Page 1

IMPORT

ZURICH

Cooperative Housing: New Ways of Inhabiting

115


BARCELONA

117


1

Cities Connection Project (CCP) is a connector between cities through its architecture, which aims to create synergies by crossing personal experiences shared among professionals, students and traders, in a series of cultural activities such as exhibitions, discussions and publications.


2


ALTITUDE: 408 M. AREA: 1719 KM2 POPULATION CANTON: 1.448.320 POPULATION CITY: 390.474 DENSITY CANTON: 837 people/KM2 DENSITY CITY: 4.442 people/KM2

ZÜRICH

3

GVA

TI


Connection_Import Zurich

Cooperative Housing: New Ways of Inhabiting First edition: 2015 dpr-barcelona Editors: Nicola Regusci, Xavier Bustos (CCP). Contributions: André Bideau, Daniel Kurz, Josep Maria Montaner, Zaida Muxí Translations: Jennifer Taylor (GER), Susanne Bosch-Abele (ENG) Graham Thomson (ENG), Graphic design: dpr-barcelona, Alex Orlich. Publishers: dpr-barcelona Printing: CEVAGRAF S.C.C.L. D.L.: B9896-2015 ISBN: 978-84-942414-7-5 Communication: Labóh Consultancy Studio. Web design: Jordi Llàcer. www.citiesconnectionproject.com twitter: @citiesconnect facebook: www.facebook.com/citiesconnect Augmented Reality interactions developed by dpr-barcelona | www.dpr-barcelona.com Augmented Reality technology powered by Aurasma | www.aurasma.com

Augmented Reality step by step Instructions:

dpr-barcelona Viladomat 59, 4º 4ª 08015 Barcelona Spain This book is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License.

Disclaimer: This is a NON-profit publication, the cover price is intended to partially cover the production, printing and distribution costs. The editors have been careful to contact all copyright holders of the images used. If you claim ownership of any of the images presented here and have not been properly identified, please contact dpr-barcelona and we will be happy to make a formal acknowledgement in our web-site and in case of future editions.

1. Download Aurasma app. (iOs, Android) 3. Follow CCProject channel 4. Check out inside the book and point to the images marked with this icon: 5. Access extra animations in each project.


Index Words

Works

8 Two economies and myriad worlds André Bideau

10

Import Barcelona Daniel Kurz

14

Barcelona_Import Zurich Nicola Regusci, Xavier Bustos

18

Collective Housing and singular buildings in Zurich

20

22

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Clusterhaus, Hunziker Areal. ZÜRICH-OERLIKON - Duplex Architekten AG Hunziker Areal Haus I. ZÜRICH-OERLIKON - Futurafrosch GmbH Kalkbreite. ZÜRICH - Müller Sigrist Architekten AG WOHNÜBERBAUUNG Stähelimatt. ZÜRICH-SEEBACH - Esch Sintzel Architekten SIA BSA Wohnüberbauung Illnau. Illnau- Guignard & Saner Architekten SUR, Wohnüberbauung Rautistrasse. ZÜRICH-ALTSTETTEN - UNDEND ARCHITEKTUR AG SIEDLUNG HAUSÄCKER. ZÜRICH-ALTSTETTEN - HLS ARCHITEKTEN Grunderhuus. Wangen-Brüttisellen - Michael Meier und Marius Hug Architekten Wohnsiedlung Werdwies. Zürich-Altstetten -Adrian Streich Architekten AG A-Park. Zürich-Albisrieden - Baumann Roserens Architekten Zwicky Süd. DÜBENDORF, ZÜRICH - Schneider Studer Primas GmbH Wohnüberbauung Katzenbach. ZÜRICH-SEEBACH - Zita Cotti Architekten AG Badenerstrasse 380. ZÜRICH - pool Architekten Wohnsiedlung Grünmatt FGZ. ZÜRICH -Graber Pulver Architekten AG Wohnhaus Avellana. ZÜRICH-SCHWAMENDINGEN- EDELAAR MOSAYEBI INDERBITZIN ARCHITEKTEN DOLLIKERSTRASSE. MEILEN - NEFF NEUMANN ARCHITEKTEN AG SENIOR APARTMENTS ETZEL. STÄFA - ERNST NIKLAUS FAUSCH ARCHITEKTEN aspholz SÜD. ZÜRICH-AFFOLTERN - DARLINGTON MEIER ARCHITEKTEN WOHNHOCHHAUS. HIRZENBACH ZÜRICH - BOLTSHAUSER ARCHITEKTEN Toni-Areal. ZÜRICH-WEST. - EM2N

K5_Zurich District 5 Afterword

24 28 32 36 40 44 48 52 56 60 64 68 72 76 80 84 88 92 96 100

104

106 After the Housing Nightmare: New players, new organizations, new forms Josep Maria Montaner, Zaida Muxí

108


835 km ZURICH

BARCELONA: 1.615.000 INHABITANTS_2013_17% FOREIGNERS METROPOLITAN AREA: 3.226.000 INHABITANTS_2013

METROPOLITAN AREA BARCELONA: 628 KM2.

km2 DENSITY: 5.140 INHABITANTS/KM

2

BARCELONA AREA: 102 KM2. DENSITY: 15.800 INHABITANTS/KM2

6

41°22′N 2°10′E

BARCELONA

BARCELONA-ELPRAT INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT_IATA AIRPORT CODE / BCN PASSENGER TRAFFIC 2014: 37.5M GDP-PIB BARCELONA: 61.915M €-74.298M CHF (2013) GDP-PIB PER INHABITANT: 38.500 €-46.200 CHF (2013) BARCELONA SUBWAY: 8 LINES_ 102 KM OF ROUTE AND 141 STATIONS

NUMBER OF ARCHITECTS IN BARCELONA: 7.891 BARCELONA ICONIC COLLECTIVE BUILDING: THE HOUSING COMPLEX WALDEN-7. 1973-1975 INHABITANTS:1.000 APPROX. 446 APARTMENTS AREA: 40.000 m2 ANA BOFILL, RICARDO BOFILL,SALVADOR CLOTAS, RAMÓN COLLADO, JOSÉ AGUSTÍN GOYTISOLO, JOAN MALAGARRIGA, MANUEL NUÑEZ, DOLORS ROCAMORA, SERENA VERGANO


670 km BERLIN 492 km BRUSSELS

CANTON OF ZURICH: 1.448.320 INHABITANTS_2014_25% FOREIGNERS ZURICH CITY: 390.474 INHABITANTS_2014 488 km PARIS

CANTON OF ZURICH SURFACE AREA: 1729 KM . POPULATION DENSITY: 837 INHABITANTS/KM2 CITY SURFACE AREA: 87.9 KM2. POPULATION DENSITY: 4.442 INHABITANTS/KM2 2

km

2

ZURICH-KLOTEN INTERNATIONAL AIRPORT_IATA AIRPORT CODE / ZRHPASSENGER TRAFFIC_2014: 25.5M

47°22′N 8°33′E

GDP CANTON ZURICH: 134.980 M CHF-123.466M € (2012 ) GDP PER INHABITANT: 96.382 CHF-88.163 € (2012)

ZURICH

OVER 1.6 MILION DAILY PASSANGERS USING ZVV TRANSPORT ONE-THIRD USE THE S-BAHN RAILWAY NETWORK. THE ZURICH S-BAHN SYSTEM HAS AN OVERALL ROUTE OF 380 KM THE SWISS SOCITY OF ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS (SIA) IS SWITZERLAND’S LEADING PROFESSIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR CONSTRUCTION, TECHNOLOGY, AND ENVIRONMENT SPECIALISTS. SIA ZURICH SECTION 2584 MEMBERS (2014) ZURICH ICONIC COOPERATIVE HOUSING COMPLEX_1930-1932 WERKBUNDSIEDLUNG NEUBÜHL. WOLLISHOFEN.ZURICH MAX ERNST HAEFELI,CARL HUBACHER,RUDOLF STEIGER, WERNER MAX MOSER, PAUL ARTARIA, EMIL ROTH, HANS SCHMIDT. INHABITANTS: 6.500_2780 APARTMENTS 121 HOUSES. 194 APARTMENTS

218 km MILAN

835 km BARCELONA

7


words


9


CURATORS THEORY HOSTS

Two economies and myriad worlds André Bideau

10

In terms of contemporary architecture and urban development on the whole, Zurich is high on the list of cities where the outskirts are infinitely more interesting than the saturated inner city. In the city centre, it is still just as impossible as ever to show an out-oftown visitor any recent building that would warrant an interesting discussion. Genteel graciousness is promised there instead by David Chipperfield’s extension for the Kunsthaus, which has begun construction in 2015. The Helvetic aversion to visionary tours de force has both pros and cons. It is reflected, for example, in a construction scene in which housing takes priority. The privileged position enjoyed by housing architecture is based on the topographic, economic and institutional conditions prevailing in the city and environs. Although some imposing office buildings have been realized here – especially on the city’s margins in a densely networked service corridor to the airport – these exemplars scarcely surpass their commonplace kin in other cities. By contrast, housing construction conveys not only a conceptual complexity that is lacking in office architecture; as a theme, housing also seems to express the local identity with greater success. This specific condition shall be discussed here.

Flexible accumulation Two divergent economies can be cited as driving factors for housing production in Zurich, for which the outskirts of the city have provided the perfect setting. Taking stock of the past two decades, the emergence of parallel worlds can be observed on both the urban scale and with regard to architectural commissions. This is a result of the polarization of private and public housing – highend versus subsidized or cooperative – that has caused Zurich’s architecture to play out as two separate films. In just a few years, a skyline has emerged in Zürich West consisting of high-rises devoted mainly to condominiums or rental apartments in the upscale segment. Initially, a scenario had been pictured for this district – its name a product of urban branding – in which office buildings would replace the former industrial areas. Residences, however, promised a better return on investment. What was ultimately realized here makes it easy to forget that this was once the beating heart of the Swiss machine industry. It was after all only thanks to industrialization that Zurich once managed to outstrip Basel, Geneva and Bern in economic importance. Forbidden cities where locomotives, ship engines and power turbines were once built; textiles spun and beer bottles filled have been colonized today not only by upscale residential buildings but also by art galleries, theatres and the Zurich University of the Arts. In 2014 the latter moved into a former yogurt factory, its envelope containing a floor area that exceeds even Centre Pompidou. The architects from EM2N responded to the vast scale of the industrial relic with a kind of “inner urbanism”, generating a monumental porous structure. For the full-service contractor that spearheaded the project, the converted factory was first and foremost a moneymaking machine. Hence, this project demonstrated how structural transformation can have a direct impact on the division of roles. Although the Canton of Zurich initiated the conversion, its art university is merely the chief tenant in the complex, which also includes rental apartments. The whole is therefore not a genuine student campus but rather an example of air rights development, with the air space above the factory made profitable by adding on ten storeys for luxury housing. Zurich’s postmodern metamorphosis into a lifestyle and service metropolis is a textbook example of the effects David Harvey describes as flexible accumulation. Another

decisive factor spurring this trend was the reorganization of administrative structures under Frank Eberhard’s term as director of the office for urban development and planning, from 1997 to 2009. Eberhard’s trademark was the implementation of planning cooperation that opened up large former industrial sites for investment more rapidly than before – in keeping with Blair-esque social-democratic urban planning policies. This model entailed countless workshops and test planning sessions with investors and architects, hoping to relaunch the industrial quarter. In contrast to the 1990s, when planning was usually imposed from above and the last Swiss economic recession cast its shadow, Eberhard honed his cabinet policy in the course of dealings with diverse configurations of private stakeholders. For the city district, at this point no more than a phantom, architects became sought-after suppliers of images. This was also the moment when Gigon Guyer, Diener & Diener, Meili & Peter, still younger names at this point, managed to push their way into a market that had hitherto been dominated by the seasoned corporate offices. The younger architects’ work on the Maag site gave Zürich West the kind of high-profile signature that had been utterly missing from the previously developed district of Neu-Oerlikon. Most distinctive among this production is Gigon Guyer’s Prime Tower, an office tower that since 2011 stands out as the antithesis of Zurich’s fossilized downtown. The fact that Zürich West plays no significant role in the recent lively development of public and subsidized housing is due to land ownership that rules out any lowcost residential construction on brownfield sites where soil often requires decontamination. Due to the related costs and – above all – the lack of cross-subsidies, the apartments currently being built here are affordable only by a limited few. Thus, no affordable housing is being built on the sites abandoned by industry in the 1970s and 80s. In this respect, it may seem paradoxical that in Zurich the German/Anglo-Saxon model of housing cooperatives is still being practised. Morover, this tradition has recently been rejuvenated by such innovative housing estates as “Kraftwerk”, “Kalkbreite” and “mehr als wohnen”. They are the counterparts of Zürich West and, as such, equally are part of the post-industrial condition: experiments taking into account that the construction of social housing has long since lost the kind of legitimacy and audience that would have been self-evident in the Keynesian welfare state.


Objects, parcels and boundaries The belt formed around the city by residential neighbourhoods like Schwamendingen, Affoltern, Altstetten, Albisrieden, Leimbach and Wollishofen is at once a legacy of the past and the way of the future. For the last fifteen years, the objective of housing policy has been to modernize these quarters. The renewal campaign focuses primarily on structural densification, because Zurich’s reserves of developable land are today practically exhausted. This means that modernization in most cases involves the demolition of housing estates from the inter-war and post-war periods. With varying degrees of success, such housing estate replacement tends toward a selective appropriation of the respective location’s urbanistic traditions. In this regard, it is not always easy to write off the architectural value of individual ensembles within their urban context. Given its often repetitive nature, we may be permitted to question what part each replaced estate plays in the neighbourhood’s overall process of transformation. And in view of what are once again monofunctional programmes, the main difference between old and new can be found in most cases solely in the size of the apartments, and especially in the increased utilization of the available land. The new buildings thus reproduce the self-containment of existing ensembles in a different typology and morphological grain – echoing indirectly the private urbanism that has arisen atop the former industrial sites. When existing patterns of linear construction recur in a contemporary architectural idiom, merely adopting a densified and purified form, this process of overwriting can have a destabilizing effect – particularly in the garden-city landscape with its finely balanced ratio of outdoor areas to building mass. Instead of such divergences in scale, it would make more sense in some cases to embrace an urbanism of divergent objects. The architectural legacy of the welfare state has nevertheless proved a fertile atmospheric backdrop. One might even say that the anonymous settings of Zurich’s urban periphery have sensitized the architectural discourse to the charm of the everyday. At the same time, such an approach is an indication of the astoundingly privileged situation enjoyed by recent architectural production. The neo-realistic visions and the fine craftsmanship that goes into their realization are a consequence of Zurich’s manageable scale. Distances are so moderate between urban centre and periphery that the latter could never descend into a scene of

uncontrollable dysfunction – in contrast to the real-life tristesse brutally visited upon Milan’s Gallaratese satellite after the completion of Aldo Rossi’s iconic apartment block there. In this respect, Zurich’s current housing scene owes much of its design scope to the simple fact that metropolitan crisis dynamics in which ageing largescale developments plunge whole neighbourhoods into ruin are virtually unknown here. The lack of social distress also explains the microclimate in which the dry realistic iconography modelled on Rossi as intellectual patriarch was able to thrive. Finally, the groundwork from the 1970s when Rossi taught at ETH can likewise be cited. This legacy is one of reasons why in urban development specific architectural themes have been teased out with so much success, rather than overloading design with too many social desiderata. Rossi and his Swiss students helped to legitimize a selfreferential architectural discourse. Based on the formal logic of Neorazionalismo, they were able to distance themselves from postmodernism, soon viewed as a failed historicizing project, and to construct their own tradition of autonomy. The heart of this esprit de Zurich became of all things housing construction – a field of endeavour that is particularly vulnerable to monopolization by the agendas of real estate and urban policy. Yet with the backing of private and public developers, a climate of innovation prevailed that was creatively balanced by certain restrictions. In this regard, Annette Spiro has compared the apartment buildings conceived by Pool Architects to the “American Songbook”: Swiss-German floor-plan craft as the specialty of talented performers who know how to reinvest tradition with a steady stream of new nuances, but who are averse to originality for its own sake. One consequence of this climate is that the classic divide between market realities and architectural soliloquy can be found much less frequently here than elsewhere. Compared to its historical origins, Swiss-German realism unfolds in Zurich today in a much-changed environment. In the hands of the developers, it displays the marketability of architectural silence. And even if the majority of Swiss with their conservative aesthetic penchant have now been socialized to accept contemporary architecture, this does not necessarily imply the existence of an enduring building culture. Nor is it any guarantee against the increasingly disastrous urban sprawl in the greater Zurich metropolitan area. Although land-use planning

is repeatedly the subject of discussion – both among professionals and as part of direct democratic initiatives such as the “Kulturlandinitiative” passed by voters in 2012 – it is nearly impossible to stem the proliferation of motley housing development. While individuals require more and more living space, the housing market has dried up, leading to centrifugal development away from the city. This trend has been promoted not least by an excellent public transport system. With easy mobility available, the significance of municipal boundaries has greatly declined, and yet the Zurich metropolitan area remains a fragmented structure both administratively and mentally: in spite of trans-municipal interest groups, many suburban communities put up resistance to any process of spatial renegotiation, which has become fundamentally necessary. The tendencies toward compartmentalization and confinement that prevail within the city in both the redevelopment of industrial sites and housing estate replacement reappear on the scale of the agglomeration. And while its suburbs continue to grow, Zurich itself is devolving more and more into a stylishly decked-out victim of its own success. As one of the world’s most expensive cities, it boasts exorbitant rental costs. And yet no less than a quarter of its entire housing stock is subsidized, making it number one in Switzerland for social housing. In connection with the housing estate replacements, an almost guild-like organizational structure has emerged among housing cooperatives, competition participants, juries and a city bureaucracy that sees itself as an agent for contemporary architecture. The reason why this kind of network is able to produce quality and address issues of contemporary living is the fact that socio-economic weaknesses are cushioned by the genius loci – even if the parcel-for-parcel densification of garden city housing produces disparities in spatial scale that are not always convincing. At the other end of the economic spectrum, in Zürich West, planning cooperation between private developers, city planners and select designers has proven able to effectively facilitate the transformation from industrial wasteland to privileged biotopes. The progress made thus far has been a learning process for all those involved. Twenty years ago, no one could have foreseen answers to such a challenge with as many post-industrial unknowns. Now, after the architects have revelled in their Eldorado, it remains to be seen whether the city districts will stand the test of time.

11


CURATORS THEORY HOSTS

Zwei Ökonomien und viele Einzelwelten André Bideau

12

Was Gegenwartsarchitektur und überhaupt städtebauliche Entwicklungen angeht, gehört Zürich ganz vorn mit zu den Städten, deren Ränder unendlich interessanter sind als die saturierte Innenstadt. Nach wie vor erweist es sich im Zentrum als unmöglich, dem auswärtigen Besucher ein Gebäude oder einen öffentlichen Raum neueren Datums vorzuführen, die auf irgendeine Weise zur Diskussion anregen würden. Gepflegte Behaglichkeit verspricht dort David Chipperfields Kunsthaus-Erweiterung, deren Bau 2015 begonnen hat. Die helvetische Aversion gegen visionäre Würfe hat Vor- und Nachteile. Sie spiegelt sich etwa in einer Bauproduktion, bei der Wohnungsbau eine führende Stellung einnimmt. Seine Privilegierung beruht auf topografischen, ökonomischen und institutionellen Voraussetzungen. Zwar sind auch imposante Dienstleistungsarchitekturen entstanden – besonders an den Rändern der Stadt im hochvernetzten Service-Korridor bis zum Flughafen. Doch die dortigen Beispiele übertreffen kaum die Allgemeinplätze, die sich auch in anderen Städten finden. Dagegen transportiert der Wohnungsbau nicht nur eine Komplexität, die der Bürohausarchitektur konzeptionell fehlt; als Thema scheint er vielmehr auch erfolgreich in die Ortsidentität eingeschrieben zu sein. Diese Produktionsbedingungen sollen hier diskutiert werden.

Flexible Akkumulation Als treibender Faktor der Zürcher Wohnbauproduktion können zwei Ökonomien genannt werden, denen sich der Stadtrand als Handlungsraum in den angeboten hat. Zieht man eine Bilanz der beiden vergangenen Jahrzehnte, manifestieren architektonisch-städtebaulich parallele Welten. Die Rede ist von Polarisierung im privaten und geförderten Wohnungsbau – high-end versus gefördert bzw. genossenschaftlich – die sich in der Zürcher Architekturproduktion als zwei Filme abspielen. In wenigen Jahren ist in Zürich West eine Skyline mit mehrheitlich auf Eigentum und Vermietung im gehobenen Segment des Wohnens ausgerichteten Hochhäusern entstanden. Anfänglich war für diesen Stadtteil – sein Name ein Produkt des urban branding– ein Szenario angenommen worden, bei dem auf stillgelegten Industriearealen Bürobauten realisiert worden wären. Die einträglicheren Renditen versprach jedoch das Wohnen. Was schliesslich realisiert wurde, lässt vergessen, dass hier einst das Herz der Schweizerischen Maschinenindustrie schlug. Erst dank der Industrialisierung überrundete Zürich in seiner Bedeutung Basel, Genf und Bern. Verbotene Städte, in denen einst Zahnräder gestanzt, Lokomotiven, Schiffsmotoren und Kraftwerksturbinen gebaut, Bierflaschen abgefüllt wurden, besiedeln heute nicht nur Wohnungsbauten im gehobenen Segment, sondern auch Kunstgalerien, Theater und die Zürcher Hochschule der Künste. Die 2014 bezogene ehemalige Joghurtfabrik übertrifft in ihrer Grundrissfläche das Centre Pompidou. Auf den Massstab des Industrierelikts haben EM2N mit einem „inneren Urbanismus“ reagiert, um so eine poröse Grossform zu generieren. Für die federführende Totalunternehmung war die umgebaute Fabrik vor allem eine Renditemaschine: Das Vorhaben zeigte auf, wie Strukturwandel sich konkret auf die Rollenverteilung auswirkt. Denn obwohl der Kanton Zürich die Umnutzung initiierte, ist seine Kunsthochschule bloss Mieterin im Komplex, der auch teure Mietwohnungen enthält – kein Studentencampus also, sondern ‚air rights developments’, das den Luftraum über der Fabrik mit einer zehnstöckigen Aufstockung profitabel macht. Die postmoderne Metamorphose Zürichs zur Lifestyleund Dienstleistungs-Metropole ist ein Textbuch für die Auswirkungen der von David Harvey beschriebenen Flexiblen Akkumulation. Entscheidend war dabei auch der Umbau der administrativen Strukturen während

der Amtszeit von Frank Eberhard, 1997-2009 Direktor des Amts für Städtebau. Zu Eberhards Markenzeichen wurden kooperative Entwicklungsplanungen, durch die sich grosse Industrieareale rascher als bisher für Investitionen öffnen liessen – ganz im Sinn der blairistisch eingefärbten sozialdemokratischen Stadtpolitik. So wurden im Hinblick auf die Relancierung des Industriequartiers unzählige Workshops und Testplanungen mit Investoren und Architekten durchgeführt. Im Gegensatz zu den Neunziger Jahren, die noch von eher dirigistischen Planungsvorstellungen sowie von der letzten Rezession der Schweizer Wirtschaft geprägt waren, entwickelte Eberhard seine geschmeidige Kabinettspolitik im Umgang mit immer anderen Konfigurationen privater Akteure. Für den Stadtteil, der noch ein Phantom darstellte, wurden Architekten zu gefragten Bilderlieferanten. Dies war auch der Moment, als in einen bis anhin von routinierten Großbüros kontrollierten Markt damals noch jüngere Namen eindrangen: Gigon Guyer, Diener & Diener, Meili & Peter. In ihrer Arbeit auf dem Maag-Areal haben sie Zürich West in den vergangenen Jahren zu Signaturen verholfen, wie sie beim zuvor entwickelten Neu-Oerlikon noch gänzlich fehlten. Am deutlichsten der Prime Tower von Gigon Guyer, der seit 2011 den Gegenpol zur verkrusteten Zürcher Innenstadt markiert. Dass Zürich West in der lebhaften Entwicklung des geförderten Wohnungsbaus keine wesentliche Rolle spielt, liegt an Bodenbesitzverhältnissen, die dort einen kostengünstigen Wohnungsbau ausschliessen. Wegen hoher Bodenkosten und – vor allem – mangels Quersubventionen bleibt der gegenwärtig entstehende Wohnungsbau auf ein bestimmtes Publikum beschränkt. So findet kein geförderter Wohnungsbau auf den Grundstücken der in den Siebziger und Achtziger Jahren abgewanderten Industrie statt. In dieser Hinsicht mag es gerade wie ein Paradox scheinen, dass in Zürich die deutsch-angelsächsische Genossenschaftstradition nicht nur weiterhin praktiziert, sondern jüngst mit innovativen Wohnsiedlungen aktualisiert wird: ‚Kraftwerk’, ‚Kalkbreite’, ‚Mehr als Wohnen’ sind die Gegenstücke zu Zürich West. Sie sind ebenfalls Teil des postindustriellen Dispositivs. Denn diese Experimente reagieren darauf, dass der gemeinnützige Wohnungsbau schon lange Legitimation und Publikum eingebüsst hat, die ihm im keynesianischen Wohlfahrtsstaat selbstverständlich gewesen waren.


