE BREWERY ART COLONY 2100 N. Main St., #A-9 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 342-0717 http://www.breweryartwalk.com Fri.-Sat., 12-4pm; & by app't.

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ITALIAN CULTURAL INSTITUTE — SPAZIO ITALIA 1023 Hilgard Ave Los Angeles, CA 90024 (310) 443-3250 http://www.iiclosangeles.esteri.it/IIC_Losangeles Mon.-Fri., 9:30am-5pm ITURRALDE GALLERY 116 S. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-4267 http://artscenecal.com/Iturralde.html Tues.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sat. by app't. JACK HANLEY GALLERY 9945 Sun Mun Way Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 626-0403 http://www.jackhanley.com JACK RUTBERG FINE ARTS 357 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-5222 http://www.jackrutbergfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 10am-5pm JAIL 965 N. Vignes St., 5A Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 621-9567 http://www.thejailgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm JAMES GRAY GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-4 (Bergamot Station) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-9502 http://www.jamesgraygallery.com JAN KESNER GALLERY 164 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 938-6834 http: //www.jankesnergallery.com JANCAR GALLERY 3875 Wilshire Blvd. #1308 Los Angeles, CA 90010 (213) 384-8077 http://www.jancargallery.com Thu.-Sat 12noon-5pm and by app't. JAPANESE AMERICAN NATIONAL MUSEUM 369 E. 1st St Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 625-0414 http://www.janm.org

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS JFERRARI GALLERY 3015 Glendale Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 877-5542 http://www.jferrarigallery.com Tues.-Sun., 12-5pm JK GALLERY 2632 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-3330 http://www.jkgallery.net Wed.-Sat., 11am-6pm

KONTAINER GALLERY 6130 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-4746 http://www.kontainergallery.com

L.A. COUNTY ARBORETUM 301 N. Baldwin Ave Arcadia, CA 91007 (626) 821-3232 http://www.arboretum.org

KOPEIKIN GALLERY 8810 Melrose Avenue West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 385-5894 http://www.kopeikingallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't

L.A. GAY & LESBIAN CENTER THE ADVOCATE GALLERY 1125 N. McCadden Pl. Los Angeles, CA 90038 (323) 860-7337

JONATHAN KENT GALLERY 474 N Robertson Blvd West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 657-5727 http://www.artkent.com

KOPLIN DEL RIO GALLERY 6031 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-9055 http://www.koplindelrio.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-5:30pm; Sat., 11am-5:30pm

JUDSON GALLERY 200 S. Avenue 66 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 255-0131 http://www. judsonstudios.com Mon.-Fri., 10am-3pm

KRISTI ENGLE GALLERY 5002 York Ave Los Angeles, CA 90042 (213) 629-2358 http://www.kristienglegallery.com

JUNC 4017 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 814-2640 http://www.juncgallery.com Fri., 1-6pm; Sat. & Sun., 12-7pm; & by app't.

L.A. ARTCORE/ARTCORE BREWERY ANNEX 120 N. Judge John Aiso St. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-3274 http://www.laartcore.org Weds.-Sun., 12-5pm

KANTOR ART 205 S. Beverly Dr. Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 274-6499 http://www.kantorart.com KAREN LYNNE GALLERY 216 N. Canon Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 858-8202 http://www.karenlynnegallery.com KARYN LOVEGROVE GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd.#8 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 525-1755 http://www.karynlovegrovegallery.com KINKEAD CONTEMPORARY 6029 Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-7400 http://www.kinkeadcontemporary.com KLAPPER GALLERY 8759 Beverly Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 652-6552 http://www.klappergallery.com

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LA ART HOUSE 8825 Beverly Blvd., West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 205-0480 http://www.laarthouse.net Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat.-Sun. by app't L.A. ARTS OF ASIA & TRIBAL ARTS SHOW 1855 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 455-2886 http://www.caskeylees.com

LA CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART 107 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-629-1102 L.A. CITY COLLEGE DA VINCI ART GALLERY 855 N. Vermont Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 953-4220 LA CONTEMPORARY 2634 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6200 http://www.lacontemporary.com

