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e c n ie r e p X e U S J The eXperience What’s Inside 4

MONTH-TO-MONTH Highlights from August to April

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STUDENT LIFE Homecoming Events, Residence Halls, Commuter Students, Veteran Students, International Students

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LEADERSHIP JSU President Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers JSU Presidential Cabinet

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STUDENT LEADERSHIP Miss JSU Sarah A. Brown SGA President Brian J. Wilks SGA Officers

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ACADEMICS Jackson State University Colleges Academic Spotlight: Dr. Dollye M.E. Robinson

2012-2013 e-Yearbook

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108 JSU STUDENT ACTIVITIES JSU Clubs and Organizations NPHC Greek Organizations 150 JACKSON STATE UNIVERSITY SPORTS JSU Sports Teams 172 FEATURES A spotlight on various events that took place on the Jackson State University campus.

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192 JSU FACES Random Faces of Jackson State University students 196 JSU SPEAKS Comments on various topics from JSU students during the 2012-2013 academic year 200 SENIOR TIMELINE A timeline of important events that happened from Fall 2009 to Spring 2013 204 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS Thanks to those who made this possible

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ONE NATION UNDER the

BLUE

The 2012-2013 theme, ONE NATION UNDER the BLUE, embodies the JSU spirit that the yearbook staff tried to capture and reflect on the pages of this publication. “ONE JSU” expresses the collective commitment to excellence that permeates the JSU family. Tiger NATION is how the students fondly refer to “their” university. UNDER the leadership of President Carolyn W. Meyers and her Cabinet, JSU is soaring to higher ground. “Thee, I love the BLUE and the White,” a traditional and easily recognizable symbol of JSU.

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August

Welcome Week 2012

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elcome Week is a time when Jackson State University welcomes new students to the university and acquaints them with many of the opportunities they will be afforded during their matriculation. Activities during this week included: Movie Nights, Freshmen Carnival, Parent and Family Orientation, Comedy Show, Scavenger Hunt, Freshmen Pinning Ceremony, Community Service Projects, Information Fair, Campus Tours, Voter Registration Rally and many other events. Along with academic orientation, these activities inform new students about services, campus life, and policies at JSU.

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September

iPad Initiative

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pproximately 900 incoming Jackson State University freshmen received a new Apple iPad, thanks to the iPad Technology Advantage Scholarship Initiative at JSU.

With the help of the Mississippi e-Center Foundation, the TASI program was able to award each student an iPad with only a $50 insurance fee for two years. The package includes student apps, a bluetooth keyboard and a protective cover. After a student has completed five semesters at JSU, they will be granted ownership of the iPad. Jackson State is the first institution in Mississippi and one of the first in the nation to comprehensively integrate the iPad into the curriculum.

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The program, funded by the Mississippi e-Center Foundation, is estimated to cost between $600,000 and $700,000. Dr. William McHenry, Executive Director of the e-Center said, “Equipping the students with iPads is JSU’s attempt to help students improve their adaptive learning skills and to also help them save money on buying books.” McHenry stated that as time passes, ebooks will be available for the majority of the courses and professors will be encouraged to incorporate the iPads into the class curriculum. Students like freshmen biology pre-nursing major Lenthra Laster from Morton, Miss. said, “The new iPad will help me to purchase books at a cheaper price through ebooks.”


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October

Founder’s Day

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r. Earlexia M. Norwoood began her Founders’ Day speech with popular lyrics from R&B hit, “I Believe I Can Fly” by R. Kelly. “I believe I can fly, I believe I can touch the sky, I think about it every night and day, spread my wings and fly away!” Kendra Montgomery, an elementary education major from Detroit, Mich., said, “I felt the speaker was good because she stressed the importance of our ancestors and how their actions are still making an impact on why JSU is a great university today.»

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After the convocation, a processional of faculty, staff and students moved to the historic Bell Ringing ceremony. The ringing of the bell took place in the garden in front of Ayers Hall. Dr. Hilliard Lackey’s famous saying, “Ring that bell!” echoed on the walkway in a show of appreciation for the founders and people who have dedicated their lives to making JSU into the university it is today. “To always hear about the sacrifices from the people who founded the school helps me be grateful for my education and to continue to do well in school,” said Aja Woods.

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November

Obama Victory

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he votes came in. They were counted. President Barack Hussein Obama was re-elected as the leader of the United States of America. He beat Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney by 303 electoral votes to 206. On the night of the election, JSU students gathered in the Student Center to watch as election results came in. They cheered as Obama gained electoral and popular votes. After the Nov. 6 election between President Obama and Gov. Romney, many cheered for Obama’s win, while others were disappointed at the results. Many had voted in the on-campus precinct.

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LNC Run/Walk

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n Oct. 27, approximately 200 Jackson State University students, staff, faculty and community participants began the journey held in memory of Latasha Norman, a junior accounting major from Greenville, Miss., who lost her life to domestic violence in 2007. The year’s icy cold weather did not prevent runners and walkers from supporting the cause. Among the many supporters in the run/walk were members of the current Blue & White Flash staff, who participate every year to honor Norman, a former Student Publications staff member.

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December

Fall Graduation

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or the first time, Jackson State University held a December commencement. Commencement exercises for both graduate and undergraduate students were held at the Lee E. Williams Athletics and Assembly Center at 8 a.m. on Saturday, Dec. 8. Approximately 707 students received degrees; 274 of those students received doctorate and master’s degrees while the remaining 433 were a combination of undergraduate degrees from all academic departments. The speaker for the commencement was Myron Gray, president of U.S. operations for the United Parcel Service. 14

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SWAC Championship Send-Off

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ome JSU athletes sacrificed walking across the stage with their peers to try to bring home a trophy from the Southwestern Athletic Conference Championship football title game, that was played on the same day as Fall Commencement. These players walked across another stage on Friday, Dec. 7 in the Student Center Ballrooms A and B. The Tiger Football team headed to Birmingham, Ala. to the SWAC Championship game amisdt a crowd of supporters. Unfortunately, JSU fell to UAPB in a valient effort.

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January

Obama’s Inauguration

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ordarius Hill, a junior speech communications major from Memphis, Tenn., like many others, did not let the cold weather discourage his enthusiasm to experience history. Along with 43 other Jackson State University students, he traveled to Washington, D.C. and headed to the Presidential Inauguration at 6 a.m on Monday, Jan. 21. Bundled up in winter apparel, the group was prepared to face the frigid weather and huge crowds to witness the historic swearing in of President Barack Obama into his second term as the leader of the United States of America.

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MLK Day of Service

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ore than 50 students participated in Jackson State University’s observation of the Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service. The third Monday of January marks the day of the year in American history celebrating Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s birthday. Jackson State University students used this day of service to help various organizations and service campaigns including: Operation Shoestring, Gateway Rescue Mission, Hope House and ‘Buddy for a day’ at Community Nursing Home. These sites gave selected JSU students the opportunity to help the surrounding community. J A C K S O N

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February

Black Fossil

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irected by Yohance Myles, the play stood as a flashback into the development of the African-American culture. Myles was able to capture the struggle of Africans all the way to the modern day Black man and woman in the play. “Black Fossil” wanted to show that from the capturing and enslavement of our people, African-Americans have not really gotten out of the slave mentality. AfricanAmericans still seemed to be held down by something. As the play came to an end, the message seemed to be an appeal for African-Americans to stop trying to be something that they are not in order to progress. ‘‘Stop being a slave to hatred but an advocate for acceptance.’’ 18

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HBCU Conference

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he Blue & White Flash won 1st place awards in the Signed Commentary/Column Writing category with entries from Diamond Jenkins and 1st place for Best Editorial Cartoon from Alan Wells. The Flash also received honorable mention in Arts and Entertainment/ feature writing. Attendees from Jackson State included Diamond Jenkins, Kachelle Pratcher, Candace Chambers, William Owens and Alan Wells, along with Ernest Camel, Production Coordinator and Sylvia Watley, Adviser. Reginald Stuart, a recruiter for the McClatchy Company, said BCCA contest “entries and winners show a real passion for journalism from a new generation of journalists. We’re excited about their future and look forward to seeing their work in media.”

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March

The Great Reveal

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ackson State University’s Pan-Hellenic Council presented “The Great Reveal: The Wait is Over”, on Sunday , March 3, 2013 at the Lee E. Williams Athletics & Assembly Center. There were seven of the Divine 9 organizations present, all revealing their new members to the public for the first time. They included sororities: Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc., Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc., Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc. Fraternities included were: Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc., Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc., Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc. and Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

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Sweetness Run/Walk

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he streets surrounding Jackson State University were filled with 500 runners and walkers who donated their time to walk or run for one common goal — to fight against obesity, during the 7th Annual Walter Payton Sweetness 5K Run/Walk on March 30th. Mississippi holds the title of being “The Fattest State� in the country and studies show that 34.9 percent of its residents weighed in as obese in 2012. This percentage has more than doubled in the last 20 years, from 15 to 35 percent since 1991. Patrick House, winner of Season 10 The Biggest Loser from Vicksburg, Miss., was a guest and host at the event.

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April

International Week

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tudents at Jackson State University recognized diverse cultures during its 2013 “Peace Through Understanding� International Week.

The objective of this event was to highlight diverse cultures within the JSU community, foster a closer bond between international and American students, and cultivate mutual understanding among students of diverse backgrounds. Some of the events held were: Parade of Flags, International Banquet, Night of Dance, International Taste and Bazaar and Chinese Cultural Night.

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Sports Banquet

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ackson State University coaches, trainers, and administrators honored students for leading the way in athletics and academics. The Division of Athletics All Sports Awards Banquet was held on April 10, 2013 in the JSU Student Center Ballroom. The main goal of the event was to recognize student athletes who excel in their sport as well as in academia. The guest speaker of the banquet was Dr. Ambrosia Scott, a JSU alumna from Memphis, Tenn., who transferred to JSU on a volleyball /softball scholarship in 1999.

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May

Spring 2013 Commencement

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he spring 2013 class includes 688 undergraduates and 304 graduate students. IHL Commissioner Dr. Hank Bounds spoke at the graduate exercises May 3 on the university’s main campus. During his address, Bounds urged JSU students to use the knowledge they acquired while pursuing their graduate degrees to make a difference in the lives of others. Bounds said the degrees bring an obligation to teach, help, and lead others. Actor and writer Hill Harper addressed Jackson State University students May 4 during the university’s undergraduate commencement ceremony at the Mississippi Veterans Memorial Stadium, where he urged graduates to always take risks and never fear failure.

