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FREE

EXPERIENCE 2019/2020

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The Mountain Parks

17 Helpful Map Pages Cycling Mountain Art Mt Assiniboine Cannabis Elizabeth Parker Campground Directory Icefields Parkway

Photo Contest


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Experience the Mountain Parks Welcome to Canada’s Mountain National Parks! People have been drawn here for ten thousand years. I first passed through this area as a young lad from Saskatchewan, almost 50 years ago. On that occasion, this special place got into my bones, so we moved to Calgary. I return to the mountains regularly and nothing gives me greater pleasure than sharing them with others. We hope the mountain parks will leave their mark on your heart, too. Your first encounter may be brief, but hopefully long enough for you to want to return to develop a deeper connection with this remarkable, soul-filling region.

This is the only guide to all 7 national parks. It will provide you with unique insights as to how to best appreciate the mountains. For many, it becomes a very trusted companion because of stories, hidden gems, compelling images, maps, and more maps: everyone loves maps!. So, keep it close. You’ll be taking lots of pictures. Upload one to our annual reader contest (see pg 58) for a chance to win a Getaway to Sunshine Village and much more! We know that Experience the Mountain Parks can help you enjoy your visit, and we are truly honoured to be of service. But if you’re not careful, you may just decide to linger for a few extra days! Bob Harris

From our Mobile Library, you can seamlessly share your discoveries with your friends & family via Social Media. Check out ExperienceTravelGuides.com/Library. And dig into our archives for even more great stories!

Our Contributors

Kerry Robins believes

Chic Scott has devoted

in authenticity, and has a casual conversation with her audience. Her writing spans two decades. She is a storyteller at heart and an independent writer for various magazines. Alberta’s mountain sceneries inspires her. She appreciates nature and feels at home when she is outside enjoying all-season activities.

his life to skiing and climbing. Chic is an honorary member of the Calgary Mountain Club, Association of Canadian Mountain Guides and Alpine Club of Canada. A recipient of the Banff Mountain Film Festival Summit of Excellence Award, Chic lives in Banff, where he continues to write, lecture and, of course, ski. (Mount Assiniboine pg 16)

(Rocky Mountain High pg 28)

Graeme Pole is

Lisa Christensen has

Andrew Penner is

the best-selling author of thirteen books that describe the natural history and the human history of western Canada. Three of his titles have been finalists in the Banff Mountain Book Festival. His most recent is the novel, Siren Call.

worked in the art world over 35 years. Her three guide books explore the art of the Canadian Rockies and have won numerous awards. The fourth in this series: An Explorer’s Guide to the Art of Walter J. Phillips, was released in May 2019. She lives in Calgary, obsesses about Canadian art history, keeps bees, and plans the next trip. (Think Like An Artist pg 26)

an independent writer and photographer living in Calgary, Alberta. His work has been featured in Westworld, Westjet Magazine, Golf Magazine, Golf Tips, Golf Canada, and many leading golf and lifestyle publications. When not travelling or working, he enjoys reading, movies, and chilling out in the backyard with his wife, Dawn, and their four boys. (Cycling in the Mountain Parks pg 8)

Visit his website: mountainvision.ca (Canadian National Railway pg 10)

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Experience the Mountain Parks Welcome to the 2019 – 2020 Edition CMI Publishing is a division of Complete Marketing Inc., a privately-owned company with offices in Calgary, Alberta. We specialize in the production of our Experience Travel Guides & Maps in print as well as digital formats. Printed copies are delivered in bulk to our network of distribution outlets throughout the region. Travellers are encouraged to pick up a FREE printed copy through these outlets or use a mobile-friendly edition of this, or any of our current or archived guides from our Mobile Library at ExperienceTravelGuides.com/Library Please support our advertisers and sponsors. If you get the chance, kindly mention where you saw their ad. Without their support this guide would not be possible Publisher: Bob Harris, CMI Publishing bob@cmipublishing.ca Ph: (403) 259.8290 Designer: Christine Weston christine@extenddesign.ca Cartographer: Rob Storeshaw robstoreshaw@shaw.ca Book Keeper: Adrienne Albrecht bookkeeper@cmispeakers.com Advertising Sales Reps: Dan Clements, Allen Gibson, Joseph Macdonald, David Saxby Brian Peck, Dale & Kelly Schultz

Circulation: Ian Klein, Warren & Sandy Pearson Dale, Kelly & Carla Schultz Distribution Outlets: Through most Visitor Information Centres in Alberta & British Columbia, CAA and AMA Travel Offices, retail stores, attractions, hotels and motels in the region. For a complete list: experiencemountainparks.com/our-distributors Cover photo: Courtesy of Mari Omori At 3,618m (11,870 ft) Mount Assiniboine is the highest peak in the Southern Canadian Rockies Share Your Experience: Upload your selfies, photos and videos to be eligible to win great prizes ExperienceTravelGuides.com/Contests Follow us on Facebook/ExperienceTravelguides

Sister Publications Include: Experience the Cowboy Trails, Experience the Dinosaur Trails, Experience Calgary & Kananaskis, Experience Waterton Lakes National Park Experience Alberta’s Coal History, The Jasper Map and the Kananaskis Trail Maps

PHOTO CONTEST

Table of Contents Destinations Banff National Park 15 Glacier National Park 62 Golden 59 Hinton 42 Icefields Parkway 33 Jasper National Park 36 Kootenay Rockies 46 Radium Hot Springs 50 Revelstoke 63 Waterton Lakes National Park 10 Wells Gray Provincial Park 45 West Kootenays 64 Yellowhead 42 Yoho National Park 56

Specialty Pages Burgess Shale 54 Campground Directory 66 Canadian National Railway 40 Cycling in the Mountain Parks 8 Cycling the Icefields Parkway 30 Elizabeth Parker: A Passion for the Alpine 22 Flora and Fauna in the Mountain Parks 48 Headbanging in Radium Hot Springs 52 Mount Assiniboine 16 Photo Contest 58 Rocky Mountain High 28 Sunshine Meadows 24 Think Like an Artist 26

Map Pages Alberta 7 Banff National Park 18 Banff Townsite 20 Bow Valley Parkway 21 British Columbia 44 Columbia Valley 46 Glacier & Mt. Revelstoke National Parks 63 Icefields Parkway 34 & 35 Jasper National Park 36 Jasper Townsite 39 Kootenay National Park 47 Lake Louise Townsite 25 Radium Hot Springs Townsite 53 Waterton Lakes National Park 14 West Kootenays 64 Yoho National Park 57

Share your Mountain Experience to Win a Sunshine Getaway - 3 nights in a Deluxe Room for of 3   - Dining Room Gift Certificate                                                    - Gondola Passes for 3                                                                 - Interpretive Guided Hike Sunshine Meadows

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Experience the Mountain Parks

HELPING YOU SLEEP CLOSER TO THE STARS SINCE 1885.

WOODS.CA

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Experience Alberta

Alberta Fast Facts Capital City: Edmonton Population: 4.32 million History: Entered Canadian Confederation in 1905 Total Area: 661,848 km sq/255,541 mi sq Highest Point: Mount Columbia, 3,747 m/12,293 ft Lowest Point: Slave River, 152 m/499 ft above sea level Longest River: Peace River, 1,923 km/1,195 mi Provincial Flower: Wild Rose Provincial Tree: Lodgepole Pine Provincial Bird: Great Horned Owl Provincial Fish: Bull Trout Provincial Motto: “Strong and Free�

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Experience Cycling in the Mountain Parks Just seconds into my descent down Superberm, one of the fastest, flowiest downhill mountain biking trails at Kicking Horse Resort, the exhileration, the fear, and the fun-factor goes off the charts. After hitting a few super-fast berms, I pop off a little jump and feel the wonder of weightless. (A really short, just-inches-off-the-ground flight, but it was a flight nonetheless!). Indeed, ripping down the mountainside on a full suspension bike is speaking to me. I’m definitely listening.

all abilities can enjoy. While the journey takes approximately two hours to complete, first-timers will want to stop numerous times to soak in the stunning views, linger at the viewpoints, and enjoy a few snacks along the way. Many people make it a full-day, there-and-back adventure, you can also make it a oneway trip and take a shuttle back to either Banff or Canmore. ROAM public transit offers regular shuttles (with your bike) to get you back to your starting point.

While mountain biking is one of the coolest and craziest things I’ve done in the mountains, I’ve long since realized that it certainly isn’t the only way to enjoy the mountains on two wheels. Far from it. From e-bikes to road bikes, and everything in between, there are tons of great biking adventures to be had in the mountains. And they all have plenty of merit. Here are four of the best biking excursions that the mountain parks have to offer. Fear not, none of them require mandatory air time. (With the exception of heli-biking, of course!)

The Old Coach Trail in Radium Hot Springs: Traversing high on arid benchlands – with spectacular views of the Columbia Valley Wetlands and the Purcell Mountains – the 9 km outand-back Old Coach Trail between Radium and Dry Gulch makes for an fun family-friendly bike ride. Although you will likely encounter some roots, rocks, and pitchy sections, the gravel trail is rated “green.” Travelled by cars and carriages over a hundred years ago, this trail features spectacular viewpoints and abandoned relics (mainly old cars rusting away in the trees!) of a long-gone era of coach and automobile travel.

Biking the Rocky Mountain Legacy Trail Between Canmore and Banff: Meandering in close proximity to the Trans-Canada Highway, the 22km paved pathway that links Canmore and Banff is a beautiful, family-friendly adventure that cyclists of

Mountain Biking in Golden: True, the downhill single-track trails at Kicking Horse Bike Park are phenomenal! However, Golden is fast-becomming a mountain biking Mecca for all genres of riding. Cross-country enthusiasts have a handful of

Photo Courtesy of Mike Nimmo at Kicking Horse Resort

Waterton Lakes National Park Photo Courtesy Travel Alberta / Katie Goldie

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Jasper National Park Photo Courtesy Ryan Bray


Experience Cycling in the Mountain Parks areas to explore including Moonrakers (34 trails), Columbia Basin Trust (14 trails), Mountain Shadows (17 trails), and Mount 7 (22 trails). For experienced riders (that don’t mind a little cliff-side exposure!), the 5 km, 515 metre plunge down the Canyon Creek Trail in the Moonrakers network is one of Golden’s signature trails. Bring your “A” game. Road Cycling the Icefields Parkway: Without a doubt this is one of the world’s most scenic highways. Unfortunately, when you’re going highway speed in a vehicle, you’re going to miss a lot. On a bike, not so much! Want to bike the parkway but don’t quite know how to manage the logistics? No problem. Go with Mountain Madness Tours. They’ve guided thousands of cyclists and have it down to a tee. While the trip between Jasper and Banff usually takes four days, it can be customized depending on your group’s skill and fitness level. Also, if you want to add a trip down to Waterton Lakes National Park (the ride down Alberta’s Cowboy Trail is phenomenal!) or ride all the way back to Calgary or Vancouver, it can be done. All you need is a sense of adventure and some pretty strong legs! E-Biking in Waterton Lakes National Park: True, Waterton Lakes National Park suffered some significant fire damage in 2017. However, the beauty of this park is still fully intact! Not

Jasper National Park Photo CourtesyParks Canada/Nicole Gaboury

only that, but one of the region’s most beautiful roads is now closed to cars...but open for hikers and bikers! Yes, this means that the stunning Red Rock Parkway makes for one of the best biking opportunities in the mountain parks. And perhaps the best way to enjoy this scenic stretch of road is via an E-bike, which provides an extra power boost when you really need it. E-bikes (as well as a full fleet of other bikes) are available for rent at Pat’s in downtown Waterton. Even if you don’t make it out to the parkway, just peddaling around the townsite is a memorable activity nearly everyone can do. Heli-biking in Revelstoke: One would think that if you can heli-ski and heli-hike, then you can surely also heli-bike. And, if you go to Revelstoke, that is correct! The Mount Cartier heli-biking adventure is definitely not for the faint of heart (or the newbie rider!) After your heli-drop near the summit of Mount Cartier, you’re in for a fast, white-knuckle, blackdiamond descent down rocky single-track and aerie ridgelines. It’s steep, it plunges over 7,000 feet, it’s 17 km long, and it will leave you breathless. Your beer at the end will be the best one you’ve ever had. Book your trip with Wandering Wheels, they were the pioneers of this world-renowned adventure. Visit wanderingwheels.ca. By: Andrew Penner

Photo Courtesy Tourism Jasper

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Crowsnest Pass

Photo Courtesy Quin Schrock @everchanginghorizon


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park

There are places on earth that defy description. These special places are so unique, and so uniquely beautiful, that you can’t quite find the words to express what your senses are taking in. They are breathtaking to the eyes, to be sure, but the appeal is somewhat intangible. It is a feeling in the air, a vibe, an energy. You feel good just being there, and the more you explore, the stronger the feeling becomes.

Thomas Blakiston who was a member of the famous Palliser Expedition, was one of the area’s earliest explorers, in 1858. He bestowed its name in honour of the 19th century naturalist Charles Waterton. In 1895, Waterton was protected thanks to the efforts of local ranchers including Fredrick Godsal. John George “Kootenai” Brown, a wilderness trapper, became the areas first settler and the first park superintendent in 1911.

Waterton Lakes National Park is one of those places. Perhaps it is one of the most distinctive mountain parks on the planet. Tucked away in the southwest corner of Alberta, prairie and lofty mountains meet in an unusual combination of habitats unique in Canadian National Parks. Whether you are a backcountry enthusiast, or someone who’d rather curl up with a good book, come bask in the natural glory of Waterton Park’s majestic landscape. Rare wildflower species are abundant. Wildlife watching is easy.

In 1932, Waterton Lakes National Park in Canada and the United States Glacier National Park united to form the world’s first International Peace Park. This partnership was dedicated to world peace by the Rotary International. Today, with its unguarded border, this park continues to symbolize the bonds of peace and friendship between the people of our countries.

For 10,000 years, travellers have made their way to this special place. 300 archaeological sites reveal the activities of the first people. European explorers and settlers also left their mark.

Waterton has an interesting geologic history, too. It has been shaped over the centuries by wind, fire, glacial ice and floods. Water sculpts the land with abundant lakes, waterfalls, and streams. The climate adds to the drama. The park’s ecosystem is so special that it was designated a Biosphere Reserve by the United Nations, in 1979.

The 2017 Kenow Wildfire impacted Waterton Lakes National Park areas and facilities. To find out what is currently open and closed in the park, please visit pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/ab/waterton/visit/ideale_best 10 | Enter Our Photo Contests


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park Fire is a natural and required element in this landscape. The 2017 Kenow Wildfire burned 19,303 hectares within – just over one-third of the park’s area. As a result, about half of Waterton was initially closed to public access. Ecological renewal is taking place! Within a few days of the ground cooling, signs of resilience appeared in the form of grass shoots and healthy wildlife. Colours emerged at lower elevations in the form of stunning fields of wildflowers in 2018. Wildfires change the growing conditions in a forest. More sunlight reaches the forest floor and the soil chemistry is changed in ways that suit specific plants. The new vegetation in burned areas may look different from before. Lodgepole pine cones are specially adapted to open in the heat of a wildfire, releasing seeds that grow in the bright sun and exposed soil of a burned forest. Lodgepole pine seedlings are thriving in some areas of the post-wildfire landscape. Due to recent wildfires, certain areas may be temporarily unavailable due to restoration work. Parks Canada is working hard to get these areas of the park re-opened as soon as possible. For the updates visit parkscanada.ca/Waterton.

However, there is lots to see and do in Waterton. Campsites abound, and cozy indoor accommodations dot the town site. And the activities? Well – those are otherworldly too! Waterton boasts world-class hikes that range in difficulty from a short stroll to steep day treks or several days’ duration. Check out their new Interactive Virtual Experience Trail Map for the status of every trail in the park. MyWaterton.ca/Trail-Guide It is difficult to imagine a more majestic setting for a round of golf. Photographers, bird-watchers and botanists gather here for good reason. Waterton Lake is a fisherman’s dream and a wind surfer’s paradise. In the winter, return to ski or snow shoe. Adventure companies are standing at the ready, but if you would rather wind things down, consider a picnic, a leisurely paddle, a moonlit lake cruise, or quiet reflection by Cameron Falls. The lakes and waterfalls here really help set Waterton apart from other mountain communities because the town site was constructed on the shores of Waterton Lake. And that’s just gentle on your mind. Yes, Waterton has that intangible appeal, and it has it the way mountain park aficionados love it best. Unspoiled. Uncrowded. And unbelievably beautiful.