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L.A. LOUVER GALLERY 45 N. Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-4955 http://www.lalouver.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm L.A. MODERNISM SHOW 1855 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (818) 244-1126 http://www.lamodernism.com L2 KONTEMPORARY 990 N. Hill St., #205 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 225-1288 http://www.L2kontemporary.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm; & by app't. LA LUZ DE JESUS 4633 Hollywood Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 666-7667 http://www.laluzdejesus.com LA SIERRA UNIVERSITY BRAND STATER GALLERY 4700 Pierce St Riverside, CA 92515 (951) 785-2959 http://www.lasierra.edu/art Mon.-Thurs., 9am-4pm; Sun., 2-5pm LACE 6522 Hollywood Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90028 (323) 957-1777 http://www.welcometolace.org Weds.-Sun., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm LACMA 5905 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 857-6111 http://www.lacma.org/ Mon., Tues., Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., 12-9pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-8pm LARRY SMITH FINE ART 8642 Melrose Ave West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 360-9135

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS 129 E. 6th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-488-0313

LITTLE BIRD GALLERY 3195 Glendale Blvd, Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 662-1092 http://www.littlebirdgallery.com

M+B 612 N. Almont Dr. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 550-0050 http://www.mbfala.com

LATIN AMERICAN MASTERS 264 N. Beverly Dr Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 271-4847 http://www.latinamericanmasters.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

LIZABETH OLIVERIA GALLERY 2712 S. La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 837-1073 http://www.lizabetholiveria.com

MACHINE PROJECT 1200 D N. Alvarado Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 483-8761 http://www.machineproject.com

LM PROJECTS

MADISON GALLERY 1020 Prospect Suite 130 LaJolla, California 92037 (858) 459-0836 http://www.madisongalleries.com

THE LAST LAUGH

LATINO ART MUSEUM 281 S. Thomas St., Suite 105 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-6009 http://www.lamoa.net

125 W. 4th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-621-4055 LMAN GALLERY 949 Chung King Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-3883 http://www.lmangallery.com

THE LATINO MUSEUM 514 S. Spring St. Downtown LA, CA 213-626-7600 LAWRENCE ASHER GALLERY 5820 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 935-9100 http://www.lawrenceasher.com Tues.-Thurs., 11am-6pm; Fri., 11am-7pm; Sat., 12-5pm; & by app't LAXART 2640 S. La Cienega Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 868-5893 http://www.laxart.org LEFT COAST GALLERIES 12324 Ventura Blvd Studio City, CA 91604 (818) 760-7010 http://www.leftcoastgalleries.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm; Sun., 12-6pm; & by appointment LESLIE SACKS FINE ART 11640 San Vicente Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 820-9448 http://www.lesliesacks.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-6pm LIGHTBOX 2656 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-1111 http://www.lightbox.tv LIONESS GALLERY 3032 Sunset Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90026 (818) 252-7168 http://www.lionessartgallery.com Sat., 12-5pm; and by app't.

LONG BEACH CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 4901 E. Carson St. Long Beach, CA 90808 (562) 938-4817 LONG BEACH MUSEUM OF ART 2300 E. Ocean Blvd. Long Beach, CA 90803 (562) 439-2119 http://www.lbma.org Tues.-Sun., 11am-5pm LORA SCHLESINGER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-1133 http://www.loraschlesinger.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm LOS ANGELES CENTER FOR DIGITAL ART (LACDA) 107 W. Fifth St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (323) 646-9427 http://www.lacda.com Weds.-Sat., 12-5pm LOUIS STERN FINE ARTS 9002 Melrose Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-0147 http://www.louissternfinearts.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm LOUWE GALLERY 306 Hawthorne St. So. Pasadena, CA 91030 (626) 799-5551 http://www.louwegallery.com M. HANKS GALLERY 3008 Main St. Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 392-8820 http://mhanksgallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm; & by app't.