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Gospel Explosion

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ackson State University opened up its 2012 Homecoming Week “One Nation Under the Blue” activities with the Fall Gospel Explosion Concert on Oct. 14 in the Rose E. McCoy Auditorium. The event was hosted by the JSU Interfaith Gospel Choir and featuring the RUF Praise Team, Sunday Best competitor Ashford Sanders and gospel recording artist Jonathan McReynolds. The concert opened with greetings from SGA president Brian Wilks and mistress of ceremony, alumni Jerrica Stimage. The explosion was filled with great performances, tears rolling down your face and excitement throughout the auditorium. “This was my first time attending a gospel concert and I must say I was really engaged with every performance and sang along to every song I knew,” said Torin Adams, a freshman business administration major from Jackson, Miss. The fully engaged audience was cheering, shouting praises admidst the energy that moved through the room. Sanders, who performed from a stool on the stage, expressed to the audience that he had recently had surgery but that didn’t stop his talent from showing. Sanders had the crowd on its feet by singing various songs that the audience loved. “I had the time of my life. I was upset that I missed church this morning but I was able to make up for it with tonight’s gospel explosion,” said Knesha Thomas, a junior accounting major from Anguilla, Miss. McReynolds gave the audience a different feel, opening up with an R&B song by Usher with the words changed to make it a catchy gospel song. He captured the audience with his smooth soulful sound and his skills on the guitar while performing his hit single ‘I Love You’. The finale to the gospel explosion was Jackson State’s Interfaith Gospel Choir. The choir’s upbeat songs and energy on the stage was an exciting sight for the audience. Practicing every week since school started, Interfaith is known to stimulate and enhance the quality of the spiritual outlook of JSU students through traditional and contemporary gospel music. “Performing with Interfaith was a great experience. It was a chance for students, including myself, to sing God’s praises together. I enjoyed it,” said Kristi Williams, a junior biology pre-med major from Jackson, Miss.

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fter students got their praise on at Rose E. McCoy Auditorium, a short walk over to the Lee E. Williams Athletics & Assembly Center (AAC) for Basketball Midnight Madness began at 8 p.m. featuring the JSU Men’s and Women’s Basketball Teams. The night consisted of several activities and attractions, such as a dunk contest featuring members of the men’s basketball team, music by D.J. Unpredictable (97.7FM), and a fireworks show outside the Athletics and Assembly Center at the conclusion of the event. Other features of the night included: 3-Point shoot out Alumni basketball game Greek Stroll JSU Baby Tigers miniature skills competition Sonic Boom of the South and J-Settes Tug of war Face painting Additionally, fans had the opportunity to meet and get autographs from the players and coaches of the men’s and women’s basketball teams. 

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YouThinkYou Can Sing

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he Voice of JSU returned bigger and bolder in its second year as a featured event during Jackson State University’s homecoming activities. The finale took place on Oct. 15, 2012 in the Lee E. Williams Athletics & Assembly Center with featured celebrity judges Kandi Burruss, Ruben Studdard and Dathan Thigpen. This year’s finalists were Victoria Agnew, Aaron Cain III, Derrick Griffith, Sarah Hodges, Jasmine Howard, Calandra Jones, Latia Peavy, Martika Ross, Tameka Smith, KD Walker, and Kristi Williams. Phillip Cockrell, Associate Vice President for Student Life and Dean of Students, and the student justices played a key role in organizing this event. The event had a twist this year with special performances from the JSU Dazzlers and Dance Ensemble. Presented not only for students to showcase their talents vocally, “The Voice of JSU” was also used to share information on Student Life’s “Pause for a Cause”, an educational awareness campaign about domestic violence. The 2012 hosts were James Earl Lehaman Jr. and Britney Johnson, former senior class president and one of the founders of “The Voice of JSU.” The production of the event was organized by JSU Tiger TV 22. After all the contestants performed, the celebrity judges deliberated and chose the top five contestants: Victoria Agnew, Martika Ross, Jasmine Howard, Tameka Smith, and Sarah Hodges. The final round was a battle of the feminine felines of JSU with tributes to music powerhouses such as Michael Jackson, Whitney Houston, Tina Turner and many more. Each contestant was accompanied by a live band, back-up singers and dancers. Everyone competing brought their own style and flavor to the final round. After the final performances, along with the judges, the decision of who would be crowned the new Voice of JSU was up to the audience. The audience voted by texting “thevoicejsu” to “72727” then received instruction’s afterwards. Sarah Hodges, a senior music education major, was crowned “The Voice of JSU” 2012-2013.

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Fall Festival

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usic, food, and fun are three words to describe the JSU 2012 Homecoming Fall Festival. On Tuesday, October 16, 2012, students, faculty, staff, and alumni gathered on the Gibbs-Green Pedestrian Walkway to celebrate their dear old college home.

The festival included performances by JSU’s Dance Ensemble, Maddrama Performance Troupe, finalists for the Voice of JSU, OutSpoken, and the Insatiable Modeling Squad. JSU’s Dance Ensemble began the evening showcasing pink and black attire, while also demonstrating their flexibility and creative moves. JSU students showed their excitement. “I had so much fun. This fall festival made me too excited about the weekend,” said Ashley Patterson, a freshman political science major from Canton, Miss. Maddrama Performance Troupe performed: A Tribute to Homecoming: One Nation Under the Blue. Performers spoke of the unity of the university evident throughout history. They asked the audience, “What is so true about that blue at JSU?” Sarah Hodges, the 2012 Voice of JSU, sang “Golden” by Chrisette Michele. Martika Ross, one of the finalists for the Voice of JSU, sang while playing her acoustic guitar. Modeling blazers, fishnets, colored jeans, scarves, suspenders, ties, and other fashionable clothing items, members of the Insatiable Modeling Squad walked the runaway to Rihanna’s “Where Have You Been.” The show featured male and female models. Brianna Washington a sophomore mass communications major from Jackson, Miss. expressed her experience in the fall festival fashion show. “I love when my team gets to show off our cool outfits and walk down the runway in front of everyone. Everybody out on the plaza supported us and we all had fun,” said Washington. OutSpoken began their tribute by singing an excerpt from the alma mater. The poets expressed their love for the university through poetry. The crowd danced and sang to the music provided by DJ T. Money. The night’s festivities provided entertainment during the 2012 Homecoming at Jackson State University, while celebrating the past and present.

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ackson State University elected a new queen in spring 2012. Miss JSU, Sarah Brown, a senior physics major from Jackson, Miss., was officially crowned at her coronation on Oct. 18.

The theme of the coronation was reminiscent of a scene from the “Harlem Nights.” Brown entered the Lee E. Williams Athletic Assembly Center in a classic vintage yellow Bentley. The annual event also gave representatives of student organizations a chance to don elegant gowns and tuxedos. Rhythmic performances by the JSU Dance Ensemble and the verbal artistry of Outspoken helped make the event one to remember. Brian Wilkes, JSU Student Government Association President, introduced Brown after she stepped out of the vintage 1940’s car. “I remember the first time I met Sarah. We had a class together our freshman year; Sarah came into the class and announced ‘Hello class, my name is Sarah Brown and I am going to be Miss Jackson State University 2012-2013.’” Wilkes mentioned that from that point on he had made a friend in Brown. Brown said that she did not prepare a speech for the coronation simply because she has always been told that the best story is your own story. “A lot of my peers doubted my decision to run for Miss JSU because I wasn’t involved in anything and I wasn’t that social. I stayed in my books, but I knew that I was going to be Miss Jackson State University. It is something that I have wanted since the age of fifteen,” said Brown. She added: “When I was officially crowned as Miss Jackson State, it was a very special moment because I am now able to serve the school and move forward with my platform.” After being sworn in by SGA Chief Justice Jeremy Sanford and crowned by JSU President Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers, Brown was adorned with a long, royal blue cape and scepter, after which various groups paid her tribute.

Coronation

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Coronation Kings & Queens

Brian J. Wilks & Sarah A. Brown, Miss JSU

Russell Lewis & Flenicia Caldwell

Davon Jones & Albany Essex

Mickey Nixon & Simone Taylor

Thaddeus Wright & Brianna Davis

Kelvin Graves & Amanda McCree

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Coronation Kings & Queens

Raymond Jones, Jr. & Rosland Latiker

Anas Alfarra & Kesica Jayapalan

Delbert Griffin, Jr. & Ruby Dixon

Calvin Bogan & Tiffany Johnson

Darryl Bufford & Nivea Green

Andrew Namura & Kennitra Thompson

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Coronation Kings & Queens

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Chevon Baker & Stacie Hopkins

Nathan Marshall & Tearra Williams

Ennis Crosby & Alicia Meadows

Shawn Hubbard & Crystal Waters

Aaron Cain, III & Mekel Johnson

Michael Allen & Iasia Collins

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Coronation Kings & Queens

Tyron Steele & Kontessa Gilliam-RIce

Kiyahd Burt & Memry Bender

Veni Khamphaha Vah & Kandice Williams

Matthew Hawkins & Jasmine Preston

Limon Stephney & JoVanda Flowers

Carlos Smith & Chelsea Tillman

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Coronation Kings & Queens

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Samar Moton & Kasprina Moton

Donald Hewitt & Anteigra Coleman

David Mateen & Sabrina Hodge

Travis Thomas & Kantra Reid

Trenton Miller & Malicia Holifield

Johnathan Bounds & Tatiyana Blood

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Coronation Kings & Queens

Kaylon McCou & Tierra Williams

Caroll McLaughlin & Tempsett Johnson

Anthony Watkins & Jaylon Dixon

Quentin Greathree & Morgan Jackson

Jonathan Rosser & Natasha Scruggs

DeAngelo Brown & Kieyschmen Spann

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Coronation Kings & Queens

Chadrick Taylor & Stephanie Bishop-Lane

Richard Kelly & Chelsea Swanier

Mr. & Miss Senior Jason Hardiman & Trista Demby

Mr. & Miss Junior Alvin Perkins, II & Manisha Heard

Mr. & Miss Sophomore Keonte Turner & Arekia Bennett

Mr. & Miss Freshmen Alexander Burton & Robin Jackson

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Street Jam/Yardfest

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he Welcome Home Yard Fest / Street Jam took place on the Gibbs-Green Pedestrian Walkway/ B.F Roberts Parking Lot.

The event showcased vendors with various items, a live performcae from the band and J-Settes. Various clubs and organizations were also on hand selling goods that woud financially benefit their organizations.

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Comedy Show

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he JSU community shared some side-splitting comedy on Wednesday, Oct. 17th at the Homecoming Comedy Show. The event featured the hilarious and best dressed man in comedy, Lav Luv; the raw, tell it like it is humor of Ms. Dominique, and the silliness of multi-talented actor and comedienne Gary Owens.

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Step Show

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veryone was sure to save some energy for the Annual Pan Hellenic Greek Show, which featured the Greek organizations of Jackson State University and was hosted by DJ Unpredictable and held in the Williams Athletics and Assembly Center. All of the participants were good but the ladies of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority took home the overall prize.