Waterton Lakes National Park | Alberta, Canada

A Taste of Waterton May 24 - June 2, 2019 Participate in traditional and contemporary aboriginal dancing, music, art, and cuisine. Visit mywaterton.ca/events

Waterton Wildflower Festival June 13 - 18, 2019 Join in a variety of activities celebrating Waterton’s wildflowers. Visit watertonwildflowers.com

Waterton Wildlife Festival September 19 - 22, 2019 Waterton’s wildlife is at its best in the fall. This weekend features a variety of wildlife events. Visit watertonwildlife.com

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Experience Waterton Lakes National Park

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Experience Waterton Lakes National Park

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mywaterton.ca 13 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Experience Waterton Lakes National Park See Campground Directory on pg 67

Some areas may be closed due to the 2017 Kenow wildfire. Check parkscanada.ca/waterton frequently for updates and closures.

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Alpine Stables Come celebrate the 50th anniversary of Alpine Stables and spectacular riding experiences in Waterton Lakes National Park! Alpine Stables has seen a lot of changes in the last 50 years,

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Experience Banff National Park Banff National Park (BNP) runs northwesterly from Canmore to the Columbia Icefield. This is the birthplace of Canada’s national park system. Established in 1885, after three railway workers discovered hot springs, BNP has become a world class destination. The park now hosts an estimated 4 million visitors each year. Our map on pg 18 details eight of the many popular attractions and provides the locations of the campgrounds. The international airports in Calgary and Edmonton serve travellers flying into the region. Buses run to BNP year-round, from each of these large urban centres. In addition, both Via Rail and Rocky Mountaineer Vacations operate rail passenger sightseeing trips in western Canada, with stops in Banff and Jasper from May to October. Within BNP are two important communities: The Town of Banff and the Village of Lake Louise. Both are located along the Trans-Canada Highway. They’re small, so it’s easy to get around either community without your vehicle. That’s great because parking is at a premium and some lots are not able to accommodate large vehicles such as RVs. Municipal lots and street parking and are free but have time restrictions. “Roam” is the name of the local public transit system. It provides safe, affordable and environmentally friendly service throughout the Banff town site. You’ll find our map of the Town of Banff on pg 20, along with 15 map keys starting on pg 19, to ensure a magical time.

With a record number of visitors expected in the national parks this summer, the owners of HopOnBanff claim that in the past two years, their service has changed the way visitors see the Park. Buy a Day Pass, hop on and hop off as you like, and avoid the hassle of finding a parking spot. HopOnBanff is affordable, safe, and eco-friendly. In addition, Sunshine Meadows offers their Banff to Sunshine Shuttle Service that will pick you up from nine convenient locations in Banff. Their summer service is free and runs daily from 8am - 6pm from June 28 - September 8, 2019. The Legacy Trail runs 26 km along the highway right-of-way between Banff and Canmore. Part of The Great Trail, formerly the Trans-Canada Trail, it is a popular paved, recreational trail suitable for walking, bicycling, and in-line skating. Note: riding from Canmore to Banff is mainly uphill and typically into the wind, so expect it to take twice as long to ride to Banff as it takes you to ride to Canmore. Located 45 min west of Banff is the Village of Lake Louise. The mountains that surround are internationally renowned for their majestic beauty. Lake Louise is often referred to as the Hiking Capital of Canada. In the summer, go for a simple stroll around the lake, a physically demanding climb, or be whisked away in a gondola to the top of the world. You’ll find our map of Lake Louise on pg 25 along with important map keys and a valuable coupon for the gondola!

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Experience Mount Assiniboine

Mount Assiniboine towers above Sunburst Lake; Photo Courtesy of Chic Scott

A.O. Wheeler who did so much to promote the Mount Assiniboine area; Photo Courtesy of Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (CAJ_1944_na66_299)

“If you are worn and tired from the daily grind of routine existence. If you need revitalizing and a real rest. If you are nervous, neurotic or dyspeptic, come and try it for a week or two. The cure is certain and for the remainder of your life the pages of memory’s scrapbook will be replete with scenes and experiences that will recur again and again with a thrill of joy.” (From the brochure for: “Banff to Mt. Assiniboine, A Public Walking and Riding Tour”)

There are few mountains on earth as beautiful and striking as Mount Assiniboine. It towers 500m above all its neighbours and has a perfect pyramidal shape. If you asked a child to draw a mountain, this is what it would look like. This mountain is right here in our backyard, located 30 km southwest of Banff, in British Columbia’s Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park. Created almost one hundred years ago, this park is one of the jewels of the BC Park system. George Dawson, exploring on behalf of the Geological Survey of Canada, named the mountain in 1885 due to the similarity it holds to the tipis of the Assiniboine First Nation. It was first seen up close by ‘European’ eyes when legendary guide and outfitter Tom Wilson led a Chicago businessman,

Robert L. Barrett, to the base of the mountain, in 1893. Over the next decade the mountain was explored on all sides and several attempts were made to reach the summit. By the turn of the century Mount Assiniboine had become the premier mountaineering prize to be won in the Canadian Rockies. Assiniboine was finally climbed in 1901 by Englishman, Sir James Outram, led by his two Swiss guides Christian Haesler and Christian Bohren. It was a remarkable climb with the trio reaching the summit via the southwest face, then descending via the northeast ridge, thus making a bold traverse of the peak. Mount Assiniboine was visited only sporadically over the next two decades but in 1920 A.O. Wheeler, a prominent surveyor and the founder of the Alpine Club of Canada, began what he called “Banff to Mount Assiniboine Public Walking and Riding Tours”. Wheeler had discovered the great beauty of

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Experience Mount Assiniboine

Mount Assiniboine in 1907; Photo Courtesy of the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V653_i_na_565)

Mount Assiniboine was named for the resemblance it bears to the First Nations tipis; Photo Courtesy of Ken Jones

this area in 1913 and 1916 when he had surveyed the British Columbia / Alberta boundary and he wanted to make the place more accessible to mountain lovers from around the world.

Known now as the Naiset Huts, Wheeler’s cabins are still there and have been much refurbished over the years. For a modest $25 per person per night you can stay in these huts. A sleeping bag is required and you cook for yourself in a large, heated and fully equipped kitchen building.

Wheeler’s tours were the very first to promote the magic of this place. From Banff, the intrepid hikers followed the Spray River for a short distance then ascended the Goat Creek trail to where the Spray Lakes Reservoir is today. In those days, however, this was a beautiful high alpine valley with the two Spray Lakes nestled in the meadows. The hikers then followed Bryant Creek and crossed Assiniboine Pass to Wheelers Camp below the great mountain. Here the hikers could take a few days off and enjoy the magnificent scenery before resuming their trek back to Banff via the Valley of the Rocks, Citadel Pass, Sunshine Meadows and Healy Creek. A.O. Wheeler had comfortable camps located along the route where the hikers and riders could overnight in comfort. Wheeler’s Walking and Riding tours ran til 1926 and hundreds of mountain lovers visited this special place. At the urging of Wheeler, the British Columbia Government established Mount Assiniboine Provincial Park, in 1922. Today, the Park is a world famous scenic destination and the difficult journey on foot or on horseback has been replaced by an exciting ten minute helicopter ride.

For those who would like a higher level of comfort there is Mount Assiniboine Lodge, with deluxe accommodation for 30 guests. Built in 1928, by the Canadian Pacific Railway, this lodge was operated by Norwegian ski adventurer Erling Strom for almost 50 years. Sepp and Barb Renner took over the full operation of the lodge in 1983 and today, their son Andre and his partner Claude Duchesne operate the lodge. For those on limited budgets there is the campground during the summer which has 40 tent pads and a covered cook shelter. Go to env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/mt_assiniboine/ or for more information assiniboinelodge.com. The helicopter, Mount Assiniboine Lodge and the Naiset huts can all be booked through Mount Assiniboine Lodge by calling 403-678-2883 (info@assiniboinelodge.com). The campground can be booked at discovercamping.ca. By: Chic Scott

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Experience Banff National Park Town of Jasper, JASPER NATIONAL PARK (233 km from Lake Louise)

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Banff National Park Campgrounds Liquor Ban Fri-Mon on all long weekends

REACH NEW PEAKS! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK, JUNE 28 - SEPT 8, 2019. LEARN MORE AT BANFFSUNSHINEMEADOWS.COM

18 | Enter Our Photo Contests

Calgary (128 km from Banff)

Lakes

Distance (km) from Banff/Lake Louise 3/49 Backswamp 6/46 Mule Shoe 8/44 Prescribed Burn 11/41 Sawback 13/39 Hillsdale 16/36 Pilot Pond 21/31 Moose Meadow 26/26 Castle Cliffs 28/24 Storm Mountain 40/12 Baker Creek 48/4 Morant’s Curve

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Stop at roadside viewpoints and interpretive exhibits along this scenic road between Banff and Lake Louise. See Pg 21

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Drive with care on this busy thoroughfare. Look for five animal overpasses just between Banff and Lake Louise, one more west of Lake Louise, all built to allow wildlife to cross the road safely.

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ROCKY MOUNTAIN HOUSE National Historic Site (167 km from Saskatchewan Crossing)

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Experience Banff National Park Banff National Park Map Keys

Banff Townsite Map Keys

See map page 18

See map page 20

2 Johnston Canyon

1 Parks Canada Visitor Centre

25 km (30 min) from Banff Exciting cat-walks cling to the canyon walls. Interpretive Display, 1.1 km (20 min) to the Lower Falls, 2.7 km to the Upper Falls. Stay on the trail and away from the edge.

224 Banff Avenue and 327 Railway Avenue 403-762-1550

2 Cave & Basin National Historic Site

311 Cave Avenue. The birthplace of Canada’s national park system.

3 Village of Lake Louise - Most Services Parks Canada Visitor Centre by Samson Mall. Ride the Gondola mid-May to mid-Oct. “The Hiking Capital of Canada” reflects the best high elevation hiking in the Rockies - including the Plain of Six Glaciers, and the famous Iceline Trail in Yoho National Park. See pg 25 for Shuttle Service Along the Icefields Parkway Hwy 93

3 Banff Park Museum National Historic Site

91 Banff Ave (by the Bow River Bridge) Discover Banff’s wildlife 403-762-1558 sh Red Paintbru

- Courtesy of

a Lloyd Dykstr

Named for the series of glaciers lining this route, the parkway is one of the world’s great mountain highroads. This drive along the “backbone of the continent” from Lake Louise to the town of Jasper takes half a day, with time to stop and admire the views. Stock up on camera supplies.

Bow Falls & Banff Springs Hotel National Historic Site Magnificent views from either side of the Bow River.

For details turn to pg 34 & 35

4 Crowfoot Glacier

34 km (25 min) from Lake Louise A century ago, there were three “toes” of ice here. How many can you see today?

Upper Hot Springs Pool

Baby Bear - Courtesy

1-800-767-1611 Mountain Avenue. Heritage Bath House Locker, swimsuit and towel rentals, Café, and Gift Shop. Open year-round. Summer 9 am - 11 pm. hotsprings.ca

of Hilke Beuck

Banff Gondola & Sulphur Mountain

5 Bow Summit and Peyto Lake Viewpoint

1-800-760-6934 Mountain Avenue. Open year-round. Take the Gondola to the summit for breathtaking views. Interpretive boardwalk to historic exhibit.

40 km (30 min) from Lake Louise - Interpretive Display 2088 m (6849’) above sea level. A short walk from the parking area leads to a view of brilliant turquoise Peyto Lake and, in July and August, an astonishing array of alpine flowers.

Buffalo Nations Luxton Museum

6 Mistaya Canyon

72 km (50 min) from Lake Louise Only 10 min by trail from the road. Look for rounded potholes and a natural arch on the canyon walls.

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403-762-2388 1 Birch Avenue. Aboriginal history, displays, live performances and demonstrations. Operated by several First Nations including the Cree, the Blackfoot Confederacy, Tsuu T’ina and the Stoney. buffalonationsmuseum.ca.

Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies

7 Saskatchewan Crossing

77 km (55 min) from Lake Louise - Interpretive Display Three rivers converge here: the Mistaya (Great Bear) River from the south, the Howse River from the west (the route used in 1807 by David Thompson to cross the Great Divide), the North Saskatchewan from the north - arising in the Columbia Icefield and emptying into Lake Winnipeg. Services available April - October.

403-762-2291 111 Bear Street. Brings mountain history, art and culture alive. Special learning programs for young children. whyte.org.

Vermilion Lakes

The turnoff is 1 km west of Banff, on the south side of the Trans-Canada Highway. Enjoy views of Mount Rundle from the pull-outs along this road.

8 Columbia Icefield and Info Centre

130 km (1.5 hrs) from Lake Louise 90 min Motorized Tours take you onto the glacier. Glacier Exhibits illustrate the effects of global warming. Restaurant, picnics, rooms, guided ice walks and more. Most Services available May 1 - Oct 15.

The Cascades of Time Garden

Flower gardens with walking path behind the Banff Park Administration Building. Great for families: FREE ADMISSION. Open Daily.

Cascade Ponds (Minnewanka Loop)

10 min - A favourite with locals and visitors alike. Grassy meadows, clear shallow pools, and a small beach. Picnic areas with fire pits. Accessible on foot and bicycle via Banff Legacy Trail. Elk - Courtesy of Wendy And

erson

19 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Experience Banff 13

LAKE MINNEWANKA

NOT TO SCALE CASCADE FIRE ROAD

Banff Townsite Map Keys

Upper Bankhead

An easy trail circles this shallow lake. A small beach and good wildlife watching. Picnic tables.

Lake Minnewanka

A short interpretive trail leads to this superb view point, or book a rafting trip to view the Hoodoos from the Bow River.

(Lake of the Water Spirits) Boat tours available, May 17 - Oct. 14. 800-760-6934 Leisurely lakeside stroll to Stewart Canyon (30 min).

EWA NKA

Cascade Ponds

The Hoodoos (Tunnel Mountain Road)

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Charming short and easy stroll through the surface workings of the coal mine and the outline of the old town site. Picnic area and trailhead. Road closed in winter.

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not to scale

See Campground Directory on pg 66 See legend on page 67

2nd Floor - Cascade Shops

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Experience the Bow Valley Parkway Protecting wildlife is the foundation of a sustainable future for the parks and a great visitor experience. To ensure this special area remains a high quality home for wildlife, from March 1st to June 25th, travel by vehicle, bicycle, or foot is not permitted between 8pm - 8am on the 17 km section between Johnston Canyon Campground and the Trans-Canada Highway. This travel restriction will allow wildlife to move unimpeded across the landscape, use high-quality habitat, and engage in normal behaviour. It is part of a larger action plan to ensure the ecologically rich Bow Valley Parkway area continues as a worldclass setting for visitors to learn about and experience the park, and as a safe environment for wildlife. All businesses remain open during this period of mandatory travel restriction and are easily accessible via the Castle Junction exit.

Johnston Canyon - Courtesy of: Leighton Lum

The Bow Valley Parkway is a very scenic, 48 km road that runs parallel to the Trans-Canada Highway between Banff and Lake Louise. Its eastern portion travels through a vital part of the park, called the montane, that provides critical habitat for large carnivores, including wolves, cougars and bears.

Along the Bow Valley Parkway Hwy 1A W

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Stop at roadside viewpoints and interpretive exhibits along this scenic road between Banff and Lake Louise.

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Distance (km) from Banff/Lake Louise 3/49 Backswamp 6/46 Mule Shoe 8/44 Prescribed Burn 11/41 Sawback 13/39 Hillsdale 16/36 Pilot Pond 21/31 Moose Meadow 26/26 Castle Cliffs 28/24 Storm Mountain 40/12 Baker Creek 48/4 Morant’s Curve Mystic

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Lake

REACH NEW PEAKS! OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK, JUNE 28 - SEPT 8, 2019. LEARN MORE AT BANFFSUNSHINEMEADOWS.COM

21 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

Calgary Ski Norquay 1


Elizabeth Parker: A Passion for the Alpine

“Alpine Club summer camp in the Rockies, 1907.” (Pres. A.O. Wheeler and Sec.Treasurer Elizabeth Parker), Courtesy of Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies.