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MAK CENTER FOR ART AND ARCHITECTURE L.A. 835 N. Kings Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 651-1510 http://www.makcenter.org Weds.-Sun., 11am-6pm MANDARIN GALLERY 970 N. Broadway Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 687-4107 http://www.mandaringallery.com MANNY SILVERMAN GALLERY 619 Almont Dr West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 659-8256 MARC FOXX GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 857-5571 http://www.marcfoxx.com MARC SELWYN FINE ART 6222 Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 933-9911 http://www.marcselwynfineart.com MARGO LEAVIN GALLERY 812 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 273-0603 MARY GOLDMAN GALLERY 932 Chung King Rd Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 617-8217 http://www.marygoldman.com

MARTIN & LOZANO GALLERY 302 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA www.martinlozano.com 310-358-0617

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS MC 6088 Comey Ave Los Angeles, CA 90034 (323) 939-3777 http://www.mckunst.com MEDEA GALLERY 445 W. 7th St., San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 833-3831 http://www.medeagallery.com Mon.-Fri.: 9am-5pm and by appt. METRO GALLERY 1835 Hyperion Ave Los Angeles, CA 90027 (323) 663-2787 http://www.metrogallery.org

215 W. 6th St. # 109 Downtown LA, CA

MICHAEL HITTLEMAN GALLERY 8797 Beverly Blvd., #302 Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 655-5364 http://www.michaelhittlemangallery.com Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm; Sunday, 1-5pm MICHAEL KOHN GALLERY 8071 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 658-8088 http://www.kohngallery.com

MORONO KIANG GALLERY 218 W. 3rd St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 628-8208 http://www.moronokiang.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm MORYORK GALLERY 4959 York Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90042 http://www.claregraham.com/MorYork.html MOSS 8444 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (323) 866-5260 http://www.mossonline.com Tuesday-Saturday 11am-7pm MOUNT ST. MARY'S COLLEGE JOSE DRUDIS-BIADA GALLERY 12001 Chalon Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 954-4360 http://www.msmc.la.edu/pages/1897.asp Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm

MILO GALLERY 6130 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 935-3662 http://www.milogallery.net Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm MIXOGRAFIA 1419 E. Adams Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90011 (323) 232-1158 http://www.mixografia.com Mon.-Fri., 11am- 5pm; & by app't. MLA GALLERY 2020 N. Main St., #239 Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 222-3400 http://www.mlagallery.com MOCA 250 S. Grand Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 62-MOCA-2 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thursday, 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed.

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MOCA PACIFIC DESIGN CENTER 8687 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 289-5223 http://www.moca.org

MOCKHOUSE GALLERY

MICHAEL DAWSON GALLERY 535 N. Larchmont Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90004 (323) 469-2186 http://www.michaeldawsongallery.com Weds.-Sat., 9am-5pm

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MOCA – THE GEFFEN CONTEMPORARY 152 North Central Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 621-1745 http://www.moca.org/ Mon., Fri., 11am-5pm; Thurs., 11am-8pm; Sat., Sun., 11am-6pm; Closed Tues.-Wed.

MUCKENTHALER CULTURAL CENTER 1201 W. Malvern Ave Fullerton, CA 92633 (714) 738-6595 http://www.muckenthaler.org MUSEUM OF JURASSIC TECHNOLOGY 9341 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 836-6131 http://www.mjt.org/ MUSEUM OF LATIN AMERICAN ART 628 Alamitos Ave Long Beach, CA 90802 (562) 437-1689 http://www.molaa.com Tues.-Sat., 11:30am-7:30pm; Sun., 12-6pm

MUSEUM OF NEON ART 114 W. 4 th St. Downtown LA, CA 213-489-9918

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MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHIC ARTS 1649 El Prado San Diego, CA 92101 (619) 238-7559 http://www.mopa.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Thurs. 10am-9pm MUSEUM OF TOLERANCE 9786 W. Pico Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90035 (310) 553-8403 http://www.museumoftolerance.com NEW STONE AGE 8407 W. 3rd St Los Angeles, CA 90048 (213) 658-5969 Mon.-Sat., 11am-6pm, Sun., 12-5pm NOHO GALLERY LA 5108 Landershim Blvd North Hollywood, CA 91601 (818) 761-7784 http://www.nohogalleryla.com Thurs.-Sat., 2-8pm; Sun., 1-6pm NORBERTELLEN GALLERY 215 West 6th St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 818-662-5041 http://www.norbertellengallery.com NORTON SIMON MUSEUM 411 W. Colorado Blvd. Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 449-6840 http://www.nortonsimon.org Weds.-Mon., 12-6pm; Fri., 12-9pm OCMA, ORANGE LOUNGE AT SOUTH COAST PLAZA 3333 Bear St., South Coast Plaza Costa Mesa, CA 92626 (714) 662-3366 Mon.-Fri., 10am-9pm; Sat., 10am-7pm; Sun., 11:30am-6:30pm OFF-ROSE, THE SECRET 841 Flower Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 664-8977 Sat., 1-5pm; & by appt. OPUS GALLERY 2824 Sepulveda Blvd Torrance, CA 90505 (310) 891-2000 http://www.opusgallery.com ORANGE COUNTY CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ART 117 N. Sycamore Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 667-1517 http://www.occca.org Thurs.-Sun., 12-5pm; Fri., Sat., 12-9pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS ORLANDO GALLERY 18376 Ventura Blvd. Tarzana, CA 91356 (818) 705-5368 http://artscenecal.com/Orlando.html Tues.-Sat., 9:30am-3pm