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he Homecoming Court, local and national bands, drill teams, social organizations, car clubs and many more were on display during the Annual JSU Homecoming Parade on Saturday, Oct. 20th in Downtown Jackson. The Homecoming Grand Marshal’s were physician, civil rights activist and community leader, Dr. Robert A. Smith, Sr. and Olympic Champion and JSU alumnus Michael Tinsley.

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Game Time!!!

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ith Jackson State still in hot pursuit of the chance to play for a SWAC championship, the Tigers outlasted the Mississippi Valley State Delta Devils by a score of 14-7 in the JSU homecoming game in double overtime. Jackson State’s Clayton Moore rushed for a 1 yard touchdown run in the second overtime that sealed the victory for JSU. On the Delta Devils final possession of the game, JSU’s Jamal Carter forced and recovered a fumble that ended the game and sealed the deal for Jackson State. With this win JSU improved to a 4-4, 4-2 record. The Tigers were tied for second place with Alabama State, in the Southwestern Athletic Conference Eastern Division. The Delta Devils fall to a 2-5, 2-3 record. The game was a defensive battle in the first half and went into half time with a 0-0 score. Jackson State’s offense gained momentum in the second half with Clayton Moore’s 9 yard pass to Rico Richardson with 1:19 on the clock. The score gave JSU a 7-0 lead in the third quarter. Mississippi Valley tied the ball game with 6:42 left in regulation as Richard Drake caught a 71 yard pass from Marcus Randle sending the game into overtime.

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Alexander Hall

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lexander Residence Center is named in honor of Florence Octavia Alexander, an alumna of the JSU and renowned educator. The Center is comprised of two residence halls, Alexander East Hall which houses the freshmen male students and Alexander West Hall, which houses the freshmen female students. Alexander Center has 410 rooms, study rooms, a lobby with a large screen television and two laundry facilities. A historic fact about Alexander Center -- bullet holes remain in the concrete from the Gibbs-Green shooting in 1970. Alexander West Hall will close for renovation at the end of the fall semester.

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Dixon Hall

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ohn W. Dixon Hall was constructed in 1969. This seven-story facility houses 402 junior, senior, and graduate male students. In 1983, New Men’s Dormitory was officially named J.W. Dixon Hall in honor of an outstanding alumnus, John W. Dixon. In 2004 Dixon Hall closed for renovations and reopened Spring 2006 as a suite style residence with a community kitchen for special occasions, wall-to-wall carpet, central heat and air-conditioning, study rooms, a laundry facility and a beautiful lobby with a big screen television. Other amenities are: basic cable plus HBO, Wi-Fi, hotel style locks and MicroFridge units in each room.vollecab ium eici qui od.

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McAllister-Whiteside Hall

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cAllister-Whiteside Residence Center was first occupied in 1982. The 247 room facility houses 444 female honor freshmen, sophomores and selected athletes. The five-story building has lobby/study rooms, laundry facilities and Micro fridge units in each room. Other amenities are: central heat and air-conditioning, Wi-Fi, basic cable plus HBO.

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Transitional Hall

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ransitional Hall is a four-story suite style facility that opened in August 2002 as a residence hall which houses students while other residence halls are renovated or built. Currently, Transitional Hall serves as a female residence hall, which houses 432 junior, senior and graduate students. The amenities are basic cable plus HBO, Wi-Fi, MicroFridge unit in each room, a laundry facility, central heat and airconditioning and hotel style locks.

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Stewart Hall

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.T. Stewart Hall is named in honor of a noted alumnus, Edgar T. Stewart. This older facility has community bathrooms, basic cable plus HBO, Wi-fi, Microfridge units in each room, hotel style locks, and a laundry facility. It currently houses continuing freshmen and sophomore males. Stewart Hall will be closed at the end of the 2013 academic year.

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Campbell College Suites

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ampbell College Suites is an upscale residence complex that is comprised of two residence halls, “North and South�. The suites feature spacious bathrooms, furnished living/dining areas, and a kitchenette that is equipped with a refrigerator and microwaves. Other amenities which are included are: private rooms, wall-to-wall carpet, central heat and air-conditioning, Wi-Fi, basic cable plus HBO, laundry facilities, hotel style locks, a community kitchen for special occasions, lobby with a big screen television, study rooms and a beautiful courtyard. An added feature to Campbell Suites North is the Housing/Residence life Office is located on the first floor. Campbell College Suites was named after Campbell College, which was moved from Vicksburg to Jackson, Mississippi in 1899.

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Commuter Students

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ackson State University offers housing for more than 2,000 students, but a majority of the campus population includes commuter students, many of whom are native to Jackson and the surrounding areas. While many commuters gain economically, others say they miss out on information and participation in on-campus activities. A desire for independence and economic issues and rising living costs are sited as major reasons why students decide to live off campus instead of taking advantage of university resident housing. Tiara Thompson, a 22-year-old biology major from Jackson, Miss., said she usually relies on her peers to get information. ‘‘I really do not participate in many activities but my friends and classmates help to keep me informed.’’ Students like Jasmine F. Ash, a 22-year-old senior elementary education major from Atlanta, Ga., commute to campus everyday because she finds it less expensive to live off campus, despite the daily transportation and parking issues. The Division of Student Life sponsors a commuter student program and a commuter lounge on the second floor of the Student Center.

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Veteran Students

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ransitioning from any branch of the military impacts an individual physically, mentally, and emotionally. Jackson State University’s Veterans Services Program aims to help veteran students with that transition.

The Veterans Center officially opened on campus in August of 2012 led by director, Timothy Abrams, who also serves in the United States Army Reserve. With a rapid increase of veteran students, the services offered at the center are designed to help student veterans adapt to an academic institution and also serve as a liaison between the veteran student community and the university. The Veterans Center, which is located on the first floor of the Jacob L.Reddix Building, offers students academic and advising service, transition assistance, veteran career transition, veterans work-study, family assistance and counseling services in conjunction with the Latasha Norman Center for Counseling and Psychological Services. The services are provided in an effort to change the sub-culture of veteran students on campus by giving them a place they can call home on campus and a voice to make sure they are connected with the rest of their peers on and off campus and within the community. Fredricus Funchess, a junior computer engineering student from Georgetown, Miss., went straight to war right after his high school graduation. Funchess is a 21 year-old Army National Guardsman and a father. When trying to re-enter society after being deployed to Iraq, Funchess hit the ground running and ended up enrolled as a student at JSU. “I like to consider myself a hardworking man. After I came back, getting into school was easy with the help of my mother. She handled a lot of my paperwork and scholarship business while I was deployed,� said Funchess.

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International Students

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any of the students at Jackson State University had to only travel hundreds of miles away from home to go to college. But can you imagine being more than 8,000 miles away from home to attend college? There are many international students at Jackson State University who have done just that to immerse themselves in a whole new environment of different cultures and language. JSU has 49 countries represented on campus.

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L EADERSHIP

JSU P RESIDENT

Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers

Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers, Ph.D., is the 10th president of Jackson State University and a

professor of civil and environmental engineering.

Under Dr. Meyers’ leadership, Jackson State University earned a 10-year reaffirmation of accreditation from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools and national accreditations in business, teacher education and engineering as well as full certification by the NCAA. Dr. Meyers also pushed Jackson State University enrollment to an all-time high of 8,903, increased fundraising tenfold to $4.2 million, and positioned the university to become a national model for educating the underserved and achieving global recognition for excellence in education, research and service. Dr. Meyers brought to Jackson State University more than 30 years of academic and administrative leadership

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experience in higher education, serving most recently as President of Norfolk State University in Norfolk, Virginia. She served as Provost and Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs for North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University, where she was a tenured professor of mechanical engineering and Dean of the College of Engineering. Dr. Meyers also was a tenured faculty member at the Georgia Institute of Technology and was the first Associate Dean for Research in its College of Engineering. Dr. Meyers earned a bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from Howard University, a master’s degree in mechanical engineering and a doctorate in chemical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology, and completed post-doctoral work at Harvard University. She is a fellow in the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Dr. Meyers has published numerous articles and reports and given more than 200 invited presentations and technical papers on education and diversity topics as well as research and technical topics. Her numerous awards and honors include the National Society of Black Engineers’ Golden Torch Award, the National Science Foundation’s Presidential Young Investigator Award, and a joint resolution from the Virginia Legislature commending her for leadership and service to higher education.

L EADERSHIP

Dr. Meyers is a native of Newport News, Virginia. She has three adult children and four grandchildren.

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JSU P RESIDENTIAL C ABINET David Buford arrived at Jackson State University to serve as the associate general counsel in 2006. He was promoted to general counsel in 2012. Prior to coming to the university, Buford worked as an associate with the local firm currently known as Jones, Funderburg, Sessums, Peterson, and Lee, PLLC. Buford’s primary area of practice was employment law, workers compensation and general litigation. Buford earned a bachelor’s degree in English from the University of Mississippi in 2000 and a juris doctorate from the University of Mississippi School of Law in 2003.

L EADERSHIP

Mr. David S. Buford General Counsel

Dr. Marcus A. Chanay manages all faces of student life including housing, career and counseling services and student leadership. The University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff alumnus was promoted from associate vice president to vice president in July 2011. He holds a master’s degree in educational administration and supervision and a doctorate degree in urban higher education from Jackson State University.

Dr. Marcus A. Chanay Vice President of Student Life

Dr. Deborah F. Dent worked for more than 36 years for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Vicksburg before joining Jackson State University in August 2012. For the past decade, dent served as deputy director of the Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) at the U.S. Army Engineer Research and Development Center. There she managed operations of the lab and oversaw the execution of ITL’S facility budgets and assisted the execution of its research and development, engineering, information technology and major computational efforts. Dr. Deborah Dent Vice President for Information Mgmt. 76

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JSU P RESIDENTIAL C ABINET

Dr. Vivian L. Fuller Director of Athletics

David Hoard has a 30-year background in fundraising at institutions of higher learning as well as nonprofits, raising more than $250 million in his career. Before arriving at Jackson state University in August 2011, Hoard served as an executive director at Savannah College of Art and Design and vice chancellor at North Carolina AT&T State University. He is also chief executive officer of D.W. Hoard & Associates. Hoard holds a bachelor’s degree in history from Oberlin College.

L EADERSHIP

Dr. Vivian L. Fuller joined the JSU in August 2011 from Sojourner Douglas College, where she served as dean of the college’s Cambridge, Md., campus. Before joining Sojourner Douglas in 200, Fuller spent more than a decade directing the athletics programs at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore, Tennessee State University and Northeastern Illinois University. Fuller earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education from Fayetteville State University’s, a master of education from the University of Idaho and a doctorate in higher education from Iowa state.