Parzellen, Objekte und Grenzen Der Gürtel, den Siedlungsquartiere wie Schwamendingen, Affoltern, Altstetten, Albisrieden, Leimbach oder Wollishofen rings um die Stadt bilden, ist gleichzeitig Vermächtnis und Zukunft. Seit fünfzehn Jahren wird eine Wohnungsbaupolitik umgesetzt, deren Ziele in der Modernisierung dieser Viertel liegen. Im Zentrum der Erneuerungskampagne steht die bauliche Verdichtung, weil Zürichs Baulandreserven heute praktisch ausgeschöpft sind. In der Regel ist damit der Abriss von Siedlungen aus der Zwischen- und Nachkriegszeit verbunden. Mit unterschiedlichem Erfolg zeigen die Ersatzneubauten eine selektive Vergegenwärtigung der städtebaulichen Tradition des jeweiligen Ortes. Dabei erweist es sich nicht immer als unproblematisch, innerhalb grösserer Verbände einzelne Ensembles in ihrem architektonischstädtebaulichen Wert abzuschreiben. Angesichts des repetitiven Charakters ihrer baulichen Umgebung stellt sich die Frage nach dem Part, den jeweils die erneuerte Siedlung im Verwandlungsprozess eines Quartiers erhält. Angesichts weiterhin monofunktional zugeschnittener Programme liegt der Hauptunterschied meistens allein in der Größe der Wohnung, vor allem aber in der erhöhten Bodenausnutzung. So reproduziert der Ersatzneubau die Autarkie bestehender Ensembles in einer anderen Typologie und morphologischen Körnung – was indirekt dem privaten Urbanismus auf den Industriearealen entspricht. Wenn bisherige Zeilenmuster verdickt und purifiziert, in einer zeitgenössischen Sprache wiederkehren, kann sich dieser Überschreibungsvorgang gerade im Gartenstadt-Teppich mit seinem fein austarierten Verhältnis von Außenraum zu Masse destabilisierend auswirken. Konsequenter als diese Masstabssprünge wäre in manchen Fällen das Bekenntnis zu einer Stadt der Objekte. Die architektonischen Hinterlassenschaften des Wohlfahrtsstaats haben sich als ein entwerferischatmosphärisch ergiebiger Hintergrund erwiesen. Man kann sagen, dass in Zürich über die anonymen Orte der urbanen Peripherie der Architekturdiskurs für das Alltägliche sensibilisiert wurde. Ein solcher Zugang ist zugleich ein Indiz für die erstaunlich privilegierte Situation, in der sich die jüngste Architekturproduktion abspielen konnte. Wie die handwerkliche Kontrolle bei der Realisierung sind die neorealistischen Projektionen eine Folge des überschaubaren Maßstabs von Zürich. Zwischen Zentrum und Rand sind sind die rümlichen Distanzen

derart bescheiden, dass die Peripherie niemals zum Ort unkontrollierbarer Dysfunktionalität werden konnte – ganz im Gegensatz etwa zur realen Tristesse eines MilanoGallaratese, die Aldo Rossis ikonischen Wohnblock nach der Fertigstellung brutal heimsuchte. Insofern verdankt Zürichs gegenwärtiger Wohnungsbau einige seiner entwerferischen Spielräume der simplen Tatsache, dass großstädtische Krisendynamiken, in denen alternde Großsiedlungen ganze Kontexte ins Verderben stürzen, hier unbekannt sind. Der fehlende Leidensdruck erklärt auch das Mikroklima, in dem in der Nachfolge des geistigen Übervaters Rossi eine trockene Realismus-Ikonographie gedeihen konnte. Nicht zuletzt ist das Erbe der Siebziger Jahre einer der Gründe für den Erfolg, mit dem im Städtebau jeweils architektonisch thematisierbare Inhalte herausgearbeitet werden, anstatt diesen mit gesellschaftlichen Desideraten zu überfrachten. Rossi und seine Schweizer Schüler halfen dabei, einen selbstreferentiellen Architekturdiskurs zu legitimieren. Mit dem Argumentarium des Neorazionalismo vermochte man sich von der Postmoderne als einem willfährig historisierenden Projekt zu distanzieren und eine eigene Tradition autonomer «Setzungen» zu konstruieren. In den Mittelpunkt dieses esprit de Zurich rückte mit dem Wohnungsbau ausgerechnet eine Aufgabe, die der wirtschaftlichen und städtebaupolitischen Vereinnahmung hochgradig ausgesetzt ist. Mit dem Rückhalt privater und öffentlicher Bauträger herrscht hier ein Klima der gebundenen Innovation. Diesbezüglich hat Annette Spiro die Wohnungsbauten von Pool Architekten mit dem «American Songbook» verglichen: Deutschschweizer Grundriss-Handwerk als Metier talentierter Interpreten, die eine Tradition mit immer wieder neuen Nuancen aufzuladen verstehen, Originalität um ihrer selbst willen aber abgeneigt sind. Eine Folge dieses Klimas ist, dass der klassische Graben zwischen Marktrealitäten und Architekten-Selbstgespräch sich weitaus seltener auftut als andernorts. An seinen historischen Anfängen gemessen, spielt sich der Deutschschweizer Realismus heute in einem veränderten Umfeld ab. In den Händen der Developer belegt er inzwischen die Marktgängigkeit von architektonischer Stummheit. Und wenn in der Schweiz ästhetisch im Grunde genommen konservativ gepolte Massen für zeitgenössische Architektur sozialisiert worden sind, lässt dies nicht unbedingt auf eine bleibende Baukultur schliessen. Vor allem ist damit keine Garantie gegen

die zunehmend desaströse Zersiedelung in der Zürcher Agglomeration verbunden. Obwohl wiederholt Raumpolitik thematisiert wurde – sowohl fachintern als auch mit direktdemokratischen Vorstössen wie der 2012 von den Stimmbürgern angenommenen ‚Kulturlandinitiative’ – ist die Ausdehnung des Siedlungsbreis kaum zu stoppen. Der ausgetrocknete Wohnungsmarkt und ein stets wachsender individueller Flächenverbrauch bewirken eine zentrifugale Entwicklung aus der Stadt hinaus. Gefördert wurde und wird diese Tendenz nicht zuletzt durch ein hervorragend ausgebautes öffentliches Verkehrssystem. Mit der Mobilität hat sich die Bedeutung kommunaler Grenzen zwar stark relativiert, doch administrativ und mental bleibt der Metropolitanraum Zürich ein fragmentiertes Gebilde: Trotz überkommunaler Interessenverbände leisten viele Agglomerationsgemeinden gegenüber den notwendigen räumlichen Aushandlungsprozessen Widerstand. Grenzen und Abschottungstendenzen, die sich auf dem Stadtgebiet bei Ersatzneubauten und auf Industriearealen beobachten lassen, stellen im Massstab der Agglomeration ebenfalls eine Hypothek dar. Während diese Agglomeration weiterhin wächst, wird Zürich selber immer mehr zum gestylten Opfer des eigenen Erfolgs. Als weltweit eine der teuersten Städte kann es auf exorbitante Mietkosten verweisen. Aber immerhin: Es steht mit einem Viertel seines Wohnungsbestands im gemeinnützigen Bereich schweizweit an vorderster Stelle. Im Zusammenhang mit den Ersatzneubauten haben Wohnbaugenossenschaften, Wettbewerbsteilnehmer, Juroren und eine als Agentin zeitgenössischer Architektur sich verstehende Bürokratie in der Stadt Zürich beinah zünftische Strukturen aufgebaut. Ein derartiges Netzwerk kann Qualität produzieren und zeitgenössische Wohnvorstellungen thematisieren, weil die sozioökonomischen Schwächen durch den Genius Loci abgefedert werden – auch wenn die parzellenweise Verdichtung der Gartenstädte einen nicht immer stimmigen räumlichen Maßstabssprung zur Folge hat. Am anderen Ende des ökonomischen Spektrums in Zürich West erwiesen sich die kooperativen Entwicklungsplanungen imstande, die Transformation von Industriebrachen in privilegierte Biotopen zu moderieren. Der seither zurückgelegte Weg war für alle Akteure ein Lernprozess. Keiner, der vor zwanzig Jahren Antworten auf diese Gleichung mit ihren vielen postindustriellen Unbekannten hätte voraussehen können. Nach dem ArchitektenEldorado steht den Stadtteilen jetzt die Bewährung bevor.

13


Middle-class structures in social housing construction

Import Barcelona Daniel Kurz

14

CURATORS THEORY HOSTS

Social housing is equated today in many parts of Europe with social destitution, decay and crime. It has therefore not been difficult for neo-liberal ideologues to put an end to the construction of public housing in many countries. The situation is different in Zurich of all places, the economic capital of conservative Switzerland. For over 100 years, municipal and cooperative housing construction for broad strata of society has been firmly entrenched politically and not a subject of debate. The city promotes housing construction by providing land, mortgages and guarantees – but largely without subsidies. The developers are in most cases relatively small and legally independent cooperatives (the largest owns fewer than 5,000 apartments) whose members have a true say in things and which offer living space not only for the neediest but also for the middle class. As they are committed to renting at cost, their rents remain permanently low. 25% of housing stock in Zurich belongs to the city and the cooperatives, and the political aim is to increase this share to at least 30%. In the years following the First and the Second World Wars, non-profit developers were responsible for the majority of urban expansion. Under the urban planning supervision of the city authorities, whole districts of loosely arranged and distinctive apartment blocks were created. With their landscaped courtyards and often featuring murals or figurative ornament, these buildings still lend the neighbourhoods a strong identity today. After the Second World War, it was popular to build apartment houses in rows, interspersed with flowing, park-like green spaces, a style that still characterizes the peripheral neighbourhoods. It was not until the period from 1955 to 1975 that larger ensembles began to be added, with slab-type buildings and tower blocks for greater density. Rediscovery of the city centre Following the economic crisis in 1973, very little was built for an entire generation. The existing cooperatives had by that time become somewhat saturated and focused more on the meticulous care of their holdings. But then a younger generation began to rediscover the old workers’ quarters in the city centre. They set up flat-shares in the low-cost apartments available in the heritage buildings, and their resistance to expensive modernization projects

eventually spawned both the squatter movement and new cooperatives such as WOGENO, which bought and collectively managed existing housing stock. Participation for all and self-management, as well as communal spaces and activities, were very important to squatters and cooperatives alike, along with involvement in the political life and an awareness of environmental issues. The 1980 Zurich youth movement with its anarchistic spirit served to connect the two movements and resulted in a new form of social entrepreneurship. With his 1983 book “bolo’bolo”, the author p.m. (Hans Widmer) drafted a social utopia in which communal forms of living and working would be possible on a large scale. In newly built pioneer settlements (for example Hellmutstrasse, ADP Architekten, 1991), a didactic form of architecture designed for communication and encounters among residents supported this new direction. The liberating experience of self-management in squatted houses culminated in radical experiments such as “Karthago” (1997), where, instead of individual households, one big domestic community lives together and shares a common kitchen. Innovation for the 21st century The 1990s brought a new economic crisis for Switzerland, which led to the collapse of the real estate market. Bankruptcies and vacancies were rampant, and the city came to be seen as a hotspot for social problems such as the open drug scene, high unemployment, an ageing population and a lack of integration for immigrants. Drastic public-sector austerity measures only increased the sense of crisis. But these difficult years also opened up new opportunities: squatting had better long-term prospects; an innovative illegal bar and party scene took root, flying in the face of the previously tight regulations; and the creative industries found a new home on vacant factory grounds. Above all, however, the shared plight gave rise to new alliances that had once seemed unthinkable. A prime example is the project “Kraftwerk 1”, realized in 2001 (Stücheli und Bünzli Courvoisier Architekten). Here, what was at first an informal group of people from the youth and squatter movement set itself the goal in the early 1990s of putting “bolo’bolo” into action. The vast deserted industrial sites seemed ideal for this purpose. And the group in fact succeeded in just a few years in acquiring a planning ruin and – what is truly amazing – in transforming it with the help of a commercial developer into a model social and ecological project


on a grand scale. Andreas Hofer, one of the project’s masterminds, describes it as follows: “During the 1990s real estate crisis a window opened up for a short time in which the young Kraftwerk1 cooperative was able to take advantage of the perplexity of the property speculators – and to venture a joint experiment with them. The first Kraftwerk1 housing estate, with its diverse apartment types, eco-friendly construction, and the participation of residents in the planning, set standards that still influence today’s housing development in Switzerland and contributed to the renaissance of Zurich’s cooperative movement.” 1 The traditional cooperatives and the city helped finance the innovative construction project by providing guarantees – and hence the major players on the real estate market, formerly at cross-purposes, entered into a completely new form of alliance. In the collective habitation practised in Kraftwerk1, large residential communities known as “suites” were the key to utilizing the considerable structural depth of the planned buildings (up to 20 meters) for housing construction. “Rues intérieures” designed as common areas and multistorey “Loos apartments” are combined with smaller residential units to take advantage of the entire depth of the building. The highest ecological standards in line with Zurich’s vision of the “2,000-watt society”, a deliberate social mix (via a solidarity fund and housing reserved for the socially disadvantaged), as well as an intense sense of community still characterize life today in Kraftwerk1. The colony can thus be considered the prime driving force for many new, in some cases even larger or more ambitious, projects and developments (“Kraftwerk2” from 2012, “Kalkbreite” from 2014, “mehr als wohnen” from 2015 and “Zollhaus”). Replacement construction and urban densification With the programme “10,000 new flats”, launched in 1998 during a campaign period, the Zurich city government effectively helped to end the real estate crisis and give a fresh boost to housing construction after the turn of the millennium. Even though no funds were actually allocated to the scheme, breaking down mental and bureaucratic hurdles proved sufficient against the backdrop of a favourable environment to unleash a new building boom. The political objective was to create living space in particular for families with children, whose numbers had been dwindling for years. Larger apartments with four to five rooms were to supplement the spatially

confined housing stock of the building cooperatives. By setting specific urban planning requirements, the city authorities succeeded in establishing architecture competitions as standard for larger projects, both for building cooperatives and private developers – resulting in a profusion of new ideas for urban development and especially for possible floor plans. The key vehicle for urban renewal proved to be replacement construction: the demolition of existing residential complexes or estates and their replacement with more densely packed buildings constructed to an improved standard. The first example was the residential area “Werdwies” by Adrian Streich (2001–2007), which replaced a problematic social housing complex. The cooperatives were especially willing and able to write off their older building stock and to create relatively affordable and yet spacious apartments on land that had been acquired on the cheap decades earlier. Replacement construction is in fact much cheaper per square meter of living area than modernization with a view to improving amenities. In the course of numerous competitions, the city’s best architects delivered the corresponding projects, playing a crucial role in helping residential construction in Zurich to achieve a high degree of recognition throughout Europe. Despite their almost consistently extremely high quality, however, a certain disappointment or even disdain can be felt at times toward the widespread replacement projects. It’s not only that a large number of old but affordable apartments are disappearing, displacing migrants, single parents and others with low incomes. Just as evident is that these attractive projects, for all their excellent floor plans and ecologically sound solutions, are not helping in any way to rethink the city. For one thing, the new residential complexes simply carry on the traditional housing monoculture. At best, parts of the ground floor are reserved for shared laundry facilities, nurseries and common rooms, but commercial spaces or workplaces are virtually never planned, so that there is no chance for an “urban mix” to develop. Secondly, structural consolidation usually brings a relatively low increase in the number of residents; the increased volume is simply taken up by much larger living spaces – and only the influx of families with several children ensures higher residential density.

Thirdly – and most importantly – the new replacement buildings are invariably conceived and built with only their immediate surroundings in mind – within the already existing framework of urban structures. Policymakers and the Office for Urban Development tend to promote the highest possible degree of integration into the existing park-like typology. Although the new buildings are up to twice as high as their older neighbours next door and also set much closer together, the planners cling to the idea of intervening open spaces, with the result that the once park-like greenswards are reduced to narrow bands. The building line, which requires a certain distance from the street complete with a front garden, is never called into question. The progressive renewal of adjacent housing estates leads to neighbourhoods with a hybrid character, which promise garden living but don’t really offer it – while simultaneously ruling out street life in an urban setting. The streetscape is often interpreted more as an afterthought at the rear of the building than as a public address. The same criticism can surprisingly also be applied to the commercially planned residential buildings in central transformational areas such as Neu-Oerlikon or Zurich West, which now find themselves afloat amidst poorly defined open spaces. The latest construction projects launched by innovative building cooperatives – “Kalkbreite” and “mehr als wohnen” – have demonstrated on a large scale that new concepts of urban renewal are not only urgently desirable but are also possible, given the requisite passionate engagement. It is to be hoped that, through their example, more urban forms of habitation, working and living will take hold on the edge of the traditional residential areas. City planning is called on to take action here.

1. www.kraftwerk1.ch

Dr. phil. Daniel Kurz Editor-in-chief werk, bauen + wohnen

15


Mittelständische Struktur im sozialen Wohnungsbau

Import Barcelona Daniel Kurz

16

CURATORS THEORY HOSTS

«Social Housing» wird in vielen Teilen Europas heute mit sozialem Elend, Zerfall und Kriminalität gleichgesetzt. Deshalb fiel es neoliberalen Ideologen nicht schwer, dem sozialen Wohnungsbau in vielen Ländern ein Ende zu bereiten. Anders ist die Situation ausgerechnet in Zürich, der Wirtschaftskapitale der konservativ ausgerichteten Schweiz. Seit über 100 Jahren – genauer: seit 1907 – sind hier der kommunale und der genossenschaftliche Wohnungsbau für breite Schichten etabliert und politisch wenig umstritten. Mit der Bereitstellung von Bauland, Hypotheken und Bürgschaften – jedoch überwiegend ohne Subventionen – fördert die Stadt den Bau von Wohnungen. Bauträger sind in den meisten Fällen relativ kleine und rechtlich selbständige Genossenschaften (die grösste besitzt weniger als 5’000 Wohnungen), die eine echte Mitsprache ihrer Mitglieder kennen, und die nicht nur für die besonders Bedürftigen, sondern auch für den breiten Mittelstand Wohnraum bieten. Da sie sich verpflichten, zu Selbstkosten zu vermieten (Prinzip der Kostenmiete), bleiben ihre Mieten dauerhaft niedrig. 25 % des Wohnraums in Zürich gehört Stadt und Genossenschaften, und das politische Ziel ist, diesen Anteil auf mindestens 30 % zu erhöhen. In den Jahren nach dem Ersten und dem Zweiten Weltkrieg trugen die gemeinnützigen Bauträger den grössten Teil der Stadterweiterung. Unter der städtebaulichen Leitung der Stadtbehörden entstanden damals ganze Quartiere in weiträumiger Bauweise: Markante Blöcke mit begrünten Innenhöfen und nicht selten mit Wandmalereien oder figürlichem Schmuck geben diesen bis heute eine starke Identität. Nach den Zweiten Weltkrieg setzte sich die Zeilenbauweise mit parkartig fliessenden Grünräumen durch und prägt bis heute die peripheren Stadtquartiere. Erst im Zeitraum von 1955 bis 1975 kamen grosse Ensembles mit Scheiben- und Punkthäusern in etwas höherer Dichte dazu. Wiederentdeckung der Innenstadt Nach der Wirtschaftskrise von 1973 wurde im Zeitraum einer Generation nur wenig neu gebaut. Die bestehenden Genossenschaften waren inzwischen ein wenig saturiert und konservativ geworden und konzentrierten sich auf die minutiöse Pflege ihrer Bestände. Dagegen entdeckte damals eine jüngere Generation die alten Arbeiterquartiere der Innenstadt neu. In den preiswerten