Visitors to Canada’s Rocky Mountain National Parks quickly realize what a treasure they are. But in the early days, it took passionate advocates to create and sustain the parks we know today, people like Kootenai Brown in Waterton, and Elizabeth Parker in…Winnipeg?

utilitarian age; for keeping free from the grind of commerce, the wooded passes and valleys and alplands of the wilderness. It is the people’s right to have primitive access to the remote places of safest retreat from the fever and the fret of the market place and the beaten tracks of life.”

Yes, an eastern prairie girl was instrumental in developing the ethos of protection of our mountain heritage.

Talk about passion!

Born in Nova Scotia, Elizabeth Parker married young, moved west, and became a daily editorial writer at what is now The Winnipeg Free Press. When the head of the American Alpine Club suggested forming a Canadian chapter, Parker had none of it! She advocated fiercely for an independent Canadian club, helped organize the first meeting thereof in 1906, and became its first secretary. All this at a time when women were not exactly welcomed at most of the world’s alpine clubs. The very next year, in the first article of the Canadian Alpine Journal, Parker declared the club’s ideal. She wrote, “By virtue of its constitution, the Alpine Club is a national trust for the defense of our mountain solitudes against the intrusion of steam and electricity and all the vandalisms of this luxurious

While not a mountain climber herself, Elizabeth Parker was comfortable in the mountains, and enjoyed visiting many times. Today, visitors can still experience the amazing value of a ‘retreat from the fever and fret!’ at the Elizabeth Parker Hut in Yoho National Park, one of 34 such facilities run by the Alpine Club of Canada. In 2012, Parker was recognized by Parks Canada as a person who helped shape Canadian culture, history, and identity.

Visiting the high country If you are a true outdoorsman, or woman, you probably already know about the Alpine Club of Canada’s network of 34 remote cabins and huts sprinkled among amazing mountain ranges, glaciers and high passes.

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Elizabeth Parker: A Passion for the Alpine But let’s face it - most of us aren’t regular visitors to the peaks of mountains, preferring to see the magnificent backcountry through a vehicle window, or from a ski lift or a gondola. But if, just once in your life, you want to truly get away from it all, or experience the alpen-glow off a mountain peak at sunrise, or see a glacier from under the light of the moon with no other living soul in sight, then maybe it’s time to begin planning a visit to one of these gems. And it will take some planning! The club’s most popular site is the Elizabeth Parker Hut built in 1919 at the gorgeous Lake O’Hara. Yes, THAT Lake O’Hara – the one you’ve been ogling in tourism shots for decades! But to book a few nights in this gem, plan at least a year in advance, and even then you have to enter a lottery in the fall to even have a shot to bag this prize for the next summer. For most huts, though, it’s a simpler matter. To pick your destination visit alpineclubofcanada.ca, then call 403-678-3200 ext. 0 to make a reservation. You do not have to be a member, but by joining the club you can book a year in advance, versus 30 days for the public. Probably worth joining, especially for a family.

Elizabeth Parker backcountry hut, photo by Tanya Koob, courtesy of Alpine Club of Canada.

Next you’re going to need appropriate gear, like a nice warm sleeping bag, solid hiking boots (don’t even think about trying this in running shoes), and some hi-energy lightweight food options. And the usuals like sunscreen and lip balm and blister cream. Lastly, you’ll want to be in decent shape, be comfortable in the wilderness, and ready for a serious hike, if not downright rock-climbing or glacier traversing to get to the hut in the first place. If all of that sounds a little bit overwhelming, the club offers camps and training courses designed to make the whole thing more manageable, whether you just want to visit a hut safely, or want to learn how to climb all those mountains you are looking at! Options can be found under the ‘Adventures’ tab on their website. “One of the reasons we exist,” says the club’s K. Haberl, “is that we want to expose people to the mountains. Because once people go there, they want to protect it!” By: Allen Gibson

Elizabeth Parker backcountry hut, photo by Trisha Hook, courtesy of Alpine Club of Canada.

23 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Experience Sunshine Meadows

Standish Viewing Deck, overlooking Rock Isle Lake, Laryx Lake & Grizzly Lake. Photo Courtesy of Banff Sunshine Meadows

Take time to enjoy a quite moment at the Monarch Lookout, Photo Courtesy of Dan Evans

From the placid waters of Laryx Lake, a loon releases a series of haunting calls that reach across the morning coolness of Sunshine Meadows. Even in the summer months in the Rocky Mountains the morning is still brisk at 2300m. Pastel-coloured wildflowers shake off the dew of evening’s chill and a plump ground squirrel meekly squeaks as it begins its busy routine of tunnelling, snacking, and snoozing. These tiny creatures greet the day in the presence of limestone giants; the Monarch, Spar Mountain, and Mt. Assiniboine stand sentry over the meadows as they have for millennia.

However you choose to enjoy the meadows, expect the trip to be stunning. Over 10 km of interconnected trails traverse the meadows and hug three emerald-blue lakes: Rock Isle, Laryx, and Grizzly. Situated atop the Continental Divide — the rocky spine that splits the Pacific from the Atlantic watershed— these lakes glimmer with the ancient minerals of the last ice age.

To connect with this protected environment is breathtaking, but the exertion needed for such a view won’t take your breath away. Sunshine Meadows is one of the few subalpine hiking destinations in the Rockies accessible for the entire family. And this year it is easier than ever. From June 28 to Sept. 8, 2019 you can purchase a pass to ride the Sunshine Village gondola (Friday-Monday) or take the Scenic Alpine Shuttle (Tuesday-Thursday) from 8am-6pm. Once you have reached the village (full amenities are available), you can begin your hike or take advantage of the latest option of riding the chairlift to the top of Mt. Standish.

Alternatively, a longer and often-quieter hike will lead you to the Monarch viewpoint. Seated at the foot of Twin Cairns peak, this open expanse gives you the chance to glimpse a deer or even a grizzly foraging for flora, and to revel in the grandeur of the Monarch’s cliffs rising above the Simpson Valley.

For a short outing, be sure to ride the Standish chairlift, and hike down the trail to Rock Isle Lake, then take that trail north back to the village.

Trails are well maintained. Staying on trail ensures your safety, as well as the health of the sensitive ecosystem. Trail hosts offer regular interpretive tours from the top of Standish chair (we recommend making a reservation). By Bree Kullman

For more information about accessing Sunshine Meadows via the gondola or shuttle visit banffsunshinemeadows.com 24 | Enter Our Photo Contests


Experience Lake Louise

5

Sightseeing Lift, Restaurants & Interpretive Centre The best Grizzly Bear viewing and Scenery in the Rockies!

EMP

$

SAVE

GONDOLA RIDE FREE Parking

Open Daily May 17 - October 13, 2019 TOLL FREE

& Shuttle to the Lake

1.877.956.8473

lakelouisegondola.com Skoki Ski Lodge National Historic Site

Lake Louise Ski area and Gondola

Expect crowds!

See legend on pg 67 WH I

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OVERFLOW CAMPING AND PARKING FOR LAKE LOUISE AND MORAINE SHUTTLE 5.5 KM BANFF 56 km CANMORE 82 km CALGARY 184 km

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Public parking fills quickly. Plan on visiting during the week before 10 am and after 3 pm Or take the free shuttle between the Lake Louise overflow parking area and Upper Lake Louise. Running daily between May 17 – Oct. 14

JASPER 230 km COLUMBIA ICEFIELDS 127 km

Valid to Oct 13, 2019. Max 4 people per coupon. Not valid with any other offer.

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NOT TO SCALE

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FIELD 27 km GOLDEN 76 km VANCOUVER 795 km West

Road closed OCTOBER - MAY

Great Divide

Saddleback

Lake Agnes

Consolation Lake

NOT TO SCALE

Plain of Six Glaciers

2 Lake

Louise

Lake Louise Visitor Centre at Samson Mall Banff/Lake Louise Tourism 403-762-8421. Parks Canada Visitor Centre 403-522-3833. Exhibits explain the geology and history of the Canadian Rockies. Open 7 days a week. For hours visit: pc.gc.ca/banff. Lake Louise - 5 min from the Village Stoney Indians called it the "Lake of Little Fishes" The easy stroll around the lakeshore is stunning. Access point for more difficult hikes.

Fairview Lookout

Paradise Valley

ROCKPILE

Larch Valley Sentinel Pass Eiffel Lake

3 Lakeshore

Moraine Lake - 20 min from the Village Nestled in the Valley of the Ten Peaks. Hiking restrictions when grizzly bears in the area: tight groups of 4+ hikers. Open late May to early Oct.

Lake Louise Sightseeing Gondola 4.5 km from the village; 403-522-3555 Summer Gondola runs mid-May to mid-Oct. but come back to ski early Nov. to mid-May.

25 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

Moraine Lake


Think Like an Artist Imagine yourself alone on the shoreline of Lake Louise. Gaze

last day skiing, try to paint a particular shade of gold that you

across the milky, turquoise lake towards Mount Victoria. The

recently observed in a sunrise, or would you write about or

only sounds you hear are birds chirping, the rustle of wind,

dance out your experience? And how do you come away from

and the occasional tumble of rockfall off a distant cliff. No

that day with enough source material to create something of

human chatter, no sounds of cars or bus engines, no throngs

real artistry? For that, to create something meaningful, you’ll

of tourists blocking your view. Just you, the lake, and the day.

have to really engage with what you are seeing.

Pretty hard to imagine, isn’t it? To really get into the artist’s headspace, spend some time in When researching the art history of the Canadian Rockies, I

one of the many galleries and museums that now house their

often find myself considering the idea of the artist alone in the

work. The Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in Banff,

mountains. The watercolour painter extraordinaire Walter

and the retail galleries in Canmore, Jasper, Lake Louise, and

J. Phillips (1884 - 1963) lived in Banff for twenty years and

other mountain towns offer multitudes of interpretations of the

walked to his most favoured sketching locations, where he

landscape. Choose a work you like, and take a good, long look.

would sit with his paint box on his knees, working for hours without seeing another soul.

Studies have shown that the average visitor to a gallery spends less than fifteen seconds looking at any one painting. Rather

Group of Seven painters Lawren Harris and A.Y. Jackson went

shocking, considering the amount of time the artists spend

into the backcountry in the 1920s, spending days in relative

making them. How lucky these painters and photographers

solitude at places like Maligne Lake and Mount Robson,

were, to stay engaged with their chosen subject for so long.

intensely looking and sketching. The requirements of their

This is where my kernel of jealousy sits. So be less concerned

craft necessitated remaining still for extended periods of time,

about the number of kilometers you have hiked, the elevation

contemplating, then arranging and capturing, their unique

you have reached, or the number of bucket-list spots you have

versions of the scene. I have great admiration for their work,

seen. Leave the distractions of technology behind. Be open

but what I really envy are those by-gone days, times when one

to the joy that can be found in sitting still and just looking, in

could be alone in paradise.

listening for the birds, in absorbing the essence of where you are. See, truly see, the colour of the lake or the sky. Touch the

As the author of three mountain art guide books with a fourth

trees, feel the rocks, smell the air.

upcoming, I feel responsible for the congestion on some of today’s trails. But I also understand the thirst for beauty that

Quality art, in every media, requires serious intent, a deeper

draws us — with an overwhelming pull — to the mountains. So

kind of interaction with the subject. The artists I have studied

how can we experience the mountains like Phillips, Jackson

spent their time keenly observing. It took Phillips multiple

and Harris, despite the crush of people we might encounter? I

journeys to reach the uppermost waterfall at Johnston Canyon.

would suggest that we think like an artist.

On his first forays, he stopped and painted each waterfall he encountered in turn, and from a variety of angles, as he slowly,

Thinking like an artist will enrich your experience. It forces

over the course of one summer and multiple trips, made his

you to slow down, to extend you viewing time, to enter a state

way to the top. Heed his example, spend some time seriously

of deep contemplation of what you see, with consideration of

looking, letting the beauty of the natural world wash over you,

how to capture it. If you set out to express your most recent

and you will be rewarded with a richness of experience that

mountain days’ experience creatively, what would it look like?

you otherwise might have missed.

Would you draw a memory of blue shadows on snow from your 26 | Enter Our Photo Contests

By: Lisa Christensen


Pete Whyte Painting Snowdome, 1961, Courtesy of Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies (V683/III/B/ns-4722)


Rocky Mountain High

Oh! Canada’s mountain parks, offer a different experience for everyone. Millions of visitors enjoy our mountain parks, and this year you may see, or smell a newcomer: Cannabis. Who? Cannabis, commonly known as marijuana, grass, pot or weed, was legalized for recreational use in Canada in October 2018. So, before you skedaddle at the first whiff of a lurking skunk, stop; it may be cannabis you smell, a.k.a. skunkweed. Cannabis has grown in popularity since the 1960’s. Recently this smelly weed is making big headlines for its medicinal qualities. Cannabis is also famous for producing hemp fiber used in paper, textiles, clothing, biodegradable plastics, paint, insulation, biofuel, food, and animal feed. A tall plant with a stiff upright stem and divided serrated leaves, fine hairs cover each leaf. Cannabis grows into either female or male plants. Generally speaking, the female plants are preferred because of the large resin-secreting flowers that are trimmed into round or pointed buds. The plant contains two compounds Cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). THC is the main psychoactive compound in the plant best known for getting one ‘high’. CBD has multiple therapeutic uses and won’t intoxicate you. Whether you and cannabis have a long-standing relationship, or you’re a first-time user, ‘start low, go slow’ — a low dose, a bit at a time. If you feel like you’ve overdone it, sit back, relax, drinks lots of water, and the high will pass.

Cannabis is consumed in many ways including: Inhaling or smoking it; Vaporizing it; and/or Ingesting it. While cannabis can be ingested through edibles like cookies, brownies, gels, or gummies, don’t be too quick to look for your favourite cannabis laced snack. Edibles aren’t legal in Canada. Like alcohol, cannabis is off limits in some areas, and it’s best to be in the know. Understanding the local laws on usage is important when planning your trip, so you don’t incur a fine. Cannabis use is regulated under Canada’s Federal Cannabis Act. Each province/ territory is responsible for determining how cannabis is distributed and sold in their jurisdictions. Municipal borders can be obscure, so exercise caution when and where you’re consuming cannabis. It’s up to you to understand the restrictions of cannabis use in our mountain parks. The big thing to remember is that use is off limits in most public places. People consume cannabis for many reasons and the important thing to remember is BE SAFE. Grow, store, and consume cannabis responsibly. Please, remember to properly extinguish that joint, because only you can prevent wildfires. For more info visit: pc.gc.ca/en/voyage-travel/securite-safety/cannabis

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By: Kerri Robins


Rocky Mountain High Where and when you can and cannot consume cannabis in Alberta’s National Parks (Banff, Jasper, Waterton Lakes) You can smoke or vape cannabis: • If you are 18+ years old; • In campsites with valid permits from 7am to 11pm; • In public areas including day-use area; • On front and back country trails; • In the hamlet of Lake Louise; • In Waterton Lakes National Park public areas within the town boundary; and

You cannot smoke or vape cannabis: • In campground common areas including playgrounds, kitchen shelters, washrooms, trails, roads; • Within five metres of buildings throughout the park or small municipalities; • During summer long weekends from Victoria Day through Labour Day; • During special events or festivals; • In any public places within the Town of Banff and municipality of Jasper including day-use areas at Pyramid, Annette, Edith beaches and Palisades Centre; and Banff Upper Hot Springs.

Where and when you can and cannot consume cannabis in British Columbia’s National Parks (Kootenay, Yoho, Mount Revelstoke, Glacier) You can smoke or vape cannabis: • If you are 19+ years old; • In campsites with valid permits; • In public areas including day-use area; • On front and back country trails; and • In the townsite of Field (Yoho National Park) in public areas within the town boundary.