Mr. David W. Hoard Vice President/Institutional Advancement

Dr. William E. McHenry oversees the university’s research and technology hub, which also provides support services to businesses, researchers and organizations. Before arriving at Jackson State University in 2005, McHenry held administration positions with the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education and the Mississippi Institutions of Higher Learning. McHenry holds a bachelors degree in chemistry from Southern Arkansas University and a doctorate in synthetic heterocyclic organic chemistry from Mississippi State University. Dr. William E. McHenry Executive Director J A C K S O N

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JSU P RESIDENTIAL C ABINET Dr. Felix Okojie has been a member of Jackson State university’s team for nearly 20 years. In his current capacity, Okojie has helped to bring in more than $670 million to the university for research. Okojie holds a bachelor’s degree in marketing from Auchi Polytechnic, a master’s degree in medical sociology and a doctorate in educational leadership and policy analysis from Atlanta University. Okojie also earned a master of public health degree from Jackson State University.

L EADERSHIP

Dr. Felix A. Okojie Vice President/Research & Fed Relations

Dr. James C. Renick joined Jackson State’s administration in July 2011 after serving as vice president of the American Council on Education. Renick was president of North Carolina A&T University from 1999 to 2006 and chancellor of the University of MichiganDearborn from 1993 to 1999. He earned a bachelor’s degree in sociology from Central State University in Ohio, a master’s degree in social work from the University of Kansas and a doctorate in public administration from Florida State University.

Dr. James C. Renick Vice President for Academic Affairs

Michael Thomas, who came to Jackson State in 2000 as interim vice president for business and finance, was named to the position permanenty in 2011. Thomas joined Jackson State after 16 years with the Jackson Public School District where he managed a $350 million budget. Thomas holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from Jackson State.

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Miss JSU

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arah Brown said shortly after being named one of three finalists in the Miss JSU pageant that she shared the same dream as her competitors. What she didn’t know at the time was that her dream to be Miss Jackson State University would come true.

Brown, a senior physics major from Jackson, Miss., won the title with 623 of the 1147 votes cast. She said: “Being elected as Miss Jackson State University 2012-2013 is a feeling that cannot be expressed in words. It has brought a feeling to my heart of hope, love, and happiness.” A member of several organizations including the Meteorology Club, Society of Physics, Chi Alpha Epsilon National Honor Society, Alpha Lambda Delta, Essence of a Lady Tiger, Miss Residence Hall Association 2011-201, Miss Congeniality for Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Brown is a dedicated volunteer to Stewpot Community Center. She attends Mt. Nebo Missionary Baptist Church in Jackson, where she serves as a member of Daughters of Destiny. Brown also enjoys reading, tutoring in math and science. “I had a desire to run for Miss JSU because I really want to implement my platform “Think BIG” which focuses on Bigger Service, Bigger Impact, and Bigger Success.” Brian Wilkes, 2012-2012 JSU Student Government Association Presidents believes that Brown has always ‘thought big’! “I remember the first time I met Sarah. We had a class together our freshman year; Sarah came into the class and announced ‘Hello class, my name is Sarah Brown and I am going to be Miss Jackson State University 2012-2013.’” Wilkes said that from that point on he had made a friend in Brown. “A lot of my peers doubted my decision to run for Miss JSU because I wasn’t involved in anything and I wasn’t that social. I stayed in my books, but I knew that I was going to be Miss Jackson State University. It is something that I have wanted since the age of fifteen,” said Brown.

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SGA President

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dream came true for Brian Wilks on April 12, 2012 when he was elected president of the Student Government Association at Jackson State University.

Wilks, a senior political science major from Prentiss, Miss., spent his term trying to enhance the unity between the JSU student body and the SGA. “As the SGA president, I want to bridge the gap between the SGA and students. For the last three years, I have learned things from each president. It is a tough job, and I know I will have to work hard at it,” said Wilks, who ran unopposed for the top leadership position. Wilks has been a part of student leadership since his freshman year and said he knows his strengths and his weaknesses, which will hopefully make him a prepared leader. “I am a thinker. When there are issues presented, I can brainstorm solutions to solve them,” said Wilks. “My weakness is that sometimes I take on too many responsibilities. It can be hard for me to say no to people sometimes. I am good at getting things done, but there are times where I am burnt out at the end of the day.” Wilks said becoming SGA president was his opportunity to serve. “Winning was a humbling experience. I am excited about the title, but what can I do with the title? Being the SGA president can allow me to show the students that I am here to serve the people.” Wilks wants to be known as a president of action.

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SGA Executive Board

Quentin Hendree, Director of Public Relations, George Tan, Director of Multicultural and International Student Involvement, Roland Swanson, Parliamentarian, Lauren Summer, Senior Class President, Brian Wilks, SGA President, Marcus Lindsey, SGA Vice President, Jeremy Sanford, Chief Justice, Charles Cathey, III, Junior Class President, Michael Gorden, Freshman Class President

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Class of

2013

Brian Wilks, SGA President; Chelsea Swanier, Parliamenatarian; Willie Bell, Asst. Secretary, Lauren Summer, President, Sarah Brown, Miss JSU; Brandon Johnson, Vice President; Jason Hardiman, Mr. Senior; Amanda Smith, Business Manager, Donovan Mitchell, Secretary

Class of

2014 Carlos Smith, SGA Associate Chief Justice, MaNisha Heard, Miss Junior, Roland Swanson, SGA Parliamentarian, William Parks, Class Senator, Daryl Williams, Jr., Parliamentarian, Charles Cathey, III, President, Dexter Nix, Academic Council Senator, Maurice Martin, Jr., Class Senator, Deja Knight, Torrian Watts & Jason Gibson, Religious Council Senators, Perrin Bostic, Special Interest Council Senator, Natya Jones, SGA Justice

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Class of

2015 Left to Right – Arekia Bennett, Amber Brown, Shontrice Garrett, Lianna Norris

Class of

2016 Erin Miller & Kentonio Johnson, Class Senators, Michael Gorden, President, Robin Jackson, Miss Freshman, Rashad Moore, Vice President, Jessica Stubbs, Secretary

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SGA

Legislative Council

Erin Miller, Freshman Class Senator, Kentonio Johnson, Freshman Council Senator, Deja Knight, Special Interest Council Senator, Jason Gibson, Religious Council Senator, Marcus Lindsey, SGA Vice President, Dexter Nix, Maurice Martin, Jr., Torrian Watts, Religious Council Senator, Perrin Bostic, Special Interest Council Senator, Kachelle Pratcher, Residential Council Senator William Parks

SGA

Judiciary Council

Natya Jones (Justice), Carlos Smith (Justice), Jeremy Sanford (Chief Justice), Jade King (Justice), (Not pictured: Daryl Swanigan, Jr.)

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A CADEMIC S POTLIGHT

D OLLYE M.E. R OBINSON D EAN E MERITUS

The Mississippi Institution of Higher Learning approves Dean Emeritus status for Dollye M.E. Robinson in 2012. Dr. Robinson, former dean of the College of Liberal Arts, has served Jackson State University for 60 years. She also is a full professor in the Department of Music. In recognition of Robinson’s numerous contributions, the College of Liberal Arts building bears her name. Robinson began her career at JSU in 1952 as the assistant band director and instructor of music. Since that time, Robinson has served in leadership positions including head of the Department of Music, chair of the Division of Fine Arts, associate dean of the School of Liberal Arts and dean of the College of Liberal Arts. During her tenure at JSU, Robinson led significant progress at the university including designing and supervising the construction of the F.D. Hall Music Center and providing significant input in the design of the College of Liberal Arts building, which is named in her honor. She also initiated the degree programs for the bachelor of music education, bachelor of music performance and the master of music education, while supervising the self-study process for initial accreditation for the Department of Art, and for the university in 1971 with the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools. A Jackson native, Robinson earned a bachelor’s degree in music from Jackson State and a bachelor’s degree, two master’s degrees and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University. She has also studied at Boston University and the Boston College of Music.

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College of Liberal Arts

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Dr. Lawrence T. Potter, Jr. Dean, College of Liberal Arts

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he College of Liberal Arts is changing lives by providing the best in performance, creativity, and excellence in the social and behavioral sciences. This college is comprised of three college divisions and ten departments including: College of Fine and Performing Arts: Department of Art and Department of Music; College of Communication: Department of English and Modern Languages, Department of Mass Communications, and the Department of Speech Communications; College of Social and Behavioral Sciences: Department of History and Philosophy, Department of Military Sciences, Department of Political Sciences, Department of Psychology and the Department of Sociology and Criminal Jus-

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College of Business

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Dr. Jean-Claude Assad Dean, College of Business

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he Jackson State University College of Business is empowered with its accreditation by the American Assembly of Collegiate Schools of Business to provide educational opportunities to individuals interested in pursing undergraduate and graduate degrees in business. Having envisioned the business world’s changing needs, the School’s objective is to prepare professionally competent individuals capable of competing successfully in a global marketplace and to equip them with the social, ethical and leadership skills that will make them valuable members of any business, community or organization. The college is comprised of six undergraduate majors, two master degree programs of study, a Ph.D. program in Business Administration and certificate programs in Real Estate and Accounting.

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College of Education & Human Development

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Dr. Daniel Watkins Dean, College of Education & Human Development

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he majority of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) began as teacher colleges. The College of Education and Human Development at Jackson State University (JSU) has not lost that historically prominent role. It ranks second among HBCUs in graduating education majors. It leads the state in terms of African-American education graduates and its doctoral graduates lead the university.

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College of Science, Engineering & Technology

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Dr. Richard Alo Dean, College of Science, Engineering & Technology

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he College of Science, Engineering and Technology at Jackson State University has distinguished itself with outstanding faculty and staff who are dedicated to providing quality education and the science leadership necessary to achieve the highest possible level of excellence. This college is comprised of six departments including: Aerospace Studies; Biology; Chemistry; Mathematics; Physics, Atmospheric Science & Geosciences; and Technology.

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College of Public Service

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Dr. Mario Azevedo Dean, College of Public Service

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he vision of the College of Public Service is to be a global multidisciplinary learning environmnent of excellence in teaching, research and experiential service provided in partnership with both urban and rural communities in the State, the nation, and the world. The mission of the College of Public Service is to educate students from diverse backgrounds for outstanding professional service and to develop local, national, and international innovative leaders in the professional academic disciplines represented in the Schools of Health Sciences, Policy and Planning, and Social Work.

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H.T. Sampson Library

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Dr. Melissa Druckery Dean, Libraries & Information Services

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he libraries at Jackson State University assist you in attaining the skill required in all of your future educational and occupational endeavors.

The centerpiece of the Jackson State University Library System is the H. T. Sampson Library. Located on the main campus, it serves as the primary library and research facility for the campus community. Please visit the library web site (http://sampson.jsums.edu) for a description of the resources and services that are available.