Altbauwohnungen bildeten sich Wohngemeinschaften, und aus dem Widerstand gegen teure Sanierungsprojekte entstanden einerseits die Bewegung der Hausbesetzer (Squatters), anderseits neue Genossenschaften wie die WOGENO, die bestehenden Wohnraum erwarben und kollektiv verwalteten. Beiden waren Partizipation und Selbstverwaltung sowie gemeinschaftliche Räume und Aktivitäten sehr wichtig, ebenso die Teilnahme am politischen Leben im Quartier und Achtsamkeit in ökologischen Fragen. Die Zürcher Jugendbewegung von 1980 mit ihren Massendemonstrationen und ihrem anarchistischen Geist sorgte für die Vernetzung dieser Bewegungen und zog ein neues soziales Unternehmertum nach sich. Und mit dem Buch «bolo’bolo» schuf der Autor p.m. (Hans Widmer) 1983 eine soziale Utopie, die gemeinschaftliche Wohn- und Arbeitsformen im grossen Massstab möglich scheinen liess. In einzelnen neu gebauten Pioniersiedlungen (z.B. Hellmutstrasse, ADP Architekten 1991) unterstützt eine didaktisch auf Kommunikation und Begegnung ausgerichtete Architektur diese neue Ausrichtung. Die befreiende Erfahrung der Selbstverwaltung in besetzten Häusern mündete in radikale Experimente wie das «Karthago» (1997), wo anstelle einzelner Haushalte eine grosse Hausgemeinschaft miteinander lebt und eine gemeinsame Grossküche führt. Innovation für das 21. Jahrhundert Die 1990er Jahre brachten der Schweiz und der Stadt Zürich eine neue Wirtschaftskrise, die den Zusammenbruch des Liegenschaftenmarkts nach sich zog. Konkurse und Leerstände häuften sich, und die Stadt galt als Brennpunkt sozialer Probleme wie der offenen Drogenszene, hoher Arbeitslosigkeit, Überalterung und mangelnder Integration von Immigranten. Einschneidende Sparprogramme der öffentlichen Hand verschärften das Krisengefühl. Doch gerade diese Jahre boten auch neue Chancen: Hausbesetzungen hatten bessere Aussicht auf Dauer, eine innovative, illegale Bar- und Partyszene mischte die bislang engen Regulierungen auf, und in leerstehenden Fabrikarealen nistete sich die Kreativwirtschaft ein. Vor allem aber ermöglichte die gemeinsame Notlage neue Allianzen, die zuvor undenkbar schienen. Dies illustriert exemplarisch das 2001 realisierte Projekt «Kraftwerk 1» (Stücheli und Bünzli Courvoisier Architekten): Eine zunächst lockere Gruppe von Menschen aus dem Umfeld der Jugend- und Besetzerbewegung setzte sich Anfang der 1990er Jahre das Ziel, «bolo’bolo» in die Tat umzusetzen. Die grossen leerstehenden Industrieareale


schienen ihr dafür geeignet. Tatsächlich gelang es nach wenigen Jahren, eine Planungsruine zu erwerben und – das Erstaunliche – zusammen mit einem kommerziellen Developer zu einem ökologisch-sozialen Musterprojekt im grossen Massstab zu entwickeln. Andreas Hofer, einer der führenden Köpfe dieses Projekts fasst es so zusammen: «In der Immobilienkrise der 1990er-Jahre öffnete sich ein kurzes Zeitfenster, in dem die junge Genossenschaft Kraftwerk1 die Ratlosigkeit der Bauspekulanten nutzen konnte – um mit ihnen zusammen ein Experiment zu wagen. Mit ihren vielfältigen Wohnungstypen, ihrer ökologischen Bauweise und der Mitsprache der BewohnerInnen in der Planung setzte die erste Kraftwerk1-Siedlung Standards, die den heutigen Siedlungsbau in der Schweiz beeinflussen, und trug zur Renaissance der Zürcher Genossenschaftsbewegung bei.» 1 Die traditionellen Genossenschaften und die Stadt unterstützten durch ihre Bürgschaft die Finanzierung des innovativen Bauprojekts – so trafen sich die wichtigsten, aber bislang verfeindeten Akteure des Immobilienmarktes in einer völlig neuartigen Allianz. Die kollektiven Wohnformen von Kraftwerk1, die «Suiten» genannten, grossen Wohngemeinschaften waren der Schlüssel, um die grosse Gebäudetiefe der geplanten Bauten (bis 20 Meter) für den Wohnungsbau zu nutzen. Als Aufenthaltsbereiche ausgestaltete Rues intérieures und die mehrgeschossigen «Loos-Wohnungen» erschliessen in Kombination mit kleineren Wohnungungstypen die Tiefe des Baus. Höchste ökologische Ambitionen im Sinn der 2000-Watt-Gesellschaft, bewusste soziale Durchmischung (über einen Solidaritätsfonds und reservierten Wohnraum für sozial Benachteiligte) sowie ein intensives Gemeinschaftsleben charakterisieren bis heute das Kraftwerk1, das als wichtigster Impulsgeber für viele neue, teils noch grössere oder ambitiösere Realisierungen und Projekte («Kraftwerk2» 2012, «Kalkbreite» 2014, «mehr als wohnen» 2015, «Zollhaus») gelten kann. Ersatzneubau und städtische Verdichtung Mit dem 1998 als Wahlschlager lancierten Programm «10’000 neue Wohnungen» trug die Zürcher Stadtregierung wirksam zur Beendigung der Immobilienkrise und zum neuen Aufschwung des Wohnungsbau nach der Jahrtausendwende bei – obwohl dem Programm eigentlich keine finanziellen Fördermittel zustanden: Der Abbau mentaler und bürokratischer Hindernisse genügten in einem günstigen Umfeld, um einen neuen Bauboom

auszulösen. Das politische Ziel war, Wohnraum vor allem für die seit Jahren schwindende Zahl der Familien mit Kindern zu schaffen. Grössere Wohnungen mit vier bis fünf Zimmern sollten die räumlich eng bemessenen Wohnungsbestände der Baugenossenschaften ergänzen. Über städtebauliche Auflagen gelang es den Stadtbehörden, den Architekturwettbewerb sowohl bei den Baugenossenschaften wie bei den privaten Entwicklern für grössere Projekte als Standard zu etablieren – eine Vielfalt an Ideen im Massstab von Städtebau und vor allem Grundriss war die Folge. Als wichtigstes Vehikel der Stadterneuerung erwies sich der Ersatzneubau – der Abbruch bestehender Wohnkomplexe oder Siedlungen und ihr Ersatz in höherer baulicher Dichte und verbessertem Standard. Das erste Beispiel dieser Art war die Wohnsiedlung «Werdwies» von Adrian Streich (2001–2007), die eine problembehaftete Sozialsiedlung ersetzte. Vor allem die Baugenossenschaften waren bereit und in der Lage, ihre Altbaubestände abzuschreiben und auf dem – vor Jahrzehnten preiswert erworbenen – Bauland relativ erschwingliche und doch grosszügige Wohnungen zu schaffen. Denn Ersatzneubau ist – auf den Quadratmeter Wohnfläche bezogen – wesentlich billiger als ein Umbau mit Komfortverbesserungen. Die besten Architektinnen und Architekten der Stadt lieferten in zahlreichen Wettbewerben dazu die Projekte; sie trugen entscheidend dazu bei, dass Zürichs Wohnungsbau in den letzten Jahren europaweite Bekanntheit erreicht hat.

meist einen recht geringen Zuwachs an Bewohnerinnen und Bewohnern: Die sehr viel grösseren Wohnflächen kompensieren den Zuwachs an Volumen – und nur der Zuzug von Familien mit vielen Kindern sorgt für höhere Wohndichte. Drittens – und vor allem – werden die Ersatzneubauten immer nur arealweise gedacht und gebaut – im Rahmen der bestehenden städtebaulichen Strukturen. Politik und Behörden (Amt für Städtebau) fördern eine möglichst weitgehende Integration in die Bebauungstypologie der bestehenden Zeilenbauquartiere. Obwohl die Neubauten bis zu doppelt so hoch sind wie die älteren Nachbarsiedlungen und auch deutlich dichter aneinanderrücken, hält man meist an offenen Bebauungsformen fest, wobei die einst parkartigen Freiflächen zu schmalen Bändern werden. Die Baulinie, die einen Abstand mit Vorgarten zur Strasse erfordert, wird nie in Frage gestellt. Mit fortschreitender Erneuerung benachbarter Siedlungen entstehen Quartiere von hybridem Charakter, die Wohnen im Grünen versprechen, aber nicht wirklich bieten – aber auch ein städtisches Leben im Strassenraum von vornherein ausschliessen. Dieser wird oft mehr als Rückseite denn als öffentliche Adresse interpretiert. Die gleiche Kritik gilt überraschenderweise auch für die kommerziell geplanten Wohnbauten in zentral gelegenen Transformationsgebieten wie Neu-Örlikon oder Zürich West, die inselartig in schlecht definierten Freiräumen schwimmen.

Trotz der fast durchwegs sehr hohen Qualität regt sich gegenüber den verbreiteten Ersatzneubauprojekten eine gewisse Enttäuschung oder gar Abneigung. Nicht nur verschwindet mit jedem dieser Vorhaben eine grosse Zahl alter, aber umso preiswerterer Wohnungen, auf die Migranten, Alleinerziehende oder andere Menschen mit geringem Einkommen nach wie vor angewiesen sind. Es ausserdem deutlich, dass all die schönen Projekte trotz hervorragenden Grundrissen und ökologisch einwandfreien Lösungen keinen Beitrag leisten, die Stadt neu zu denken.

Die neusten Bauprojekte innovativer Baugenossenschaften – «Kalkbreite» und «mehr als wohnen» haben im grossen Massstab gezeigt, dass neue Konzepte der Stadterneuerung nicht nur dringend erwünscht, sondern – bei entsprechend leidenschaftlichem Einsatz – auch möglich sind. Es ist zu hoffen, dass durch ihr Beispiel städtische Wohn-, Arbeits- und Lebensformen auch in der Peripherie der traditionellen Wohnquartiere vermehrt Einzug halten. Die Stadtplanung ist gefordert.

Erstens setzen die neuen Wohnkomplexe die traditionelle Monokultur des Wohnens fort. Im besten Fall bleiben Teile der Erdgeschosse für gemeinsame Waschsalons, Kinderkrippen und Gemeinschaftsräume reserviert; Gewerberäume oder Arbeitsplätze werden praktisch nie geplant, ein «urbaner Mix» bleibt von vornherein ausgeschlossen. Zweitens bringt die bauliche Verdichtung

1. www.kraftwerk1.ch

Dr. phil. Daniel Kurz Chefredaktor werk, bauen + wohnen

17


Barcelona _Import Zurich Nicola Regusci Xavier Bustos

18

CURATORS THEORY HOSTS

The Cities Connection Project (CCP) seeks to establish connections at the level of architectural themes between the city of Barcelona and other European cities or regions with a significant architectural tradition. The aim is to present in a reciprocal arrangement works that reflect the best avant-garde architecture of each place, highlighting the achievements of architects under the age of 50 built during the last ten years. The further aim is to create a network of cultural connections between cities in order to affirm the value of contemporary architecture and urbanism. Each ‘connection’ starts off with a first exhibition in Barcelona, showing the work of the invited architects from the guest city or region, and is followed in due course by a return exhibition of the Barcelona architects’ work in the partner city or region. Each new ‘connection’ is articulated around a fresh theme, which is related to the specific characteristics of the invited city or region. The primary objective of these exhibitions is to create synergies between the institutions, the universities and, above all, the invited architects. After two iterations that paired Barcelona with the cities of Ticino and Geneva, the latest edition will connect the Catalan capital with Zurich. This choice is due in part to the two regions’ current impetus for expansion by means of major projects that seek to improve ongoing and future urban development. Moreover, in this iteration of the CCP we are focusing mainly on Zurich’s cooperative housing tradition, with more than 100 years of history. For about fifteen years now a renaissance of urban living has been taking place in the town of Zurich. Everybody wants to return to the city, which has a rich and attractive cultural life. This renaissance is also bringing about a renewal of activity among the housing cooperatives. The high level of demand for housing and rising rents enhance the appeal and the importance of housing cooperatives involved in a number of major building projects. It is now generally acknowledged that cooperatives are essential for the further development of the city. They have adopted ecological standards, they have developed socially compatible forms of denser building, and their large-scale projects have a significant impact on the qualitative development of the city’s neighbourhoods. In addition they recognize the importance of being able to live and work in the same building and the positive effect this has in terms of the more convivial use of the ground floors.

The vision of the so-called 2000 Watt society is part of the city constitution – and in this respect, too, housing cooperatives are important partners, because they have always adopted a long-term perspective and are willing to invest more in ecological systems. The exhibition that this catalogue accompanies focuses on the work of a new generation of architects who, thanks in part to architecture competitions, have had the opportunity to design cooperative housing and to explore their creative ability within a very strict and deterministic legal framework. This work has been entitled ‘Import Zurich_Cooperative Housing: New Ways of Inhabiting’. The projects selected succeed in this exercise of furthering spatial research and providing high-quality residential spaces. The result is a very rich palette of proposals produced by architects who use the architecture competition as a tool with which to develop, test out and affirm their own field of research.

Nicola Regusci. Architect, co-founder of CCP. Xavier Bustos. Architect, co-founder of CCP.


Barcelona _Import Zürich Nicola Regusci Xavier Bustos

Das Cities Connection Project (CCP) dient der Herstellung von Beziehungen in architektonischen Themenbereichen zwischen der Stadt Barcelona mit anderen europäischen Großstädten oder Regionen, die eine bedeutende architektonische Tradition besitzen. Ziel ist es, in einem auf Gegenseitigkeit beruhenden Arrangement, Werke zu präsentieren, die die beste Avantgarde-Architektur der jeweiligen Stadt darstellen. Es sollen Bauten hervorgehoben werden, die während der letzten zehn Jahre errichtet und von Architekten entworfen wurden, die jünger als 50 Jahre sind. Ein weiteres Anliegen besteht darin, ein Netzwerk kultureller Verbindungen zwischen Großstädten zu schaffen, um den Wert von zeitgenössischer Architektur und Stadtplanung zu bekräftigen. Jedes der CCP-Projekte beginnt mit einer Ausstellung in Barcelona, die das Werk der eingeladenen Architekten aus der Gaststadt oder Gastregion zeigt. Zu gegebener Zeit folgt dann eine Schau, in der Architekten aus Barcelona ihre Arbeiten in der Partnerstadt bzw. Partnerregion zeigen. Jede neue „connection“ wird im Rahmen eines neuen, zu den Charakteristiken der eingeladenen Stadt oder Region passenden Themas gestaltet. Das Hauptziel dieser Ausstellungen ist es, Synergien zwischen den Institutionen, den Universitäten und vor allem den geladenen Architekten zu schaffen. Nach zwei Durchgängen, in denen Barcelona sich mit dem Tessin und Genf austauschte, wird beim neuesten Projekt eine Beziehung der katalanischen Hauptstadt zu Zürich hergestellt werden. Diese Wahl hängt zum Teil mit dem Impuls zur Expansion zusammen, der momentan von beiden Regionen ausgeht und mittels größerer Projekte die gegenwärtige und zukünftige Stadtentwicklung zu verbessern sucht. Darüber hinaus werden wir bei dieser Auflage des CCP den Schwerpunkt auf Zürichs Tradition genossenschaftlichen Wohnens legen, die eine mehr als hundertjährige Geschichte besitzt. In den letzten fünfzehn Jahren hat in Zürich eine Renaissance des urbanen Lebens stattgefunden. Alle wollen in diese Stadt zurückkehren, die ein reiches und attraktives kulturelles Leben besitzt. Diese Renaissance führt auch zu einer erneuten Aktivität der Wohnbaugenossenschaften. Die hohe Nachfrage und steigende Mieten verstärken die Attraktivität und die Bedeutung der Wohnbaugenossenschaften, die an mehreren größeren Bauprojekten beteiligt sind. Es ist inzwischen allgemein anerkannt, dass die Genossenschaften für die weitere Entwicklung der Stadt wesentlich sind. Sie haben

ökologische Standards eingeführt und sozialkompatible Formen dichterer Bebauung erarbeitet. Ihre groß angelegten Projekte haben eine bedeutende Auswirkung auf die qualitative Entwicklung der Stadtquartiere. Außerdem erkennen die Genossenschaften die Wichtigkeit des Anliegens, im selben Gebäude zu leben und zu arbeiten, und die positiven Effekte, die dies auf eine geselligere Nutzung der Erdgeschossbereiche hat. Die Vision der so genannten 2000-Watt-Gesellschaft ist in der städtischen Verfassung verankert – und auch in diesem Zusammenhang sind Wohnbaugenossenschaften wichtige Partner, weil sie von jeher mit einer Langzeitperspektive gearbeitet haben und bereitwilliger sind, mehr in ökologische Systeme zu investieren. Die Ausstellung, zu der dieser Katalog entstanden ist, fokussiert auf das Werk einer neuen Generation von Architekten, die – zum Teil über Architekturwettbewerbe – die Gelegenheit hatten, genossenschaftliche Wohnungen zu entwerfen und ihre kreative Begabung innerhalb eines sehr strikten und durchgeplanten Rahmenkonzepts auszuloten. Ihr Werk wird unter dem Titel “Import Zurich_Cooperative Housing: New Ways of Inhabiting” präsentiert. In den ausgewählten Projekten setzte man sich erfolgreich mit dem Thema der Raumausnutzung und der Bereitstellung hochwertigen Wohnraums auseinander. Im Ergebnis liegt eine sehr reiche Palette an Entwürfen vor, produziert von Architekten, die den Wettbewerb als ein Mittel nutzen, in dessen Rahmen sie ihr eigenes Forschungsgebiet weiterentwickeln und überprüfen oder sich darin bestätigen lassen können.

Nicola Regusci. Architekt, Mitbegründer von CCP. Xavier Bustos. Architekt, Mitbegründer von CCP.

19


TIMELINE COLLECTIVE HOUSING AND SINGULAR BUILDINGS IN ZURICH 10

2009-2012_SUNNIGE HOF ALBISRIEDEN. ZURICH BURKHALTER-SUMI ARCHITECTS

2009-2014_ZÖLLY TOWER ZURICH WEST M.MEILI,M.PETER ARCHITECTS

2010

P

2007-2013_ “ESCHER TERRACE” 2009-2013_ HOUSING LUEGISLAND. ZURICH MIXED USE BUILDING GALLI-RUDOLF ARCHITECTS ZURICH WEST E2A ARCHITECTS 2004-2007_HOUSING DEVELOPMENT BRUNNENHOFSTRASSE.ZURICH 2003-2006_RESIDENTIAL GIGON-GUYER COMPLEX. WIEDIKON. ZURICH ARCHITECTS P.GMÜR,J.STEIB,M.GESCHWENTNER ARCHITECTS

2005

2002-2012_MOBIMO TOWER. ZURICH WEST R.DIENER-M.DIENER ARCHITECTS

M

2003-2007_MIXED-USE BUILDING WOLFSWINKELN AFFOLTERN. ZURICH EGLI-ROHR ARCHITECTS

N 2004-2011 PRIME TOWER ZURICH WEST GIGON-GUYER ARCHITECTS

1995 1992-1998_ MUSICIAN’S HOUSE ZURICH MIROSLAV SIK ARCHITECT

E

1993-2004_PARK HYATT HOTEL BEETHOVENSTRASSE 21. ZURICH M.MEILI.M.PETER ARCHITECTS

1959_SIEDLUNG WERDWIES ALTSTETTEN. ZURICH A.F.SAUTER, A.DIRLER ARCHITECTS

1957-1958_MIXED USE BUILDING WIEDIKON. ZURICH W.STÜCHELI ARCHITECT

1904-1910_KUNSTHAUS 1914-1929_BERNOULLI-HÄUSER GARDEN CITY HOUSES HEIMPLATZ 1. ZURICH HARDTURM. ZURICH KARL MOSER, ROBERT KURJEL H.BERNOULLI ARCHITECT ARCHITECTS

1916_CABARET VOLTAIRE OPENING AND BIRTH OF ART MOVEMENT “DADA” SPIEGELGASSE 1. ZURICH

A

07 13

2013_TAMEDIA OFFICE BUILDING WERDSTRASSE 21. ZURICH SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS

2005-2010_ “IM VIADUKT” 2006-2008_LETZIGRUND STADIUM REFURBISHMENT VIADUCT ARCHES. BADENERSTRASSE.ZURICH MIXED USE BUILDING.ZURICH WEST BETRIX-CONSOLASCIO EM2N ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTS

08 14 18 19

02

2007-2013_MIXED USE BUILDING EUROPAALLEE. ZURICH CARUSO-STJHON+BOSSHARD-VAQUER ARCHITECTS

2007

2006-2011_ COOPERATIVE HOUSING “KLEE” 2006_ FREITAG STORE AFFOLTERN. ZURICH GEROLDSTRASSE 17, ZURICH KNAPKIEWICS-FICKERT ARCHITECTS SPILLMANN-ECHSLE ARCHITECTS 1996-2004_ZURICH AIRPORT 1995-1997 PLATFORM ROOFS AT 1999-2002_CINEMA + RESIDENTIAL EXPANSION KLOTEN. ZURICH ZURICH MAINSTATION BUILDING RIFF RAFF. ZURICH M.MEILI-M.PETER,KNAPKIEWICZ-FICKERT GRIMSHAW, ITTEN-BRECHBÜHL, M.MEILI-M.PETER ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTS

I

F

01 11

2015

K

04

B

C

2000

1930-1932_ COOPERATIVE HOUSING COMPLEX WERKBUNDSIEDLUNG NEUBÜHL. WOLLISHOFEN.ZURICH M.HAEFELI,C.HUBACHER,R.STEIGER,W.MOSER, P.ARTARIA,E.ROTH,H.SCHMIDT,C.HUBACHER

1936_APARTMENT HOUSES DOLDERTAL. ZURICH M.BREUER, A.ROTH,E.ROTH ARCHITECTS

1955

1944-1945_SIEDLUNG KATZENBACH SEEBACH.ZURICH A.F.SAUTER, A.DIRLER ARCHITECTS

2007-2009_SIEDLUNG KRONWIESEN SCHWAMENDINGEN. ZURICH BEAT-ROTHEN ARCHITECTS

O

L

2007-2013_ EUROPAALEE BAUFELD C. ZURICH M.DUDLER,D.CHIPPERFIELD, GIGON-GUYER ARCHITECTS

2002-2004_ARCHITECT’S AND ARTIST’S HOUSE AFGH-ARCHITECTS

2001-2003_APARTEMENT HOUSE FORSTERSTRASSE. ZURICH CHRISTIAN KEREZ ARCHITECT

H 1980

G

2012-2016_ SWISS NATIONAL MUSEUM EXTENSION MUSEUMSTRASSE 2. ZURICH CHRIST-GANTENBEIN ARCHITECTS

09

1970 _FERROHOUSE 1973-1975_COMMERCIAL BUILDING 1976-1978 _HARDAU BUILDINGS 1959-1964 _HIGH-RISE MODISSA. BAHNHOFSTRASSE.ZURICH BUILDING.ZURICH BUILDING “ZUR PALME” BULLINGERSTRASSE 73. ZURICH W. GANTENBEIN ARCHITECT J.DAHINDEN ARCHITECT BLEICHERWEG 33. ZURICH M.P. KOLLBRUNNER ARCHITECT M.E.HAEFELI,W.MOSER 1930-1933_MUSEUM AND 1939_BAD ALLENMOOS 1939_KONGRESSHAUS ARCHITECTS SCHOOL OF ARTS AND CRAFTS OERLIKON. ZURICH GOTTHARDSTRASSE 5. ZURICH A.STEGER,K.EGENDER M.E.HAEFELI,W.MOSER M.E.HAEFELI,W.MOSER,STEIGER ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTS

1930

1850 DEMOLISHING OF THE CITY WALLS

03 06 16 17 20

15

1995-1997_COOPERATIVE 1996-2001_SCHIFFBAU THEATRE- 1998-2001_HOUSING DEVELOPMENT KRAFTWERK 1 HARDTURMSTRASSE 261. ZURICH HOUSING KARTHAGO 1 CULTURAL CENTER. ZURICH WEST STÜCHELI+ BÜNZLI-COURVOISIER ARCHITECTS ZENTRALSTRASSE 150. ZURICH ORTNER-ORTNER A.SPIRO,S.GANTENBEIN ARCHITECTS ARCHITECTS 1971-1972_SIEDLUNG IRCHEL 1974-1976_ATELIER-HOUSE 1969_TRIGON VILLAGE HOUSING 13 OBERSTRASS. ZURICH TRIGONDORF. ZURICH ZURICH A.WASSERFALLEN ARCHITECT J.DAHINDEN ARCHITECT E.GISEL ARCHITECT