You cannot smoke or vape cannabis: • In campground common areas including playgrounds, kitchen shelters, washrooms, trails, roads; and • Within six metres of buildings throughout the park or small municipalities. 29 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Cycling the Icefields Parkway windows to insulate you from the sounds and smells of your surroundings. All of your senses are engaged,” says Johnson. “Not only that, but if you see something interesting along the way, you can simply stop and jump off the bike for a while, have a rest, and take in the view for as long as you like. It’s an incredible journey.” Not surprisingly, during the multi-day tours (typically three or four days), they witness countless cars and buses rushing by, jockeying for position at the crowded stops, only to do it all over again a few kilometers down the road. “For us, time is one of the biggest benefits. Motorists typically complete the parkway in three to five hours and barely do it justice. But instead of quickly gulping it down in a few quick bites, we savour it. And it’s a feast cyclists will never forget. Even the unpredictable and sometimes challenging mountain weather plays a part in the experience, reminding us just how powerful nature’s systems are and the value of letting go and taking things as they come.” Photo Courtesy of Mountain Madness Tours

What’s better than driving the Icefields Parkway, you may ask? According to Ben Johnson, owner of Mountain Madness Tours, that’s a no-brainer. Biking it. Meandering through some of the most majestic mountain scenery on the planet, the Icefields Parkway hardly needs an introduction. With dozens of legendary stops along the 230 km route – including Peyto Lake, Bow Lake, Sunwapta Falls, the Columbia Icefield, and many more – thousands of people come from all over the world each and every year to drive this awe-inspiring route between Jasper and Lake Louise. But the key word there is drive. Biking it affords an entirely different experience that flies under the radar for most visitors. But Ben Johnson, who has been guiding adventure-seeking cyclists along this route for the past ten years, isn’t shy about extolling the virtues of hopping on a sleek road bike, joining some fellow riders, and embarking on an adventure that’s truly bucket-list worthy. “Due to the slower pace of travel, you can really take it all in. There’s no roof to get in the way of the mountain peaks, no 30 | Enter Our Photo Contests

Photo Courtesy of Mountain Madness Tours


Cycling the Icefields Parkway “Our tours are fully-supported,” says Johnson. “The only things cyclists need to carry on the bike are a couple of water bottles and their wallet. Our support van carries all the luggage, extra clothing, food, supplies, and so on. And it’s never far away. We set up lunch and snacks at rest stops, hotel accommodations, meals, bike transfers, park entrance fees, photographs of you and your group biking, and much more. If you need to rest on a certain leg of the trip, that’s not a problem! The support van has a seat for you whenever you need it.” While a medium level of fitness is highly recommended for the Jasper to Banff tour (they also do other custom tours in other locations), advanced biking skills are not required. “I’ve guided a huge variety of people from all walks of life on this tour,” says Johnson. “A good mental attitude will triumph all challenges and you’ll come out on the other side of this tour stronger and more confident than ever.” And, of course, you’ll have experienced one of the best little bike rides the world has to offer. By: Andrew Penner

ain Madness Tours

Photo Courtesy of Mount

Travelling together as a group over multiple days, sometimes in challenging conditions, deepens friendships and facilitates plenty of camaraderie within the group. “We notice that guests form strong connections with their fellow travellers really quickly as they share the physical challenges, the spectacular rest stops and attractions, various meals throughout the day, sipping a post-ride beverage at the hotels, and so on. With no cell reception and minimal WiFi connections, it’s always great to see people putting down their phones and talking with each other. While most of the tourists who travel between Jasper and Banff focus on the destination, we focus on the journey.” Thanks to their close attention to detail and their many years of experience, the logistics of the trip are looked after every step of the way. Participants are free to bring their own bikes or can rent a quality road bike (Felt VR30 or Scott E-Bikes) through Mountain Madness and their reputable partners. Renting a bike (approximately $50 per day) is often simpler as it alleviates the extra expense and challenge of getting a bike to the starting point, travelling home with it, and so on. 31 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

Photo Courtesy of Mountain Madness Tours


Experience the Mountain Parks

TAKE THE BITE OUT OF CAMPING

PROTECT YOUR FAMILY FROM MOSQUITOES AND TICKS Visit off.ca for more details

32 | Enter Our Photo Contests


Experience the Icefields Parkway Turquoise lakes, forested valleys, ancient glaciers, tumbling waterfalls and mountain peaks as far as the eye can see come together to compose one of the world’s most scenic drives; the Icefields Parkway. This unlikely stretch of road takes you into the heart of Banff and Jasper National Parks where nature rules and one can’t help but feel overcome with wonder. It is possible to travel this route in just three hours from Lake Louise to Jasper but it would be a crime. This is so much more than 230 km of road. It’s a journey through captivating landscapes and natural history. It presents the best hiking, biking and photo opportunities in the Canadian Rockies. There are unforgettable stops along the way – some off the beaten path. Historic and scenic markers dot the Icefields Parkway but there are some locations tucked away, unsigned, where you may find your “mountain moment”. The most popular, photographed locations are often the ones that are easily accessed such as; Bow Lake, Peyto Lake, Mistaya Canyon, Athabasca Glacier, the Columbia Icefields Centre, Athabasca Falls and Sunwapta Falls. Others that are well worth the hike include; Herbert Lake, Panther Falls, Parker Ridge, Tangle Falls and the two-for-one stop at Waterfowl Lakes Campground to take

TRAVEL TIPS

PICNIC SPOTS

in Cephren Lake and Cirque Lake. These are just a few of the many stunning stops along the Icefields Parkway. Whether you just get out and look around or you take off on a half or full day hike, we recommend getting an early morning start as the lakes are still and wildlife viewing opportunities improve. One of the best resources for an Icefields Parkway road trip is found at icefieldsparkway.com. This website gives you the best information on picnic spots, hikes, photo opportunities, wildlife sightings, and even is great resource for winter travel. Since there is no cell service on the Parkway, the site offers a downloadable “Parkway Planner” or you can download a GPS tour guide that will point out the highlights and share some great history too. If you are planning to stay for a night or two in Jasper and/or Lake Louise, this website has a special deal for hotel stays. Visit icefieldsparkway.com to receive 15% off your stay in Jasper at the Mount Robson Inn or in Lake Louise at the Mountaineer Lodge. Both properties offer super comfy accommodations as well as free breakfast and Wi-Fi. Let the Mount Robson Inn, Jasper and Mountaineer Lodge, Lake Louise connect you on your journey on one of the world’s most scenic drives.

MAPS

PHOTOS & MORE

V I S I T I C E F I E L D S PA R K WAY. C O M

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COOL DRIVE, HOT DEAL - SAVE UP TO 20% ON YOUR HOTELS IN JASPER & LAKE LOUISE

33 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

Banff Lake Louise Tourism/Paul Zizka

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BANFF NATIONAL PARK

COLUMBIA ICEFIELD

ATHABASCA 3493 m PA RK ER

KITCHENER 3505 m SNOWDOME 3459 m

GE

RID

WILCOX PASS

ICEFIELD CENTRE

SUNWAPTA PASS 2030 m

Tangle

CIRRUS 3270 m

Lake

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Nigel Pass Bridal Veil Falls

COLUMBIA 3750 m

THE TWINS 3561 m / 3686 m

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STUTFIELD 3453 m

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Cr Stanley Falls

MALIGNE 3200 m MONKHEAD 3211 m

BRAZEAU 3525 m

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ALBERTA WOOLEY 3622 m 3405 m

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MUSHROOM 3622 m

IDGE

GEC 3130 m

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CHARLTON 3260 m

UNWIN 3300 m

Beaver Lake

Jacques Lake

SAMSON 3076 m

Medicine Lake

Maligne Lake

CURATOR 2624 m

Honeymoon Lake Osprey Lake Buck Lake

IN R

NELSON 3150 m

GONG 3121 m

Gong Lake

Sunwapta Falls

CHRISTIE 3102 m

ROCHE BONHOMME 2459 m

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Hilda Creek Parker Ridge

Wilcox Pass Sunwapta Pass. Boundary between Banff and Jasper national parks

CHABA 3020 m

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Fortress Lake

BRUSSELS 3160 m

Wabasso Lake

TEKARRA 2693 m

Five Lakes

HARDISTY 2715 m

KERKESLIN 2955 m

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Pyramid Lake

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126 124

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Buck and Osprey Lakes Sunwapta Falls Junction Services: (mid-May to mid-Oct) Road to Sunwapta Falls: 15 minute walk to lower falls Bubbling Springs Poboktan Creek Jonas Creek Rockslide CHABA Jonas Creek ICEFIELD Mushroom and Diadem Peaks Beauty Creek Beauty Creek Beauty Creek Tangle Falls. Watch for sheep! Sunwapta Canyon, Mount Kitchener Icefield Centre (May 1 to Oct 15) Services: Parks Canada Information and Exhibits, Brewster Ice Explorer tours and guided icewalks Columbia Icefield Wilcox Creek

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Moab Lake Whirlpool River Athabasca Falls

River

AQUILA 2880 m

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EDITH CAVELL 3367 m

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Amethyst Lakes

WHISTLERS 2469 m

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170 158 156 153 146 145 143 136 134 133 127

178 176

Jasper Townsite Whistlers (May to October) Jasper International Jasper Tramway (April to November) THE RAMPARTS Wapiti (Summer and Winter) Junction with Highway 93A. Access to: Marmot Basin Ski Area, Mount Edith Cavell Road (mid June to mid October: viewpoints, hiking, Tonquin Valley) and Wabasso. Rejoins parkway at Athabasca Falls. Valley of Five Lakes Wabasso Lake Whirlpool Valley, Mount Hardisty, Mount Kerkeslin and Mount Edith Cavell Horseshoe Lake Athabasca Falls Junction with Hwy 93A Athabasca Falls Mount Kerkeslin Goats and Glaciers Mount Fryatt HOOKER ICEFIELD Mount Christie Mount Christie Honeymoon Lake

CHA

60 72 74 77 84 85 87 94 96 97 103

52 54

200 198 196 193 192 189 181 180

221 216 205

9 14 25

30 32 34 37 38 41 49 50

226 224

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4 6

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230 228

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Stretching 230 km between Lake Louise and Jasper, this world-class journey amidst the peaks of the Canadian Rockies offers easy access to a vast wilderness of ancient glaciers. It’s complete with guided adventures onto the ice fields, majestic viewpoints and interpretive displays designed to enrich your understanding of glaciers and climate change.

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It has been referred to as “The Back Bone of the Canadian Rockies”. National Geographic calls it “One of the World’s Ten Greatest Drives”. For many, it is the road trip of a lifetime.

el

Between Jasper & Banff, Alberta Custom Bike Tours Available

Ma li

THE ICEFIELDS PARKWAY POINTS OF INTEREST

Experience the Icefields Parkway While plotting the border between Alberta and BC in the early 1900s, this roadway was the brainchild of Arthur O. Wheeler, who described this route as a “wonder trail”. Work began in 1931 as part of a depression-era public works program to put men to work, but the rugged terrain and short season meant the project took 9 years to complete.

Isolated for centuries, 1940 ushered in an era of tourism to the region when this road opened to the public. Today, more than a million travellers experience the parkway annually.

mountainmadnesstours.com

780.885.9813

10 2

0 Miles 10

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227 230

3 0

18 16

24

33

34

37

212 214

206

197

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TO FIELD, GOLDEN

Herbert Lake Junction: Trans-Canada Hwy and Icefields Parkway Lake Louise: 2 km Banff: 59 km

Molar Pass Hector Lake Hector Lake

Crowfoot Glacier Helen and Katherine Lakes, Dolomite Pass Mosquito Creek

Turnoff for services: Bow Lake

Peyto Lake Bow Glacier Bow Glacier Falls

Waterfowl Lakes, Mts. Chephren and Howse Snowbird Glacier Turnoff to Bow Summit area

Waterfowl Lake Chephren Lake, Cirque Lake

VICTORIA 3459 m

1

BOW 2868 m

TEMPLE 3543 m

Lake Louise

DALEY

ICEFIELD

WAPUTIK Hector Lake

BALFOUR 3272 m

Bow Lake

CROWFOOT 3050 m

WAPTA ICEFIELD

THOMPSON 3065 m

PEYTO 2970 m

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REDOUBT 2902 m DOUGLAS 3235 m

PTARMIGAN 3059 m

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See Legend on page 67

See Campground Directory on pg 66

Watch for highway workers as repaving continues throughout 2018

Between 1799 and 1875, five different fur trading posts existed along the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. The explorations that were carried out from Rocky Mountain House by David Thompson and others played a key role in determining the future shape of Canada.

TO ROCKY MOUNTAIN HOUSE NATIONAL HISTORIC SITE (175 km)

North Sa s

CYCLONE 3042 m

MOLAR 3002 m

qui Mos to C

DOLOMITE 2782 m

Lake Katherine

CIRQUE 2993 m

BOW PASS

2067 m

OBSERVATION 3174 m

WEED 3080 m

HECTOR 3394 m

LAKE LOUISE

Herbert Lake

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NOYES 3084 m

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CALDRON Peyto 2917 m Lake

TOTEM 3155 m

MURCHISON 3333 m

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Pinto Lake

Saskatchewan Crossing

Waterfowl Lakes Noye

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57 48 40

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Mistaya Lake

PATTERSON 3197 m

ARIES 2996 m

Chephren Lake Cirque Lake

HOWSE 3290 m

CHEPHREN 3266 m

EPAULETTE 3095 m

KAUFMANN 3109 m

SARBACH 3127 m

3261 m

WILSON ICEFIELD

93 WILSON

s

173 182 190

173

r

Glacier Lake

ERASMUS 3265 m

Rampa

COLEMAN 3135 m SU NS ET PA

WEEPING WALL

CIRRUS 3270 m

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Mistaya Canyon, Sarbach Lookout, Howse Pass

Howse Pass

AMERY 3329 m

River

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Alexandra

SASKATCHEWAN 3344 m

GE

RID

SUNWAPTA PASS

2030 m

30

FRESHFIELD ICEFIELD

FRESHFIELD 3337 m

CORONATION 3170 m

FORBES 3612 m

MONS ICEFIELD

LYELL ICEFIELD

LYELL 3520 m

ATHABASCA 3493 m PA RK ER

BANFF NATIONAL PARK

COLUMBIA ICEFIELD

WILCOX PASS

ICEFIELD CENTRE

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76 74 71

Mounts Amery and Saskatchewan Rampart Creek Glacier Lake Saskatchewan River Crossing Services (mid-March to mid-November): Junction with David Thompson Hwy (#11)

Coleman Creek Sunset Pass and Sunset Lookout

Weeping Wall Alexandra Trail, Castleguard Meadows, Thompson Pass

North Saskatchewan River, Cirrus Mountain Saskatchewan Glacier

Parker Ridge Nigel Pass Bridal Veil Falls

Hilda Creek

Sunwapta Pass. Boundary between Banff and Jasper national parks

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154 156 159

118 114 113 113 111 106 101 99 93 90 88 78 77

122

108

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124

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BRITISH COLUMBIA

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stay in a HI hostel.

Mistaya

106

Experience the Icefields Parkway

connect with nature. Visit the Icefield Parkway and

T. 1.866.762.4122 Book direct at hihostels.ca/wildernesshostels

Pick up a copy of Experience Jasper Visitor Map to see Jasper’s Treasures


Experience Jasper National Park Special Feature Miette Hot Springs 61 km (1 hr) North of Jasper on Hwy 16 & Miette Rd. The hottest mineral springs in the Canadian Rockies. Two refreshing cool pools. Towels, bathing suits & locker rentals. Open May to Oct. 1-800-767-1611

See Campground Directory on pg 66 See legend on page 67

Plan ahead! Make sure you have a camping reservation before arriving. In 2019, Whistlers Campground will be closed for reconstruction. When the campground reopens, visitors will be greeted with a new registration centre, 17 new combined washroom and shower facilities, improved campsites, and wider roads for two-way traffic. Underground services will be replaced and many of the existing electrical campsites will be upgraded to 50 Amp service. For more information visit parkscanada.gc.ca Edith Cavell: The improvements to the Cavell Day Use area are largely complete, therefore, an access permit will no longer be required. We anticipate reopening Cavell Road to vehicle traffic June 15, weather permitting. Typically, the road remains open through until the first significant snowfall or October 15. Expect delays and plan for your own comfort. Travel early in the day or in the evening when traffic volumes are lower. For the most up-to-date information on roads in Alberta, dial 511 or visit 511.alberta.ca. For BC road information, call Drive BC at 1-800-550-4997 or visit drivebc.ca. 36 | Enter Our Photo Contests


Experience Jasper National Park Jasper National Park Map Keys 1 The Town of Jasper - All Services

Jasper Park Information Centre 500 Connaught Dr.