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Graduate Studies

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Dr. Dorris R. Robinson-Gardner Dean, Graduate Studies

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he Graduate School is composed of the departments which offer graduate instruction leading to masters’, educational specialists and doctoral degrees. The faculty of the Graduate School consists of faculty members in the departments who are qualified to teach and conduct research on the graduate level. Members of the graduate faculty engage in scholarly pursuits: research, writing, publishing and participating in professional organizations.

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Undergraduate Studies

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Dr. Evelyn Leggette Dean, Undergraduate Studies

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he Division of Undergraduate Studies (DUS) at Jackson State University provides a studentcentered quality assurance program   for first and second year students that prepare them to contribute to the social, cultural, and economic development of the state, nation and world.  The major areas in the Division include the First Year Experience, the W.E.B. Du Bois Honors College and the University College. The Division embraces the three fold mission of JSU by collaborating with the academic colleges and schools and the Division of Student Life in ensuring that students are prepared for the rigor of their intended major, are retained and engaged in leadership, service, citizenship, and community development activities.

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JSU S TUDENT A CTIVITIES


Sonic Boom of the South

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he marching band began in the 1940s consisting of college students and students from Lanier High School. Through the years it has become known for intricate, precision marching and the big band sound. The “Sonic Boom” has performed many halftime appearances for the Atlanta Falcons, Detroit Lions, New Orleans Saints and Cincinnati Bengals; a television special for Motown’s 30th Anniversary and the 34th NAACP Image Awards, with a special guest performance by “Cedric the Entertainer.” The band is a favored entry in halftime performances during football season as well as for parades across Mississippi and in other states. The Jackson State University Marching Band was dubbed The Sonic Boom of the South in 1971 by students in the band. In 1974, the band’s theme, “Get Ready,” an old Motown favorite was selected and three years after that, the “Tiger Run-On” was perfected. The “Tiger Run- On” is a fast, eye-catching shuffle that blends an adagio step with an up-tempo shuffle, then back to adagio — a “Sonic Boom” trademark that brings fans to their feet during halftime performances.

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Dowell Taylor Director of Bands

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Yearbook Staff

Taylor Bembery

Crystal Killingsworth

Lamaar Mateen

Trerica Roberson

Tiffany Edmondson

Alexis Anderson

Dominique McCraney Yearbook Editor

Dominique McCraney On assignment taking photos.

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Accounting Society

1st Row: Left to Right – Henry Thomas (cosponsor), Dominique Robinson, Miwa Martin, Terica Banks, Ashley Arterberry, Matthew Harris, Donald McWilliams (cosponsor) 2nd Row: Left to Right— Yan Gup, April Williams, Angela Bailey, Trista Demby, Dontrell Banks, Loai Alkhazan 3rd Row: Left to Right— Kanace Griffin, Matthew Lampley, Steven Marshall, Tevin Gates, Montre Brooks

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Alpha Lambda Delta

1st Row: Left to Right – Selena Smith, Mariah Coleman, Jakebia Keih, 2nd Row: Left to Right - Shontrice Garrett, Sydney Brooks, Amber Brown, Shatequa Hughes, Dilede Offiah

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Alpha Phi Sigma

1st Row: Left to Right - Gilbert Baxley (Assistant Treasurer), Shirley Collins (Assistant Secretary), Donya Manning (Secretary), Herman Horton (President), Quinlin McAfee (Vice President)-Not Pictured

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History Club

1st Row: Left to Right – Lawrence Honning, Ylani Hayes, Jalieya Brown, Prof. Farah Christmas (sponsor), Crystal Shelwood 2nd Row: Left to Right— Pete Haddad, Matthew Hawkins, Jasmine Preston, Bonnie Gardner (advisor) 3rd Row: Left to Right— Jamal Phillips

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Insatiable Modeling Squad

1st Row: Left to Right – Danielle Bryant, Carolyn Wright, Shanta Webb, Candace Fairley, Ayriana Wingfiels, Lakeidre Davis, Jeremy Liddell, Jerry Woods, Kristen Hudson, Jazmyn Wilson, Kayla Young, Demeshin Jackson, Latoya Williams

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International Student Association

1st Row: Left to Right – Liza A. Gebre, Claudette Tchakowa, Lufat Rahman, Meskerem Erebo, Meron Asnake 2nd Row: Left to Right— Alain-Daniel R. Wa-Bagoma, Loai Al Khazan, Chendra He, Magololin, Harmina, Anissa Hidouls, Anas Alfawe

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MAADRAMA

1st Row: Left to Right – James Lehaman Jr., Asanti Alexander, Dominique Ventris, Ramaria Malone, Ruby C. Dixon, Jasmine Grant, Charence Higgins, Matisha Heard, Jennifer Williams, Jacolby Adams 2nd Row: Left to Right— Sherita Ferrell, Kenya Lee, Christopher Cox, Monique Harris, John Bennett, Ashley Baker, Jenilyn Saul 3rd Row: Left to Right— Quintalions Phillips, LaToya Norman, Rashad Moore, Tornell Edwards, Jarvis Horn, JaLieya Brown 4th Row: Left to Right— Dominique Marshall, Bianca Cook, Nigel Davenport, Jalynn Brumfield, Ben-cuda Stowers, Randrika Henderson, Travis Binforn

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Outspoken

1st Row: Left to Right – Dominique Ventris, Lillian Lewis, Deborah Hart, Ylani Hayes 2nd Row: Left to Right— LaKeidre Davis, Aylyn Caston, Mary Thompson, Leo Alexander Harris

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Political Science Club

1st Row: Left to Right – Alexandra Drake, Nafeesa Edges, Princess Williams, Jasmine Hegwood 2nd Row: Left to Right - Dominique McCoaney, Isaiah Boydice, Anthony Woodberry

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Pre-Alumni Council

1st Row: Left to Right – Amber Brown, 2nd Row: Left to Right: Jewel Jackson, Jabulile Gumede, Clell McCurdy, Angela Williams, Kalyn Steed, Jakebia Keith 3rd Row: Left to Right - Sydney Brooks, Dominique McCraney, Sydney Tarver

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Society of Women Engineers

1st Row: Left to Right – Liza A. Gebre, Meskerem Etebo, Mariam Borga

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SPNEA Club

1st Row: Left to Right – Shontrice, Mariah Coleman, Trenton Miller, Candace Chambers, Alexander Drake, Shatequa Hughes

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Tau Beta Sigma

1st Row: Left to Right – Jasmine Smith, Erica McIntyre, Tia Carr, Labreia Thurman, Victoria Montgomery

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The Dazzlers

1st Row: Left to Right – Debbie Christy, Tarnika Love, Shayla Nelson, Briana McAllister 2nd Row: Left to Right— Tomysyne Ford, Jade King, Marlinda Yarbrough, Jordyn Williams

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Urban Studies Club

1st Row: Left to Right – Moe Chowdhury, Kendria Gray, Nafeesa Edges 2nd Row: Left to Right— Adrian Appway, Tiffany Bush, Julian Taylor

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Veterans Student Association

1st Row: Left to Right – SPC Jared Douglas, Sgt Dale Brown, PVT Tony Carlvin

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American Chemical Association

1st Row: Left to Right – Alan Wells, Salwa Beguumj, Kasprina Moton, Jheena Victorian, Shama Jackson 2nd Row: Left to Right—Zikera Brown, Angela L. Williams, Dalephine Davis, Lucky Ahmed, Anastasiia Goeius 3rd Row: Left to Right— Georgio Proctor, Brandon Newton, Natalie Anderson, ABM Zakaia, Attilah M. Edges 4th Row: Left to Right – Kelse Bryant, Kleopatra Ruddock, Hakim Jamison, Brian Brown

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Chi Alpha Epsilon

1st Row: Left to Right – Lee Cavett, Stacy Davison, Treyvon Wilson

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Interfaith Gospel Choir

1st Row: Left to Right – Fatonya Hamblin, Danita Lee, Jasmine Howard, Andriana Wesley 2nd Row: Left to Right—Rasheeda Coleman, Aja Woods, Chandra McDonald, Brittany Davenport 3rd Row: Left to Right— Tamron Tobias, Jeremy Bew

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Fellowship of Christian Athletes

1st Row: Left to Right – Elias Wells, Bernard Aldrich Jr., Kleopatra Ruddock, Lori Hampton (Advisor) 2nd Row: Left to Right—Kemaurrius McGee, Maurice Brooks, Taylor Emerson, Elder Michael Hampton (Advisor)

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JSU NAACP

1st Row: Left to Right – Jade King, Knesha Thomas, Arianna Stokes, Jason Hairdman, Ashley Berry , Alicia Meadows 2nd Row: Left to Right - Kelly Gills, Nivea Green, Darryl Bufford , Lianna Norris, Quentin Hendree 3rd Row: Left to RIght - Reagan Harvey, Taylor Bembery

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NOBCCHE

1st Row: Left to Right – Kaspnna Moton, Dalephine Davis, Shantelle Hughes, Jacqueline McComb, Juganta K. Roy, Leondra S. Lawson 2nd Row: Left to Right—Denise Yancey, Sharnek Walker, Zikera Brown, Tetiana Sergeieva, Anastasiia Golius, Aisha Reed 3rd Row: Left to Right— Georgio Proctor, Angela L. Williams, Attilah M. Edges, Willie Wesley 4th Row: Left to Right—Brandon Newton, Kelsey Bryant, Hakim Jamison, Christen Robinson 5th Row: Left to Right— Kleopatra Ruddock, Brian Brown, Toyketa Horne

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NSSLHA

1st Row: Left to Right – Ebony Honeysucker, Kala Battle, Amanda Williams Delendtricus Thompson 2nd Row: Left to Right—Shaquitta Washington, Carolyn Ashley, Shemekia Arterberry, Shiniqua Love

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MENC Music Essential Networking Club

1st Row: Left to Right – Kurtina Maholmes, Courtney Green, Kendrea Millbrooks 2nd Row: Left to Right—Davin Telfair, Rene Young, Jeremy Bew, Timothy Stanford

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Project S.A.F.E.

1st Row: Left to Right - Henry Goss, De Quindre Robinson, Ben-cuda Stowers 2nd Row: Left to Right - Dominique Lacey, Candace Chambers

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Young Life

1st Row: Left to Right – Timothy Griffin, Iasia Collins, Grace White 2nd Row: Left to Right—Chadrick Tyler, Michael Allen

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The Blue & White Flash / eXperience Magazine

1st Row: Left to Right - Tamikia Dunomes, Krystal Killingsworth, Taylor Bembery, Dominique McCraney 2nd Row: Left to Right - Allen Wells, Trerica Roberson, Mark Braboy, Derrick Walton

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Air Force ROTC

1st Row: Left to Right – Evan Gist, Rashad Sayles, Raymond Triplett, Jarrett Sanders, Christopher Wilson, Quinlin T. McAfee 2nd Row: Left to Right—Russell Lewis, Gregory Posey, Benjamin Hulitt, Brittany Lynn, Shanel James, Michael Gorden 3rd Row: Left to Right—Cheryl Shaw, TSgt Tashisha Morgan, SSgt Regina Nickel, Maj LaTracia Price, Lt. Col Kevin Wilson

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JSU Cheerleaders

1st Row: Left to Right - Kalyn Steed, Jasmine Jackson 2nd Row: - Cheryl E. Jones-Shaw (Cheer Coach), LaShayla Gilbert, Anthony “AJ” Baker, Mascot 3rd Row - JoVonda Flowers, Sierra Jackson, Kelli Gills

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JSU NPHC Greek Organizations

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Omega Psi Phi Fraternity, Inc.