PASADENA MUSEUM OF CALIFORNIA ART 490 E. Union St. Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 568-3665 http://www.pmcaonline.org

POUNDER-KONE ART SPACE 3407 Glendale Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90039 (323) 913-2247 http://www.cchpkas.com Thurs.-Sun. 1-7pm

OTIS COLLEGE OF ART AND DESIGN BEN MALTZ GALLERY 9045 Lincoln Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90045 (310) 665-6905 http://www.otis.edu Tues.-Sat., 10am-5pm; Thurs., 10am-7pm

PATRICIA CORREIA GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building E-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-1760 http://www.correiagallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm; & by app't.

PROJECT: GALLERY LA 8545 W. Washington Blvd. Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 558-0200 http://www.projectgalleryla.com Weds.-Sat., 11am-6pm

OVERDUIN AND KITE 6693 Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90020 (323) 464-3600 http://www.overduinandkite.com

PATRICK PAINTER, INC. 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-5988 http://www.patrickpainter.com

PYO GALLERY 1100 Hope St., Suite 105 Los Angeles, CA 213-405-1488 http://www.pyogalleryla.com

OVERTONES GALLERY 12703 Venice Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 915-0346 http://www.overtonesgallery.com Wed.-Sat., 12-6pm and by appointment

PERES PROJECTS 2766 La Cienega Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-6100 http://www.peresprojects.com

RAID PROJECTS GALLERY 602 Moulton St. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 441-9593 http://www.raidprojects.com Sat., Sun., 12-5pm; & by app't.

PETER FETTERMAN PHOTOGRAPHIC WORKS OF ART 2525 Michigan Ave., Building A-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-6463 http://www.peterfetterman.com

RED DOT GALLERY 500 S. Spring St. Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 817-6002 http://www.weeneez.com

PETER MENDENHALL GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323 936 0061

REGEN PROJECTS 633 N. Almont Dr Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com

PACIFIC ASIA MUSEUM 46 N. Los Robles Ave Pasadena, CA 91101 (626) 449-2742 http://www.pacificasiamuseum.org Weds.-Sun., 10am-6pm PALM SPRINGS ART MUSEUM 101 Museum Dr Palm Springs, CA 92262 (619) 325-7186 http://www.psmuseum.org Tues.-Sun., 10am-5pm; Fri., 10am-8pm PALOMAR COLLEGE, BOEHM GALLERY 1140 West Mission Rd. San Marcos, CA 92069 (760) 744-1150 Tues., 10am-4pm; Weds., Thurs., 10am-7pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-2pm PALOS VERDES ART CENTER 5504 W. Crestridge Rd. Rancho Palos Verdes, CA 90275 (310) 541-2479 http://www.pvartcenter.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Sun., 1-4pm

PITZER CAMPUS GALLERIES 1050 North Mills Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 607-3143 http://www.pitzer.edu/artgalleries PLATT GALLERY 15600 Mulholland Dr. Los Angeles, CA 90077 (310) 476-9777 Sun.-Thurs., 10am-4pm; Fri., 10am-2pm PLAZA DE LA RAZA 3540 N. Mission Rd. Los Angeles, CA 90031 (323) 223-2475

PAPILLON GALLERY 462 N. Robertson Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (310) 289-1887 http://www.papillongallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm; & by app't.