2 Mount Edith Cavell

29 km (30 min) south of Jasper via 93A. A switchback road climbs 14.5 km (9 mi) to a popular viewpoint. Trailers or RVs larger than 7 m are not permitted. Open mid June - Sept., Re-opening mid-June, 2019

3 Athabasca Falls

30 km (30 min) south of Jasper via 93A or 93. A bridge and platforms give views of the thundering falls. Stay on the trail and inside the protective fences.

4 Sunwapta Falls

55 km (40 min) south of Jasper via 93. A paved road and short trail lead to the falls. Sunwapta is an indigenous term meaning “turbulent river.” Stop at the resort for a great meal and excellent gift ideas.

5 Columbia Icefield and Athabasca Glacier

103 km (75 min) from Jasper on the Icefields Parkway, Hwy 93 Refer to p. 28 & 29 for more information. Guided glacier hikes (Icewalks) icewalks.com or phone 1-800-565-7547 (June - September) For Pursuit’s Glacier Adventure, book your trip at the Icefield Centre or call 1-877-423-7433.

Jasper National Park is the largest of Canada’s Rocky Mountain Parks, and part of the UNESCO World Heritage Site. Discover the rugged mountains, glaciers, alpine meadows, forests, broad valleys, and wild rivers contained within more than 11,000 km2 of protected area. Wildlife is abundant here. It is common to see elk, bighorn sheep, deer, coyote and even black bear. Jasper may have the greatest variety of accommodations in the mountain parks. Within the park, you could pitch your tent, park your RV, stay in a wilderness hostel, or be pampered in a resort. In town, your options include hotels, motels, private home accommodations and B&B’s. All of these choices are excellent. Each will appeal to a wide range of travellers and several unique properties are available in each category. If you are looking for something a little different, consider a private cabin. Typically located on the edge of town, cabins offer a rustic charm ideal for those who really just want to get away from it all. Decompress in privacy without sacrificing comfort. Use this opportunity to read a book, go for a stroll, run a trail or just gaze at the amazing night sky.

6 Jasper House National Historic Site

35km (30 min) North of Jasper on Hwy 16. A short walk on an easy trail leads to an interpretive viewpoint looking beyond the Athabasca River towards the Jasper House historic site.

7 Maligne Canyon

11.5 km (15 min) east of Jasper on the Maligne Valley Road. 3.7 km interpretive trail with foot bridges over canyon. Stay away from the edge. Very deep (50 m) narrow canyon. In winter take a guided tour inside the gorge. It is unsafe to descend into the canyon without a professional guide.

8 Medicine Lake

27 km (30 min) from Jasper on the Maligne Valley Rd. The Maligne River flows in, but where does it flow out? Drained by one of the largest underground river systems in North America.

Maligne Lake

48 km (55 min) from Jasper on the Maligne Valley Rd. The beauty of this lake is legendary. A Boat Tour of this 22 km long lake is a “must see”. Chalet open mid-May to early October, 8:30 am - 7 pm. Boat tours start when spring ice conditions permit. Tour hours 10 am - 3 pm, extended to 5 pm in the summer. Call for a Reservation 1-888-285-0376. malignelake.com.

Experience Local Hospitality 150 homes offering affordable lodging from modest rooms to upscale suites Check Availability at

StayinJasper.com 37 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

Pick up a FREE copy of our Experience Jasper Visitor Map for more highlights and activities in both Jasper National Park and Jasper.

See pg 66 & 67 for our Campground Directory Download all our Travel Guides at ExperienceTravelGuides.com/Library


Experience Jasper National Park etarium

Photo Courtesy of Jasper Plan

in the Canadian Rockies is a pursuit gaining real traction with parents and grandparents, alike. They take advantage of the perfect conditions to share this amazing experience with their children and grandchildren. Families are replacing clumsy & expensive telescopes with iPads and GPS-based star-finders to browse their way around the vast sky.

If dark starry night skies give you goose bumps, you’ve come to the right place! The landscape within Jasper National Park is a vision during daylight, but it also has a night time magic very rare in the world these days. The park boasts one of the largest dark sky preserves in the world. You can see dreamy nightscapes of planets and constellations year-round, although the stars are brightest during the monthly phase of the new moon. In March 2011 the Royal Astronomical Society of Canada (RASC) officially designated Jasper National Park as a Dark Sky Preserve (DSP). A DSP is an area in which no artificial lighting is visible and active measures are in place to promote the reduction of light pollution, the protection of nocturnal habitat, and the visibility of the night skies. While Jasper is nestled within soaring mountain ranges, it also has the largest clearings in the Rockies, ideal for dramatic open spaces for stargazing. This kind of wilderness astronomy

Astronomy programs are offered daily at the Planetarium and Jasper’s Dark Sky Festival is a “must see”. Since inception, this festival has grown into one of North America’s largest annual celebrations of the night sky. Plan to return for the ultimate Jasper Dark Sky experience, from October 18-27, 2019 that includes: • Guided virtual tour in climate-controlled dome theatre • See the local aboriginal First Nations constellations • Tour of the most powerful telescopes in the Rockies • See recent 4K sky imagery with a new video telescope • Learn how to photograph auroras and the Milky Way • Guided tour deep space and Q&A with astronomy expert What to Bring? (in addition to warm clothes) You’ll be simply amazed as to what you will be able to see with the naked eye, but if you have a Smart Phone or an iPad, load up a GPS-based star finder program from your App Store, and get familiar with it, before you leave home. Your camera! Remember to take pictures of your experience and enter our reader contest! (see pg 58) Image-stabilized binoculars feature optics that adjust many times a second to counteract your unsteady hands, effectively transforming such devices into small telescopes without the need to pack a tripod.

For more visit jasperdarksky.travel/partners and jasperplanetarium.com

jasperinn.com

C R E AT I VE , I N S P I R E D F O O D Reservations: 780-852-3779 Restaurant: 780-852-3535 www.beckerschalets.com

B U F F E T B R E A K FA S T · C R A F T B E E R S E L E C T I O N ENJOY OUR BEAUTIFUL SUMMER TERRACE

38 | Enter Our Photo Contests

At the Jasper Inn & Suites 98 Geikie Street 780.852.3232


Experience Jasper

See Campground Directory on pg 66 See legend on page 67

1 Jasper Information Centre

National Historic Site, 500 Connaught Dr. Open from 9 am - 5 pm Spring, Fall, and Winter with extended summer hours. Friends of Jasper Gift Shop. Jasper Information Centre: 780-852-6176 Tourism Jasper Visitor Desk: 780-852-6236

2 Patricia & Pyramid Lakes

5/7 km (10/15 min) drive from Jasper. Patricia Lake has a 2-3 hour loop trail. Read the plaque for WWII historical significance. Enjoy hiking, fishing, swimming, cross-country skiing, trail rides, and snow shoeing. Easy to access.

3 Old Fort Point Loop

1.5 km (5 min) drive via 93A and Old Fort Point Road - 3.8 km loop (1-2 hr) fairly steep hike to the top of this popular hill that overlooks the town & Athabasca River.

4 Lakes Annette, Edith & Beauvert

5 km (10 min) drive via Hwy 16 Sandy beaches, swim in spring-fed “kettle” lakes 2.4 km (45 min - 1.5 hr) Wheelchair and stroller accessible interpretive trail.

5 Jasper SkyTram

7 km (15 min) drive from town Phone 866-850-8726. jasperskytram.com. Open late Mar. to mid-Oct. (weather dependant). Guided tours and stunning views from atop Whistlers Mountain. Canada’s longest and highest aerial tramway (7,500 ft. above sea level).

6 The Discovery Trail

This trail can be accessed at several points throughout Jasper. (8.3 km loop) Portions are wheelchair accessible downtown.

Suggested Stargazing Sites

39 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

7 Jasper-Yellowhead Museum & Archives

400 Bonhomme St.; 780-852-3013 jaspermuseum.org. Discover the spirit of Jasper. Admission Fee: Adults $7. Permanent exhibits of Jasper’s history. Monthly exhibits in Showcase Gallery. Summer (mid May - mid Oct) 10 am - 5 pm Winter (Thurs. - Sun, only) 10 am - 5 pm

8 Fitness & Aquatic Centre & Arena

NEW Fitness Facility! Arena, Indoor Climbing Wall, 50m Waterslide 25m Pool, Hot Tub & Steam Room, Showers Tennis & Raquetball Courts, Meeting & Event Facilities Fitness & Pool: 780-852-3663 Activity Centre: 780-852-3381


Canadian National Railway (CNR) 100th Anniversary Photo Courtesy of CNR

Charles Melville Hays 1910

Wilfred Laurier

Completed in 1885, the Canadian Pacific Railway (CPR) was pivotal in creating Canada as we know it today. By the end of its first decade, the CPR was posting an annual profit of $15 million, and was cutting into the business of its main competitor in the eastern, the Grand Trunk Railway (GTR). Taking the challenge head-on, in 1896 the GTR hired Charles Melville Hays, to begin a transcontinental competition with the CPR. Hays initially focused on cutting costs in eastern Canada. By the time he committed to expand westward, there was a new kid on the block, the Canadian Northern Railway (CNoR), devoted to breaking up the CPR’s monopoly on western trade. In response to the GTR’s westward expansion plans, the CNoR sought to complete track to the Pacific Ocean quickly and proposed a partnership that would see the Grand Trunk build in the east while the CNoR built in the west.

Hays however, declined. Instead he petitioned the government to charter his railway to build across the prairies, and over the Yellowhead Pass and along the Skeena River to the Pacific. Hays stipulated that the government had to invest $6,400 per mile and provide a land grant of 5000 acres per mile. It was an election year and prime minister Wilfred Laurier, a Liberal, received Hays warmly. In the manner that John A. Macdonald had put the Conservative party’s stamp on the CPR thirty years earlier, Laurier wanted to affix his political mark to a competitor that would crack the CPR’s monopoly. Laurier put forward a complicated idea for what he called the National Transcontinental Railway. East of Winnipeg, the Canadian government would lay track to Moncton, New Brunswick. And west of Winnipeg, a newly created subsidiary of the GTR would build to the Pacific ocean.

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Canadian National Railway (CNR) 100th Anniversary This subsidiary, the Grand Trunk Pacific Railroad (GTPR), would rent the eastern section and the government would be the major guarantor of the western section. Hays became the President of the GTPR.

1914, and the CNoR in January 1915, it was apparent that there was one railroad too many in the west. WWI snuffed out the candle of prosperity. Both railways incessantly clamored for public funds to stave off collapse.

Construction began in 1905. The next year, the government became aware that the CNoR intended to file plans to also cross the Rockies at Yellowhead Pass. Because they had a big stake in the GTPR, it asked Hays to promptly file detailed plans for its proposed route, and then “misplaced” the CNoR’s application. The deception was obvious but, as a result, the GTPR’s charter received approval first, and with the best route.

In a typical Canadian move, the Conservative government of Robert Borden appointed a Royal Commission to appraise “the railway problem.” It recommended that the government take ownership of the GTR, GTPR, and CNoR, thus creating Canadian National Railways. When the amalgamation was completed in 1923, the new railway included 22,110 miles of track and employed more than 99,000 workers, making it the largest industrial employer in Canada. It began operations with a $1.3 billion debt.

In July 1909, the GTPR’s tracks reached Edmonton from the east. The following winter construction crews began to tackle the crossing of the Rockies. They soon had company. After scrambling for two years, the CNoR made an end-run around the federal government by securing a charter in BC, permitting them to cross Yellowhead Pass to Vancouver. While the GTPR’s work gangs cleared the grade and laid track, the CNoR’s surveyors leap-frogged along. For 2 years rival workers constructed twin railway grades in what would prove to be the most futile episode in Canadian transportation history. When Hays drowned on RMS Titanic in 1912, the GTPR lost its champion. Following completion of the GTPR in April

Charles Melville Hays had dreamed of a railway hotel network in western Canada to rival that of the CPR. He built the Hotel Macdonald in Edmonton, and planned the Chateau Miette resort, in Jasper. Canadian National Railways purchased the lease for a railway construction camp known as Tent City in Jasper in 1922, and subsequently built Jasper Park Lodge. However, the golden era of the railway was soon supplanted by the arrival of the automobile. Today, in many places, Hwy 16 follows abandoned railway grades. By Graeme Pole Graeme Pole writes about life in the mountains mountainvision.ca

Photo Courtesy of CNR

41 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

CN 6015 is a 4-8-2 “Mountain” type locomotive, built for the CNR in 1923. The only remaining example of 37 that were built. Graeme Pole


Experience Yellowhead County & Hinton

Hinton, Photo Courtesy of Travel Alberta

Hinton, Photo Courtesy of Leigh McAdam @hikebiketravel

More and more travellers are making Hinton and Yellowhead County part of their vacation plans – and it isn’t hard to see why. The abundance and variety of lodgings here give visitor’s countless opportunities to explore the Canadian Rockies and the surrounding foothills.

something for anyone wanting to explore some of the most majestic and eclectic landscapes in western Canada.

Located only a few hours west of Edmonton, along Hwy 16, Yellowhead County stretches from Evansburg, at the junction of Hwy 22 (The Cowboy Trail) in the east, to the gates of the Jasper National Park gates in the west. Yellowhead County has

1. Visit one of the many parks in our area. 2. Guided horse-back tours in the Rockies and foothills. 3. Stop in at one of the museums from Evansburg to Hinton. 4. Go tubing in the Pembina, McLeod or Athabasca River. 5. Hop on your mountain bike to try some of the great trails. 6. Relax at the family friendly beaches and campgrounds. 7. Hike the Hoodoos in Sundance Provincial Park. 8. Check out the Coal Branch and Cardinal Divide. With a population of 9,900 residents and located a short 15-minute drive east of the Jasper National Park boundary, Hinton is a regional hub in West Yellowhead County. Accommodations run from tepees, lodges, resorts, and B&Bs, to full-service hotels with indoor swimming pools. There are more than 30 campgrounds here, operated by the municipality, private sector and Alberta Parks. They provide a full range of serviced and non-serviced campsites to choose from. The town boasts a number of outdoor recreational facilities and attractions. Canada’s longest freshwater boardwalk, the Beaver Boardwalk is a great family outing that showcases a local wetland system around Maxwell Lake. It features two observation towers, seating areas, interpretive signs, and more than a dozen beavers. Arrive in the early morning or evening for the best chance to see them in action. Hinton is getting a reputation as a mountain biking hotspot in Western Canada, too. The biking trail network is constantly changing. Those who venture out can experience woodland

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Experience Yellowhead County & Hinton

Black Cat Guest Ranch, Photo Courtesy of Travel Alberta / Ryan Bray

beauty, wetlands or breathtaking vistas with an interesting mix of roots, side hills, climbs and technical features. On a rainy day, check out the Northern Rockies Museum of Heritage and Culture. Imagine the sounds as the old steam engine rolls into Hinton in 1911. Back then, the population was only 500 and saw little growth until the opening of local coal mines in the late 1920s. Those mines were part of a vast network that became known as the Coal Branch. A hidden gem in the area, consider a self-guided tour of the abandoned coal mines. It starts 10 minutes west of town on Hwy 40 South. A serendipity of this travel route is that it is great for wildlife spotting. Watch for bear, moose, elk, wolves and cougars. You’ll likely find herds of Big Horn sheep right along the side of the road. However, cell service is not reliable here and the road changes from paved to gravel. To learn more, pick up a copy of our Coal Mine Tour Map at the info centre. Located at 309 Gregg Avenue in the central shopping district, the staff has received high praise for their service! Hinton’s backyard is a mecca for campers, quadders, hikers, bikers, skiers, hunters, and fishers – along with rock climbers, white water rafters, canoers and kayakers. Located 15 min north of Hinton on Hwy 40, with vivid views of the majestic mountains, the William A. Switzer Provincial Park is an uncrowded gem nestled in the foothills. The park offers multiple campgrounds, beach activities, visitor centre, interpretation programs, and numerous trails for hiking, and biking and cross-country skiing. You will also find excellent wildlife watching opportunities from easily-accessible viewing platforms and self-guided interpretive trails.