1965

1963-1967 _HEIDI-WEBER HOUSE.EXHIBITION PAVILION LE CORBUSIER

05 12

2008-2020_ KUNSTHAUS EXTENSION HEIMPLATZ. ZÜRICH DAVID CHIPPERFIELD ARCHITECTS

1983-1990_ EXPANSION STADELHOFEN RAILWAY STATION S.CALATRAVA ARCHITECT

1953-1955_OFFICE BUILDING HAUS ZUR BASTEI BÄRENGASSE 39.ZURICH W.STÜCHELI ARCHITECT

D

1953-1955_HOUSING HEILIGFELD LETZIGRABEN. ZURICH A.H.STEINER ARCHITECT


_IMPORT ZURICH PROJECTS: 01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

ZHR_ ZURICH AIRPORT

Clusterhaus, Hunziker Areal. ZÜRICH-OERLIKON Hunziker Areal Haus I. ZÜRICH-OERLIKON Kalkbreite. ZÜRICH WOHNÜBERBAUUNG Stähelimatt. ZÜRICH-SEEBACH Wohnüberbauung Illnau. Illnau SUR, Wohnüberbauung Rautistrasse. ZÜRICH-ALTSTETTEN SIEDLUNG HAUSÄCKER. ZÜRICH-ALTSTETTEN Grunderhuus. Wangen-Brüttisellen Wohnsiedlung Werdwies. Zürich-Altstetten A-Park. Zürich-Albisrieden Zwicky Süd. DÜBENDORF, ZÜRICH Wohnüberbauung Katzenbach. ZÜRICH-SEEBACH Badenerstrasse 380. ZÜRICH Wohnsiedlung Grünmatt FGZ. ZÜRICH Wohnhaus Avellana. ZÜRICH-SCHWAMENDINGEN DOLLIKERSTRASSE. MEILEN SENIOR APARTMENTS ETZEL. STÄFA aspholz SÜD. ZÜRICH-AFFOLTERN WOHNHOCHHAUS. HIRZENBACH ZÜRICH Toni-Areal. ZÜRICH-WEST

04 18

SEEBACH

AFFOLTERN

12

01 02 ETH ARCHITECTURE DEPART-

BAD ALLENMOOS

OERLIKON

15

19 11

N 09

ALBISRIEDEN

20 PRIME ZURICH TOWER WEST

ALTSTETTEN LETZIGRUND ARENA

06

P

05

A I

07

08

O

D

K

H 13

FORMER ARTS & CRAFTS MUSEUM ETH ZENTRUM

ZURICH ZOO

HAUPTBAHNHOF

10

03

RATHAUS

E M

L

KUNSTHAUS

C

21

F

ZURICH KONGRESS HAUS

WIEDIKON

14 G HEIDI WEBER PAVILION CENTRE LE CORBUSIER

NEUBHÜL

B

17 16


works


23


Clusterhaus, Hunziker Areal. ZÜRICH-OERLIKON

CLUSTER HOUSE, HUNZINKER AREA. ZURICH-OERLIKON. Duplex Architekten AG www.duplex-architekten.ch Architects: Typology:

Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

Duplex Architekten Cluster apartments, shops, restaurants, workshops and artist’s studios, day care centres and guesthouses Hunzikerareal, Zurich Baugenossenschaft Mehr als Wohnen (Cooperative Housing) 77’500 m2 (total area for 13 buildings A – M) Approx. 3800 EUR/ m2 net floor area 2009 – 2015 Johannes Marburg (JM), Walter Mair (WM)

Landscape architects: Building technology: Engineering: Builder:

Müller Illien Landschaftsarchitekten Müller Buchner, IBG Edy Toscano AG, Ernst Basler Partner Anliker AG

Location: Client: Area:

24

holzstrasse

Hagen

Genossenschaftsstrasse

gweg Dialo

Location N

0

50

100m

Hunziker Areal, Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen Situation Erdgeschoss (Variante 2, farbig und grauer Hintergrund) Städtebau: ARGE DUPLEX architekten, Zürich und FUTURAFROSCH Landschaft: Müller Illien Landschaftsarchitekten

A total of 450 apartments, shops, restaurants, workshops and artist’s studios, day care centres and guesthouses are currently developed for the Hunziker Area in Zurich. We don’t want to develop an estate, our vision is a piece of a city! Where squares, alleys and green areas determine the quality of the public space, urban density is required. Instead of the usual large-scale forms of rows and blocks, the urban planning concept proposes a cluster of smaller detached buildings, their close arrangement forming a system of routes, squares and open spaces with a marked urban character. The tension-filled sequence of the outdoor spaces as well as the public-oriented use of ground floor areas livens up the quarter. Besides the ample provision of a wide variety of common areas, the quarter also requires individual places of retreat. The special characteristic of this project lies exactly between these opposite priorities: security and privacy on the one hand, and varied opportunities to engage in activities of the community on the other. The cluster apartments of House A are some kind of modern flat-sharing community with a generous common area (living/dining) and sleeping areas each with a separate bathroom. Smaller, private apartment satellites are coupled to larger common areas. Since the kitchens and living rooms need not be fully laid out for each private unit, less space is required. As a result, shared kitchens and joint living rooms can be planned more generously. The retreat to one’s private sphere is nonetheless possible at all times because each private room also includes an individual bathrooms and a small kitchenette.

Für das Zürcher Hunzikerareal werden insgesamt 450 Wohnungen, Läden, Restaurants, Arbeits- und Künstlerateliers, Kinderkrippen und eine Gästepension entwickelt. Keine Siedlung, sondern ein Stück Stadt ist unsere Vision! Wo Plätze, Gassen und Grünflächen die Qualitäten des öffentlichen Raums bestimmen, braucht es städtische Dichte. An Stelle der gewohnten Grossformen in Zeilen oder Blocks sieht das städtebauliche Konzept einen Cluster von kleineren Solitären vor, die eng aneinander ein System von Wegen, Plätzen und Freiräumen mit stark städtischem Charakter ausbilden. Eine spannungsreiche Sequenz der Aussenräume sowie publikumsorientierte Nutzungen im Erdgeschoss beleben das Quartier. Neben dem reichen Angebot an gemeinschaftlich genutzten Räumen werden aber auch individuelle Rückzugsräume benötigt. Die Spezialität dieses Projekts liegt genau in diesem Spannungsfeld: Geborgenheit und Privatsphäre auf der einen Seite und dem vielfältigen Angebot, an der Gemeinschaft teilzunehmen, auf der anderen Seite. In der Dialogphase, die auf den städtebaulichen Wettbewerb folgte, wurden die Projekte von den beteiligten Architekturbüros (Duplex, Futurafrosch, Müller Sigrist, pool, Miroslav Sik) entsprechend dem vereinbarten Regelwerk überarbeitet. Auf dem Hunziker-Areal entsteht so eine Vielfalt an Wohnformen und Grundrissen, die auf unterschiedliche Art und Weise den Anforderungen an ein genossenschaftliches Miteinander gerecht werden. Die Clusterwohnungen von Haus A sind eine Art moderne Wohngemeinschaften mit einem grosszügigen Gemeinschaftsbereich (Wohnen/ Essen) und Schlafbereichen mit eigenem Bad. Kleinere, private Wohnungs-Satelliten werden an grössere Gemeinschaftsflächen gekoppelt. Dadurch, dass Küchen und Wohnzimmer nicht für jede Privateinheit einzeln voll ausgeformt werden müssen, wird weniger Platz gebraucht. In der Folge können Gemeinschaftsküchen und gemeinsame Wohnzimmer aber auch grosszügig gestaltet werden. Der Rückzug ins Private ist trotzdem immer möglich, zu den privaten Zimmern gehört auch jeweils ein eigenes Bad und eine kleine Kochnische.


01 25

JM

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + WORKSHOPS + COMERCIAL AND DAYCARE PREMISES


10m 5

Hunziker Areal, Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen Grundriss Regelgeschoss möbliert, Haus A, Dialogweg 6 Duplex Architekten, Zürich

0

N

Typical Floor Plan

East Elevation

0

5

10m

Hunziker Areal, Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen Ansicht Ost, Dialogweg 6 DUPLEX Architekten, Zürich

26

5

10m

0

0

N

Ground Level

Hunziker Areal, Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen Grundriss Erdgeschoss möbliert, Haus A, Dialogweg 6 Duplex Architekten, Zürich

5

10m

North Elevation

0

5

10m

Hunziker Areal, Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen Ansicht Nord, Dialogweg 6 DUPLEX Architekten, Zürich

Longitudinal Section

0

5

10m


JM

WM

27

JM

WM


Hunziker Areal Haus I. ZÜRICH-OERLIKON.

Hunziker Areal house I. ZURICH-OERLIKON. Futurafrosch GmbH www.futurafrosch.org Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area (GF): Cost: Construction date: Photos by: Project manager: Assistance:

Futurafrosch GmbH, Sabine Frei & Kornelia Gysel Collective housing Dialogweg 2, 8050 Zürich, Schweiz Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen 5’130 m2 12.3 Mio EUR 2012 - 2015 Karin Gauch (KG), Fabien Schwartz (FS) Sonja Grigo Lenita Weber, Pilar Cruz, Sara Müller, Nicola Nett, Kornelia Gysel, Sabine Frei.

Building contractor: Landscape Architect:

28

Steiner AG, Zürich Müller Illien Landschaftsarchitekten GmbH, Zürich. Concept timber construction: Hermann Blumer dipl. ing. ETH/SIA, Waldstatt Fire safety in timber construction: Makiol & Wiederkehr, Beinwil am See Construction physics: Mühlebach Partner AG,Wiesendangen Structural consultant: Edy Toscano AG, Zürich Heating, ventilation, air conditioning: 3-Plan Haustechnik AG, Kreuzlingen Solid construction: Anliker AG, Emmenbrücke Timberwork: Sohm AG, Widnau

0 5 10

20

30

Situationsplan_1:1000_A3

40

Location

Context Haus I is situated on the Hunziker complex in ZurichLeutschenbach as one of a total of 13 buildings which are surrounded by various green areas and open spaces. The urban setting was designed as a complex entity with built structure and public spaces acting as direct counterparts. The progressive urban development and ecological project created by the cooperative building association “More Than Living” (Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen) promotes contemporary and sustainable forms of living and working. Programme The urban setting determines the volumes, form of expression, structure and use of the buildings. In Haus I, the residential category of a family apartment is implemented in a variety of ways. Apartments of different sizes and for different phases of life can be created. Cluster apartments for various shared residential groupings provide a bridge to classical two or three bedroom apartment types. They are supplemented by studios and rooms which can be temporarily rented as additional space. Structure The structure of Haus I is conceptually related to the urban development concept. Starting with the cluster offering the smallest private units, designed as individually configurable spaces and small areas for privacy. The load-bearing external walls of each cluster enable the interior space to be freely sub-divided into two to three bedrooms with or without a small kitchen and wet room. Between them are rooms with a more public character which offer space for communal living. The interior rooms are characterised by the largely bare-faced load-bearing structure. Whereas the mineral surfaces in the communal areas underline the urban character, the visible solid wood wall surfaces of the clusters underline the introverted character of these areas and the individual atmosphere of the more private rooms. This creates a flexible system of private units and communal areas which can be combined to form a variety of apartment sizes and can be adapted within the renewal process of the buildings life cycle.

Kontext Das Haus I ist auf dem Hunziker Areal in ZürichLeutschenbach eines von insgesamt 13 Häusern, umgeben von vielfältigen Grün- und Freiflächen. Das städtebaulich und ökologisch wegweisende Projekt der Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen fördert zeitgemässe, nachhaltige Lebens- und Arbeitsformen. Programm Die Gebäudevolumen im Projekt mehr als wohnen wurden entwickelt als direktes Gegenstück zum detailliert definierten öffentlichen Raum. Die städtebauliche Lage wird damit unmittelbar prägend sowohl für die Volumetrie und den Ausdruck, als auch für die Gebäudestruktur jedes einzelnen Hauses. Im Haus I ist der Typus der Familienwohnung vielfältig umgesetzt. Wohnungen unterschiedlicher Grössen und für verschiedene Lebensphasen sind realisierbar. Clusterwohnungen für Wohngemeinschaften verschiedenster Art schlagen die Brücke zu klassischen Wohnungstypen mit 3.5 und 4.5 Zimmern und werden ergänzt durch Studios und temporär zumietbare Zimmer. Struktur Die Struktur von Haus I ist konzeptionell mit dem städtebaulichen Ansatz verwandt. Die Ausgangslage bildet die private Minimaleinheit, welche als individuell bespielbare Fläche und kleinräumiger Rückzugsort ausformuliert ist. Dank tragenden ClusterAussenwänden, ist im Innern eine freie Einteilung von zwei bis drei Schlafzimmern mit oder ohne Teeküche und Nasszelle möglich. Dazwischen spannen sich Räume mit öffentlicherem Charakter auf, die Raum bieten für gemeinschaftliches Wohnen. Der Charakter der Innenräume wird durch die weitgehend roh belassene Tragstruktur definiert. Während die mineralischen Flächen im Gemeinschaftsbereich den urbanen Ausdruck unterstreichen, stärken die sichtbaren Oberflächen der in massivem Holz erstellten Cluster den introvertierten Charakter und die individuelle Atmosphäre der privateren Räume. Damit entsteht ein flexibles System von Privateinheiten und gemeinschaftlichen Bereichen, welche sich zu verschiedensten Wohnungsgrössen kombinieren und im Erneuerungsprozess des Gebäudes auch wieder anpassen lassen.


02 29

PROGRESSIVE COLLECTIVE HOUSING


A

A’ 0

Ground Floor

5

10m

Haus I, Hunziker Areal, Dialogweg 2 Grundriss Erdgeschoss 30 1:300

0

5

10m

Haus I, Hunziker Areal, Dialogweg 2

0

5

10m

Second floor

Haus I, Hunziker Areal, Dialogweg 2 Grundriss 1. Obergeschoss 1:300

Haus I, Hunziker Areal, Dialogweg 2 Grundriss 2. Obergeschoss 1:300

0

0

5

10m

Architektur: Futurafrosch GmbH Auftraggeber: Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen

Architektur: Futurafrosch GmbH Auftraggeber: Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen

West Elevation

First Floor

East Elevation

Haus I, Hunziker Areal, Dialogweg 2

5

10m

Architektur: Futurafrosch GmbH Auftraggeber: Baugenossenschaft mehr als wohnen

Transversal Section A-A’

Haus I, Hunziker Areal, Dialogweg 2


31


Kalkbreite. ZÜRICH.

Kalkbreite. ZURICH.

Müller Sigrist Architekten AG www.muellersigrist.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client:

Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

Collaborators:

32

Müller Sigrist Architekten AG Residential and commercial development. 8003 Zürich Genossenschaft Kalkbreite (Wohn- und Gewerbebau) Stadt Zürich (Tramhalle) NA Wohn-und Gewerbebau: CHF 63.5 Mio. Tramhalle: CHF 11.5 Mio 2012 -2014 Joel Tettamanti (JT), Lausanne Michael Egloff (ME), Zürich Martin Stollenwerk (MS), Zürich Pascal Müller, Grit Jugel, Johannes Maier (PL), Lea Berger, Gisella Chacon, Sabine Scheler, Niederrickenbach (Farbgestaltung) Dr. Lüchinger und Meyer, Zürich B&P Baurealisation, Zürich

Engineering: Builder:

Location

The residential and commercial complex with integrated tram depot stands at a prominent point marking the boundary between two city districts. It combines residential, service and commercial uses in an identitylending, large but compact form.

Die Wohn- und Gewerbesiedlung mit integrierter Tramhalle steht an städtebaulich prägnanter Stelle zwischen zwei Quartieren. Sie vereint die Nutzungen Wohnen, Dienstleistung und Gewerbe in einer identitätsbildenden, kompakten Grossform.

A cascade of access points links indoors and outdoors, walkable roofs and a courtyard above the tram depot. The building complex contains 88 flats, »joker spaces« that can be added on, various communal areas as well as cultural, catering, retail and service premises for 256 residents and providing 200 jobs. Kalkbreite hence offers new and flexible forms of living and working, serving as a model for cooperative living in the city.

Eine Erschliessungskaskade verbindet Innen und Aussen, begehbare Dächer und den Hof über der Tramhalle. Der Gebäudekomplex beinhaltet 88 Wohnungen, zumietbare Jokerräume, diverse Gemeinschaftsflächen sowie Kultur-, Gastronomie-, Detailhandel und Dienstleistungsräume für 256 Bewohner und 200 Arbeitsplätze. Die Kalkbreite bietet neue, flexible Wohnformen und hat Vorbildcharakter für das genossenschaftliche Wohnen in der Stadt.

The complex was built according to the energy and ecology targets of the 2000-watt society and meets the Minergie-P-Eco standard. The seven-storey building is a hybrid construction with a façade of prefabricated wood elements. The plaster walls of the polygonal perimeter block development dazzle in colours ranging from orange to turquoise.

Die Siedlung wurde bezüglich Energie und Ökologie nach den Zielen der 2000 Watt-Gesellschaft erstellt und erfüllt den Minergie-P-Eco Standard. Das siebengeschossige Gebäude wurde in hybrider Bauweise mit einer Fassade aus vorfabrizierten Holzelementen realisiert. Der Putz der vieleckigen Blockrandüberbauung schillert in einem Farbspektrum von Orange bis Türkis.


03 33

JT

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + COMERCIAL AND SERVICE PREMISES + TRANSPORT INFRASTRUCTURE


Roof Level

10

0

Cross Section. Tram Hall

20m

QUERSCHNITT TRAMHA

GRUNDRISS DACHAUFSICHT 1:400

0

5

10

20

MÜLLER SIGRIST ARCHITEKTEN AG HILDASTRASSE 14a CH-8004 ZÜRICH TEL 044 201 91 09 FAX 044 201 91 08

M A I L I N F O @ M U E L L E R S I G R I S T.C H

Fourth Level

0

5

10

20

MÜLLER SIGRIST ARCHITEKTEN AG HILDASTRASSE 14a CH-8004 ZÜRICH TEL 044 201 91 09 FAX 044 201 91 08

MAIL INF

GRUNDRISS 4. OBERGESCHOSS 1:400

0

5

10

20

Second Level

South-East Elevation

MÜLLER SIGRIST ARCHITEKTEN AG HILDASTRASSE 14a CH-8004 ZÜRICH TEL 044 201 91 09 FAX 044 201 91 08

M A I L I N F O @ M U E L L E R S I G R I S T.C H

ANSICHT KALKBREITESTRASSE

1:400

ANSICHT ROSENGARTEN

South Elevation ANSICHT KALKBREITESTRASSE

1:400

34

Bade

1:400

nerst

rasse Rose ngar ten

elw Urs eg

reite

lkb

Ka

0

5

10

20

0

MÜLLER SIGRIST ARCHITEKTEN AG HILDASTRASSE 14a CH-8004 ZÜRICH TEL 044 201 91 09 FAX 044 201 91 08

5

10

20

M A I L I N F O @ M U E L L E R S I G R I S T.C H

North-East Elevation GRUNDRISS 2. OBERGESCHOSS 1:400

0

5

10

20

MÜLLER SIGRIST ARCHITEKTEN AG HILDASTRASSE 14a CH-8004 ZÜRICH TEL 044 201 91 09 FAX 044 201 91 08

ANSICHT BADENERSTRASSE 1:400

M A I L I N F O @ M U E L L E R S I G R I S T.C H

ANSIC

Ground Level 0

10

20m 0

5

10

20

MÜLLER SIGRIST ARCHITEKTEN AG HILDASTRASSE 14a CH-8004 ZÜRICH TEL 044 201 91

5

10

20

0

West Elevation

GRUNDRISS ERDGESCHOSS 1:400

0

MÜLLER SIGRIST ARCHITEKTEN AG HILDASTRASSE 14a CH-8004 ZÜRICH TEL 044 201 91 09 FAX 044 201 91 08

M A I L I N F O @ M U E L L E R S I G R I S T.C H

ANSICHT URSELWEG 1:400

10

20m


ME RG

35 MS

MS

MS

MS

MS


WOHNÜBERBAUUNG Stähelimatt ZÜRICH-SEEBACH.

Stähelimatt Housing Development. ZURICH-SEEBACH. Esch Sintzel Architekten SIA BSA www.eschsintzel.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client:

The location on the periphery of Zurich is characterised by a dramatic change in scale. While the settled area itself consists of a conglomerate of small spaces of the buildings, gardens, streets and squares, the city here leads, without transition, directly into the open landscape. The two long building volumes derive their scale from the nearby landscape space, for instance through their layout parallel to the striking woodland edge or through the staggering of the building height, which seems to anticipate the rising terrain. By accommodating all the dwelling units in just two buildings and through the east-west orientation a lot of space is left which allows the landscape to flow in between the buildings. Complementary to this movement the volumes gradually become higher and more dense towards the rear. The way the volumes are developed reflects the changes in typology: the heavy northern ends of the buildings accommodate special apartments whose corner location can be experienced in the interior.

Esch Sintzel Architekten SIA BSA Wohnsiedlung Stähelimatt Zürich-Seebach Baugenossenschaften Linth-Escher und Schönau, Zürich 8422 m2 24,8 Mio CHF Wettbewerb 2003 Ausführung 2006-2007 Hannes Henz (HH), Walter Mair (WM)

Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by: Collaborators:

Engineering: Landscape architect:

Situation Massstab 1:2500

36

Andrea Ringli, Pia Schwyter-Lanter, Manuel Joss, Stefanie Frömmcke, Claudia Mühlebach, Britta Küest, Regula Arpagaus, Wettbewerb Regula Zwicky Ernst Basler + Partner AG Hager Landschaftsarchitekten

The flexibility of an apartment floor plan can be measured by the degree of diversity that it allows within the fixed walls. The generosity of the communal living spaces, the nuancing of the individual spaces as well as zones that are deliberately “blurred” allow the same apartment to meet both the traditional middle-class resident’s requirements of his home as well as those of his neighbour, who teleworks from at home, has a patchwork family whose members do not always live there and the support of an au-pair. A few “additional” doors expand the way in which each room can be read and the possibilities of allocating it to the communal or private, daytime or nighttime areas. Continuous bands of sheet aluminium articulate the facades. The artist Jürg Stäuble has inscribed a perforated image in these bands which is based on overlaying two waves that spread orthogonally across the façades.

Location

Die Lage an der Peripherie Zürichs wird von einem markanten Massstabsprung geprägt. Während das eigentliche Siedlungsgebiet aus einem Konglomerat von Kleinräumen mit Gebäuden, Gärten, Strassen und Plätzen besteht, geht die Stadt unvermittelt in offene Landschaft über. Die beiden langen Baukörper orientieren sich am Massstab des nahen Landschaftsraums, so etwa in der parallelen Ausrichtung zur prägnanten Waldkante oder in der Höhenstaffelung, die das ansteigende Relief vorwegzunehmen scheint. Die Bündelung der Wohneinheiten in bloss zwei Baukörper und deren Ost-West-Orientierung lässt viel Platz, so dass der Landschaftsraum bis hinein zwischen die Häuser fliessen kann. Komplementär zu dieser Bewegung werden die Volumen nach hinten allmählich höher und dichter. Der volumetrischen Entwicklung entspricht die typologische: Die schweren Köpfe am Nordende nehmen besondere Wohnungen auf, welche die Übereck-Lage innenräumlich erfahrbar machen. Ausserdem werden die Lifte - ohnehin nötig infolge des zusätzlichen Stockwerks – für möglichst viele behindertengängige Wohnungen zugänglich. Wie flexibel ein Wohnungsgrundriss ist ermisst sich daran, wie vielfältig sich innerhalb der festen Wände leben lässt. Die Grosszügigkeit der Gemeinschaftsräume, die Nuancierung der Individualräume sowie Zonen bewusster „Unschärfe“ erlauben, dass dieselbe Wohnung den Vorstellungen des gutbürgerlichen Bewohners vom trauten Heim ebenso entspricht wie denjenigen seines Nachbarn, tele-heimarbeitend, mit unregelmässig anwesender Patchwork-Familie und Aupair-Unterstützung. Wenige „zusätzliche“ Türen erweitern die Lesarten jedes Zimmers, seine Zuordnung zum gemeinschaftlichen oder privaten, zum Tages- oder Nachtbereich. Umlaufende Bänder aus Aluminiumblech gliedern die Fassade. Der Künstler Jürg Stäuble hat diesen Bändern ein Lochbild eingeschrieben, das auf der Überlagerung zweier Wellen beruht, die sich orthogonal über die Fassade ausbreiten.