POMONA COLLEGE MUSEUM OF ART 330 N. College Ave. Claremont, CA 91711 (909) 621-8283 http://www.pomona.edu/museum Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Sat., Sun., 1-5pm

PASADENA CITY COLLEGE ART GALLERY 1570 E. Colorado Blvd Pasadena, CA 91106 (626) 585-3285 http://www.pasadena.edu/artgallery Mon.-Thurs., 12-8pm; Fri., Sat., 12-4pm

POP LOCK GALLERY 211 W. 5th St. Downtown LA, CA 310-666-4445 www.poplockgallery.com

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REGEN PROJECTS II 9016 Santa Monica Blvd (at Almont Drive) Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-5424 http://www.regenprojects.com RICHARD HELLER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-9191 http://www.richardhellergallery.com RICHARD TELLES FINE ART 7380 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 965-5578 http://www.tellesfineart.com RIO HONDO COLLEGE ART GALLERY 3600 Workman Mill Rd., B-13 Whittier, CA 90601 (562) 908-3471 Mon.-Thurs., 9am-3pm; Mon.-Weds., 6-9pm RIVERSIDE ART MUSEUM 3425 Mission Inn Ave. Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 684-7111 http://www.riversideartmuseum.org Mon.-Sat., 10am-4pm; Thurs., 10am-9pm

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS RIVERSIDE COMMUNITY COLLEGE, 4800 Magnolia Ave Riverside, CA 92506 (951) 222-8358

SANTA FE ART COLONY 2401 S. Santa Fe Ave Los Angeles, CA 90058 (213) 587-6381

ROBERT BERMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., D-5, & C-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 315-1937 http://www.robertbermangallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

SANTA MONICA ART STUDIOS AND ARENA 1 GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7449 http://www.santamonicaartstudios.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

ROBERTS & TILTON GALLERY 6150 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90048 (323) 549-0223 http://www.robertsandtilton.com ROSAMUND FELSEN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-8488 http://www.rosamundfelsen.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-5:30pm ROSE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building G-5 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-8440 http://www.rosegallery.net RUTH BACHOFNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. (Bergamot Station), G-2 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-3300 http://www.ruthbachofnergallery.com Tues.-Sat., 10am-6pm S B LONDON 3740 W. Sunset Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (323) 668-0734 http://www.sblondon.com

SANTA MONICA COLLEGE – PETE AND SUSAN BARRETT ART GALLERY 1310 11th St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 434-3434 http://events.smc.edu/art_gallery.html SANTA MONICA MUSEUM OF ART 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90403 (310) 586-6488 http://www.smmoa.org Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SCA PROJECT GALLERY 281 So. Thomas St., Unit 104 Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 620-5481 http://www.scagallery.com Thurs.-Sat., 12-4pm SCALO/GUYE GALLERY 302 N. Robertson Blvd. West Hollywood, CA 90048 (310) 358-9396 http://www.scaloguye.com Mon.-Sat., 11am-7pm SCHOMBURG GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-5757 http://www.schomburggallery.com

SAM FRANCIS GALLERY 1714 21st St Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-7391 Mon.-Fri., 1-3pm; & by app't. SAM LEE GALLERY 990 N. Hill St., #190 Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 227-0275 http://www.samleegallery.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm SAMUEL FREEMAN GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-7 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 449-1479 http://www.samuelfreeman.com

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SELF-HELP GRAPHICS & ART INC. GALERIA OTRA VEZ 3802 Avenida Cesar Chavez Los Angeles, CA 90063 (323) 881-6444 http://www.selfhelpgraphics.com Tues.-Sat., 9am-5pm SEYHOUN GALLERY 9007 Melrose Ave. West Hollywood, CA 90069 (310) 858-5984 http://www.seyhoungallery.com SHERRY FRUMKIN GALLERY 3026 Airport Ave., Suite 21 Santa Monica, CA 90405 (310) 397-7493 http://www.frumkingallery.com Weds.-Sat., 12-6pm SHOSHANA WAYNE GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building B-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-7535 http://www.shoshanawayne.com SHOTGUN 2121 N. San Fernando Rd., #11 Los Angeles, CA 90065 http://www.shotgunspace.com SIDE STREET PROJECTS 145 N. Raymond Ave Pasadena, CA 91103 (626) 577-7774 http://www.sidestreet.org

SCI-ARC GALLERY 960 E. Third St Los Angeles, CA 90013 (213) 473-8432

SILK ROADS DESIGN GALLERY 145 N. La Brea Ave Los Angeles, CA 90036 (310) 857-5588, http://www.silkroadsgallery.com Mon.-Sun., 11am-5pm