Hinton, Photo Courtesy of Travel Alberta / Ryan Bray

Hinton will host two major summer festivals in 2019. The Föhn Festival is Hinton’s signature event! It is designed to showcase their rich diversity, it is combined with their Canada Day Celebrations on July 1. Don’t miss the fireworks on the evening of June 30. fohnfest.com The Wild Mountain Music Festival runs from July 13-15 at the Entrance Ranch, 8 km north on Hwy 40. The festival features two stages, beer gardens, vendors, and kids’ activities. Catch the shuttle bus from Hinton or camp on-site. wildmtnmusic.ca

stay

another

day

CAMPING

MOUNTAIN BIKING

ZIPLINE

PARKS &

DISC GOLF

PLAYGROUNDS

FESTIVALS

HELI-HIKING

TOURS

X-COUNTRY SKIING

EVENTS

HIKING

visit us at DISCOVERALBERTAROCKIES.COM VIC Address: 309 Gregg Ave #1, Hinton, AB email: info@hinton.ca phone: 1 800-252-3782

White Wolf Inn Hinton

Come join the pack Whether lone time, or time with the pups Trek the forest behind Journey into the Rockies Jacuzzi & kitchenettes Complimentary breakfast Pets are welcome

whitewolfhinton.com | 780-865-7777

43 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Experience British Columbia

New Denver

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Courtenay

BC Fast Facts Capital City: Victoria Population: 4.99 million History: Entered Canadian Confederation in 1871 Total Area: 944,735km sq/364,764mi sq Highest Point: Fairweather Mountain, 4,663m/15,299ft

Lowest Point: Pacific Ocean, Sea Level Longest River: Fraser River, 1,368 km/850 mi Provincial Flower: Pacific Dogwood Provincial Tree: Western Redcedar Provincial Bird: Steller’s Jay Provincial Gemstone: Jade Provincial Motto: “Splendour Without Diminishment”

Discover northeastern BC’s dino finds! Pick up a free copy of Experience the Dinosaur Trails or download our mobile edition at ExperienceTravelGuides.com

FREE

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Experience Wells Gray Provincial Park

Courtesy of Claude Robidoux

Helmcken Falls, Courtesy of Claude Robidoux

Courtesy of Chance Breckenridge

Our coverage of British Columbia (BC) begins with the communities of Blue River, Clearwater, Valemount, and Wells Gray Provincial Park.

Clearwater Valley Resort & KOA Campground

Wells Gray PP contains 5,250 sq km of alpine wilderness, borne from volcanoes and carved by glaciers. It boasts one of the most unique landscapes in all of BC; where your days are measured in vertical feet, big game sightings and the number of waterfall shots on your camera. Helmcken Falls is Canada’s 4th highest waterfall and just one of the 39 named waterfalls you’ll find here. It’s where the Murtle and Clearwater Rivers roar into life each spring and wildlife sightings are as common as sunrise and sunset. Murtle Lake is North America’s largest canoe-only lake. It is here, through a kaleidoscope of colour where you can hike through the wildflower meadows of the Trophy Mountains. You’ll find serenity among old-growth interior rainforests. Select Valemount, Blue River or Clearwater as your staging ground for wilderness adventures. Tour by car, on foot, or from a saddle… in the Canada you imagined. Located one hour west of Jasper on Hwy 16, drop by the Mount Robson Visitor Centre, or stop at the Info Centres in Valemount or in Clearwater. The friendly staff will ensure you get the most from your visit to this breath-taking area! 45 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

heated outdoor pool • laundromat treed, park like setting • wifi mini golf • playground 52 RIDGE RESTAURANT with breakfast & dinner specials MOTEL AND BUNGALOWS extra large rooms • family rooms queen & king beds • kitchenettes air conditioning KOA CAMPGROUND AND KAMPING KABINS 50 & 30 amp sites • firepits & tables pull thru sites

Call: 1.888.837.1161 or 250.674.3909 www.clearwatervalley.com 373 Clearwater Valley Road, Clearwater


Experience the Kootenay Rockies To Jasper

93

To Revelstoke

Lake Louise

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Highway 93 runs north from Wickenburg, Arizona, 2,768 kms to Jasper, Ab. American visitors cross into Canada at the Roosville Border Crossing which is open 24/7 year round. For much of the 330 km within BC, Hwy 93 follows the Columbia River Valley and passes through historic communities like Fort Steele, resorts such as Fairmont Hot Springs, and the quaint town of Radium Hot Springs, before veering northeast through Kootenay National Park. Unplug, slow down and drink in the charm of this section of your journey.

Brisco

Windermere Creek

95

Bed & Breakfast Cabins

Koo

93

ten

Radium Hot Springs

• 107 forested acres • Private secluded log cabins with kitchens and jacuzzis • Creekside hammocks and picnic areas, hours of trails • $119 - $159 +tax/couple includes breakfast

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Invermere

Panorama Windermere Windermere Lake 95 93

Fairmont Hot Springs

Columbia Lake

1-800-946-3942

www.WindermereCreek.com

18 km south of Kootenay National Park - Windermere, BC

Canal Flats

British Columbia

Alberta

Skookumchuck

95A

Kimberley

95 93

Fort Steele To Sparwood and the Crowsnest Pass

Cranbrook 93

3

Fernie 3

Elko

3

To Vancouver

STAY, EXPERIENCE, EXPLORE

Creston 95

Eco-Resort • Luxurious log cabins Daily guided activities • Multi day Adventure camps Open Summer & Winter • Pet Friendly

93

CANADA U.S.A.

2

Eureka 93

To Coeur d’Alene

95

2

To Kalispel

MOUNTAIN RESORT

To Whitefish, Kalispel

46 | Enter Our Photo Contests

To Book Your Stay call 1-877-647-4525

www.nipika.com


Experience Kootenay National Park Kilometres 0 Miles 0

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1.5 km from Radium. The iron-rich cliffs of the Redwall Fault provide a dramatic entrance to the park. Watch for bighorn sheep.

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16 km (20 min) from Radium. Stop here for exhibit & dramatic view of: The Kootenay River Valley, The Mitchell & Vermilion Ranges.

Special Features Radium Hot Springs Pools

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3 km from Radium; Admission fee. Hot pool is a relaxing 39 oC (102 oF). Cool pool is a refreshing 29 oC (84 oF). Lockers, swimsuit and towel rentals available. Visit hotsprings.ca for hours and fees.

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Crooks Meadow

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90 km from Radium Hot Springs. Fee applies for the guided hike. See pg 54

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Panorama, Invermere, Windermere, Fairmont Hot Springs, Cranbrook, Fort Steele & U.S.A.

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Kootenay National Park is on Mountain Time – 1 HR AHEAD of Pacific Time (and most of B.C.)

Red

Vermilion Pass, Fireweed Trail 95 km (1.2 hr) from Radium. Elevation: 1640 m. The Continental Divide is the dividing line between the Pacific and Atlantic watersheds. A 15-min interpretive trail loops through a regenerating forest.

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7 Paint Pots

85 km (1 hr) from Radium. Cold, iron-rich mineral springs bubble up through small pools, staining the earth a deep ochre.

Shanks

Dolly

63 km (45 min) from Radium. Located at Vermilion Crossing. Gift Shop, Cabins & Dining. Lodge Open Mid-May to Mid-Sept.

6

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13 km (15 min) from Radium. Interpretive trail bordering a clear, shallow lake.

6 Kootenay Park Lodge

1A

Banff (132 km from Radium)

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93

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In the village of Radium Hot Springs. Tourism Radium Information Desk OPEN YEAR ROUND 250-347-9331 Friends of Kootenay Gift Shop Parks Canada Info Desk 250-347-9505 Ktunaxa Nation culture & history exhibit.

KOOTENAY NATIONAL PARK

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Lake Louise and JASPER NATIONAL PARK

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10 5


Experience the Flora in the Mountain Parks As you explore one of Canada’s most spectacular landscapes, you’ll often be staring toward immense ramparts. At other times, you’ll be squinting to spot some of an area’s amazing animals. Just remember to look down to appreciate some of the unique wild flowers that line the trails and roadsides. The Crocus To many locals, the crocus is the official harbinger of spring. Its delicate pinkishpurple flowers announce the start of the wild-flower season. Orchids As the spring gives way to summer, the calypso orchid or fairy slipper emerges from carpets of needles lying beneath towering forests of lodgepole pine. An Amazing Diversity As you learn to recognize wildflowers, take note of where you encounter them. Was the area in the open sun or more shaded? Were the plants protected from the elements or subjected to high winds? Was the soil moist or dry? Learning to recognize the landscape within which the flowers live will help you anticipate which flowers to expect as you head out on future wildflower walks.

the tiny bloom of the blue violet and the creamy flowers of the yellow locoweed. Try to find the star flowered Solomon’s seal, bunchberry, wild strawberry, bearberry, twinflower or a prickly rose. Flowers of the High Country This season is short so the flowers need to bloom as soon as conditions allow. Watch for red and purple flowers, like the common red paintbrush, alpine forgetme-not, and the tiny moss campion. Other high elevation flowers include the cow parsnip and the club like flower clusters of the bear grass. This summer, get to know a few of the wild flowers. They’ll be your constant roadside and trailside companions as you roll your way through the mountains and unlike bears, they don’t run away as soon as you try to get a good look at them. But remember: look, don’t pick!

Seedhead, Wilcox Pass - Courtesy Terry Webb

Flowers of the Montane The valley bottom plays host to most of the early season wildflowers. Watch for

Galypso Orchid - Courtesy Joshua Angiola

Crocus - Courtesy Jerre Paquette

Blanket of Daisies - Courtesy Jeremy Klager

Red Paintbrush - Courtesy Lloyd Dykstra

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Meadow of Scarlet Paintbrush - Courtesy Terry Webb


Experience the Fauna in the Mountain Parks

Elk - Courtesy of Sheila McKeand

Dawn and dusk are your best bet for spotting animals in their natural setting. However, it’s important to keep in mind that these are WILD animals.

The Many Members of the Deer Family Here you’ll find white-tail and mule deer, elk or wapiti, moose, and even caribou in the northern reaches.

Bears Both black and grizzly bears can be seen along highways as they feed on spring dandelions or summer buffaloberries.

You’ll likely see more animals while you’re driving. Mule and white-tailed deer, along with large populations of elk (or wapiti) line many of the highways. They typically graze the grassy roadside shoulders and hillsides taking advantage of plentiful forage.

Black bears may be any colour, so colour itself is a poor indicator. Instead, look for a prominent shoulder hump and a slightly dished-in appearance to the face - a sure sign that you’re watching a grizzly. Bighorn Sheep or Mountain Goats? Bighorn sheep make appearances along the roadside, mountain goats do not. To help you identify them, remember that mountain goats are snow white. Male bighorn sheep get the large full-curl horns. Females have small, goat-like horns.

Keep Them Wild; Keep Yourself Safe We all want to keep the animals safe and your visit memorable. Here are some tips for safely observing wildlife in the mountains: Stay in your vehicle when you see an animal. They are very large and equally fast. Be sure to stop your vehicle only if it is safe to do so. Blind corners and steep hills can obscure other drivers’ view of your vehicle. Do not feed or entice animals to move closer to you. Animals that approach humans for handouts are likely to lash out defensively if they feel threatened. Help us keep the wild in wildlife.

Mountain Goats - Joey Olivieri

Bear - Courtesy Trevor Ward

Remember to keep your smart phone, camera and binoculars ready for action. Spotting wildlife often happens suddenly with little warning and ends just as fast. By Ward Cameron

Wolfs - Courtesy Francis Sandoval

Bears - Courtesy Leonard Heinonen

Coyotes - Courtesy Nicholas Taffs

49 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

Big Horn Sheep - Courtesy Richard Collens


Experience Radium Hot Springs

Hike Golf Soak STAY

Inn On Canyon

Old Salzburg Restaurant

The Inn On Canyon is a charming 2-storey Victorian style Inn that offers warm cozy rooms, perfect for a mountain getaway. Complimentary hot breakfast is included in your stay.

Austrian & Continental Cuisine | Homemade Pasta & Desserts | Daily 3 course dinner specials | Schnitzel | Steak | Seafood | Enjoy Austrian beer on tap on our mountain view patio.

InnOnCanyon.ca | 1-250-347-9392

OldSalzburgRestaurant.com | 1-250-347-6553

Cobblestone Creek Cottage & Lodging Co.

Radium Hot Springs Pools

Boutique Vacation Home Rentals specializing in Golf Packages | Whitewater Rafting Tours | Ski Packages | Snowmobile & ATV Tours

CobblestoneCreek.ca | 1-888-711-3722

Relax and soak in the view of Sinclair Canyon from the hot pool or bring the kids for a fun day of swimming in the cool pool. Day spa services available on-site. HotSprings.ca | 1-800-765-1611

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Experience Radium Hot Springs

Valley Visitor Services Radium Hot Springs Visitor Centre Open Year Round Winter Hours 9-5 Daily Summer Hours 9-7 Saturday - Thursday | 9-9 Friday’s Closed Christmas Day, Boxing Day & New Year’s Day

Music & M a r ke t on M a in

Columbia Valley Chamber of Commerce Open Year Round Winter Hours 9-5 Monday - Saturday (September – June) Closed Sunday’s and Statuary Holidays Summer Hours 9-6 Daily

Downtown Invermere Kiosk

FRIDAYS

June 28 - Aug

ust 30

4pm-9pm

Special Cana da event on July Day 1

Car Show Mus

ic

Open Seasonally through July & August Wednesday – Sunday 9:30-5:30

Friday Septem & Market ber 20 4 PM – Saturday Sept8PM embe 12 PM – 4 PM r 21

Fairmont Hot Springs Kiosk Open Seasonally July & August 10-6 Daily

Columbia River Paddle

@TourismRadium

Located in Invermere, Specializing in guided & self guided tours, rentals, instructions and sales, in canoeing, flat & whitewater kayaking, and stand-up paddle boarding.