04 37

HH

COLLECTIVE HOUSING


S端dfassade Haus B

S端dfassade Haus B

South Elevation. House B

5m 2m 0m

Dachgeschoss Massstab 1:200

Westfassade

Third Floor

Ostfassade

Nordfassade

0m

2m

5m

NordfassadeFassaden Massstab 1:500

0m

2m

0

North Elevation

20m

10

5m

18

Fassaden Massstab 1:500

5m 2m 0m

2. Obergeschoss Massstab 1:200

Westfassade

38 Second Floor

Ostfassade

0m

2m

5m 2m 0m

5m

East Elevation

1. Obergeschoss Massstab 1:200

Fassaden Massstab 1:500

Westfassade

Ground Level

0

10

20m

West Elevation

0

10

20m


WM

39 WM

WM

HH

WM


Wohnüberbauung Illnau. Illnau.

Residential Development Illnau. Illnau. Guignard & Saner Architekten www.guinardsaner.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

Guignard & Saner Architekten Collective Housing Illnau Canton Zürich Pensionskasse Sada / Genossenschaft Werdmühle 18116 m2 32’000’000 CHF | 29’345’458 EUR 2007-2010 Roman Keller

Landscape architecture: Engineering:

Berchtold + Lenzin , Zürich Synaxis AG, Zürich

English translation:

Benjamin Liebelt

40

The development site neighbouring the village centre is characterised by the route of the Chämt and the parallel landscape of varying hills. Usterstrasse crosses the valley floor and combines with the small-scale buildings to form the village centre. In urban planning terms, the proposed buildings follow the route of landscape. The two business buildings complement the village structure and frame Schmittenstrasse. The exterior space’s simplicity is intended to recall the former agricultural use of the areas and maintain the village character. The mead with scattered individual trees continues to advance up to the village’s core. The five-storey commercial building serves as a mediator between the upper levels of the station and the village. Along that line, steps lead to the railway tracks. It is part of a new pedestrian route leading from the village centre along a broad walkway through the new elongated building to the station. The long residential building that hugs the line of the terrain has a ribbonlike zone in front of it to the west, which extends out into a square in the entrance area. The building is accessed from there, creating a lively location for gathering and recreation.

Das an den Ortskern angrenzende Baugebiet wird durch den Verlauf der Chämt mit den beidseits parallel verlaufenden, landschaftlich abwechslungsreichen Hügelzügen geprägt. Die Längsrichtung des Baugebiets erhält durch die Wiesenböschung zum Bahnhof hinauf eine zusätzliche Betonung. Die Usterstrasse durchquert die Talsohle und bildet mit den angrenzenden kleinmassstäblichen Gebäuden den Dorfkern. Städtebaulich folgen die vorgeschlagenen Baukörper der landschaftlichen Richtung. Die beiden Gewerbehäuser ergänzen die Dorfstruktur und fassen die Schmittenstrasse. Der Aussenraum soll in seiner Einfachheit an die ehemals landwirtschaftlich genutzten Flächen erinnern und den dörflichen Charakter beibehalten. Der Wiesengrund mit den gestreuten Einzelbäumen stösst weiterhin bis an die Kernzone. Als landschaftlich wertvolles Element wird die Böschung mit ihren Rampenwegen und Heckenkörpern erhalten. Sie findet ihr Ende nun am Baukörper des neuen Gewerbehauses nahe den Bahngeleisen. Dieses fünfgeschossige Gebäude dient als Vermittler zwischen der oberen Ebene des Bahnhofs und dem Dorf. Diesem entlang führt eine Treppe zu den Geleisen. Sie endet im Bereich einer Aufenthaltszone mit attraktiver Aussicht auf das Dorfzentrum und die nahe Landschaft. Dem langen, sich in den Terrainverlauf anschmiegenden Wohnhaus wird westlich eine bandartige Zone vorgelagert, die sich im Bereich des Durchgangs platzartig ausweitet. Von hier aus wird das Gebäude erschlossen, sodass ein lebendiger Ort für Begegnung und Spiel entsteht.

Location


05 41

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + COMERCIAL PREMISES


rstr a

e

ne ko reti Eff

25

25

20 10 0

5

Second Level

5

10m

Cross Section

4

10

0

20m

5

25 West Elevation

50m

5 0

0

42

0

e

rass

nsst

Statio

WohnĂźberbauung Station lllnau, Grundrisse EG

5 0

Ground Level

2

50m

e ss tra rs te Us

50m sse

ďż˝

ass e Eff reti ko ne rstr

e

ss

tra

es

itt

hm

Sc

ss

tra

ns

pfe

Gu

e

ss

tra

es

itt

hm

Sc

0

10

20m

5

10m


43


SUR, Wohnüberbauung Rautistrasse. ZÜRICH-ALTSTETTEN.

SUR, Public Housing Complex. ZURICH-ALTSTETTEN UNDEND ARCHITEKTUR AG www.undend.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area (GF): Cost: Construction date: Photos by: Construction Supervisor:

Engineering: Builder:

“Sur“ is the winning project in a public housing competition by the City of Zurich.

UNDEND Architektur AG Public Housing complex Wohnüberbauung + Kinderhort Zürich Altstetten City of Zurich 11,582 m2 53,7 Mio CHF | 48,000,000 EUR 2012 - 2014 Roland Tännler

The building lot in Zurich-Altstetten at the foot of the Üetliberg is situated in a heterogeneously scaled part of the city. Seven buildings with 105 apartments in total occupy the parcel in such a way that the former garden landscape, consisting of existing meadows and trees, will be preserved. The housing regulations have been utilized to optimize the quality of the urban setting in regards to free space and visual permeability as opposed to maximizing the degree of exploitation.

Emch und Berger AG Gesamtplanung Hochbau, Zürich Spiegel + Partner AG, Zürich Emch+Berger AG Ingenieure und Planer, Zürich Anliker AG, Thalwil

The seven-storey buildings are organized in layers of two flats per floor and provide an orientation of all apartments towards three sides, thus offering a wide range of changing light-atmospheres in the course of a day and diverse views over the city of Zurich.

44

N

W

O

S 0

Location

5

10

20

Das Projekt Sur ist im Jahr 2005 als Sieger aus einem öffentlichen Wettbewerb für Wohnungsbau der Stadt Zürich hervorgegangen. Das Grundstück in Zürich-Altstetten liegt am Fusse des Üetlibergs an nördlicher Hanglage in einem massstäblich durchmischten Quartier. Die sieben Gebäude, auf welche die 105 Wohnungen gleichmässig verteilt sind, werden auf dem Grundstück so gesetzt, dass eine möglichst grosszügige Gartenlandschaft mit bestehenden Baumgruppen dem Quartier erhalten bleibt. Das baurechtliche Mittel der Areal-Überbauung wird hier nicht zur Steigerung der Ausnützung herangezogen, sondern für die Optimierung der städtebaulichen Qualität bezüglich Freiraum und Durchsicht eingesetzt. Die siebengeschossigen Gebäude sind 2-bündig organisiert und geben allen Wohnungen eine dreiseitige Orientierung im Spannungsfeld zwischen Sonneneinstrahlung und Aussicht. Dass die Gebäude damit keine ausgeprägten Vorder- und Rückseiten bzw. Wohn- und Schlafzimmer-Seiten besitzen manifestiert sich in der städtebaulichen Setzung der Gebäude zueinander und zum Quartier.


06 45

MOMODATA

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + PUBLIC NATURAL SPACE


top level, house 1, 4, 5, 6 3½-room apartement 92 m²

Section (S-N)

house 7

house 6

Trockenputz

5½-room apartement 121 m²

0

5

10m

Top Level 1. - 3. level, house 4, 5, 6 / 4. - 6. level, house 2, 3, 7 4½-room apartement 106 m²

4½-room apartement 106 m²

Section / Elevation (E-W) Longitudinal Section

6

10

0

20m

7 5

Schnitt D

4 3

3 Section / Elevationhouse (E-W)

0

46

0

5

5

Upper Level

house 7

house 4

house 7

2

1

10m

house 3

10m

house 4

groundlevel, house 1 & 2 5½-room apartement 120 m²

atelier 20 m²

0

5

25

50m

Schnitt TG

6

0

5

25

7

50m

5

4 3

2

Schnitt TG 1 6

7 5

0

5

Ground Level

10m

0

5

10m

East - West Elevation

0

40m

20 4 3

2

1


47


SIEDLUNG HAUSÄCKER. ZÜRICH-ALTSTETTEN.

SIEDLUNG HAUSÄCKER. ZÜRICH-ALTSTETTEN. HLS ARCHITEKTEN www.hlsarchitekten.ch Architects:

Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost : Construction date: Photos by:

Matthias Hauenstein, Andreas La Roche, Daniel Schedler Collective Housing Zürich Baugenossenschaft Graphika 7’703 m2 28.2 Mio CHF 2007-2010 Hannes Henz

Collaborator: Engineering: Builder:

Christoph Hefti Thomas Boyle Armin Streuli & Partner

48

Location

The replacement building for an existing housing development is taking on the surrounding heterogeneous urban condition and resumes it. The position and form of building volumes determines flowing exterior spaces and reacts to building permit regulations.

Städtebaulich wird die ortstypische heterogene Bebauungsweise aufgenommen und fortgeführt. Durch Stellung und Formgebung der Gebäude ergeben sich fliessende Aussenräume und können baurechtliche Abstände minimiert werden.

The exterior space evolves a differentiated sensation through alternation of narrowing and opening up in the space continuum, creating two open public spaces, which can be differentiated in use, while connecting the new complex to the surrounding buildings. Pedestrian and inhabitants enjoy diversified views through the complex itself and the surrounding neighborhood.

Die sich verengende und weitende Bewegung des Aussenraumes erzeugt Spannung und Abwechslung. Zwei Platzräume entstehen, die thematisch verschieden genutzt werden können und die bestehenden Gebäude in die Anlage einbinden. Dem Fussgänger und Bewohner eröffnen sich vielfälltige Sichtachsen und Ausblicke durch die Siedlung hindurch in das Quartier hinaus.

The exterior space concept is continued into the layout of individual apartments. Bed-, bathrooms and staircases form “packages”, bracketing the open flowing space consisting of entrée, kitchen, living space and balcony. This typology shown for every unit is differentiated into a variety of different layouts as a result of buildings kinked geometry.

Das Aussenraumkonzept wird auf den Grundriss, respektive den Wohnraum übertragen. Schlafräume, Nasszellen und Treppenhäuser bilden Zimmerpakete, die einen fliessenden Raum fassen, bestehend aus Entree, Küche, Wohnraum und Balkon. Diese Typologie zeigt sich in allen Wohnungsgrundrissen. Durch die Gebäudegeometrien ergibt sich eine Vielzahl unterschiedlicher Wohnungen.


07 49

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + PUBLIC SPACE


63 102

120

86

103 108 103 107

57

50

108

80 81

106 104

Floor Plans

0

5

10m


51


Grunderhuus. Wangen-Brüttisellen.

Grunderhuus. Wangen-Brüttisellen.

Michael Meier und Marius Hug Architekten www.meierhug.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost : Construction date: Photos by:

Michael Meier und Marius Hug Architekten AG Apartments for elderly people Wangen-Brüttisellen Baugenossenschaft AZUR 2430 M2 15 Mio. CHF 2012 - 2014 Roman Keller

Engineering: Builder:

Henauer Gugler AG Lerch AG

The village center of Wangen is an exception in the settlement area of Glatttal, which is dominated by infrastructural buildings. The rural atmosphere of the historic village and the wide meadows and fruit trees in the west are the characterising qualities of the site. East of the plot there is a garden village from the 1960’s. With its generous green outdoor spaces it is a typical urbanistic structure of its time. Along with a wide range of different services the residence for elderly provides a common room. In combination with the outdoor space the common room forms the key significance of the structure both for the residents and the community. The volume is arranged as an angled, four-storey building along Brüttisellenstrasse. On the one hand it strengthens the urban space at the crossing of Brütisellen- and Dübendorfstrasse and on the other hand it creates an outdoor space between the building and Dübendorfstrasse that develops deep into the plot. This collective space forms the heart of the residential community promoting the community spirit. It also holds the main access to the building.

52

Through the sequencing of the elevation and the set back attic floor the building fits in well with the scale of its environment. The wooden paneling is reminiscent of the old barns in the surrounding and it embeds the building in the agricultural context, whereas the treatment and the joining of the panels lend the building an appropriate architectural expression for its use. Location

Der intakte Dorfkern Wangens ist eine Besonderheit im Siedlungsraum des Glatttals, der meist durch Bauten der Infrastruktur geprägt wird. Die ländliche Atmosphäre des historischen Siedlungskerns und die westlich angrenzenden Wiesenflächen mit Obstbäumen bestimmen die landschaftlichen Qualitäten des Grundstücks. Die östlich angrenzende Gartensiedlung ist eine zeittypische Siedlungsstruktur der 60er Jahre, die durch grosszügig durchgrünte Aussenräume charakterisiert wird. Im Wohnhaus für Seniorinnen und Senioren wird neben dem Angebot unterschiedlicher Dienstleistungen ein Gemeinschaftsraum angeboten, der in Verbindung mit dem Aussenraum von zentraler Bedeutung für die Bewohner und die Gemeinde ist. Vor diesem Hintergrund wird der Baukörper als winkelförmiges, viergeschossiges Wohnhaus entlang der Brüttisellenstrasse angeordnet. Dieser festigt einerseits den Strassenraum an der Kreuzung der Brüttisellen- und Dübendorfstrasse nach Osten und formuliert andererseits einen sich in die Parzellentiefe entwickelnden Aussenraum zwischen Gebäude und Dübendorfstrasse. Dieser kollektive Aussenraum ist zentraler Ort der Wohngemeinschaft, fördert den Gemeinschaftssinn und ist übergeordneter Zugang zum Wohnhaus. Das Gebäude erhält durch die partielle Staffelung der Abwicklung, das Zurücksetzen des Attikageschosses und die unterschiedliche Höhenlage eine dem Umfeld angemessene Massstäblichkeit. Die hölzerne Verkleidung ist eine Reminiszenz an die prägnanten Scheunen der Umgebung und verankert das Haus im landwirtschaftlichen Umfeld, wobei die Oberflächenbehandlung und die Fügung der Holztafeln dem Baukörper, seiner Nutzung als Wohnhaus entsprechend, einen angemessenen, architektonischen Ausdruck verleihen.


08 53

RESIDENCE FOR ELDERLY PEOPLE


Ground Floor

0

5

First Floor

10m

3 0

54

2

4

4

KEY 1. HALL 2. LIVING ROOM 3. KITCHEN/DINING ROOM 4. BEDROOM 5.10BATHROOM m

5

10 m

0

2

4

1 2

0

Apartment Plan

Cross-Section 0

2

4

10 m

0

5

0

West Elevation

10m

1

4m

East Elevation

0 0

2

4

4m

2

10 m

2

4

10 m


RG

55


Wohnsiedlung Werdwies. Zürich-Altstetten.

Wohnsiedlung Werdwies. Zürich-Altstetten. Adrian Streich Architekten AG www.adrianstreich.ch Architects Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost : Construction date: Photos by:

Adrian Streich Architekten AG Collective Housing Zürich-Altstetten City of Zurich 32’313 m2 71’300’000 CHF | 65’400’000 EUR 2007 Georg Aerni (GA), Roger Frei (RF)

Collaborators:

Christoph Altermatt, Roman Brantschen, Roger Frei, Nicole Gerber, Cristina Gutbrod, Bruno Kurz, Gerhard Stettler, Adrian Streich Schmid Landschaftsarchitekten, Zurich APT Ingenieure GmbH, Zurich

Landscape architects: Civil engineer:

56

0

The course of the river Limmat and the motorway represent two of the outer limits forming the boundaries of the island-like Grünau quarter in Zurich, Switzerland. The Werdwies residential complex provides the quarter with an open centre characterised by the density of an inner space. The complex consists of seven rhythmically positioned rectangular constructions along the Grünauring and the Bändlistrasse, creating a sequence of built and open spaces. In between, smaller and larger squares open up the complex to the quarter. This open structure interweaves with extensive green areas in the north as well as with the parcelled southern part, establishing a comprehensive spatial connection within the Grünau quarter.

Wie Antipoden liegen sich am westlichen Stadtrand von Zürich der ruhige Flusslauf der Limmat und die lärmige Autobahn gegenüber und umgrenzen den inselartigen Mikrokosmos des Grünauquartiers. Die Wohnsiedlung Werdwies gibt dem Quartier eine offene Mitte bei gleichzeitig hoher räumlicher Dichte. Entlang dem Grünauring und der Bändlistrasse sind sieben rechteckig geschnittene Wohnhäuser rythmisch aufgereiht und erzeugen einen wechselseitigen Takt von Füllung und Leerraum. Zwischen den Häusern ergeben sich kleinere und grössere Plätze, die sich zum Quartier öffnen. Diese offene Struktur verwebt sich mit den weitläufigen Grünflächen im Norden und der parzellierten Quartierstruktur im Süden. Im Grünauquartier wird so ein übergreifender räumlicher Zusammenhang geschaffen.

The seven buildings are surrounded by a hard covering which allows pedestrians and cyclist to move freely within the complex. Dispersed desk-high sections of lawn and a large fountain channel the flow of movement and delimit quiet retreat areas. About 100 trees underline the park-like character of the complex. All of the trees were planted with gravel-filled grates so as to allow the rainwater to seep into the soil. In accordance with the public character of the outdoor spaces, the ground floors house a food shop, a bistro, several smaller commercial premises, two kindergartens as well as a crèche. These public uses constitute a significant contribution to the infrastructure in this Quarter on the outskirts of the city.

Ein Hartbelag umgibt die Häuser, der eine freie Bewegung der Fussgänger und Fahrradfahrer innerhalb der Siedlung erlaubt. Dazwischen liegen wie Intarsien tischhohe Rasenkissen und ein grosser Brunnen, die den Bewegungsfluss kanalisieren und ruhige Rückzugsorte umschliessen. Mit der Pflanzung von rund 100 Bäumen wird der parkartige Charakter der Anlage unterstrichen. Durch die mit Schotter gefüllten Baumscheiben kann das gesamte Regenwasser der Überbauung versickern.

All of the 152 apartments are located on the upper floors. Mirroring the spatial interweaving with the adjoining parts of the Quarter, their long loggias create a dense relationship between interior and exterior space. Each apartment includes a sequence of rooms lighted from different directions, with areas for living, eating and sleeping, connecting to the continuous loggias crosswise or lengthwise. Simple layouts with long rooms, built-in cupboards extending over the whole length of the wall as well as the generous loggias give the apartments a robust character which appeals to a broad public.

100

Location

Entsprechend dem öffentlichen Charakter der Aussenräume sind im Erdgeschoss ein Lebensmittelgrossist, ein Bistro, kleinere Gewerberäume, zwei Kindergärten und eine Kinderkrippe untergebracht. Diese öffentlichen Nutzungen leisten einen wichtigen Beitrag für die Infrastruktur des Quartiers am Stadtrand. Alle 152 Wohnungen befinden sich in den Obergeschossen. Analog der räumlichen Verzahnung der Wohnsiedlung mit den benachbarten Quartierteilen schaffen die langgestreckten Loggien eine dichte räumliche Beziehung zwischen den Wohnungen und dem Siedlungsraum. Jede Wohnung umfasst eine mehrseitig belichtete Raumfolge mit Wohn-, Ess- und Schlafbereichen, die quer- oder längsseitig auf die durchgängige Loggia trifft. Einfach geschnittene Grundrisse mit langen Räumen, wandfüllenden Einbauschränken und grosszügigen Loggien geben den Wohnungen einen robusten Charakter für ein breites Publikum.


09 57

GA

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + OUTDOOR PUBLIC SPACE + COMMERCIAL AND DAYCARE PREMISES


5 1

5m

0

0

2.5 Room Apartment

4.5 Room Apartment

4.5 Room Apartment

0

0

1

1

5

5

58

Upper Level

Longitudinal Section

0

10

20m


RF

59

GA

WW

WW

RF


A-Park. Zürich-Albisrieden.

A-Park. Zürich-Albisrieden.

Baumann Roserens Architekten www.brarch.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by: Video: Collaborators: Landscape architects: Color concept:

60

In the 1960’s a piece of land was left vacant for an express route. This was later donated to a cooperative for the construction of 60 affordable apartments and commerce. The ground floor of A-Park is a rich urban fabric of public use, transforming what had till then been the rural suburbs of Albisrieden into a new urban center.

Baumann Roserens Architekten AG Housing, Retail / Wohnungsbau, Verkaufsläden Zürich-Albisrieden Baugenossenschaft Zurlinden, Zürich 7477 m2 25.600.000 EUR 2006-2008 Claude Plattner (CP), Andrea Helbling (Arazebra) (AH) Samuel Perriard, Zürich

The two bent longitudinal structures define two exterior urban spaces of quite different character: through a low transept created parallel to Albisriederstrasse is an urban space, which serves as access to all the shop. A narrow passage leads to the more intimate, leafy courtyard. The courtyard offers an interaction area with playground, through which the apartment entrances are accessed.

Marein Gijzen, Sonja Casty, Stefanie Müller Rotzler Krebs Partner, Winterthur Annette Roserens, Zürich

2

10

20

40m

The majority of apartments are housed in the two main wings. They are characterized by an east-west orientation. The aim of the floor plan was the creation of generous opening spaces, making the actual corridors superfluous and letting the compact floor plans appear generous. The living and dining rooms with separable kitchens are designed as continuous, light-filled living areas. Following their meandering shape, each room branches off and is put on display. In the lower transept there are six two-storey maisonettes. On the upper floor, the spacious living area and kitchen are structured around an atrium, from which a staircase leads to the private roof terrace. Horizontal concrete slabs envelope the building and divide the facades vertically, marking each storey. Large windows with aluminum frame are fitted into this rhythm giving an overall harmony to the facade. In contrast to the bright aluminum frames and the concrete elements, the closed outer wall parts have been covered with dark slate Porto.

Location

Auf einem Grundstück, das für eine in den 1960-er Jahren geplante Expresstrasse frei geblieben ist, hat die Stadt Zürich durch Abgabe von Bauland an eine Baugenossenschaft den Neubau von 60 preiswerten Wohnungen, einem Grossverteiler und weiteren Ladengeschäften ermöglicht. Das bisher eher ländlich geprägte Aussenquartier von Albisrieden hat durch diesen Neubau mit seinem öffentlichen Erdgeschoss ein neues städtisches Zentrum erhalten. Die zwei geknickten Längsbaukörper definieren städtebaulich zwei Aussenräume von ganz unterschiedlichem Charakter: Durch einen niederen Querbau entsteht parallel zur Albisriederstrasse ein urbaner Platzraum, der als Zugang und Vorzone zu allen Läden dient. Über einen schmalen Durchgang gelangt man in den intimeren, begrünten Hofraum. Von diesem gemeinsamen Spiel- und Aufenthaltsraum aus sind sämtliche Wohnungen erschlossen.    Die Mehrzahl der Wohnungen sind als Geschosswohnungen in den beiden Hauptflügeln untergebracht. Sie zeichnen sich durch eine Ost-West-Orientierung aus. Ziel der Grundrissgestaltung war die Schaffung eines grosszügigen Erschliessungsraums, der eigentliche Korridore überflüssig macht und die kompakten Grundrisse grosszügig erscheinen lassen. Die Wohn- und Essräume mit abtrennbarer Küche sind als durchgehende, lichtdurchflutete Wohnzonen gestaltet und erschliessen durch ihre mäandrierende Form sämtliche Räume der Wohnung. Im niedrigeren Querbau befinden sich sechs zweigeschossige Maisonettewohnungen. Der grosszügige Wohnbereich mit Küche im oberen Geschoss wird über ein Atrium gegliedert, von welchem eine Treppe zur privaten Dachterrasse führt. Umlaufende, horizontale Sichtbetonstirnen gliedern die Fassaden geschossweise und fügen die grossflächigen Verglasungen mit Aluminiumzargen zu einem tektonisch gefügten Fassadenbild. Im Kontrast zum hellen Aluminium und den vorgehängten Betonelementen sind die geschlossenen Aussenwandteile mit dunklem Portoschiefer verkleidet.