Corliss Harris, Travis Wood, Reginald Lewis, Stephen Rayford, Louis Leathers, Michael Hoggatt, Willie McCoy, Keith January, Tommy Brumfield, Terrance Handy, Karl Calendar, Alonzo Hutchins, Percy Seaberry

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Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

1st Row: Left to Right – Jordan Carter, Lauren Franklin, Brionna Brown, Satara Patrick, Morgan Jackson, Morgan Polk, Terriona Cowan, Kenya Gilkey, Mariah Wells 2nd Row: Left to Right—Anissa Butler, Albany Essex, Ashley Berry, Arianna Stokes, Ryan Irving, Faith Sherman, Andrea Johnson, Ebony Honeysucker, Robria Daniels, Lakeitha Brown, Taylor Johnson 3rd Row: Left to Right—Jennie Butler, I’Esha Bowens, Ashia Clark, Reyana Stowes, (Amber Brown, Not Pictured)

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Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, Inc.

Kieychemen Spann, Tierra Wiliams, Jamencia Pay, Jasmine Howard, Y’Tasha Smoots, Brittany Gibson, JaTorie Towers, LaCorie Towers, Brianna McFarland, Frances McCain, Lisa Wren, Renesha Hendrix, Lynice Higgins, Dominique Simmons, Ana Brown, Chelsea Tillman, LaTanque Smith, Candice Kinnard, Kenecia Harris, Charmaine Wooden, Xavier Hudson, Stefane’ Puckett, Kendra Montgomery, Kendrid Gray, Rolique Moffett, Brittany N. Williams, Jasmine Barnes, Sherika Trader, Taquita Knott, Rosilyn Burke, Chandra McDonald, Ebonee Swilley, April Thomas, Jasmne Moering, Jasmine Knighton, Brittany Jelly, Julie Ann Drake, Aja Woods, Brianna Wright, Marcedes Scott, Kourtney Kelly, Chiquita Anderson

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Sigma Gamma Rho Sorority, Inc.

Kristi Williams, Johnetha Lindsey, Kenya Lee

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Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.

Gregory Lane, Clincy Harris, Byron Steele, Terry Wilborn, Tyron Steele, Damien Payton, Gentile Calhoun, Darryl Bufford, Ramon Jackson, Chadrick Jenkins, Anthony Baker, Roland Swanson, Wilie Bell, Robert Ford, Keonte Turner, Kersee Burkett, Dexter Nix, Lavale Leggett, Marcus Lindsey, Norman Handy, Kaylon Mccou, Richard Kelly, William Jenkins, Zavien Magee, Cordarius Hill, Carrol McLaughlin, Eddie Parker

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Iota Phi Theta Fraternity, Inc.

1st Row: Left to Right - Paul Mc Ginnis, Markus Bailey, Dhahran Hall 2nd Row: Left to Right - Edgar Williams, Mike Allen, Walter Tabb, Cam, Anthony Gordon

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Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity, Inc.

1st Row: Left to Right – William Parks, William Neal, Darion Ragsdale, Preston Fowler, Carlos Smith, Jeremy Sanford 2nd Row: Left to Right—Keith Willis, Marquez Walker, Brandon King, Corvis Willis, Norvell Jackson, Phillip Naylor 3rd Row: Left to Right— Abraham Erhabor, Deunta Pittman, Derrick Walton, Delbert Griffin Jr.

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J ACKSON S TATE U NIVERSIT Y • S PORTS


Football

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he Jackson State University Tigers were three points away from becoming Southwestern Athletic Conference champions…So close and yet so far away. The Tigers lost the title game to the University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff in a 24-21 overtime nail-biter in which the Tigers led most of the game. A 95-yard touchdown pass from Arkansas-Pine Bluff quarterback  Benjamin Anderson  to  Willie Young  with 2 minutes left in regulation forced overtime, and the Lions emerged with a 24-21 victory over Jackson State in the Southwestern Athletic Conference championship game at Legion Field. After Moore was hit from behind by linebacker Xavier Lofton, linebacker  Bill Ross  scooped up the fumble and raced 73 yards for a touchdown with 4 seconds left in the half. The bitter loss ended the 7-2 (7-5 overall) season, and hopes for the elusive SWAC title that has not been held by JSU since 2007 when the Tigers defeated Grambling University. Rico Richardson was hoping to cap off his senior year and stellar season with the win, but still made the JSU Sport’s history books. Richardson was named the 2012 Offensive Player of the Year. Richardson, a senior wide receiver from Natchez, Miss. majoring in recreation administration, joined the single season 1,000 yard club during Jackson State University’s game against Alabama A&M University on Nov. 11, 2012 and was the only receiver in the SWAC to gain over 1,000 yards receiving this season, He is one of five and the first in 13 years who has been able to accomplish such a goal. He finished the regular season with 56 receptions for 1,081 yards which led the SWAC and is ranked 13th in the NCAA. He also led the conference in TD grabs with 10. He averaged 19.3 yards per catch and 98.3 per game also lead the SWAC.

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n a SWAC Title re-match with Alabama A&M, Jackson State  secured its second conference championship by defeating the Lady Bulldogs 3-1 with a set score of 2522, 25-23, 25-19 and 25-17. The Lady Tigers will receive the SWAC’s automatic bid to the NCAA Tournament. Mikayla Rolle and Christine Edwards posted 10 and 28 kills, respectively. Rolle also recorded seven blocks in Jackson State’s victory.  Angelica Kelley contributed 11 digs, while Jenna Siddiqui chipped in 44 assists as the Lady Tigers captured back to back SWAC Titles. Christine Edwards, Mikayla Rolle and Paige Williams were named to the 2012 AllTournament Team.  Edwards was also named Tournament MVP.  Head Coach Rose Washington received the 2012 Coach of the Year Award.

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SWAC CHAMPIONS

Volleyball

SWAC CHAMPIONS 2 Consecutive Years!!! J A C K S O N

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Basketball

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SU Tiger fans were looking forward to lay-ups, hook shots, dunks and much more from the 2012-2013 JSU Tigers Men’s Basketball team. Last season, JSU was hit hard by the injury bug to key players, losing SWAC preseason player of the year. The Tigers ended the season 11-22, 9-9 Southwestern Athletic Conference winning four of their last five games. Although the record didn’t show it, the games lost were hard fought to the final seconds of play. The Tigers placed 4th in the SWAC at the close of the 2012-2013 season.

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Women’s Basketball

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urina Dixon was tapped to lead the future of the lady Tiger basketball team. Dixon is a seasoned basketball coach with over 20 years of coaching experience at the NCAA Division I and II levels. Under her leadership, the Lady Tigers finished the season 12-15, 9-9 in the SWAC, ending the regular season by winning six of its final 10 games. JSU Lady Tigers entered the SWAC Tournament as the No. 5 seed. Tiffany Kellum, Jackson State’s starting post player, was named to the Boxtorow Division I HBCU Women’s All-American team. Kellum, who was also named a first team All-SWAC team member, finished the regular season as Jackson State’s leading scorer.

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Soccer

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or the second time in SWAC finals history, JSU faced off against MVSU for the title. Since 2007, JSU and MVSU have met three times in the conference tournament. In 2010, Jackson State outscored Mississippi Valley State, 2-0, in the last 20 minutes of the game giving the Lay Tigers their first ever SWAC Soccer Championship, one they wanted to attain again. With most of the first half scoreless, it seemed like a repeat of 2010, until  Shanesse Spratt scored the first goal of the game at the 36:54 mark sending the game into halftime with a 1-0 score. The Lady Tigers turned up the momentum, firing off 4 shots on goal in the second half. Shelby Willcock, MVSU keeper, was ready for them as she stopped all four shots giving Mississippi Valley State the victory over Jackson State.  

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labama State and Jackson State tied for first in the East, while Southern is favored in the West to win SWAC divisional titles this season. Both Hornets and Tigers picked up 77 points in the voting by Southwestern Athletic Conference head coaches and sports information directors. Each team also received eight first place votes. Alcorn State was picked third with 61 points and two first place votes, while Mississippi Valley State placed fourth with one first place vote and 48 points and Alabama A&M was fifth with 22 points. Southern took 10 of the 20 first place votes and tallied 85 points as the favored team to win the West. Prairie View was second with 74 points and six first place votes. Grambling and Texas Southern were a close third and fourth with 59 and 56 points respectively, while Arkansas-Pine Bluff was fifth with 26 points.

Baseball

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Softball

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he Southwestern Athletic Conference released its 2013 Preseason All-Conference teams for softball. The Jackson State had six Lady Tigers selected to the teams. Breea Jamerson, Sabeana Romero and Tayler Nave were each named first team members, while Amanda Vasquez, Lauren Aikens and Jasmine Warren received second team nods. Last season, pitcher Jamerson received second team All-SWAC honors last season. Romero was named the SWAC’s 2012 «Hitter of the Year». Nave was named SWAC «Newcomer of the Year», first team All-SWAC and All-Tournament Team during the 2012 season. The Lady Tigers were also predicted to finish second in the SWAC this season. Mississippi Valley State was selected as the preseason conference champion according to league coaches and SIDs. The Lady Tigers open the 2013 season on February 7, 2013 against Southeast Missouri State. First pitch is set for 4 pm at the JSU Softball Complex.

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Golf

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he Jackson State men’s and women’s golf teams finished in second place in the 2013 Southwestern Athletic Conference golf championship.

Stevie Booker finished fourth in the individual standings as she fired a 163 (83, 80), She was named an All-SWAC first team member. Erica Payton came in ninth place with a 169 (86, 83) while Amanda White and Barbara Wilson both finished 10th (175) to round out the list of All-SWAC members. Kyle Bodenstein led Jackson State as he fired a 72 on the final day and 218 for the tournament, as he finished in third place in the individual standings and earned an All-SWAC first team nod. Josh McCormick also earned an All-SWAC first team spot as he finished fourth with a score of 224. James Reed finished in sixth place with a score of 227 to earn a spot on the All-SWAC second team.

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Track & Field

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he Jackson State men’s and women’s track and field teams opened the outdoor season with top performances at the MC Season Opener.