SCRIBBLE THEORY 210 N. Bush St. Santa Ana, CA 92701 (714) 542-5928 http://www.scribbletheory.com

SISTER 437 Gin Ling Way. Los Angeles, CA 90012 (213) 628-7000 http://www.sisterla.com

SEA AND SPACE EXPLORATIONS 4755 York Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 445-4015 http://www.seaandspace.org

SIXSPACE 5803 W. Washigton Blvd. Culver City, CA 90230 (323) 932-6200 http://www.sixspace.com

SANDRONI REY GALLERY 2762 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 280-0111 http://www.sandronirey.com 102

SEE LINE GALLERY Janet Levy, Director Pacific Design Center 8687 Melrose Avenue Suite B274 West Hollywood, CA 90069 info@seelinegallery.com http://www.seelinegallery.com

SIXTEEN:ONE 2116-B Pico Blvd. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 450-4394 http://www.16to1.com Web fabrikmagazine.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS SKIRBALL CULTURAL CENTER 2701 N. Sepulveda Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-4500 http://www.skirball.org Tues.-Fri., 12-5pm; Thurs., 12-9pm; Sat., Sun., 10am-5pm SOHO GALLERY 300 A. So. Thomas St Pomona, CA 91766 (909) 469-1599 Thurs.-Sun., 11am-4pm; second Sats., 11am-10pm SOLWAY JONES 990 N. Hill Street Los Angeles, CA 90012 (323) 223-0224 http://www.solwayjonesgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm SPARC ART GALLERY 685 Venice Blvd. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 822-9560 http://www.sparcmurals.org Mon.-Fri., 10am-6pm (closed at noon-1pm SPONTO GALLERY 7 Dudley Ave. Venice, CA 90291 (310) 399-2078 STEPHEN COHEN GALLERY 7358 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 937-5525 http://www.stephencohengallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm STG (STEVE TURNER CONTEMPORARY) 6026 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90036 (310) 271-3721 http://www.steveturnergallery.com SULKIN/SECANT GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building T-6 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-8411 http://www.sulkinsecantgallery.com SUSANNE VIELMETTER LOS ANGELES PROJECTS 5795 W. Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (323) 933-2117 http://www.vielmetter.com SYLVIA WHITE GALLERY 1783 East Main Street Ventura, CA 93001 (310) 452-4000 http://www.artadvice.com

TAG, THE ARTISTS' GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., #D-3 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 829-9556 http://www.TAGtheArtistsGallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm TASENDE GALLERY 8808 Melrose Ave Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 276-8686 http://www.artnet.com Tues.-Fri., 10am-6pm; Sat., 11am-5pm; Closed for Holidays Dec.21-Jan. 1. TAYLOR DE CORDOBA 2660 S. La Cienega Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90034 (310) 559-9156 http://www.taylordecordoba.com

TEMPLE OF VISIONS 719 S. Spring St. Downtown LA, CA 213-537-0139 info@templeofvisions.com http://templeofvisions.com TERRENCE ROGERS FINE ART 1231 Fifth St. Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 394-4999 http://www.trogart.com Thurs-Sat., 12-5; & by app't. THE ACORN GALLERY 135 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 850-8655 THE BALMORAL 1522 Abbot Kinney Venice, CA 90291 (310) 392-3635 http://www.gallerybalmoral.com THE BREWERY 2100 N. Main St. at Avenue 21 Los Angeles, CA 90031 http://www.breweryart.com

THE FOLK TREE 217 S. Fair Oaks Ave Pasadena, CA 91105 (626) 795-8733 http://www.folktree.com Mon.-Weds., 11am-6pm; Thurs.-Sat., 10am-6pm; Sun., 12-5pm THE GETTY CENTER 1200 Getty Center Dr Los Angeles, CA 90049 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Tues.-Thurs., Sun., 10am-6pm; Fri., Sat., 10am-9pm THE HIVE 729 S. Spring St Los Angeles, CA 90014 http://hivegallery.com/ 213-955-9091 THE GETTY VILLA 17985 Pacific Coast Highway Pacific Palisades, CA 90272 (310) 440-7300 http://www.getty.edu Thurs.-Mon., 10am-5pm; closed Tues. Weds. and major holidays THE HIVE GALLERY 729 S. Sping St. Los Angeles, CA 90014 (213) 955-9051 THE LOFT 401 S. Mesa, San Pedro, CA 90731 (310) 831-5757 http://www.the-loft.net First Thursday Artwalk, 6-9pm; and by app't. THE PERFECT EXPOSURE GALLERY 3513 6th St., Los Angeles, CA 90020 (213) 381-1137 http://theperfectexposure.com

