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In your opinion, what is the biggest change in the way people are viewing artwork online —i.e., multiple image views, larger mobile-friendly slide shows, etc.—and how has your site succeeded in this? Fans, collectors, curators, and even critics are relying on viewing artwork online more and more. The days when a trip to SoHo would inform an individual about what was happening in the contemporary art scene are long gone. Everyone is on the go worldwide, and if someone is in Istanbul, gallery websites allow him or her to view our artworks on display in New York for the duration of the exhibit. This also allows people to pre-select which exhibits they feel are of interest to them, so more serious, informed parties come into the gallery. We like to use the site as a virtual replication of our physical space. We love the fact that people can go through our installation shots and the individual images of the works in an exhibition—they can feel like they are going through our actual premises. Because you work with video artists, the most recent trends in technology have favored you. How do you feel about that, and how does your site handle video content? The trends toward developing technology are not particularly recent. Society has been fixated on software development from its inception. I launched my first website in the early 1990s, with interactive online projects designed by artists like John F. Simon Jr. Recent advancements are terribly exciting for us, and we love to stay ahead of the curve.

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Profile for exhibit-E

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

The Art World and the World Wide Web  

The Art World and the World Wide Web. Essays, Interviews and Case Studies.

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