10 61

CP

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + PUBLIC SPACE + COMMERCIAL PREMISES


1

5

10

1

20m

1

5

10

1

20m

Ground Floor

Second Floor

5

10

5

10

10

0

20m

20m

20m

62 1

East Elevation

Longitudinal Section

5

10

1

20m

5

10

20m

South Elevation

Transversal Section

0

10

20m


CP

CP

AH

63

AH

CP

AH


Zwicky Süd. DÜBENDORF, ZÜRICH.

Zwicky Süd. DÜBENDORF, ZÜRICH. Schneider Studer Primas GmbH www.schneiderstuderprimas.ch Architects: Landscape architect: Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost : Construction date: Photos by: Collaborators:

64

Engineering: Contractor:

Schneider Studer Primas GmbH, Zürich. Lorenz Eugster Landschaftsarchitektur, Zürich. Housing and mixed use Dübendorf, Schweiz Bau- und Wohngenossenschaft KraftWerk 1. Senn Resources AG Kraftwerk 1: 21000 m2 gross floor area Total: 42‘000 m2 gross floor area Kraftwerk 1: CHF 55’000’000.Total: CHF 110’000’000.2013-2017 Andrea Helbling Franziska Schneider, Jens Studer, Urs Primas. Ivo Hasler (project architect). Elisabeth Zissis, Francisco Amado, Martin Arnold, Sarah Birchler, Aline Brun, Savvas Ciriacidis, Dominik Joho, Amadeo Linke, Liliana Miguel, Zlatina Paneva, Lukasz Pawlicki, Valentina Sieber Schällibaum AG / Patrick Gartmann (structure) Amstein & Walthert AG (building services) Senn Construction AG

0

Location

50

Well-connected, but distant from historical centers, Zwicky Süd is typical for the recent wave of development in the agglomeration around Zurich. Our project contributes to this emerging urbanity, not only by providing a high density of housing, but also by establishing important new connections and by offering a variety of public or collective spaces and programs.

Ausgezeichnet erschlossen, aber abseits der historischen Zentren gelegen ist Zwicky Süd ein typisches Beispiel für die jüngste Welle der Nachverdichtung in der Zürcher Agglomeration. Unser Projekt leistet einen Beitrag zu dieser werdenden Stadt, indem es nicht nur Wohnungen in hoher Dichte, sondern auch neue Verbindungen sowie vielfältige, öffentliche oder gemeinschaftliche Räume und Nutzungen anbietet.

The abandoned space under the train viaduct is activated and becomes the main address for bicycles and pedestrians. A dense network of alleys and squares continues the spatial fabric of the existing industrial site. Three complementary building types form a conglomerate: slender slabs, massive blocks and lowrise halls. The slabs are suffused with light from two sides and can easily be subdivided in small studios, ateliers or hotel rooms. The blocks, on the other hand, contain deep plans with internal lightwells.

Der verlassene Raum unter dem Bahnviadukt wird als neue Hauptadresse für Fussgänger und Velofahrer aktiviert. Ein dichtes Netzwerk von Gassen und Plätzen führt das Raumgefüge des alten Industrieareals weiter. Drei komplementäre Bautypen ergänzen einander gegenseitig und fügen sich zu einem Konglomerat: schlanke Scheiben, massive Blocks und flache Hallen. Die zweiseitig orientierten, lichtdurchfluteten Scheiben lassen sich leicht unterteilen in kleine Studios, Ateliers oder Hotelzimmer. Die Blocks dagegen enthalten tiefe Grundrisse mit Lichthöfen.

This typology - familiar from office buildings - is adapted to house various sizes of apartments, from studios to large, shared apartments. The halls provide additional surface on the ground floor for production, storage, exhibition, sales floors and even for loft-like row houses. A light steel structure wraps around the buildings, allowing for balconies, galleries and façade greening. The development is a result of the collaboration between private investors and the cooperative Kraftwerk 1, who occupies the western part of the site.

Diese aus dem Bürobau vertraute Typologie wird adaptiert und nimmt Wohnungen in ganz unterschiedlichen Grössen auf: vom Studio bis zur Grosswohngemeinschaft. Die Hallen bieten zusätzliche Erdgeschossflächen, wo produziert, gelagert, ausgestellt, verkauft und in loftartigen Reihenhäusern sogar gewohnt wird. Eine leichte Stahlstruktur umhüllt die Bauten und nimmt Balkone, Laubengänge und Fassadenbegrünungen auf. Die Projektentwicklung entstand in einer Zusammenarbeit zwischen privaten Investoren und der Bau- und Wohngenossenschaft Kraftwerk 1, welche den westlichen Teil des Areals besetzt.

The buildings of the cooperative are easily recognizable by the spectacular, recycled bridges which connect shared flats with their “satellites” in adjacent buildings, providing additional collective space and interconnectedness.

Die Bauten der Genossenschaft sind leicht erkennbar an den spektakulären, rezyklierten Fussgängerbrücken welche Wohngemeinschaften mit ihren „Satelliten“ verbinden und so ein zusätzliches Angebot an gemeinschaftlichen Räumen und interner Vernetzung schaffen.


11 65

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + PUBLIC SPACE + MIXED USE


66

0

Cooperative Kraftwerk 1 Fourth Level

10

0

0

Transversal Section

0

5

20m

10

5

10m

20m

0

5

10m

10m


67


Wohnüberbauung Katzenbach. ZÜRICH-SEEBACH.

Katzenbach residential estate. ZURICH-SEEBACH. Zita Cotti Architekten AG www.cottiarch.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

Zita Cotti Collective Housing Zurich-Seebach Baugenossenschaft Glattal

Landscape architect: Colour design: Management of works:

Robin Winogrond Andrea Burkhard b+p Baurealisation ag

68

Location

83.2 Mio EUR 2005-2010 Georg Aerni (GA), Roger Frei (RF), Hannes Henz (HH)

Zurich-Seebach, with its green settlements and freeflowing open spaces, was created in the late 1940s based on the idea of a garden city. The master plan by the city’s Municipal Architect A.H. Steiner is still partially visible today, for instance in the direct vicinity of the new estate, where there is a large green area to the north along the Katzenbach stream and a wood-covered hill to the south. The Katzenbach housing estate, with around 220 apartments, is the first constructed comprehensive replacement development by a housing association in the City of Zurich. The densification from 40 to 115 percent represented a challenge with respect to its acceptance in the quarter and its integration into the urban planning context.

Zürich-Seebach mit seinen durchgrünten Siedlungen und den fliessenden Freiräumen entstand in den späten 1940er Jahren basierend auf den Ideen der Gartenstadt. Der übergeordnete Plan des Stadtbaumeisters A.H. Steiner ist auch heute noch zu erkennen, so in unmittelbarer Nähe der neuen Siedlung, wo sich im Norden ein grosszügiger Grünraum entlang des Katzenbachs und im Süden ein bewaldeter Hügel finden. Die Wohnüberbauung Katzenbach mit rund 220 Wohnungen ist der erste realisierte umfassende Ersatzneubau einer Genossenschaftssiedlung in der Stadt Zürich. Die Verdichtung von 40 auf 115 Prozent stellte hinsichtlich der Akzeptanz im Quartier und in Bezug auf die Einbindung in den städtebaulichen Kontext eine grosse Herausforderung dar.

By placing the building perpendicular to the two streets, the staggered ground plan and height, as well as the reserved materialisation, allowed the new buildings to be integrated into the context. At the same time, the exterior space was interspersed with the existing green areas to combine the settlement and quarter and maintain the idea of a garden city.

Durch die Setzung der Baukörper senkrecht zu den beiden Strassen, die Staffelung in Grundriss und Höhe sowie die zurückhaltende Materialisierung gelang es, die Neubauten in den Kontext einzubinden. Zugleich wurden die Aussenräume mit den bestehenden Grünräumen verflochten, sodass Siedlung und Quartier miteinander verbunden und die Ideen der Gartenstadt weitergeführt werden.

The theme of permeability is consistently continued in the apartments. The Z-shaped living and dining rooms span from façade to façade and thereby mediate between the trees of the accessing courtyard and the rear yard lined with hedges. By contrast, the terraces enclosed on two sides underline the longitudinal alignment and the staggered buildings, while opening out towards the quarter’s green areas. The borders between the apartments and exterior spaces, marking the juncture between private and public areas, are thereby architecturally highlighted and make a decisive contribution in integrating the new buildings into the existing context.

Das Thema der Durchlässigkeit wird in den Wohnungen konsequent weitergeführt. Z-förmige Wohn- und Essräume spannen sich von Fassade zu Fassade auf und vermitteln so zwischen baumbestandenem Erschliessungshof und mit Hecken umschlossenem Gartenhof. Im Gegensatz dazu betonen die zweiseitig gefassten Terrassen die Längsrichtung sowie die Staffelung der Baukörper und öffnen sich zu den angrenzenden Grünräumen des Quartiers. Die Grenze zwischen Wohnung und Aussenraum, zwischen privat und öffentlich wird somit architektonisch in Szene gesetzt und trägt massgeblich zur Verzahnung der Neubauten mit dem bestehenden Kontext bei.


12 69

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + PUBLIC GREEN SPACE


KZB_ANS-SCH_1200

ZB_FASS D_500 Ground General Level

0

North-East Elevation

ZB_SCH_500

10

20m

KZB_WHG_200

12

70

Zita Cotti Architekten AG Limmatstrasse 285, 8005 Z端rich

Druckdatum

04.10.13

Revidiert

19.11.13

Druckdatum

04.10.13

Revidiert

06.11.13

2.04

Longitudinal Elevation. Building D

10

Zita Cotti Architekten AG Limmatstrasse 285, 8005 Z端rich

Cotti Architekten AG matstrasse 285, 8005 Z端rich

0

Floorplan House D

12

10

Druckdatum

04.10.13

Revidiert

19.11.13

Zita Cotti Architekten AG Limmatstrasse 285, 8005 Z端rich

Longitudinal Section. Building B

0

5

10m

Druckdatum

04.10.13

Revidiert

06.11.13

5m


71


Badenerstrasse 380. ZÜRICH

Badenerstrasse 380. ZURICH. pool Architekten www.poolarch.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

pool Architekten Cooperative Housing Badenerstrasse 380, Zurich Baugenossenschaft Zurlinden 13’876 m2 33.500.000 euros 2008 – 2010 Giuseppe Micciché

The building spans the entire parcel between Badenerstrasse and the new Hardau Stadtpark (city park). Its orientation toward these two public spaces is strengthened by the shaping of the two visually striking main façades. Along Badenerstrasse, the street alignment is closed, and the vertical articulation – i.e. the volumes that rise from the continuous ground story – adopts the rhythm of a typical “jutty” building.

Der Baukörper überspannt die gesamte Parzelle zwischen Badenerstrasse und dem neuen Stadtpark Hardau. Die Ausrichtung auf diese beiden öffentlichen Räume wird mit der Bildung von zwei prägnanten Hauptfassaden gestärkt. Entlang der Badenerstrasse wird die Strassenflucht geschlossen. Die vertikale Gliederung der aus dem durchgehenden Sockelgeschoss aufgehenden Volumen nimmt den Rhythmus der typischen Erkerbauten auf.

Collaborators:

Mathias Heinz, David Leuthold, Andreas Wipf, Jves Lauper SJB Kempter Fitze AG ZGZ Zimmerei Genossenschaft Zürich

A simple, uniform structure that remains invariable through all stories renders the construction process economical. The ground floor level is executed as a retaining basin in site-mixed concrete in order to offer the supermarket a maximally column-free sales area. Constructed on top of this in a prefabricated timber element construction is the six-story residential section.

Eine einfache, über alle Geschosse gleichbleibende Struktur erlaubt eine wirtschaftliche Erstellung. Das Sockelgeschoss, als Abfangtisch in Ortbeton ausgeführt, bietet dem Supermarkt eine quasi stützenfreie Verkaufsfläche. Darauf wird in vorgefertigter Elementbauweise aus Holz der sechsgeschossige Wohnteil erstellt.

The point of departure for the design was apartments that take up the building’s entire depth and are oriented toward the south as well as toward the park. For the predominantly single and two-person households, as well as for small families, an open living concept was ideal. Uninterrupted view axes produce an open, expansive spatial feel while nonetheless allowing zoning into individual residential areas.

Ausgangspunkt des Entwurfs sind durchgehende Wohnungen, welche sowohl nach Süden als auch zum Park hin orientiert sind. Für die mehrheitlich Singleund Zwei-Personen-Haushalte sowie Kleinfamilien ist ein offenes Wohnkonzept ideal. Das Raumkontinuum wird durch Verengungen moduliert und erzeugt nicht nur ein Höchstmass an Raumerlebnis sondern erlaubt gleichzeitig eine Zonierung der einzelnen Wohnbereiche.

The project was developed in a consistent way according to the criteria of the 2000-Watt Society. It is the first building in Switzerland that fulfills the high standards targeted by the new municipal legislation. Since the large solid wood transverse sections can be dismantled and be used as raw material for other high-quality products, it is not only a contribution to sustainable building methods, but also a response to the question of a long-term reusability of buildings.

Das Projekt wurde konsequent nach den Kriterien der 2000-Watt Gesellschaft entwickelt. Es ist das erste Gebäude in der Schweiz welches den hohen Standard erfüllt, der neu durch die kommunale Gesetzgebung angestrebt wird. Da die Massivholz-Querschnitte demontiert und als Rohmaterial wieder genutzt werden können, ist es nicht nur ein Beitrag zur nachhaltigen Bauweise sondern auch Antwort auf die Frage einer langfristigen Ressourcenbeschaffung im Bauwesen.

Engineering: Builder:

72

Location N

site plan

0

50

100

150

200m


13 73

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + COMMERCIAL PREMISES


South-West Elevation

Fifth Floor

N

floor plan 5th floor

0

10

20

30

40

50m

elevation south west facade

0

10

20

30

40

50m

74

floor plan 2nd/3rd floor

N

0

0

Longitudinal Section

Second - Third Floor

10

20

30

40

50m

0

10

20

30

40

5

10m

50m

longitudinal section

Construction Process

Holzbau 0176 Wohn- und Geschäftshaus Badenerstrasse 380 pool Architekten • Bremgartnerstrasse 7 • 8003 Zürich

0

Ground Floor

floor plan ground floor

N

0

10

20

30

40

5

10m

50m

1:100 gez. adw

Format 0.89/1.76 Datum 03.07.2009


75


Wohnsiedlung Grünmatt FGZ. ZÜRICH.

Housing Development Grünmatt. ZURICH. Graber Pulver Architekten AG www.graberpulver.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area :

Cost: Competition date: Construction date: Photos by: Project Manager: Collaborators: Wood construction engineering: Construction supervisor: Engineering: Landscape architect:

1/1

76

Marco Graber, Thomas Pulver, Alexander Huhle, Collective Housing | Wohnungsbau Zürich Familienheim-Genossenschaft Zürich FGZ 27’397 m2 (above ground) 32‘573 m2 (incl. underground parking space) CHF 86 Mio. 2006-2007 2010-2014 Philip Heckhausen

As a replacement for the row housings from the 1920’s, the goal was to design a contemporary piece of a Garden City with 160 cooperative apartments, a kindergarten, a common room and a residential care group. The design reacts on these provisions and the site along the Friesenberg slope with slender wooden buildings, grouped in low curved rows following the contour lines and thus modulate the topography. Due to the sloped site, the upper floors obtain a free view over the neighbouring lower row. Each unit’s living space stretches from one facade to the other and has continuous loggias towards the south, partially with an adjacent private garden. The vehicles are parked underground between the two upper building rows.

Beat Kübler Arthur Kaiser, Michael Metzger, Yves Reichenbach, Tina Ringelmann Pirmin Jung Ingenieure für Holzbau GmbH, Rain Perolini Baumanagement AG, Zürich Freihofer & Partner AG, Zürich 4d AG Landschaftsarchitekten, Bern

Differentiated radii widen and narrow the open space stretched between the building rows and create two diagonal shifted squarelike situations with possibilities to reside and to play. The cooperative idea of the collective is supported by an almost monumental superelevation which derives from the depth of the perspective space. The tectonically joined, continuous loggia elements made of prefabricated concrete poles and slabs on the south side, which create light and shadow effects are juxtaposed with the convex bent « stretched skin » at the north facade.

Empfänger eingeben

We are equally intrigued by the spatial gesture of the rows, which radiate generosity due to their curve and the staccato of the loggias, as by the efficiency of the wooden and concrete construction. The architectonic expression derives from a restrained and unagitated detailing and the modesty of the wood. The overhanging roofs as constructive weather protection seem similar appropriate as the reduced ornamentation of the slate boarding on the north sides tilted by ninty degrees respectively, which weave the windows of the various types of apartments into a fine fabric. The pigmented paintwork with its differentiated colouring scheme creates an additional design layer.

013 en

n

üsse e eingeben

Architekten AG

ng Grünmatt FGZ, Zürich (2007)

Location

0

50

100

200

site plan

0

50

100

200

Als Ersatz einer Reihenhaus-Siedlung aus den Zwanzigerjahren sollte ein Stück „zeitgemässe Gartenstadt“ mit knapp 160 genossenschaftlichen Wohnungen, Kindergarten/-hort, Gemeinschaftsraum und Pflegewohngruppe konzipiert werden. Auf diese Vorgabe und auf den Ort am Zürcher Friesenberg reagiert der Entwurf mit schlanken Holzbauten, zusammengefasst zu niedrigen Gebäudezeilen, die in leichter Krümmung den Höhenlinien folgen und die Topografie im Schnitt modellieren. Die Hanglage ermöglicht jeweils den freien Blick aus den Obergeschossen über die hangunteren Zeilen zur Stadt. Alle Wohneinheiten haben durchgesteckte Wohnräume und südseitig durchlaufende grosszügige Loggien, teilweise sogar mit privaten Gärten. Die Fahrzeuge werden unterirdisch zwischen den beiden oberen Gebäudezeilen abgestellt. Unterschiedliche Radien bewirken Aufweitungen und Verengungen der zwischen die Zeilen gespannten horizontalen Aussenräume und schaffen diagonal zueinander versetzt zwei platzähnliche Situationen mit Aufenthalts- und Spielmöglichkeiten. Dem genossenschaftlichen Gedanken des Kollektivs wird durch die Tiefe des perspektivischen Raumes eine fast monumentale Überhöhung zugetragen. Dem tektonisch gefügten, durchlaufenden Loggia-Element aus vorfabrizierten Betonstäben und Platten auf der Südseite, welches Licht- und Schattenspiel aufnimmt, steht die konvex gebogene, „gespannte Haut“ der Nordfassade gegenüber. Die räumliche Geste der Zeilen, die dank deren Krümmung und dem Stakkato der Loggien Grosszügigkeit ausstrahlt, interessierte uns ebenso wie die Effizienz der Holz- und Betonkonstruktion. Der architektonische Ausdruck lebt von einer zurückhaltenden, unaufgeregten Detaillierung und der ‚Bescheidenheit’ des Holzes. Ein konstruktiver Wetterschutz erscheint dank auskragenden Dächern ebenso angemessen wie die reduzierte Ornamentik der jeweils um neunzig Grad gedrehten Brettschalungen auf der Nordseite der Zeilen, die die Fenster der unterschiedlichen Wohnungstypen in ein feines Gewebe einbinden. Der pigmentierte Anstrich schafft mittels differenzierter Farbgebung eine weitere gestalterische Ebene.


14 77

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + DAYCARE + COLLECTIVE PREMISES


S2

S1

S2

S1

1/1

Empfänger eingeben

Ort 25.02.2013 Betreff eingeben Anrede eingeben

S1

S1

Text, offen Ansicht Nord Freundliche Grüsse Vorname Name eingeben

S2

S2

Graber Pulver Architekten AG

Ansicht Süd

General Ground Floor

General First Floor

1/1

0

20

40m

0

20

40m

1/1

0

10

20

40

floor plan – ground floor

Zeile 1, Siedlung Grünmatt FGZ, Zürich (2007) 1:1000

0

10

20

40

floor plan – first floor

Empfänger eingeben

78

Empfänger eingeben

Ort 25.02.2013 Betreff eingeben

North Elevation. Row 1 Anrede eingeben Text, offen Ansicht Nord Freundliche Grüsse Vorname Name eingeben

Ort 25.02.2013 Betreff eingeben

South Elevation. Row 1

Anrede eingeben Text, offen Ansicht Nord Freundliche Grüsse Vorname Name eingeben

S1

Graber Pulver Architekten AG

Graber Pulver Architekten AG

0

10

20

40

elevations – row 1 Ansicht Süd

Ansicht Süd

S1

S2

Cross Section 1 Zeile 1, Siedlung Grünmatt FGZ, Zürich (2007) 1:1000

Zeile 1, Siedlung Grünmatt FGZ, Zürich (2007) 1:1000

0

0

10

20

10

20

40

Cross Section 2 40

elevations – row 1

sections 1 and 2

0

20

40m


79


Wohnhaus Avellana. ZÜRICH-SCHWAMENDINGEN.

COOPERATIVE HOUSING AVELLANA. ZURICH-SCHWAMENDINGEN EDELAAR MOSAYEBI INDERBITZIN ARCHITEKTEN www.emi-architekten.ch Architects:

Edelaar Mosayebi Inderbitzin Architekten AG ETH SIA BSA Cooperative Housing Zürich. Wogeno, Zurich

Typology: Location: Client: Area (GF): Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

6,291,000 CHF | 5,660,000 EUR 2010-2012 Roland Bernath

Collaborators: Engineering:

Jonathan Roider, Samuele Tirendi. Timbatec GmbH, Zurich/Thun (wood construction) APT Ingenieure GmbH, Zurich (concrete construction)

80

The housing project Avellana is located at the northern foot of the Zürichberg hill, at the heart of ZurichSchwamendingen. Here there are still remnants of the old, original agrarian village structures. The project’s site is enclosed by some of these former farmhouses. It lies towards the back of them, almost in a second row, as a garden plot hidden behind the row of buildings facing the street.

Das genossenschaftliche Wohnhaus Avellana befindet sich am nördlichen Fuss des Zürichbergs in der Kernzone von Zürich-Schwamendingen. Hier bestehen noch heute Reste der alten, ursprünglich agrarisch geprägten Dorfstrukturen. Das Grundstück des Projektes wird gefasst von einigen dieser ehemaligen Bauernhäuser. Es liegt rückwärtig, quasi in der zweiten Reihe als Gartengrundstück versteckt hinter Strassen zugewandten Gebäudestrukturen.

The project interprets this specific urban situation in both its volumetric development and architectural expression. The low building — being merely two-storey and flat-roofed — is typologically subordinated to the representative buildings along the street — its appearance is one of a courtyard building, or even a garden building. The length of the volume is broken in several places, where the figure responds differently to the side where a stream runs, and to the side of the courtyard garden. Towards the stream, the volume is subdivided by fine kinks, such as the entrances to the open circulation. To the garden, the facade modulation is more pronounced: the volume is no longer felt in its entirety, rather the impression of individual buildings arises. With this, the building perceives anew the side of the path and stream, and on the garden side reacts to the disperse courtyard structures, with their gardens and small outhouses.