THE CLAYHOUSE 2909 Santa Monica Blvd. (near Yale St.) Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 828-7071

THE WHOLE 9 GALLERY 6101 Washington Blvd Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 836-4600 http://www.thewhole9.com

THE CONFERENCE ROOM 325 S. Robertson Blvd. Beverly Hills, CA 90211 (310) 598-6367 http://www.theconfroom.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-7pm

THINKSPACE GALLERY 4210 Santa Monica Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90029 (323) 913-3375 http://www.thinkspacegallery.com Thurs.-Sun., 1-6pm

THE DRAWING CLUB 3235 San Fernando Rd., #2C Los Angeles, CA 90065 (626) 303-2556 http://www.thedrawingclub.com Thurs. 7-10pm; & by app't.

TINLARK GALLERY 6671 Sunset Blvd., #1512 Hollywood, CA 90028 (323) 463-0039 http://www.tinlark.com

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ART GALLERIES & MUSEUMS TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY 7321 Beverly Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90036 (323) 933-5523 http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-5pm,

UCR/CALIFORNIA MUSEUM OF PHOTOGRAPHY 3824 Main St Riverside, CA 92501 (951) 784-FOTO http://www.cmp.ucr.edu Tues.-Sat., 12-5pm

TOPANGA CANYON GALLERY 120 N. Topanga Canyon Blvd., Suite 109 Topanga, CA 90290 (310) 455-7909 http://www.topangacanyongallery.com Tues.-Sun., 10am-6pm

USC FISHER GALLERY 823 Exposition Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90089 (213) 740-4561 http://fishergallery.org Tues.-Sat. 12-5pm

TORRANCE ART MUSEUM 3320 Civic Center Dr Torrance, CA 90503 (310) 618-6340 http://www.torranceartmuseum.com Tues.-Sat., 12-6pm

VINCENT PRICE ART MUSEUM EAST LOS ANGELES COLLEGE 1301 Avenida Cesar Chavez Monterey Park, CA 91754 (323) 265-8841 http://elac.edu/collegeservices/vincentprice/ Mon.-Weds., Sat., 12-4pm; Thurs., 12-7pm

TRACK 16 GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave., Building C-1 Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 264-4678 http://www.track16.com Tues.-Sat., 11am-6pm

VIVA (VALLEY INSTITUTE OF VISUAL ART) 13261 Moorpark St., Sherman Oaks, CA 91423 (818) 385-0080 Weds.-Fri., 11am-4pm; Satu., 12-4pm

TRACY PARK GALLERY 1431 Ocean Ave Santa Monica, CA 90401 (310) 260-9954 http://www.tracyparkgallery.com

VOILA! GALLERY

TRIGG ISON FINE ART 511 N. Robertson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90069 (310) 274-8047 http://www.triggison.com

2642 S. La Cienega Blvd. LA, CA 90034 www.waltermacielgallery.com 310-839-1840

TROPICO DE NOPAL GALLERY 1665 Beverly Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90026 (213) 481-8112 http://www.tropicodenopal.com

518 N. La Brea Ave. Los Angeles, CA 90036 323.954.0418

WALTER MACIEL GALLERY

WATTS TOWERS ART CENTER NOAH SYLVESTER PURIFOY GALLERY 1727 E. 107th St Los Angeles, CA 90002 (213) 847-4646 Weds.-Sun., 10am-4pm