@Tourism.Radium @Tourism_Radium

ColumbiaRiverPaddle.com | 1-250-342-7397

RadiumHotSprings.com

Valley Zipline Adventures Valley Zipline Adventures is the Columbia Valley’s adventure playground, offering unforgettable ecotourism adventures for any level of adventure seeker. Book with us today! ValleyZip.com | 1-250-347-7627

1.888.347.9331 RADIUM VALLEY VACATION RESORT

RADIUM ELK PARK BED & BREAKFAST

CRESCENT MOTEL

LAKESHORE RESORT & CAMPGROUND

RadiumValleyVacationResort.com | 1-250-347-9715 RadiumElkParkBnb.com | 1-250-347-9522

CrescentMotel.ca | 1-888-295-8822

51 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

LakeshoreResortCampground.com | 1-250-342-6352


Headbanging in Radium Hot Springs Photo Courtesy of James Anderson

Come late fall, the village of Radium Hot Springs, as it goes with many mountain towns, slows down considerably. Many of the summer soakers, hikers, bikers, golfers, and the like, have made their journey home. However, some Radium “residents” never leave. In fact, come late fall, they start “raising the roof” with a headbanging show that always draws a crowd. Radium Hot Springs – a beautiful Kootenay Rockies village located 260 km west of Calgary in the Columbia Valley – is known for many things. Obviously, the gorgeous natural hot pools (the largest in Canada) immediately come to mind. The exceptional golf – there are two spectacular courses in town - the hiking, the Columbia Valley Wetlands, the quaint motel-lined downtown “strip,” which boasts ice cream shops, candy stores, restaurants, mini-golf, and the like, are all staples on Radium Hot Spring’s “To Do ” list. Throughout the year Radium also hosts a number of popular events including the unique Headbanger Festival. But it’s not quite what you’re thinking. There are no eardrum-busting heavy metal bands, mosh pits, or wild, all-night parties. No, the Headbanger Festival in Radium Hot Springs celebrates (in

Radium Springs Golf Course Photo Courtesy of Andrew Penner

a good, clean, family-friendly way!) the fall rutting season. And the bighorn sheep always put on quite a show. “Watching the big rams engage in their head-butting rituals is an awesome experience,” says Kent Kebe, the Manager at Tourism Radium. “It’s one of the most impressive displays in the natural world you can see in Western Canada.” The festival incorporates lots of chances to witness the headbutting first-hand. (This banging of heads occurs when two rams square off and smash horns in a thundering display of raw aggression and dominance. The winner then becomes the leader of the herd and earns the right to mate with the ewes.) Parks Canada presentations, guest speakers, photography workshops, interpretive hikes, and family art projects are other highlights of the weekend; one that is all about celebrating the iconic wildlife in Radium and educating attendees on how wildlife and humans can better co-exist. “Radium is one of the few places in North America where a herd of bighorn sheep lives and roams freely in a residential

Radium Hot Springs Photo Courtesy of Parks Canada / C. Douce

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Headbanging in Radium Hot Springs area,” says Kebe. “So the educational piece surrounding how this is best managed, how humans, predators, and bighorn sheep interact, is a pivotal part of this weekend. There are unique challenges and many people from around the world are very interested in how we are managing this situation.” Although the numbers of the Radium herd has gone down over the years (it’s now approximately 160 animals, down from 220 ten years ago), greater awareness and understanding of all the issues involved (such as harmful food sources, traffic hazards, and large predators like cougars entering the town) is making a difference. “Nature is connected. Together with Parks Canada, our goal is to ensure sustainability and long-term success for both humans and animals,” says Kebe. Obviously, attendees of the weekend festival will also get a taste for what the charming town of Radium Hot Springs is all about. The soothing hot springs – located up the hill from town in Kootenay National Park – are iconic and should not be

missed. Interestingly, while soaking in the natural hot springs pools, you can glance up on the bordering mountainside and often view wildlife, including bighorn sheep! Ringed with snow-capped mountains, rushing rivers, hoodoos, dramatic canyons, and a beautiful network of trails, the outdoor recreational opportunities are endless. Right in the heart of town, for example, the Sinclair Canyon hiking trails offer a beautiful half-day of walking. (A hike, followed by a soak in the hot springs, capped off with ice cream is, in my opinion, a perfect day in Radium!) Regardless of whether you’re in Radium Hot Springs for the fall Headbanger Festival, or for some camping and a few rounds of golf in the middle of summer, one thing is certain: you will be “wowed” by the gorgeous mountain scenery. And leave with a greater appreciation for the mountains and the natural world around you. By: Andrew Penner

See map keys on pg 47 See legend on page 67

53 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Experience the Burgess Shale

Photo Courtesy of Bookman’s Travel Reports

Photo Courtesy of Burgess Shale Geoscience Foundation

As we climb higher and higher up the mountainside, the views of Takakkaw Falls just keep getting better and better. We stop often to rest, snap photos, and gaze at the torrent of water plunging down the sheer rock wall that towers over everything. The trail is steep and rocky and not for the faint of heart. But this was not a surprise. Our group of 12 wide-eyed explorers seems up for the challenge. And, the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, keeps us moving onwards and upwards. Located at an elevation of 2,286 m near the town of Field, the Walcott Quarry is one of the most important fossil deposits in the world. It is the most famous of the three Burgess Shale sites that you can visit in the region. Situated high on a mountainside in Yoho National Park, it was also designated a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980. Charles Walcott, a paleontologist, discovered the Burgess Shale in 1909. Not surprisingly, given the strange fossils and the sheer number he found, he visited again the next year. Then the next. In fact, Walcott visited the site virtually every year until his death in 1927, at the age of 74. By that time, he had collected over 65,000 fossils while categorizing the strange specimens, most of which had never been recorded before. In the 1960s, after a thorough reinvestigation of the site, it was discovered that Walcott had barely scratched the surface into

the significance and rarity of his findings. The fossils, many of which had little resemblance to modern life forms, were absolutely bizarre, like they were from another planet. Some of the creatures had five eyes, hose-like snouts, and walked upside down on symmetrical spines. Long story short, the other-worldly fossils of the Burgess Shale are from earth. And they are old. Very old. Way older than the dinosaurs! They date back 508-million years, from the middle Cambrian era. It’s believed they were exquisitely preserved (in black shale) because of the lack of oxygen. The soft-bodied organisms, some with recognizable fluids and the remains of other creatures inside of them, are, literally, everywhere on the sites. And there are only a few places on the entire planet where you can see and photograph them. Not surprisingly, when you visit any of the Burgess Shale sites you cannot take anything away. It’s against the law. However, visitors are allowed to photograph the specimens and make paper copies, or imprints, of the fossils when they visit. While the Walcott Quarry, which requires a difficult day-hike to get to, is the most famous of the Burgess Shale sites, Parks Canada offers additional tours to two other amazing Burgess Shale sites. (You cannot visit any of the sites on your own. They are protected, and you must visit with a guide.)

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Experience the Burgess Shale

Photo Courtesy of Blonde Coyote

Here is a closer look at the three options that are available. And, yes, they all require some “sweat equity” to reach. 1. The Walcott Quarry. A strenuous adventure that takes 11 hours. Together with your guide and 12 hikers max, you will leave the trailhead near the base of Takakkaw Falls at 7am and not return until 6pm. You must be over 8 years of age to participate. The elevation gain is 825m. Cost: $70

Photo Courtesy of The Fossil Forum

to book your unforgettable Burgess Shale Adventure please visit pc.gc.ca/en/pn-np/bc/yoho/activ/burgess. By: Andrew Penner

Yoho and Kootenay National Parks HAVE AN EXCLUSIVE EXPERIENCE IN THE NATIONAL PARKS

2. Mount Stephen. This is a steep, difficult hike (poles are mandatory) and takes 7.5 hours. The tour departs at 7am and returns at 2:30pm. The return distance is 8 km and the elevation gain is a whopping 795m. This hike starts and ends at the Visitor Center in Field, BC. Cost: $55

There is plenty of additional information you’ll want to know before participating in any of these hikes. Obviously, none are recommended for anyone with recurring back, knee, or ankle injuries. They are strenuous! For more information and

Hikes run June through September Ryan Creary / Parks Canada

3. Stanley Glacier. While this is the easiest of the three sites to access, it’s not a piece of cake! The hike covers 10 km and gains 450m of elevation. The duration of the tour is 7.5 hours, departing at 8am and returning at 3:30pm. This hike departs at the Stanley Glacier Trailhead, which is located on Highway 93 near Vermillion Pass. Cost: $55.

Hike to the Burgess Shale fossil beds and hold 505 million years of history in your hands

Book your hike at: 1-877-RESERVE (1-877-737-3783) or www.pc.gc.ca/burgessshale

55 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Experience Yoho National Park Photo by Deschênes Steve

Visit a National Historic Site Parks Canada operates more than just National Parks. Take the whole family to one of our National Historic Sites for a fun way to learn about Canada’s rich heritage. The Twin Falls Tea House is operated seasonally as a private lodge. The CPR built this chalet in 1908 and it was designated as a national historic site in 1992. It is a charming example of early rustic, log-framed design and also a vivid reminder of the early days of trail riding, hiking, and mountaineering.

Spiral Tunnels BC joined Confederation in 1871 on the condition that Prime Minister John A. Macdonald would build a railway to link the province to the rest of Canada. The problem? The steep grades in the mountains. The solution? Spiral tunnels blasted through them to reduce the grade. The tunnels remain an engineering feat to this day. Part of the Kicking Horse Pass National Historic Site, the Spiral Tunnels are an easy place to stop and close to the village of Field.

Hike the classics! The Iceline Trail is arguably the most iconic trail in the park. It offers miles of glaciers and stunning mountain views! This is a strenuous full-day hike. For a shorter adventure, Takakkaw Falls is a thundering waterfall within a short walk from your car. At 302 m, it’s one of the highest, easy-to-access waterfalls in Canada. Insider tip: there’s also a rock climbing route that goes up beside the waterfall. Try to spot the climbers!

Experience RVing If the price of a recreation vehicle (RV) has you running for the exit, stop and get out your calculator. Break down the actual costs and look at the facts. You might be pleasantly surprised. RV vacations continue to be a very affordable way for a family to travel because of the tremendous savings on air, hotel and restaurants. And these savings offset the cost of fuel. Believe it or not, gas is not the biggest expense on a road trip. Lodging is. For instance, a standard room in Banff during the summer

is typically about $400 per night, double that at one of the top hotels. That compares to about $35 for a nice campsite. Even when fuel rates increase for campers, they also increase for the non-RVer, at the pump for your car, and also with fuel surcharges for your airline ticket. Plus, the cost of dining out is significantly higher than preparing a healthy home-cooked meal in your RV. And with the money you save, you can see more attractions, stay longer, or take a second vacation! There’s more time together as a family, less stress getting to and from the airport, renting a car, keeping track of luggage (or worse, losing it!) and eating meals out. The pace is more leisurely. You get to see more along the way. But perhaps most importantly, there’s more time together for family activities. You make happier memories gathered around a campfire roasting hot dogs than you do sitting in an airport. Do your own research. Rent a unit first to see how you like it. RVing. It’s definitely the way to go.

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Experience Yoho National Park

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17 km from Field; Fee for the guided hike. For more info on Burgess Shale see pg 54

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Burgess Shale Guided Hike to Mount Stephen

Starts in the Village of Field; Fees apply.

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22 km (30 min) west of Field. In the Nakoda language of the Stoney Nation, Wapta means “running water” or “river”. Trail head is 2 km drive down dirt road, off of the Trans-Canada Highway. 90-minute round trip hike to see these impressive falls. Opens Mid-May - Mid-June.

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17 km (25 min) from Field. In the Cree language, Takakkaw means “magnificent.” One of the highest waterfalls in Canada. Walk to the base of the falls, or start a magnificent day-hike or backpacking trip on one of the nearby trails.

11 km (15 min) from Field. A jewel of the Canadian Rockies. A 2 hour trail circles the lake. Sweet in the summer and incredible on snowshoes in the winter. Public parking available. Open year-round.

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8 km (5 min) east of Field. Engineering marvel constructed in 1909 for rail safety. Interpretive exhibits. Open Mid-June to Mid-October.

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Just off the Trans-Canada Highway. Parks Canada and Travel Alberta Info Desk will be open 7 days a week until Dec. 31, 2019. Phone: 250-343-6783. Friends of Yoho National Park Gift Shop. Burgess Shale fossil displays.

2 The Village of Field

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Yoho National Park

27 km (30 min) west of Lake Louise, Alberta - most services. Quaint mountain town with numerous Guesthouses and Bed & Breakfast Accommodation.

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WAPTA ICEFIELD

250-343-6393 www.friendsofyoho.ca

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Yoho National Park is on Mountain Time – 1 HR AHEAD of Pacific Time (and most of B.C.)

57 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

See Campground Directory on pg 67 See legend on page 67


Capture Your Experience for a Chance to WIN

Photo Courtesy of Lloyd Dykstra

Photo Contest Prizes, Rules, Close Date and to Enter go to: ExperienceTravelGuides.com/Contests Follow Us on Facebook (/ExperienceTravelGuides) for up-to-date information on our prize package


Experience Golden

These days, our addiction to devices, and growing obsession with spontaneity and travelling like a local means that we leave planning a vacation to the last minute, often whilst we are on the road. We are sure that we’ll meet that local who knows everything and has the time to tell us about it, but the reality is that the most famous towns in the Canadian Rockies are so full of tourists and seasonal workers that finding a true local is almost as challenging as discovering a four-leaf clover. But, with a little bit of planning, and being fore-armed on where to find the best information whilst you’re on the road, you too can ensure you get a truly authentic and unique experience in the mountains. Here’s what I wish I knew when I first visited the mountain parks in the Canadian Rockies:

same wonderful rewards but without the crowds. The tripplanning tool helps you create your own customised itinerary that can be saved, printed, and shared via email.

3. Travel in the shoulder season; May, June, September, and October are all great months to visit the Rockies when snow is on the peaks, temperatures are cooler, and crowds diminish.

4. Book your accommodation early, especially if travelling in the high season (July and August). I recommend staying in a bed and breakfast; they’re owned by people who live in Golden because they love it, and you’ll have plenty of opportunity to get their hints, tips, and stories first-hand throughout your visit.

1. Make Golden your base; Golden is a small unassuming 5. One of the first things to do on arrival is drop into the new mountain town sitting at the confluence of two historic rivers, surrounded by the majestic beauty and outdoor opportunities of the Rockies and Purcell mountain ranges, and an easy drive from Banff Lake Louise, Yoho, Glacier, Mt. Revelstoke, and Kootenay National Parks, as well as the Icefields Parkway. Yes, it is busier in July and August, but the locals are truly local; families who have lived there for generations, and who love talking about their town, mountains, and outdoor experiences.

2. Use the Tourism Golden website. Their unique Experience Finder will help you discover activities according to your preferences, season, and travel party type. They are experts in the place that they live, work, and recreate, and the suggested itineraries include both the ‘must-dos’ of the Rockies such as Lake Louise and Banff, along with hidden gems that offer the

Golden Visitor Centre. The counsellors are all from Golden, and can give their inside tips on additional activities, places of interest, where to eat, shop and lots more. Your customised itinerary can be emailed directly to your mobile device for use during your stay. Parks Canada passes are available to purchase.

6. Keep an eye out in the downtown area and at local events for the roving Golden ambassadors and eye-catching pop up information tent. They’re ready to answer your questions right when you need them to!

7. Connect to the best local information by downloading the Tourism Golden web app to your mobile device. There are four Wi-Fi hotspots in the downtown area, so no need to burn through your own data.

Visit tourismgolden.com/EMP for inspiration and information. 59 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


Experience Golden

At the heart of it.

Jasper National Park

ALBERTA

BRITISH COLUMBIA

Photo by Andrew Chad

Glacier National Park

GOLDEN

Banff National Park

Yoho National Park

Mt. Revelstoke National Park

Kootenay National Park Bugaboo Provincial Park

lovethenationalparks.com tourismgolden.com A heart of gold.

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Experience Golden

At the heart of your Parks adventure. Golden B.C. is surrounded by six of Canada’s most stunning national parks; Yoho, Glacier, Banff, Jasper, Kootenay, and Mount Revelstoke. This unique location makes Golden the ideal place from which to experience the spectacular scenery, iconic hiking trails, waterfalls, lakes and heritage sites of the national parks. Sitting at the confluence of two historic rivers and surrounded by majestic mountain vistas, Golden is an authentic mountain town that offers unrefined mountain adventure. Enjoy a vast range of activities or just simply appreciate our fabulous scenery and abundance of wildlife.

Start planning: tourismgolden.com/emp Golden Visitor Centre

Seek and you will find.

Ask our friendly, knowledgeable Information Counsellors about activities, attractions, dining, and accommodations in Golden. Free travel guides, Visitor Wifi Local Trip local maps, and other amenities, including free Centre Hotspots Maps Planning WiFi. Parks Canada passes are also available for purchase. Open daily during the summer months. tourismgolden.com/visitors #GOLDENRULES #GOLDENBC

Digital Kiosks

Sani Dump

250-439-7290

1000 TRANS CANADA HIGHWAY

Golden Eco Adventure Ranch

Mistaya Lodge

Magnificent Mountain Views. Situated along the Columbia River Private RV, Tent Sites, and Glamping Sites. Close to hiking, biking trails and 7 national parks.

Helicopter access only! Located in the heart of the Canadian Rockies between Banff and Yoho National Parks. Guests enjoy adventures including hiking, swimming, nature watching, photography & relaxation!

1-250-344-6825 www.goldenadventurepark.com

Golden Golf Club Stay in a peaceful setting just minutes from Golden. 42 private sites with 30 amp power, free Wi-Fi, a potable water station, adjacent to our 18-hole golf course, restaurant, and Mini-Golf course.