Das Projekt interpretiert in der volumetrischen Entwicklung wie im architektonischen Ausdruck diese spezifische städtebauliche Situation. Der lediglich zweigeschossige, flach gedeckte und damit niedrige Baukörper ordnet sich den Strassen bezogenen, repräsentativen Bauten typologisch unter – er tritt gleichsam als Hof- oder eben Gartengebäude in Erscheinung. Die Länge des Volumens wird mehrfach gebrochen, wobei der Körper auf die jeweiligen Seiten von Dorfbach und Gartenhof unterschiedlich reagiert. Zum Bach hin gliedert sich das Volumen durch feine Knicke, wie beispielsweise den Einzügen der offenen Erschliessungen. Auf der Gartenseite ist die Abwicklung ausgeprägter: das Volumen ist hier nicht mehr in seiner Ganzheit erfassbar, vielmehr entsteht der Eindruck einzelner Baukörper. Damit fasst das Gebäude auf der einen Seite den Weg- und Bachraum neu und reagiert gartenseitig auf die dispersen Hofstrukturen mit seinen Gärten und Kleinbauten.

Also in relation to architectural expression, the new building defers to the existing building — together then form an ensemble of a main, representative building, orientated towards the street and an adjacent building, towards the courtyard. In its content and atmosphere, the project references those kinds of sheds or farm buildings, without disguising its actual use. For this, the ‘soft’ timber envelope appears to be critical, as well as the shallow pitch of the roof, whose partly tilted gables and eaves recall associations of spontaneously grown and multiply transformed structures. Location

0

10

25

50 m

Auch in Bezug auf den architektonischen Ausdruck ordnet sich der Neubau dem Altbau unter – zusammen bilden sie ein Ensemble von Strassen bezogenem, repräsentativem Hauptbau und hofseitigem «Nebengebäude». Dabei knüpft das Projekt inhaltlich und atmosphärisch an derartige Schuppen oder Ökonomiegebäude an, ohne dabei seine eigentliche Nutzung zu verleugnen. Entscheidend erscheint hierbei das «weiche», hölzerne Fassadenkleid sowie das flach geneigte Dach, dessen teilweise fallende Giebel und Traufen Assoziationen an spontan gewachsene, mehrfach transformierte Strukturen hervorrufen.


15 81

COLLECTIVE HOUSING


82

0

20

Ground Floor

0

20

First Floor

0

10

20m


83


DOLLIKERSTRASSE. MEILEN.

DOLLIKESTRASSE. MEILEN.

NEFF NEUMANN ARCHITEKTEN AG www.neffneumann.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area (GF): Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

Barbara Neff, Bettina Neumann Collective housing Dollikerstrasse, Meilen Baugenossenschaft Zurlinden Zürich 3,100 m2 SBP 12,415,000 EUR June 2012 – March 2014 Roger Frei

Collaborators: Civil engineer: Timber construction: Landscape:

Liliane Haltmeier, Eva Maria Nufer Henauer Gugler, Zürich Makiol + Wiederkehr, Beinwil am See Robin Winogrond Landschaftsarchitekten, Zürich

84

The site is surrounded by a heterogeneous mix of urban typologies. Small scale fragmented historical buildings contrast with larger industrial buildings. The new building is situated within the park of a stately country house that borders a gentle stream. At the edge of the historical village, within walking distance to the shores of Lake Zurich, the interaction between the compact, low volume of the new building, the historic main building, and the garden generates a concise ensemble. The site specific constellation of site-depth, orientation, and architectural placing lead to a building depth of 21 metres. The innermost rooms are lit by courtyards. Each apartment gets its typical character from the meandering living area that wraps itself around the courtyard and flows by way of the loggia into the garden. The courtyards are covered in glass mosaic tiles and not only allow for interesting views between the loggia, kitchen and living-room areas, but also create a very unique athmosphere. The actual floor area of the apartments is comparatively small due to economic restraints. However, by avoiding large circulation spaces, and focusing on meticulous placement of the rooms in the plan and the aesthetic qualities of the courtyards, the apartments feel very spacious. The artistic expression of the facade is mainly achieved by the corrugated eternit facade. The dark green coloring is meant to mirror the colors of the lake and the surrounding landscape. Eternit as a material seems ephemeral and robust alike, and gives the building the appearance of a garden shed.

Location

Die nähere Umgebung des Grundstückes weist eine heterogene Bebauungsstruktur auf. Kleinteilige historische Gebäude kontrastieren mit grossmassstäblichen Industriegebäuden. Der Neubau befindet sich im ehemaligen Garten eines herrschaftlichen Landhauses, welches sich in Seenähe entlang eines lauschigen Bachs befindet. Durch das Zusammenspiel des gedrungenen, niedrigen Baukörpers, dem historischen Hauptgebäude und dem Gartenraum entsteht am Rande der Kernzone eines Dorfes am Zürichsee ein prägnantes Ensemble. Die spezifische Konstellation von Grundstückstiefe, Orientierung und ortsbaulicher Setzung führt zu einer Gebäudetiefe von mehr als 21 Metern. Über einen Innenhof werden die Räume in der Mitte des Gebäudes belichtet. Charakteristisches Element jeder Wohnung ist der mäandrierende Wohnraum, welcher sich um den Lichthof, über die Loggia in den Gartenraum erstreckt. Die Höfe, welche mit schimmernden Glasmosaikplättli ausgekleidet sind, erlauben spannungsvolle Sichtbezüge zwischen Loggia, Wohnzimmer und Küche, und vermitteln gleichzeitig eine stimmungsvolle Atmosphäre. Aufgrund der wirtschaftlichen Anforderungen weisen die Wohnungen relativ geringe Wohnflächen auf. Durch die geschickte Anordnung der Räume und das Vermeiden grosser Erschliessungsflächen, sowie der optischen Qualität des Innenhofes wirken die Wohnungen ausserordentlich grosszügig. Der gestalterische Ausdruck wird im Wesentlichen durch die Welleternitverkleidung geprägt. Mit der dunkelgrünen Einfärbung werden die Farbstimmungen des nahen Sees und der weiträumigen Landschaft aufgegriffen. Gleichzeitig vermittelt das Material Eternit einen provisorischen, aber dennoch robusten Charakter, welcher dem Neubau das Gesicht eines grossen Gartenhauses verleiht.


16 85

COLLECTIVE HOUSING


South-East Elevation

0

1

2

Upper Floor

5

10 [m]

1:250 I Fassade S端dost

0

1

2

5

10 [m]

1:250 I DG

North-West Elevation

0

1

2

5

10 [m]

1:250 I Fassade Nordwest

86

First Floor

0

1

2

5

10 [m]

5

0

Longitudinal Section

10m

1:250 I OG 0

1

2

5

10 [m]

1:250 I Schnitt L2

Ground Floor

5

0

0

1

2

10m

5

10 [m]

Typical Plan 2

1:250 I EG

0

2

4m


BZ

87


SENIOR APARTMENTS ETZEL. STÄFA.

SENIOR APARTMENTS ETZEL. STÄFA.

ERNST NIKLAUS FAUSCH ARCHITEKTEN www.enf.ch Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area (GF): Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

Collaborators:

88

Ernst Niklaus Fausch Architekten Cooperative Housing Lanzelenweg, Stäfa, Switzerland Baugenossenschaft Zürichsee, Küsnacht, Switzerland 3,100 m2 10,000,000 CHF | 8,350,000 EUR April 2013 - September 2014 Hannes Henz

Werubau AG, Meilen, Switzerland, General contractor

As addition to an existing nursing home, Ernst Niklaus Fausch has realised a building in composite construction with 28 senior apartments and a community room. The site lies close to lake Zurich, on slightly sloping Lanzenweg, where the original village structure provides a picturesque setting. The three-storey building volume which follows the gentle slope of the hillside, absorbs the spatial structure of the area and responds naturally. It subdivides the surrounding space into a public accessside, and a private dwelling-side. On the access-side, a common garden with forecourt forms the address to the home for the elderly. The deck, open to the common garden, provides both access to the apartments and a versatile living/meeting space. On the dwelling-side, a greenbelt of grass, hedges and trees creates a filter to the surrounding residential buildings. The tension between commonality and individuality is continued in the floor plans of the apartments. The living/dining area spans a zoned-space between the deck and balcony. Attached are the individual bedroom, bathroom and entrance area. The exterior facade utilises timber cladding articulated in a variety of ways. The bottom two storeys are clad in vertical boards with wide joints, backed by different coloured battens; on the top floor, cladding with coloured cover strips is used. The balustrades of the deck and balcony have open joints. The facade lying behind the balustrade is furnished in wooden paneling of furniture quality, thus the differentiation between public and private is continued through to the materialisation of the facade.

Location

In Nachbarschaft und als Ergänzung zum bestehenden Alterszentrum hat Ernst Niklaus Fausch Architekten ein Gebäude mit 28 Alterswohnungen und Gemeinschaftsraum realisiert. Das Grundstück liegt nahe beim Zürichsee am leicht abfallenden Lanzelenweg und vis à vis eines pittoresken Versatzstückes der ursprünglichen Dorfstruktur. Das dreigeschossige Gebäudevolumen, welches der sanften Neigung des Hanges folgt, nimmt die räumliche Struktur des Quartiers auf und gliedert sich auf selbstverständliche Art darin ein. Dabei zoniert es den Raum in eine öffentlichere Zugangsseite und eine privatere Wohnseite. Auf der Zugangsseite bildet ein gemeinsamer Garten mit Vorplatz die Adresse des Alterswohnhauses. Die zum gemeinsamen Garten hin offene Laube ist Erschliessung und vielfältig nutzbarerer Aufenthalts- und Begegnungsraum. Auf der Wohnseite bildet ein Grüngürtel aus Wiese, Hecken und Bäumen einen Filter zu den umliegenden Wohngebäuden. Die Spannung zwischen Gemeinschaftlichkeit und Individualität wird in den Wohnungsgrundrissen fortgesetzt. Der Wohn- und Essbereich spannt sich als zonierter Raum zwischen der Laube und dem Balkon zum Grüngürtel auf. Daran angelagert sind Individualzimmer, Bad und Eingangsbereich. Das Gebäude wurde in Mischbauweise erstellt. Massive tragende Innenwände, kombiniert mit Aussenwänden aus gut gedämmten Leichtbauelementen sind mit einer Holzschalung unterschiedlicher Ausprägung verkleidet. In den unteren beiden Geschossen sind es senkrechte Bretter mit breiten Fugen, die durch eine andersfarbige Traglatte hinterlegt sind; im obersten Geschoss ist es eine Bretterschalung mit farbigen Deckleisten. Bei den Brüstungen der Laube und der Balkone hat die Schalung offene Fugen. Die dahinterliegenden Fassadenteile sind mit einer Holzverkleidung in Möbelqualität versehen. So wird die Differenzierung zwischen öffentlich und privat bis in die Materialisierung der Fassade fortgesetzt.


17 89

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + COMMUNITY SPACE


1:500 OG

10

SÜD

0 2

5

South Elevation

O

East Elevation

OST

1:500 UG

First Floor

90

West Elevation

W 0 WEST 0 2

Ground Floor

0

5

10m

Longitudinal Section

0

5

10m

0 2

5

10

5


91


aspholz SÜD. ZÜRICH-AFFOLTERN.

STUDENT HOUSING ASPHOLZ. ZÜRICH-AFFOLTERN. DARLINGTON MEIER ARCHITEKTEN www.darlingtonmeier.ch Architects: Typology : Location: Client: Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by: Collaborators:

Engineering: Builder:

Darlington Meier Student Housing & Community Space Zürich-Affoltern SSWZ – Stiftung für Studentisches Wohnen Zürich 12,560 m2 | 41,950 m2 37,000,000 CHF 2011-2013 Lucas Peters Mark Darlington, Stephan Meier, Stefan Oeschger, Matthias Stücheli, Lukas Kissling, Marta Shtipkova, Aurélie Blanchard. Federer & Partner Ingenieure Implenia Bau AG

92

0

Site Plan 1:1000

Location

10

The long building defines the west perimeter of the new residential quarter next to the remaining industrial zone and countryside.

Der lange Gebäudekörper bildet einen klaren Abschluss des Wohnquartiers zur benachbarten Gewerbe- und Landwirtschaftszone.

The geometry of the northern facade facing the street and its reduced building height relate to the neighbouring scale of the new residential quarters. The double dog legged building form casually closes the emerging inner courtyard. To the south it protrudes into the park landscape, spreads beyond the alignment of its neighbours, and seeks to weave itself into the greater urban structure. The dog-legged form reduces the size of scale and accentuates the identity of the individual entrances. An urban open space stretches between the street and the west facade and along the full length of the building. Main entrances and ground floor public rooms are concentrated here and face the outdoor recreation spaces, canopied by scattered trees, for everyday meetings, communal events and studying.

Die nördliche Anbindung an die Strasse und die reduzierte Gebäudehöhe schaffen über den Strassenraum hinweg den Bezug zur vorwiegenden Geometrie des Quartiers. Der zweifach geknickte Riegel schliesst beiläufig die vorgegebene Hofsituation ab, ragt in die südliche Parkanlage hinein und verbindet sich dadurch mit der übergeordneten Siedlungsstruktur. Die Knickung des Körpers reduziert die Grossmassstäblichkeit und erhöht die Identität der einzelnen Eingänge. Dem Gebäude ist zur Quartierstrasse hin ein urbaner mit Bäumen bepflanzter Aussenraum vorgelagert, welcher zur Begegnung, gemeinsamen Veranstaltungen und zum Studieren einlädt. Eingänge und öffentlichen Erdgeschossnutzungen werden deshalb hauptsächlich auf diesen Vorplatz orientiert.

The new building provides low price residential living area for students and is divided into long- and shortterm living. The project contains a total of 30 apartments (7-9 students), 6 living clusters (13-15 students) and 5 studio apartments (2-3 students) accommodating approximately 330 students. Beside bedrooms all apartments have a flowing open planned day area with extra high ceilinged live-in kitchen/sitting room and west facing loggia. This specific spacial arrangement allows good natural light into the depth of the apartments and creates a generous view over the surrounding area.

Das gebaute Projekt stellt preisgünstigen Wohnraum für Studenten zur Verfügung und ist in unbefristetes und befristetes Wohnen organisiert. Total entstehen 30 Wohnungen (7-9 Studenten), 6 Wohncluster (13-15 Studenten) und 5 Studiowohnungen (2-3 Studenten). Somit entsteht neuer Wohnraum für 330 Studenten. Alle Wohneinheiten weisen neben den Zimmern einen fliessenden Tagesbereich mit einer überhohen Wohnküche und vorgelagerter Loggia zur Westseite hin auf. Diese spezifische Disposition erlaubt eine gute Belichtung bis in die Tiefe der Grundrisse und ermöglicht grosszügige Ausblicke.

20


18 93

STUDENT HOUSING + COMMUNITY SPACE


Third Floor 0

3. Floor 1:500

5

94

Cross Section Ground Floor

Ground Floor 1:500

Longitudinal Section

0

5

0

5

10m


95


WOHNHOCHHAUS. HIRZENBACH ZÜRICH.

WOHNHOCHHAUS. HIRZENBACH ZURICH. BOLTSHAUSER ARCHITEKTEN www.boltshauser.info Architects: Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost: Construction date: Photos by:

Boltshauser Architekten Housing Zürich, Switzerland Noldin Immobilien AG 14,600 m2 36 Mio CHF | 33 Mio EUR 2014 Kuster Frey (KF), Beat Bühler (BB)

Landscape Architect: Engineering:

4D Landschaftsarchitekten, Bern Basler & Hoffmann, Zürich BKM Ingenieure, St. Gallen Conzett, Bronzini, Gartmann Ing. Chur

96

Location

The new apartment tower and the one story commercial building formally represent the existing urban typology of low-lying public functions and high-rising housing blocks. However, the unique interior spatial organization of the apartments, which is expressed in the façade, sets this building apart from its modernistic urban environment. The 12-story building height presented the potential for a spatial concept to be generated through its section: The targeted mix of typologies from two-story duplex apartments, requiring a definitive structural grid, to single story loft apartments seeking structural flexibility, lead to a spanning plate structural system. The bridge-like structural solution fulfills the varied spatial requirements of the apartment typologies which can be read in the facade. Maisonette apartments are distinguished by partial double height spaces and a floor layout which encompasses the full building depth. In contrast, the loft apartments celebrate the idea of open space. Here the sliding walls and functional cores are the room dividing elements. The enveloping balconies carved out of the building volume visually extend the interior out into the surrounding landscape.

Die neue Hochhausscheibe und der vorgelagerte Flachbau orientieren sich an der vorgefundenen städtebaulichen Typologie, indem die öffentlichen Funktionen als niedrige Baukörper, die Wohnnutzungen hingegen in der Vertikalen entwickelt werden. Die volumetrische Bezugnahme der blockhaften Baukörper auf ihre modernistische Umgebung wird bei der Wohnscheibe von einer eigenständigen inneren Raumordnung überlagert, welche die Fassaden identitätsstiftend prägt. Die 12-Geschossigkeit des Gebäudes wird zum Potential für ein Raumkonzept, das aus dem Schnitt generiert wird: Die angestrebte Wohnungsmischung aus Duplex-Einheiten, die in ihrer Zweigeschossigkeit eine größere strukturelle Bestimmtheit aufweisen, und eingeschossigen Loftwohnungen, die nach struktureller Flexibilität streben, führt zu einem Platten-ScheibenTragwerk. Dessen brückenartige Konzeption erfüllt die unterschiedlichen Bedingungen der Geschosse und macht sie außen ablesbar. Die Maisonette-Wohnungen zeichnen sich dabei durch teilweise zweigeschossige Lufträume und ihre über die Gebäudetiefe verspannten Grundrisse aus. In den Loftgeschossen hingegen wird die Idee des freien Grundrisses zelebriert, indem die eingestellten Kerne als trennende Elemente den Raum strukturieren und die durchlaufenden, in das Volumen eingezogenen Balkondecks eine Raumerweiterung in die umgendende Landschaft hinaus erzeugen.


19 97

KF

COLLECTIVE HOUSING + COMMERCIAL BUILDING


Prov . A usf ühr ung 206 WOHNHAUS HIRZENBACH BAUHERR:

ARCHITEKT:

Gezeichnet:

VO

Noldin Immobilien AG

BOLTSHAUSER ARCHITEKTEN AG

Zweierstrasse 35 8004 Zürich

Dubsstrasse 45 | CH-8003 Zürich T +41(0)43 311 19 49 | F +41(0)43 311 19 40 info@boltshauser.info | www.boltshauser.info

Gez.:

Datum:

O

Format:

gedruckt:

95/60

Massstab:

N

M

B

L

K

J

I

H

G

F

E

D

C

B

A

25.02.11

Planstand:

mks

206_091_sc_BB_50

A

G

ZU RAB

BAUVORHABEN: Hirzenbachstrasse 40, Grosswiesenstrasse 167 8051 Zürich

206_090_sc_AA_50

Ansicht Fassade Ost

12.07.12

1:100 206_121_fs_o_100

Planbezeichnung

Änderungsinhalt:

12. Dach

+38.615

Index NR.: +37.39 +36.89

+36.61

+33.96

11. Obergeschoss, DG2

+34.065

+33.66

OF

NF

C

D

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

+31.01

2

1

B

A

!

A

6.OG

10. Obergeschoss, DG1

SF B

H

C

+31.115

+30.71

9. Obergeschoss, NG2

4

3

C

F

G

E

WF 5

OFFB

+28.165

6

+28.06

+27.76

8. Obergeschoss, NG1

7

6.OG

D

Materialisierung Fassade:

8

D

vorfabrizierte Betonelemente, Beton Typ NPK C, eingefärbt Zuschlag für Einfärbung mit Fluvio 4 Zement Produktbeispiel: Kaolor PP900 Dosierung: 4% vom Bindemittelgehalt

9 U

T

S

R

Q

P

B

O

A

+25.11

Sonnenschutz: seitlich geführter Stoffstoren, Textil BKZ 5.2, Farbe beige

6.OG

+25.215

+24.81

7. Obergeschoss, ZG

+24.545

Holz/Metall Fenster: aussen einbrennlackiert, Farbe baubronze

WFFB

+22.04

+21.89

Sixth Floor

+22.03

+21.59

6. Obergeschoss, NG2

+18.94

+19.045

+18.64

+15.99

5. Obergeschoss, NG1

+16.095

+15.69

4. Obergeschoss, ZG

+15.425

+12.92

+12.77

+12.91

+12.47

3. Obergeschoss, G3-3

+9.82

+9.925

+9.52

2. Obergeschoss, G3-2

+6.87

+6.975

+6.57

+3.92

1. Obergeschoss, G3-1

+4.025

+3.62

+2.80

+2.74

+3.355

3456778

Erdgeschoss

95:44:;5 <58=>8

5.OG

J/$// )(.*+&$+/(0$1$2$

?@"(A(BCD@E4E677@=F G:HII6@7

?@"(A(BCD@E4E677@=F G:HII6@7

Fusskote: -0.31= 428.89 m.ü.M.

Fusskote: -0.29 = +428.91m.ü.M.

J/$// )(.*+&$+/(0$1$2$

"#$''()(*+%$,% "#$%&

"#$%&

"+$++-

5.OG

Hochwasser Grundwasserspiegel 427.00m.ü.M Untergeschoss mittlerer Grundwasserspiegel 426.40m.ü.M

Hochwasser Grundwasserspiegel 427.30m.ü.M mittlerer Grundwasserspiegel 426.40m.ü.M

Fifth Floor 5.OG

4.07

O

4.75

N

4.07

M

4.89

4.07

L

K

4.40

4.07

J

4.07

I

H

4.40

G

4.07

F

4.89

4.07

E

4.75

D

4.07

C

B

A

East Elevation

4.OG

206 WOHNHAUS HIRZENBACH Hirzenbachstrasse 40, Grosswiesenstrasse 167 8051 Zürich

98

ARCHITEKT:

Dubsstrasse 45 | CH-8003 Zürich T +41(0)43 311 19 49 | F +41(0)43 311 19 40 info@boltshauser.info | www.boltshauser.info

Noldin Immobilien AG

4.OG

A

VOR

BAUHERR:

Zweierstrasse 35 8004 Zürich

BOLTSHAUSER ARCHITEKTEN AG

Gezeichnet: Format:

Massstab:

mks 95/60

Datum:

Änderungsinhalt:

MKS

29.02.12

Anpassung Loggiaelemente

Planstand:

25.02.11

gedruckt:

12.07.12

D

B

E

E

F

A

G

H

I

J

K

206_090_sc_AA_50

C

206_600_sc_E_20

G

B

L

M

O

N

1:100

Planbezeichnung

Gez.:

F

A

206_602_sc_G_20

G BZU

BAUVORHABEN:

206_091_sc_BB_50

Prov . A usf ühr ung Ansicht Fassade West

206_601_sc_F_20

Fourth Floor 4.OG

206_123_fs_w_100

12. Dach

+38.615

Index NR.: 001

+37.39 +36.89

+36.61

11. Obergeschoss, DG2

+33.96

+34.065

+33.66

OF

NF

10

D

A

E

F

G

H

I

J

K

L

M

N

O

+31.01

1

C

2

5

B

10. Obergeschoss, DG1

!