WESTERN PROJECT 3830 Main St., Culver City, CA 90232 (310) 838-0609 http://western-project.com WHITTIER MUSEUM 6755 Newlin Ave Whittier, CA 90601 (310) 945-3871 WILLIAM A. KARGES FINE ART 427 Canon Dr., Suite 101 Beverly Hills, CA 90210 (310) 276-8551 http://www.kargesfineart.com Mon.-Sat., 10am-5pm WILLIAM GRANT STILL COMMUNITY ARTS CENTER 2520 West View St Los Angeles, CA 90016 (213) 734-1164 Daily 12-5pm WILLIAM TURNER GALLERY 2525 Michigan Ave. Santa Monica, CA 90404 (310) 453-0909 http://www.williamturnergallery.com Mon.-Sat.,11am-6pm XIEM CLAY CENTER AND GALLERY 1563 N. Lake Ave. Pasadena, CA 91104 (626) 794-5833 http://www.xiemclaycenter.com XIT GALLERY AT AIU LA 12655 W. Jefferson Blvd Los Angeles, CA 90066 (310) 302-2613 Mon.-Fri., 11am-5pm YOUNG ART GALLERY 747 N. Avenue 50 Los Angeles, CA 90042 (323) 344-1322 http://www.youngartgallery.com

GOT NEWS? WANT LISTING? If you would like to be listed in Fabrik’s Los Angeles Art & Design Directory, please email us your gallery info to directory@fabrikmagazine.com. If you have exhibits and events at your gallery and would like to be considered for editorial or be included in our email newsletter, please email that info to events@fabrikmagazine.com.

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

BRING THE NATURAL ELEMENTS OF THE EARTH INTO YOUR HOME INTERIORS WITH

GOING GREEN ROCKS ART & ACCESSORIES INSPIRED BY NATURE

Home accessories that will enhance any space and help us be mindful of Mother Earth. No-one can design like Mother Nature and she created only one of each, there are no duplicates. Go to: www.goinggreenrocks.net, and find something Mother Nature created that will “Rock Your World”.

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

Rick Robinson Primitive Pop

rrobinson@macdonaldmedia.com

323-252-8768

On Facebook: Richard Owen Robinson

WILLIAM CRISWELL “Jump IV” Serigraph, 24" x 24" www.williamcriswell.com

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

Paula S. Wallace

Craving for Salt Oil on Canvas

773.750.226

Dimming of the Day Oil on Birch

Web fabrikmagazine.com

paulawallacefineart.com

Girl Under the Umbrella Oil on Birch

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ARTIST SHOWCASE

BART FORBES ORIGINAL OILS + GICLEE IMAGES WWW.BARTFORBESGALLERY.COM

SUBSCRIPTION DETAILS LA’S MAGAZINE ON ART, DESIGN, ARCHITECTURE & FASHION

SUMMER 2009

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PHOTOGRAPHY ISSUE: JULIUS SHULMAN • ANNENBERG SPACE FOR PHOTOGRAPHY LA PHOTOGRAPHERS • EVENTS, EXHIBITS & GALLERIES

ADDRESS CITY ZIP

STATE PHONE EMAIL TRANSCENDING THE FRAME: JULIUS SHULMAN 1910-2009

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Alisa Gabrielle “The shaping of a stone is as powerful a challenge as shaping one’s own spirit.” Sculptor, painter, woman, Alisa Gabrielle is each and every one of these. Her endless passion has moved her to carve the stone and fill the canvas with the same devotion, strength and depth that she uses to sculpt and color her own spirit.

Alisa Gabrielle Fine Art

sculptrss@yahoo.com (818) 346-5477

"Red Goddess"

Website www.alisagabrielle.com


Featuring over 80 exhibitors of vintage 20th century furniture, decorative and fine arts from across the U.S. and Europe.

PREVIEW PARTY GALA Friday, April 30

SHOW & SALE May 1-2, 2010

6pm - 9pm benefiting The CalArts Community Arts Partnership

Saturday: 11am - 7pm Sunday: 11am - 5pm

Advance tickets $100/$125 at door

Weekend admission $15

Preview party includes early buying, show catalog, appetizers and cocktails courtesy of Grey Goose Vodka

NEW LOCATION! Barker Hangar at Santa Monica Air Center

lamodernism.com

dolphin promotions, inc. chicago | 708.366.2710 florida | 954.563.6747 dolphinfairs.com

3021 Airport Avenue Santa Monica 90405

Photos courtesy of: Ed Cella Art & Architecture, Dragonette, Ltd., and Sally Rosen 20th Century Collections



Fabrik Magazine - Issue 8