The Lady Tigers took second place in the 4x100 meter relay (Akila Craig, Shannon Parker, Cameia Alexander and Munirat Balogun) with a time of 48.49. Sharonda Bryant claimed first place in the shot put (12.78 meters) and the discus throw (38.56 meters). Brionna Epes finished fourth in the shot put (9.85). Cliffaniqua Towbridge finished third in the discus (37.97). In men’s action Bentrell McGee finished second in the 100 meter dash with a time of 11.17. Carson Smith finished fifth with a time of 11.35. Dana Roberts took third place in the 400 meter dash with a time of 50.67. Ibrahim Hinds came in fifth place in the 800 meter run (2:03.15). Alexander Crawford finished third in the 1,500 meter run with a time of 4:13.80. The Tigers 4x100 meter relay team finished in fourth place (Justin Adams, Ledemus King, Jonathan Atkins and Richard Kelly) 42.85. In field action, Deshaun Allen won the shot put with a toss of 13.66 meters. He also finished second in the discus throw (38.60). Hakeem Belle finished fourth in the long jump with a distance of 6.50 meters. Tometrick Hemingway and Belle placed third and fourth respectively in the triple jump with leaps of 13.41 and 13.28 meters.

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Tennis

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he JSU Tennis Facility was constructed in 2001 is a part of the Walter Payton Athletics Complex on campus. The facility, which is home to JSU men’s and women’s tennis, features 12 lighted courts, with scoreboards and stadium seating for 100. «The Courts» are a state-of-the-art facility also opened to use by JSU students. The Jackson State women’s tennis team openned the 2013 season by hosting the McNeese State Cowgirls at the JSU Tennis Complex. The JSU tennis program is under the direction of first year head coach Scott Pennington. The Jackson State men’s tennis doubles team of Jose Luque and Ernesto Morales were named to the All-SWAC second team for doubles players at the No. 2 position. During the conference portion of the schedule the duo of Luque and Morales recorded a 3-0 record.

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Bowling

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he Jackson State bowling team tied for third place at the 2013 SWAC Bowling East Roundup held at Fannin Lanes. After confirmation of all  scores from both  round-ups, the 2013 All-Southwestern Athletic Conference  Bowling teams have been determined. In addition, the tournament field for the bowling championship has been set. By a very slim margin, Jackson State junior Dyanna Scott earned SWAC Bowler of the Year honors. Scott claimed the title by less than a pin. She finished the round-ups with an average of 200.46, just ahead of Sharita Turner of Prairie  view who finished with an average of 200.33.

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F EATURES 172

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F EATURES J A C K S O N

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Career Fair

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ressed in business attire and power suits, students participated in the Career/Internship Fair hosted by the Career Services Center (CSC) at Jackson State University on Feb. 13. in the Student Center. Employers including Walgreens, Missisippi Public Broadcasting, and Bank Plus, were just a few of the many companies that came prepared to accept resumes from JSU students. This Career/Internship fair is the second that has been hosted by CSC this school year. The fair was open to students of all classifications and majors. According to the JSU Career Guide, the mission of CSC is to provide career services in a supportive and proactive manner for JSU students and alumni, including information and counseling on career choices, graduate and professional school opportunities, internship opportunities, and part-time and full-time employment opportunities. Alicia Meadows, a senior biology pre-med major from Detroit, Mich, was prompt at the career fair and wasn’t going to let any opportunities pass her. “I feel like the career fair is really important for people who are trying to get in the work force and don’t have the opportunity to actually go out or maybe they don’t have transportation to get to these employers. The career fair is giving them a chance, ” said Meadows. Meadows said that the fair included employers that she was possibly interested in. “I had the list that Career Services provided me with up front. It was a list with all the employers here I picked out the ones that I knew for sure correlated with my major. I also went to all the other tables just to see if they had something for my major,” said Meadows.

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Heritage Dining Re-Opening

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he Heritage Dining Hall at Jackson State University revamped its services to provide students with a relaxing environment, more variety and more nutritious choices. ARAMARK provides these services to JSU. The company, according to its website, is a $13 billion world leader in professional services, headquartered in the United States. Students who have been partaking in these new services said they enjoy the food. Amber Stokes, a freshman biology pre-med major from Jackson, Miss., said, “I enjoy the food and would choose the cafeteria over fast food any day.�

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Chinese Moon Festival

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he Chinese Moon Festival, also known as the Mid-Autumn Festival, occurs on the 15th day of the 8th Chinese lunar calendar every year. On this day, families unite and the moon is its brightest and fullest. Sure enough, the moon was shining, Sept. 28th, through the windows of Ballroom A of the Student Center. On this evening of a glowing full moon, Jackson State University students of different ethnicities gathered to experience Chinese culture through music, food, language, and dance. The program included Chinese poetry, folktales, and a skit, all performed by students of both Chinese and American culture. The ladies wore brightly colored Cheongsams, which are Chinese garments. Musical instruments included a harmonica, guitar, and a hulusi. Some foods for the evening were sweet and sour chicken, fried dumplings, sushi, and moon cake. Moon cake, a thick pastry filled with red azuki beans, is often served with tea at Chinese Moon Festivals. The audience interacted with laughter and through singing. The students also performed “Jambo Bwana,” a Kenyan greeting song in the Swahili language, welcoming all cultures, including the Chinese, into the country. Shantelle Hughes, a chemistry graduate student from Centreville, Miss. enjoyed the festival. “It was really good. I know a lot about Chinese culture because my professors, whom are Chinese, teach us different things,” said Hughes.

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Anaso Jobodwana

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ackson State University welcomed back JSU sophomore and 2012 Olympian Anaso Jobodwana during a congratulatory celebration on Aug. 15 in the Lee E. Williams Athletics and Assembly Center.

Our Olympians

The event featured the Sonic Boom of the South marching band, greetings from Athletics Director Dr. Vivian L. Fuller, men’s track coach Mark Thorne and David Hoard, vice president for Institutional Advancement. A native of Eastern Cape, South Africa, Jobodwana ran for his home country during the 2012 Summer Olympics.

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Michael Tinsley

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ackson State University is proud of its alumnus Michael Tinsley, who earned a silver medal in the 2012 summer Olympic games. Tinsley, who competed in the 400-meter hurdles, finished with a personal best of 47.91 seconds. Tinsley said being a student at Jackson State was the best experience of his life. ‘‘I remember all the support I got from the faculty when I was there,» he said. «JSU gave me an opportunity to get an education and to do what I love to do, which is run track.’’

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uring Welocme week students participated in community service projects at various locations around the Jackson, Miss. area. The Alice Varnado Harden Center for Service and Community Engaged Learning at Jackson State University, (the Harden Center) promotes all students toward improving the human condition through civic engagement. Through the Harden Center, the university is able to continue to expand its role in cultivating and sustaining stronger communities. While the university provides excellence in educating its students, it also believes that connecting student learning with civic responsibility is fundamental to the academic environment for students who earn their degree at Jackson State University. To that end, the Harden Center supports students, faculty and staff toward a commitment to lifelong citizenship locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.

Freshmen Ser vice Project

Community Service

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hirty-five Jackson State University students spent their “Alternative Spring Break” (ASB) in service to communities in Hattiesburg, Miss. from March 10-15, 2013.

While many students enjoyed their break at sandy beaches with hot sunshine or visited family and friends, this group of students lent a hand with recovery efforts related to the devastating Feb. 10 tornado that ripped through Hattiesburg. JSU students worked with different organizations, including Volunteer Hattiesburg, Ebenezer Baptist Church, and Mount Carmel Baptist Church. Along with Ebenezer Church, the students helped clean up the neighborhood on East Eighth Street. Other relief efforts included cleaning and moving debris, painting, sorting damaged items and transporting usable items to storage units. “I didn’t expect so much damage the tornado has brought to this community. It is really saddening to see them living in such conditions,” said Shontrice Garrett, a sophomore mathematics education major from East St. Louis, Ill. She added, “But I am glad I made the right choice to come help them to rebuild the community. This is the most meaningful spring break I had.”

Alternative Spring Break

Community Service

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Black College Day

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ressed in a bronze blazer, pink collared shirt, blue and white polka dot tie, and light blue faded jeans, Fonzworth Bentley expressed his “swagger” through his unique style of dress and words of wisdom at the Black College Day celebration held on Sept. 25th. Black College Day, first celebrated in 1980 in Washington D.C., draws attention to the successes and goals of Historically Black Colleges and Universities across the nation. Jackson State University students, faculty, and staff gathered in Ballrooms A&B of the Student Center to honor HBCU’s and to listen to Bentley’s address on how confidence, manners, and style affect the journey towards success.

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Women’s Emphasis Week

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he women of Jackson State University were celebrated during the week of March 18-22, 2013.

The Women’s Emphasis Week’s special guest was Susan L. Taylor, editor emeritus of Essence Magazine, who spoke on Friday, March 22 in the Student Center Ballroom from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m. Th e event is free and open to the public. On Saturday, March 23, Taylor gave the keynote address during the 2013 Emerging Leaders Leadership Summit in the Student Center. Taylor’s address is entitled: “Bold, Visionary Leadership: From the Inside Out.”

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Tiger Zone Opens

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ackson State University re-opened its game room on Feb. 3 with new equipment and a new name, “The Tiger Zone.”

The name change reflects the upgrades of the game systems and the opportunity it gives students to interact and relieve stress between classes. The Tiger Zone currently has a library of 15 games, with 15 more games to be added each month. The room is now equipped with four X-Box’s, one Playstation 3, one Nintendo Wii, pool tables and new furniture. There is also enhanced lighting for the room. Destin Nelson, a freshman accounting major from Biloxi, Miss., said she goes to the Tiger Zone to relax. “I go to the Tiger Zone everyday with some of my friends. I like to play The Mario 3D, Little Big Planet, but sometimes I like to watch other people play.”

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JSU F ACES 192

Satara Patrick

Cherese, Bria, Kiki

Bentia Andrews & Major Brown

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JSU F ACES

Carlos Smith

Garick Laudo

Jhamasa Lewis-Adams

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JSU F ACES

Amber Cotton

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Jerome Evans

Michael Gordon and the Class of 2016

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The JSU Volleyball Team does Community Service

Lianna Norris

Aaron Cain III

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“How do you feel about the Student Decorum Policy?”

Correll Dear

Freshman Early Childhood Education Jackson, Miss.

P EOPLE ( JSU S PEAKS )

“Abiding by a certain dress code is like high school to me. JSU is a college and students should be able to express themselves and their swag.”

“How do you feel about the new registration process?”

Tyra Suggs Senior Criminal Justice East St. Louis, Ill.

“It is quite confusing. It would be better if students had been informed about the new registration process.”

“How do you feel about the new registration process?”

Mike Bembery Senior Accounting Detroit, Mich.

“I’m a collegiate man furthering my education, so the person who is trying to help that I have to support.”

“Did the negative YouTube video of the prophet Muhammad warrant the violence in Libya?’’