1-250-344-2700 www.golfgolden.com

61 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

1-866-647-8292 www.mistayalodge.com

Winston Lodge A boutique mountain lodge with 11 luxurious rooms. Wake-up to stunning views and a fresh buffet breakfast in the heart of Kicking Horse Mountain Resort.

1-250-344-7272 www.winstonlodge.com


Experience Glacier National Park High on Adventure Glacier National Park is the birthplace of mountaineering

railway, to road building and railway engineering feats, to the

in North America with the first recreational technical climbs

modern avalanche mitigation measures of today, the route

recorded in 1888. While adventure seekers can still get their

through the pass brings Canada together as a nation. Explore

adrenalin going with technical mountaineering and glacier

Rogers Pass by car through snow sheds and steep avalanche

travel, today’s network of trails caters to all abilities ranging

terrain. Stop in at the Rogers Pass Discovery Centre to learn

from short, level strolls to ambitious climbs. Be inspired by

more about the triumphs and tragedies of travel through this

dramatic mountain views, humbled by giant ancient trees or

treacherous pass. And take a stroll along abandoned rail beds.

captivated by the secrets of the abandoned railway over Rogers Pass. This summer, visit the Beaver Valley to view the mosaic of

Winter Wonderland

burned and unburned forest left after the Prairie Hills wildfire,

Glacier National Park is legendary for its snowfall, attracting

in 2017. Look for new vegetation and wildflowers sprouting up

ski-touring enthusiasts from around the world with an array

among remnant stands of old growth forest. Be safe, please use

of glades, alpine bowls, and icefields. All ski destinations in

caution near burned areas as remaining trees can be unstable.

the park require knowledge of travel in avalanche terrain. If you plan to tour in Glacier, be aware that many areas of the

Major Rogers Route

park have restricted and prohibited access in winter. Please

Travel through time in Rogers Pass National Historic Site and

visit parkscanada.gc.ca/skirogerspass before you go. Skiers are

discover human courage and ingenuity. From the early trail

urged to wear avalanche transceivers, carry a shovel and probe,

blazing for the final link in Canada’s first trans-continental

and be prepared for self-rescue.

Abbott Ridge Trail, Photo Courtesy of Mari Omori

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Experience Glacier and Mount Revelstoke National Parks Kilometres 0

Miles

Special Feature

10

0

5

10

EASTERN WELCOME STATION

Meadows in the Sky Parkway and Day Area

9

Begins 1.5 km east of Revelstoke. The only place in a Canadian National Park where you can drive to the top of a mountain. This road switch-backs 26 km up Mount Revelstoke to flower filled meadows. A free shuttle service takes you the last few kms in the summer months. Ten trail heads at the summit including the Koo Koo Sint Trail that details David Thompson’s travels in the area. The heritage of three First Nations peoples - the Secwepemc, Ktunaxa, and Okanagan is highlighted in the First Footsteps Trail. Anticipating large crowds this summer.

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2 Nels Nelsen Historic Ski Jump

Exhibit celebrates international ski jumping (1915-71). Hike from the Railway Museum or the Nels Nelsen Historic Area on Meadows in the Sky Parkway.

3 Giant Cedars Boardwalk

Approx 30 min east of Revelstoke. An excellent stop for a walk and picnic, it can also accomodate larger vehicles and provides a 20 min interpretive walk through rare old growth forest (700 year old trees)

4 Hemlock Grove Trail

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54 km (40 min) east of Revelstoke. Explore the rain forest. A 10 minute interpretive boardwalk winds through ancient Western Hemlocks.

See Campground Directory on pg 66 See legend on page 67

5 Loop Brook Trail

63 km (45 min) east of Revelstoke. This 30 minute interpretive loop winds you through historic pillars which once held up a railway engineering feat.

6 Illecillewaet/Asulkan Valleys

66 km (50 min) east of Revelstoke. Several hikes begin at this trailhead. Explore mountaineering routes established more than a century ago.

7 Rogers Pass Discovery Centre

Summit of Rogers Pass: 76 km (55 min) west of Golden; 72 km (52 min) east of Revelstoke. Parks Canada Info Desk 250-837-7500. Regular Summer hours: 8am - 7pm daily. Theatre & exhibits: history, wildlife & avalanches.

63 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com

Mount Revelstoke and Glacier national parks are on Pacific Time – 1 hour BEHIND Mountain Time.

8 Bear Creek Falls Trail

Approx 1 hr east of Revelstoke. A short hike (1 hour round trip) to a waterfall. The Connaught Creek waters cascade over the falls to join the Beaver River a short distance downstream. Bathroom available in the parking area.

Beaver Valley Day-Use Area

85 km (65 min) east of Revelstoke. The Beaver Valley is a place of fragile beauty with dynamic mountainsides, shaped by mudflows and landslides. In the warmest part of Glacier, this day-use area is one of the park’s first and last snow-free facilities every season.


Experience the West Kootenays The traditional route heading east from Revelstoke is along the Trans-Canada Hwy 1 to Golden (see pg 59). To take a path less travelled, follow the scenic Hwy 23 south towards Nelson and the free ferry across Upper Arrow Lake. This waterway is part of the Columbia River System, so if you like the calming effect of water, you’ll love this route! The road forks as you depart Galena Bay. Hwy 23 heads south to the luxury of Halcyon Hot Springs. Open year-round, your worries will melt away while you drink in the incredible view of the Arrow Lakes and Monashee Mountains. With its quaint village-like atmosphere, the welcoming philosophy here is simple. Healing waters should be shared with the world. A great spot even on a hot summer’s day, when you can utilize the mineral swimming pool on the lower deck or take a dip in the lake. halcyon-hotsprings. com 30 minutes south, and flanked by the Selkirk and Monashee mountain ranges, Nakusp is another great place to rejuvenate both the body and mind. Soak in hot springs. Relax at a spa. Lounge on the beach or hike among the cedars.

Continuing on, you will need to determine if you want to head southwest to Nelson or southeast to Creston. Nelson is an enchanting city famous for its heritage. The movie ‘Roxanne’, starring Steve Martin and Daryl Hannah was filmed here. The first leg of your journey to Creston begins at Balfour, a serene community that’s home to the Kootenay Lake ferry. Trip Advisor rates this FREE ferry ride (35 min, the world’s longest) with 5 Stars! It ends near the artisan’s enclave of Crawford Bay. Experience the laid-back charm of West Kootenays. You will leave with a lifetime of great memories!

Refresh

Radium Hot Springs

Halcyon Hot Springs

New Denver

Alternatively, scenic Hwy 31 from Galena Bay runs southeast, following the shores of Kootenay and Trout lakes. A stroll down Front Street in Kaslo will bring you to the majestic SS Moyie, one of the last great sternwheelers. It operated on Kootenay Lake for 59 years. As enchanting music wafts over the water, the Kaslo Jazz Etc Summer Festival offers family fun. It runs from Aug 2-4, 2019. Reuters calls it one of “the Top 10 places to enjoy outdoor summer music.”

YOUR BODY & SOUL

A

OPEN YEAR-ROUND

#halcyonhotsprings

68K M SO UTH O F REVELSTOKE OVERL O O K I N G ARROW LAKE

1.888.689.4699 H A L C YO N - H OT S P R I N G S . C O M

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Experience the West Kootenays Kootenay Lake Ferry Departure Schedule 2019

Balfour

Kootenay Bay

Spectacular LAKEFRONT Dining Take-out Lodging

All Year Summer All Year Summer AM Sailings

6:30 8:10 9:50 11:30

PM Sailings

1:10 2:50 4:30 6:10 7:50 9:40

6:30 8:10 9:50 10:40 11:30 12:20 1:10 2:00 2:50 3:40 4:30 5:20 6:10 7:50 9:40

7:10 9:00 10:40 12.20 2:00 3:40 5:20 7:00 8:40 10:20

7:10 9:00 10:40 11:30 12.20 1:10 2:00 2:50 3:40 4:30 5:20 6:10 7:00 8:40 10:20

Osprey 2000 MV Balfour

250-229-4244

Balfour, Kootenay Lake Beachfront Dining Apartment-Style Kitchen Suites Call for Take-Out Kid-Friendly Tasty Pizza, Gourmet Burgers, Yummy Pasta, Fish & Chips...

DOCK ‘N’ DUCK Pub Grill Lodge

www.DocknDuck.ca This Thriving Resort is FOR SALE www.KootenayCommercial.com

Whether your idea of fun is quiet reflections or late night beverages in the bar, The Lodge at Arrow Lakes is more than happy to accommodate. • BAR & TAVERN • PET-FRIENDLY ROOMS • LIQUOR STORE • NEARBY NATURAL HOT SPRINGS, BIKING TRAILS & LAKE ACCESS

1.800.663.0100 • 515 BROADWAY ST. WEST, NAKUSP, B.C. • ARROWLAKESLODGE.COM FORMERLY KNOWN AS K2 ROTOR LODGE

65 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


ss Ac ce Fir

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Dis

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San iD

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Pr o gra m sh T oil ets Sho we rs Flu

1

Castle Mountain

May 30 - Sept 116

$21.50

43

877-737-3783

pc.gc.ca

2

Johnston Canyon*

Closed Closed for2019 2019

$27.40

132

877-737-3783

pc.gc.ca

3

Lake Louise Tent*

May 30 - Sept 30

$27.40

206

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

4

Lake Louise Trailer* Year Round $32.30 Soft-Sided camping in winter only (mid-November to mid-April)

189

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

5

Mosquito Creek

May 31 - Oct 14

$17.60

32

877-737-3783

pc.gc.ca

6

Protection Mountain

June 21 - Sept 2

$21.50

72

877-737-3783

pc.gc.ca

7

Rampart Creek

May 31 - Oct 14

$17.60

50

877-737-3783

pc.gc.ca

8

Tunnel Mt. Village I*

June - Oct 7

$27.40

618

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

9

Tunnel Mt. Village II*

Year Round

$27.40 - $32.30

188

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

May 9 - Oct 7

$38.20

321

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

June 20 - Sept 3

$21.50

380

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

May 9 - Oct 7

$27.40

64

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

June 21 - Sept 3

$21.50

116

877-737-3783

pc.gc.ca

$21.50

61

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

Campground

Open Dates

Fees

rp Int e

#o f Si t es

Campground Directory

Phone Number

Websites

Banff National Park - Map on pg 18

10 Tunnel Mt. Trailer* 11 Two Jack Main* 12 Two Jack Lakeside* 13 Waterfowl Lakes

Kootenay National Park - Map on pg 47 1

Marble Canyon

June 20 - Sept 9

2

McLeod Meadows

June 13 - Sept 16

$21.50

80

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

3

Redstreak*

May 2 - Oct 15

$27.40 - $38.20

242

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

May 16 - Oct 8

$15.70

33

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

Jasper National Park - Map on pg 36 1

Icefield Tent

2

Honeymoon Lake

May 16 - Sept 17

$15.70

35

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

3

Icefield Centre RV

Apr 11 - Oct 28

$15.70

100

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

4

Jonas

May 16 - Sept 3

$15.70

25

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

5

Kerkeslin

June 13 - Sept 3

$15.70

42

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

6

Pocahontas*

May 16 - Sept 3

$21.50

140

888-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

7

Snaring River

May 16 - Sept 24

$15.70

62

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

8

Wabasso*

May 16 - Sept 17

$21.50 - $27.40

231

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

9

Wapiti (Summer)*

May 2 - Oct 8

$27.40 - $32.30

364

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

10 Wapiti Winter

Oct 8 - May 1

$27.40 - $32.30

93

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

11 Whistlers*

May 2for - Oct 8 Closed 2019

$27.40 - $38.20

781

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

12 Wilcox

May 16 - Sept 17

$15.70

46

888-773-8888

pc.gc.ca/jaspercaming

60

888-773-8888

888-773-8888

Glacier and Mount Revelstoke National Parks - Map on pg 63 1

Illecillewaet

June - Sept

$21.50

2

Loop Brook

July - Sept

$21.50

20

3

Mount Sir Donald

July - Aug

$21.50

15 888-773-8888 pc.gc.ca

For more campground information

pc.gc.ca pc.gc.ca

All Open Dates are weather dependant.

pick up or downlaod our sister publications at ExperienceTravelGuides.com/Library

All fees are subject to change without notice. A fire permit is required for fires in Parks Canada’s campgrounds.

66 | Enter our Photo Contests

* These Campgrounds accept reservations.


rp

Pr o gra m sh T oil ets Sho we rs San iD um p Dis a bl ed Ac c es Fir s e pi ts

Fees

Flu

Open Dates

Int e

Campground

#o f Si t es

Campground Directory

Phone Number

Websites

Yoho National Park - Map on pg 57 1 Hoodoo Creek

June 17 - Sept 2

$15.70

30

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

2 Kicking Horse

May 23 - Oct 14

$27.40

8

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

3 Monarch

May 2 - Sept 14

$17.60

44

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

4 Takakkaw Falls

June 20 - Oct 14

$17.60

35

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

Waterton Lakes National Park - Map on pg 14 1 Waterton Townsite* 2 Crandell Mountain 3 Belly River 4 Waterton Springs

Apr 12 - Oct 14

Please call 1-877-737-3783 for Campground information. Closures are in place due to the Kenow Wildfires

$22.50 - $38.20

237

877-737-3783

reservation.pc.gc.ca

$15.70

24

888-773-8888

reservation.pc.gc.ca

Closed for 2019 May 12 - Sept 25 Closed for 2019

Caroline, Alberta Clearwater Trading Year Round $25.00 - $35.00 47 • • • • 403-722-2378 clearwatertrading.ca Proud to offer you a separate, private venue for all your events’ needs. Call us today! Check us out on Facebook @clearwatertradingevents

Rocky Mountain House, Alberta Rocky Mountain House May 16 - Sept 2 $35.00 - $120.00 43 • • • • 403-845-2412 pc.gc.ca/rockymountainhouse National Historic Site Sept 5 - Sept 29 Camp at the national historic site! Variety of options from Heritage Camping in Tipi’s and Trapper tents, to un-serviced RV camping and walk-in tenting on the banks of the North Saskatchewan River. (Note Sept 5 - Sept 29 only open from Thurs - Sun)

Wells Gray, British Columbia Clearwater Valley Resort & KOA Campground

May 1 - Oct 1

$32.90 - $48.90

88

250-674-3918

clearwatervalley.com

Shuswap, British Columbia Crazy Creek Resort Year Round $27.00 - $44.00 60 • • • • • 250-836-4097 crazycreekresort.com 4-Season rest-stop between Sicamous and Revelstoke with accommodations, hot pools, suspension bridge & waterfalls, camping & gift shop. Sicamouse KOA May 1 - Sept 30 100 Centrally located. Pull thru sites, laundry store, pool. Trai and Hayrides.

Salmon Arm Resort

50

Family Tree Riverside RV

May 1 - Oct 01

$39.00 - $59.00

Year round

80

250-836-2507

sicamouskoa@gmail.com

250-832-6489

info@salmonarmcamping.com

250-836-2583

familytreeriversidervcampground.com

West Kootenays, British Columbia Woodbury Resort & Marina Year Round 60 • • • • • 877-353-7717 woodburyresort.com Kootenay Lake’s only year-round destination resort. Stay, Fish & Swim Packages! Boat rentals, country store, cold beer, restaurant, pub and motel. Mirror Lake Campground Apr 15 - Oct 15 $24.00 - $28.00 96 • • • • 250-353-7102 mirrorlakecampground.com Lakefront rental cabins and trailers, $55-$79 based on double occupancy. Beach with playground, rental boats and bass fishing. Dog walk.

67 | ExperienceTravelGuides.com


JUST NORTH OF AMAZING TRULY ESCAPE THE CROWDS You’ll explore spaces of humbling beauty in British Columbia’s pristine wilderness by being lifted into areas where few others have ventured before. You won’t just ‘visit’ the mountains, you’ll embark on a sensory journey that immerses you in nature, in majesty, and in the moment. CALL OUR SUMMER EXPERTS AT 1-800-661-0252 OR VISIT CMHSUMMER.COM

HELI-ACCESS HIKING AT CMH CARIBOOS PHOTO BY MIKE WELCH

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2019 Experience the Mountain parks  

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