0 1

SF B

A

H

C

+30.71

9. Obergeschoss, NG2

4

3

C

+31.115

F

G

E

WF

+28.06

+27.76

D 8 9

5

10

T B

S

R

Q

P A

8. Obergeschoss, NG1

Materialisierung Fassade: D

U

0 1

+28.165

6

10

7

5

5

OFFB

0 1

vorfabrizierte Betonelemente, Beton Typ NPK C, eingefärbt Zuschlag für Einfärbung mit Fluvio 4 Zement Produktbeispiel: Kaolor PP900 Dosierung: 4% vom Bindemittelgehalt

+25.11

O

Holz/Metall Fenster: aussen einbrennlackiert, Farbe baubronze

+25.215

+24.81 +24.545

7. Obergeschoss, ZG

WFFB

Sonnenschutz: seitlich geführter Stoffstoren, Textil BKZ 5.2, Farbe beige +22.04

+21.89

+22.03

+21.59

6. Obergeschoss, NG2

+18.94

+19.045

+18.64

+15.99

5. Obergeschoss, NG1

+16.095

+15.69 +15.425

4. Obergeschoss, ZG

+12.92

+12.77

+12.91

+12.47

3. Obergeschoss, G3-3

+9.82

+9.925

+9.52

2. Obergeschoss, G3-2

+6.87

+6.975

+6.57

+3.92

1. Obergeschoss, G3-1

+4.025

+3.62 +3.355

Erdgeschoss

2.3453

6)()) "#$%&'(&)#*(+(,(

-0.90

-1.40

Zugang Hochhaus

-1.40

Untergeschoss

Zugang Hochhaus

Veloraum

-4.00

-4.03

-4.63

Pumpenschacht gemäss Aquatec

Cross Section Cross Section

0 1

5

4.07

West Elevation

10

A

4.75

B

4.07

C

4.89

D

4.07

E

4.40

F

4.07

G

4.07

H

4.40

I

4.07

J

4.89

K

4.07

L

4.75

0

M

4.07

5

N

10m O

2.3453 -./00/1.


KF

KF

BB

KF

BB

KF

99


Toni-Areal. ZÜRICH-WEST.

20

Toni-Areal. ZURICH-WEST. EM2N www.em2n.ch Principals: Overall leaders: Project leaders:

Typology: Location: Client: Area: Cost : Construction date:

Photos by:

100

Cost and Project management: Civil engineer: Landscape architecture:

20

Mathias Müller, Daniel Niggli Björn Rimner (Associate), Christof Zollinger (Associate) Enis Basartangil, Nils Heffungs, Fabian Hörmann (Associate, Project management competition), Jochen Kremer Mixed-use Building (education, culture, housing) Förrlibuckstrasse 109, 8005 Zürich Allreal Toni AG represented by Allreal Generalunternehmung AG 125’000 m2 547 Million CHF Study commission: 2005, 1st prize Planning: 2005–2011 Construction: 2008–2014 Filip Dujardin (FD) Roland Tännler (RT) Roger Frei (RF) b+p baurealisation AG, Zurich Walt + Galmarini AG, Zurich Studio Vulkan Landschaftsarchitektur, Zurich For further data see this project into the urban context of Kreis 5. Pp 104

0

Location

1:10000

100

200

500 Site plan

The aim of the conversion of the large former Toni milk processing building into a location for education, culture and housing was to formulate a concept for a building that is almost the size of an entire urban block.

Im Umbau der ehemaligen Grossmolkerei auf dem ToniAreal zu einem Standort für Bildung, Kultur und Wohnen galt es, ein Konzept für ein Haus zu finden, das fast die Grösse eines Stadtgevierts aufweist.

Our design suggested dealing with the size of the project by means of a kind of internal urbanism. The existing system of ramps was reinterpreted as a vertical boulevard and became the building’s main circulation system. As a counterpart to this we placed a large entrance hall, conceived as a public space, at the intersection of the high-rise and the lower parts of the building. An internal spatial figure is created that is connected by a series of halls, squares, voids and cascading staircases. It helps establish identity and places the many different functions like the buildings in a city, functioning as a kind of spatial catalyst that makes internal exchange possible.

Unser Entwurf schlug vor, der Grösse des Projekts mit einer Art innerem Urbanismus zu begegnen. Die bestehende Rampenanlage wurde dabei neu als vertikaler Boulevard interpretiert und zu einer Haupterschliessung umfunktioniert. An die Schnittstelle von Hoch- und Flachbau legten wir als Gegenstück dazu eine grosse, als öffentlicher Raum konzipierte Eingangshalle. Verbunden durch eine Abfolge von Hallen, Plätzen, Lufträumen und kaskadenartigen Treppenanlagen entstand eine identitätsstiftende innere Raumfigur, die die vielen unterschiedlichen Nutzungen wie Häuser in der Stadt verortet und als räumlicher Katalysator den internen Austausch ermöglicht.

In addition to the urban planning challenges, many different questions were also posed at an architectural level: for instance how to deal in design terms with the extremely divergent scales and with the large number of very specific functions, or what overall atmospheric mood is most appropriate for such an extremely dense complex. In this regard the existing industrial building offered productive resistance and served us as a constant sparring partner. To create diversity and variety the architecture works with various degrees of refinement at different places: generally raw, here and there more refined, sometimes over-defined, mostly under-defined.

Neben städtebaulichen Herausforderungen stellten sich auch auf der architektonischen Ebene vielfältige Fragen, beispielsweise nach dem gestalterischen Umgang mit den extrem divergierenden Massstabsebenen, mit dem Problem der grossen Zahl von sehr spezifischen Nutzungen oder der übergeordneten atmosphärischen Stimmung des hochverdichteten Komplexes. Der produktive Widerstand des bestehenden Industriebauwerks diente uns dabei als ständiger Sparringpartner. Um Vielfalt und Abwechslung zu erzeugen, arbeitet die Architektur mit lokal unterschiedlichen Verfeinerungsgraden: meistens roh, ab und zu auch veredelt, mal über-, oft unterdeterminiert.

A wide range of extremely different spaces is created, extending from functional public halls and circulation spaces to intimate rehearsal cabinets: the building as city, the city as building.

Es entsteht ein breites Angebot an äusserst unterschiedlichen Räumen, von nutzbaren öffentlichen Hallen und Erschliessungsräumen hin zu intimen Übungskammern: Das Haus als Stadt, die Stadt als Haus.


20 101

FD

MIXED USE BUILDING: EDUCATION + CULTURE + HOUSING


Axonometric Drawing

Eight Floor. Rooftop promenade

Axonometric drawi

0

102

20

50

100 Ebene 8

1: 2000

Fifth Floor North Elevation

N

0 1: 2000

Ground Floor

0

50

100m

20

50

100 Ebene 5

Longitudinal Section

0

25

50m


FD

RT

103

FD

RF

FD


g

ZURICH_KREIS5 / DISTRICT 5

104

K5

i

d c

a f

e

LIMMAT RIVER

h

TRAMDEPOT HARD

b

ESCHER-WYSS-AREAL

20

TECHNOPARK

k

CITY WEST COMPLEX

MIGROS HERDERN

KREIS 5 / THE CITY OF ZURICH OFFICIALLY HAS 12 URBAN DISTRICTS, CALLED STADTKREISE. THEY ARE SIMPLY NUMBERED FROM 1 TO 12. DISTRICT 5, KNOWN AS “INDUSTRIEQUARTIER”, BETWEEN THE LIMMAT RIVER AND THE TRAIN TRACKS LEAVING ZURICH TRAIN MAINSTATION HAUPTBANHOF, IT CONTAINS THE FORMER INDUSTRIAL AREA OF ZURICH WHICH HAS GONE UNDER A LARGE-SCALE REZONING TO CREATE UPSCALE MODERN HOUSING, RETAIL AND COMMERCIAL. DISTRICT 5 HAS BEEN UNDERGOING AN URBAN PLANNING PROCESS THAT IS TRANSFORMING IT FROM A MONOFUNCTIONAL INDUSTRIAL ZONE INTO A MIXED FUNCTION URBAN DISTRICT.

HARDTURM SADIUM (PROJECT)

K5


20

TONI-AREAL_ REFURBISHMENT OF A FORMER MILK-PROCESSING FACTORY_MIXED-USE CENTER AND HOUSING _2005-2014 THIS PLATFORM FOR EDUCATION AND CULTURE HOSTS THE ZURICH UNIVERSITY OF THE ARTS,AND APPLIED SCIENCES, AREA_125.000 SQM EM2N ARCHITECTS

a

PRIME TOWER_HIGH-RISE OFFICE BUILDING_MAAG AREAL_2004-2011 126M HIGH WITH 36 FLOORS. GIGON-GUYER ARCHITECTS

b

SCHIFFBAU_REFURBISHMENT OF AN HISTORICAL SHIPBUILDING HALL_ CULTURAL CENTER_1996-2001 WORKSHOPS, STUDIO, REHEARSAL STAGES AND OTHER FACILITIES OF THE ZURICH SCHAUSPIELHAUS (THEATRE) PREVIOUSLY SCATTERED ACROSS DIFFERENT SITES ARE GATHERED TOGETHER HERE TO FORM A CENTRE ON THE FORMER SULZER-ESCHER-WYSS INDUSTRIAL SITE (SHIPYARD). ORTNER-ORTNER ARCHITECTS

c d e

MOBIMO TOWER_ 24-STORY HIGH-RISE APARTMENT BUILDING_2002-2012 R.DIENER-M.DINER ARCHITECTS ZÖLLY TOWER_HIGH-RISE RESIDENTIAL BUILDING_2009-2014 80M HIGH,128 APARTMENTS M.MEILI,M.PETER ARCHITECTS FACADE DESIGN IN IN COLLABORATION WITH WINHOV AND HARATORI ARCHITECTS “IM VIADUKT”_REFURBISHMENT VIADUCT ARCHES. _MARKET HALL,RESTAURANTS,SHOPS,CULTURAL AND SOCIAL SPACES _2008-2010. EM2N ARCHITECTS

f

FREITAG TOWER_ FLAGSHIP STORE OF THE FREITAG BRAND_2006 USED CONTAINERS HAVE BEEN CONVERTED INTO THIS BIG STYLISH TOWER SPILLMANN-ECHSLE ARCHITECTS

g

LÖWENBRÄU-AREAL_ARTS CENTER, RESIDENTIAL TOWER AND OFFICE BUILDING_2005-2014 REMODELLING AND EXPANSION OF THE SPATIAL PROGRAMME OF LÖWENBRÄU SITE ( FORMER BEER BREWERY); ADDITION TO THE EXISTING GALLERIES WITH NEW RESIDENTIAL, OFFICE AND EXHIBITION USES BY MEANS OF REFURBISHMENT AND NEW BUILD. GIGON-GUYER , ATELIER -WW ARCHITECTS

h

ESCHER TERRACE_ HIGH-RISE APARTMENT BUILDING AND REFURBISHMENT OF A WAREHOUSE_2007-2013 REHEARSAL STAGES FOR THE OPERA HOUSE WILL BE INTEGRATE WITH THE EXISTING BUILDINGS. E2A ARCHITECTS

i

HOUSING DEVELOPMENT KRAFTWERK1 _1998-2001 KRAFTWERK1 IS A COOPERATIVE HOUSING AND WORKSPACE PROJECT. IT STARTED AS AN EXPERIMENT IN THE REAL ESTATE CRISIS OF THE 1990s, DEPARTING FROM THE VISION OF A WORLDWIDE MOVEMENT OF APPROPRIATION OF FORMER INDUSTRIAL AREAS. KRAFTWERK1 BECAME A COLLECTIVE SELF ORGANIZED, ENVIRONAMENTALLY AND ECONOMICALLY SUSTAINABLE URBAN ALTERNATIVE, WITHIN A MIX OF RESIDENTIAL, SOPCIAL AND COMMERCIAL SPACES. STÜCHELI, BÜNZLI-COURVOISIER ARCHITECTS

k

BERNOULLIHÄUSER _1914-1929 THE BERNOULLI HOUSES ARE NAMED AFTER THE ARCHITECT. THESE HOUSES ARE A GARDEN CITY PROJECT FROM THE 1920S AND WERE MEANT TO BE SOLDWITHOUT PROFIT TO THE WORKERS. H.BERNOULLI ARCHITECT

105


afterword


The urban dynamics determine the scope of architectural responses to specific challenges. The former are subjected to economical and social phenomena that often move away from the field of influence of architects. Nevertheless we have seen in previous projects, how they explore, test and apply housing solutions adapted to their place and time. In this respect, housing cooperatives in Zurich constitute a good example. Nowadays an interesting question arise, in the case of Barcelona, where new conditions are provoking a rethought in the kind of answers often provided by architecture. New actors and agencies emerge from a critical scenario, making evident that housing is a right rather than a commodity.

107


CURATORS THEORY HOSTS

After the Housing Nightmare: New players, new organizations, new forms Josep Maria Montaner Zaida Muxí

108

At the end of 2015 two premises are being confirmed. One, that traditional homogeneous housing policies no longer make sense and are no longer useful in a context that is entirely different in urban, social, technical, political and economic terms. And two, that this need for a change of model is made all the more acute by the great damage caused by the abandoning of the developmentalist model, starting in 2008, as a consequence of the collapse of financial models in America and Europe, and worsened by neoliberal policies of public spending cuts, especially in the south of Europe. The result is that foreclosures and forcible evictions have left thousands of homes empty and in the hands of financial institutions, while at the same time many thousands of people are denied access to housing by the requirements of the systems of access previously in force, such as that they constitute a stable family, couple or household with an income guaranteed by a permanent employment contract.

In light of the above, housing policies need to be rethought in response to the new conditions, and not only in terms of architectural design but also in terms of programmes, of the people and agencies involved, of systems of tenancy and economic models, and of the structure of the city. All of this means that housing policies today need to be highly diversified and complementary, pivoting on a series of priority axes: - The incorporation of empty homes for social use on a rental basis; - The construction of homes with new models of management, tenancy and morphology-typology; - Small-scale interventions attuned to the logic of the renovation and rehabilitation of neighbourhoods and actively embracing the different capacities and capabilities of the future residents, not only their ability to pay rent but also their potential for generating work. In this respect, grassroots citizen’s movements have taken the lead in coming up with workable alternatives. The first of these, in legislative terms,1 is acceptance of the option of handing back the keys in termination of the mortgage in order to protect people against the situation of total and permanent exclusion, in time and space, in which households unable to meet the repayments find themselves; the guarantee of rehousing; and the fight against exclusion in the form of energy poverty. Another crucial contribution is being made by experiments with new forms of cooperative organization,2 which involve active grassroots participation and will result in alternative architectural typologies and construction systems, given that they must adapt from the outset to a real diversity of lifestyles and economic and technical capacities. In this new context of a self-managed

cooperative economy, if these homes are not flexible and sustainable then they are not possible. Among the characteristics that are beginning to reveal themselves in the new housing resulting from cooperative and participatory processes is a focus on austerity and efficiency in the space-durability-technology-beauty correlation, in so far as housing is clearly a utility that has no need of the superfluous and the merely cosmetic, the formal qualities of which derive from its essence and its process. Social rent, directly related to people’s actual economic capacity, is the fairest legal way to implementing the right to adequate housing, in a society which ever fewer people have a permanent work contract, a condition of stability that was the basis for access to housing prior to the collapse of the former model. This change in policy is essential to address the critical situation created by the system of social precarity that has been imposed by neoliberalism and poses a grave threat to people’s human and social rights.

1. http://afectadosporlahipoteca.com/2015/07/25/aprobada-por-unanimidad-la-ilp-contra-los-desahucios-y-la-pobreza-energetica/ 2. http://www.laborda.coop/

Josep Maria Montaner, architect Councillor for Housing, Barcelona City Council Zaida Muxí, architect Director of Urbanism, Santa Coloma de Gramenet Town Council


gültigen Anforderungen versagt wurde. So mussten die Anwärter ihre Stabilität als Familie, Paar oder Haushalt in Form eines über einen unbefristeten Arbeitsvertrag garantierten Einkommens nachweisen.

Nach dem Immobilienalbtraum: Neue Akteure, neue Organisationen, neue Formen Josep Maria Montaner Zaida Muxí Ende 2015 finden zwei Prämissen ihre Bestätigung. Erstens ist die traditionelle homogene Wohnungspolitik nicht mehr sinnvoll und zweckmäßig, da sich ihr Kontext in urbaner, sozialer, technischer politischer und wirtschaftlicher Hinsicht komplett verändert hat. Zweitens wird die Notwendigkeit für ein verändertes Vorgehen infolge des großen Schadens noch dringlicher, der durch die Aufgabe des von der ökonomischen Entwicklung abhängigen Programms entstanden ist. Dieser zeigte sich ab 2008 als Auswirkung des Zusammenbruchs der Finanzierungsmodelle in Amerika und Europa und wurde durch neoliberale politische Maßnahmen wie Ausgabenkürzungen – insbesondere im Süden Europas – noch verschlimmert. Im Ergebnis haben Kündigungen von Hypotheken und Zwangsräumungen dazu geführt, dass Tausende von Eigenheimen leer standen und sich in der Hand von Geldinstituten befanden, während gleichzeitig tausenden Menschen der Zugang zu Wohnraum aufgrund der früher

In Anbetracht des oben Geschilderten muss die Wohnungspolitik unter Berücksichtigung der neuen Bedingungen überdacht werden, und zwar nicht nur im Hinblick auf den architektonischen Entwurf, sondern auch im Hinblick auf Programme, die beteiligten Menschen und Behörden, die Vermietungssysteme, die Wirtschaftsprognosen und die städtischen Strukturen. Dies alles bedeutet, dass in der Wohnungspolitik heute stark diversifiziert und mit einander ergänzenden Schritten vorgegangen werden muss. Dabei sind folgende Schwerpunkte zu berücksichtigen: – Die Einbeziehung leerstehender Wohnstätten auf Mietbasis; – der Bau von Häusern mit neuen Modellen für Management, Mietverhältnisse sowie Stadtmorphologie und Bautypologie; – Eingriffe in kleinem Umfang, die auf die Bedingungen der Renovierung und Sanierung von Wohngegenden abgestimmt sind und sich aktiv mit den unterschiedlichen Kompetenzen und Befähigungen der zukünftigen Bewohner auseinandersetzen, nicht nur mit ihrer Fähigkeit, die Miete zu zahlen, sondern auch mit ihrem Potenzial hinsichtlich der Schaffung von Arbeitsplätzen. In diesem Zusammenhang haben basisdemokratische Bürgerbewegungen die Führung übernommen und praktikable Alternativen entwickelt. In juristischer Hinsicht1 ist die wichtigste dieser Alternativen die Option, dass bei Beendigung einer Hypothek die Schlüssel zurückgegeben werden, um die Menschen davor zu schützen, dass sie komplett und auf Dauer aus ihrem Haus vertrieben werden, wie es zahlungsunfähigen Familien immer wieder geschieht; hierzu gehören weiterhin die Garantie einer Neuunterbringung und das Abwehren einer Exklusion in Form von Stromabschaltungen. Ein weiterer entscheidender Beitrag zur Entwicklung erfolgt durch Experimente mit neuen Formen der genossenschaftlichen Organisation, 2 etwa aktiver

basisdemokratischer Partizipation. Sie werden zu alternativen Bautypologien und Konstruktionssystem führen, da sie sich von Beginn an einer Vielzahl von Lebensweisen und ökonomischen und technischen Kompetenzen anpassen müssen. Wenn diese Häuser in diesem neuen Umfeld einer selbst verwalteten genossenschaftlichen Ökonomie keine Flexibilität und Nachhaltigkeit aufweisen, dann sind sie nicht realisierbar. Zu den Charakteristiken der neuen Bauformen, die aus kooperativen und partizipatorischen Prozessen hervorgehen, gehört die Konzentration auf Nüchternheit und Effizienz in der Korrelation von Raum, Haltbarkeit, Technologie und Schönheit, insofern als der Wohnungsbau eindeutig von Nützlichkeitserwägungen bestimmt wird und keinen Bedarf für Überflüssiges und rein Kosmetisches hat, da die formalen Qualitäten sich aus seiner Essenz und der Durchführung ergeben. Eine sozialverträgliche Miete, die den finanziellen Möglichkeiten der Menschen entspricht, ist der fairste legale Weg, das Recht auf adäquate Unterbringung in einer Gesellschaft einzuführen, in der immer weniger Menschen einen unbefristeten Arbeitsvertrag haben, was vor dem Zusammenbruch des alten Modells als Zeichen für stabile Verhältnisse gewertet wurde und daher eine Bedingung für den Zugang zu Wohnraum war. Diese Veränderung der Politik ist ein wesentlicher Faktor bei der Auseinandersetzung mit der kritischen Situation, die eine Folge des vom Neoliberalismus aufgezwungenen Systems des sozialen Prekariats ist und eine starke Bedrohung der sozialen Rechte der Menschen darstellt.

1. http://afectadosporlahipoteca.com/2015/07/25/aprobada-por-unanimidad-la-ilp-contra-los-desahucios-y-la-pobreza-energetica/ 2. http://www.laborda.coop/

Josep Maria Montaner, Architekt Stadtrat für Wohnungswesen, Stadtrat Barcelona Zaida Muxí, Architekt Director des Amts für Städtebau, Stadtverwaltung von Santa Coloma de Gramenet

109


_IMPORT ZURICH PROMOTED BY

WITH THE PATRONAGE OF

WITH THE SUPPORT OF Anmeldung zur Monatsveranstaltung am 27. August 2015 Bis spätestens 24. August 2015 beim Sekretariat BSA Zürich, Pascale Wappel, c/o

agps architecture ltd. Zypressenstrasse 71 8004 Zürich t 044 298 20 20 f 044 298 20 21 e p. wappel@agps.ch Teilnahme

……….. Person(en)


SPONSORS PREMIUM

SPONSORS PREMIUM

PRIVATE SPONSORS


NYC

LAX


KOMMENDE CONNECTIONS

CPN LON

BER

BXL PRS

PRÓXIMAS CONEXIONES

GVA BCN

MLN

ZRH TIC

113

UPCOMING CONNECTIONS


Cities Connection Project seeks to establish connections at the level of architectural themes between the city of Barcelona and other European cities or regions with a significant architectural tradition. A series of architecture exhibitions are the focus of this project that also offers other events such as conferences, meetings among universities, and synergies among the professional architects involved. Each event, which is called “connection”, starts off with a first exhibition in Barcelona, showing the work of the invited architects from the guest city, and is followed by a return exhibition of the Barcelona architects’ work in the partner city. Every exchange is articulated around a fresh theme, which is related to the specific characteristics of the invited city or region. The _Import Zurich title focuses mainly on Zurich’s cooperative housing projects. For about fifteen years now a renaissance of urban living is bringing about a renewal of activity among the housing cooperatives. They have adopted ecological standards, they have developed socially compatible forms of denser building, and their largescale projects have a significant impact on the qualitative development of the city’s neighbourhoods. This is coupled with a new generation of architects who, thanks in part to architecture competitions, have had the opportunity to develop, test out and affirm their own field of research within a very strict and deterministic legal framework. With contributions by André Bideau, Daniel Kurz, Josep Maria Montaner, and Zaida Muxí Includes texts in English and German. Cities Connection Project (CCP) is a project curated by Nicola Regusci and Xavier Bustos

With Augmented Reality contents in each project. dpr-barcelona www.dpr-barcelona.com

Profile for dpr-barcelona

Import Zurich. Cooperative Housing: New Ways of Inhabiting  

The _Import Zurich title focuses mainly on Zurich’s cooperative housing projects. For about fifteen years now a renaissance of urban living...

Import Zurich. Cooperative Housing: New Ways of Inhabiting  

The _Import Zurich title focuses mainly on Zurich’s cooperative housing projects. For about fifteen years now a renaissance of urban living...

Advertisement