Rim Marghli Graduate Student Tunisia, Africa English Literature

“I think it triggered the riots of an extremist group of Islamists that do not represent the common Muslim. These attacks have a bigger agenda than what it seems.’’

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“What homecoming event are you most looking forward to? Why?”

Kenya Gilkey Sophomore Health Care Admin. Macon, Miss.

“Do you think enough is being done in the African-American community to bring awareness to Breast Cancer?”

Therman Richardson Freshman Psychology Atlanta, Ga.

“No. I can tell you all about diabetes with no problem, however I don’t really know much about it. All I know is that we need a cure.”

“Is voting as important to this generation as it was to past generations?”

Daisy Jones Junior Social Work Jackson, Miss.

“I think it’s equally important but I think our older generation appreciates it more because they had to fight for it. Our voting rights were just given [and] they had to fight for theirs.”

P EOPLE ( JSU S PEAKS )

“The coronation because of the tradition of the crowning of the queen and royal court.”

“What can you as an individual do to help the country as a whole after this Presidential election?”

Rashon Bogan-Roberson Freshman Political Science Warren Hill, Miss.

“I will continue voting, support businesses and my own community, continue to study hard, work, and pray.” J A C K S O N

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“What are you thankful for and why?”

James Booth Sophomore Comm. disorders Jackson, Miss.

P EOPLE ( JSU S PEAKS )

“The opportunity to come to college. I understand that people have paved the way for me. I’m going to honor them by coming to college and getting an education.”

“Did you choose your major for financial stability or because you have a passion for it?”

Krysten Shumaker Sophomore Mathematics Arlington, Texas

“I choose my major because it’s something I have always done well in, and it comes to me so easily, which makes it challenge and fun!”

“Do you feel that the current generation is living out the legacy of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.?”

Willie Jackson Junior Civil Engineering Vicksburg, Miss.

“No, because I feel like some people don’t work as hard as they used to and we as a generation are okay with the norm. There should be more of us trying to strive for greatness as MLK Jr. did.”

“WHat defining moment in Black History inspires you the most?’’

Gabrielle Mason Freshman Psychology Memphis, Tenn.

“The most inspiring black history moment for me would be every moment that has built our history. Each moment had its own special purpose and has helped shape us as a community.” 198

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“Do you feel safe in the clubs in Jackson, Mississippi?’’

Monica Moore Freshman Psychology Jackson, Miss.

“What has been your best or worst Valentine’s Day experience and Why?”

Joseph Gooden Sophomore Music Education Clarksdale, Miss.

“My best Valentine’s day experience was when me and my date had an intimate evening which consisted of dinner and a movie.”

“Do you feel the minimum wage should be increased and Why?”

Sidney Tarver Sophomore Biology Chicago, Ill.

“Minimum wage should be increased because it costs money to attend school and students use money from work for books and school.”

P EOPLE ( JSU S PEAKS )

“No, I don’t feel safe because being the cautious person that I am, I would rather be safe than sorry. You don’t know what might happen. Going out is unpredictable and is a risk on your life.”

“How do you feel about Mississippi’s recent ratification of the 13th Amendment?”

Ayo Beckley

Senior Mass Communications Oakland, Calif.

“I feel like Mississippi is a couple years behind on a couple things and I think it’s about time for the South to get out of this old school mentality.” J A C K S O N

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Senior Timeline

2009 -2010 JSU Students Protest Proposed University Merger Jackson State University students organized a rally on the steps of the State Capitol at in protest of Gov. Haley Barbour’s recommendation to merge the state’s three historically black colleges and universities. In his Nov. 16 budget proposal, Barbour announced that the state was facing a $715 million budget shortfall in fiscal year 2011 and another $500 million shortage in fiscal year 2012. In addition to merging the state’s HBCUs, he suggested many budget cuts in response to the impending shortage.

Lafeyonda Brooks, president of the JSU NAACP and late Senator Alice Harden.

OTHER NOTABLE EVENTS OF THE YEAR JSU students react to the death of Michael Jackson Construction begins for University Place JSU suspends 25 members of the Sonic Boom Percussion section for hazing JSU Implements Everbridge Emergency System Stanley Cole convicted of Murdering JSU student, Latasha Norman Andross Milteer elected SGA President for 2010-2011 Ronnika Joyner elected Miss JSU for 2010-2011 President Ronald Mason resigns from JSU to lead Southern University System

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Senior Timeline

2010 -2011 Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers becomes first woman to lead JSU After an all-day meet and greet with faculty, staff, students, alumni and community leaders, Carolyn Meyers was named president of Jackson State University. She is the first woman to hold this position. After the announcement of her selection, Meyers said: “I am humbled and honored that the Board of Trustees has selected me to lead Jackson State University. Jackson State has a rich history and an even brighter future as the state urban university. I look forward to working with the Jackson State family as we build on its history together.”

JSU President Carolyn Meyers applauds student performers during her Inauguration.

OTHER NOTABLE EVENTS OF THE YEAR Leslie B. McLemore named Interim JSU President McDonald’s opens Sonic Boom themed restaurant at Hwy. 80 location Michael Teasley elected first white JSU NAACP president University Place opens for business Cornell West delivers powerful message at JSU Black History Month Celebration Commuter student program begins at Jackson State JSU football team faces possible post-season ban World-renowned poet Nikki Giovanni speaks during JSU’s Women’s Emphasis Week Minister Louis Farrakhan speaks at Sixth Annual Conference of the Veterans of The Mississippi Civil Rights Movement NBA Player Mo Williams speaks to Jackson State University students Mea Ashley elected Miss JSU 2011-2012 Matthew Thompson elected SGA President

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Senior Timeline

2011 -2012 Filmmaker Spike Lee speaks at Black College Day at JSU Nearly 3,000 people came to the Lee E. Williams Athletics and Assembly Center to hear film producer, actor and Tisch School of the Arts—NYU Graduate Film professor, Spike Lee, share life experiences at Jackson State University’s Black College Day. Lee’s first student film, “Last Hustle in Brooklyn” was completed when he was an undergraduate at historic Morehouse College. He went on to produce such films as “Do the Right Thing,” “School Daze,” “Malcolm X” and “Mo’ Better Blues.”

Students welcome Spike Lee to JSU during Black College Day. OTHER NOTABLE EVENTS OF THE YEAR JSU names Dr. Vivian Fuller new Athletics Director Judge Karen Mills-Francis speaks at JSU Constitutional Day program JSU out-sources dining services to Aramark JSU freshman Harold Owens III wins the 2011 U.S. National Yo-Yo Championship Mea Ashley launches Queen’s Campaign fundraiser for student scholarships Tuskegee Airmen speak at Veteran’s Day program JSU launches it mobile application JSUGO CSCEL hosts first International Alternative Break to China JSU Volleyball teams wins SWAC Championship Iyanla Vanzant speaks at Capitol City Classic event at JSU JSU changes commencement to Fall and Spring JSU students react to death of Pop icon Whitney Houston Dr. Dollye Robinson retires from JSU after 60 years of service JSU Presidential Inauguration of Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers Jackson State University student Nolan Ryan Henderson III killed JSU students can ride the JATRAN city buses for free with school I.D. American Navy Seals kill Osama Bin Laden, orchestrator of 9/11 terrorist attacks Brian Wilkes elected SGA President Sarah Brown elected Miss JSU

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Senior Timeline

2012 -2013 JSU Celebrates Scholar Athletes at Breakfast of Champions The Jackson State Division of Athletics held its first annual „Breakfast of Champions“ event to honor its scholar student-athletes who earned at least a 3.0 grade point average through the summer of 2012. A total of 84 Tigers and Lady Tigers were recognized during a breakfast ceremony Thursday morning at the JSU Student Center Ballroom. The guest speaker for the event was JSU’s interim provost Dr. James C. Renick. During his speech, Renick told the crowd of approximately 150 people that he was humbled to be in the company of such greatness.

OTHER NOTABLE EVENTS OF THE YEAR Hurricane Isaac forces campus closure Miss JSU Sarah Brown implements her Molding the Minds mentorship program Michael Teasley, first White JSU NAACP president, dies Hurricane Sandy Strands JSU students in New York Capitol City Classic becomes Magnolia Soul Bowl New trial ordered for man convicted of 2007 slaying of Latasha Norman JSU Tiger Volleyball team wins 2nd straight SWAC Championship President Barrack Hussein Obama wins second term as United States President JSU announces opening of Madison campus location Devastating tornado rips through Hattiesburg, MS Mississippi ratifies 13th amendment after years of overcite Susan Taylor, Essence Editor Emeritus, speaks at Women’s Emphasis Week program Basketball coach Tevester Anderson retires as Men’s Tiger Basketball Coach Wayne Brent named new Men’s Tiger Basketball Coach Christopher Cathey elected 2013-2014 SGA President Deja Knight elected 2013-2014 Miss JSU Housing renovations begin for Alexander Hall and Stewart Hall to be demolished. Community Service Civic Engaged Learning renames center to honor Alice V. Harden Terrorists bomb Boston Marathon

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Acknowledgements The Division of Student Life, Dr. Marcus A. Chanay, Vice President University Communications, Eric Stringfellow, Director Student Publications Staff: Sylvia T. Watley, Director Ernest F. Camell III, Production Coordinator Shannon D. Tatum, Production Assistant eXperience eYearbook Staff Student Photographers/Writers Alexis Anderson Taylor Bembery Candace Chambers Tiffany Edmondson Terry Haley, Jr. Mark Jefferson Crystal Killingsworth David Lamaar Mateen Dominique McCraney Trerica Roberson Crystal Shelwood Freelance Photographer: Abram Jones

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In Memoriam

The Jackson State University Family would like to express its condolences to the friends and family of the JSU students we lost during the 2012-2013 school year.

Amanda Booker Robin Credit Corinthians Dixon Jihad Muhammad Michael Teasley Charles Wilkerson, Jr.

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Jackson State University, founded in 1877, is a historically black, high research activity university located in Jackson, the capital city of the state of Mississippi. Jackson State’s nurturing academic environment challenges individuals to change lives through teaching, research and service. Officially designated as Mississippi’s Urban University, Jackson State continues to enhance the state, nation and world through comprehensive economic development, healthcare, technological and educational initiatives.

The only public university in the Jackson metropolitan area, Jackson State is located near downtown with four satellite campuses throughout the city. Jackson State is accredited by the Commission of the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award 43 bachelor’s degrees, 36 master’s degrees, three specialist-in-education degrees and 11 doctoral degrees.

Dr. Carolyn W. Meyers, President 1400 John R. Lynch Street Jackson, MS 39217 www.jsums.edu

The 2012-2013 eXperience e-Yearbook was produced by the Student Publications unit of the Division of Student Life at Jackson State University.

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The JSU eXperience 2012-2013 e-Yearbook