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City preparing for Communities in Bloom By David Willberg dwillberg@estevanmercury.ca

Rod March hopes the city will be looking good when the judges for the Communities in Bloom competition visit Estevan on July 25. The city signed up for Communities in Bloom last year and entered in the entry level category of non-evaluated friends. This year Estevan will be part of the evaluated friends division. As part of evaluated friends, the city will not compete for a bloom rating, but will receive the insight from the judges in six different criteria: tidiness, environmental action, heritage conservation, urban forestry, landscape and floral displays. Points will be awarded for each criteria, with a grand total of 1,000 points. “They will come and look at the city, and see how we’re doing in terms of setting that baseline model for ‘This is what you guys have done in the last couple of years in terms of beautification, in terms of looking after your trees, in terms of waste management and how good the parks look,’” said March. People can help out with Estevan’s entry in Communities in Bloom by keeping their yards and businesses tidy. If they would like to participate with the local Communities in Bloom committee, they are asked to contact Shannon Wanner, who is the city’s parks foreman. He applauded Wanner for taking the lead on Communities in Bloom with the projects and initiatives this year. Since 1995, Communities in Bloom has allowed communities to benefit from participating in the program, with economic benefits such as sharing information about best practices. There has also been lower vandalism rates and benefits for tourism, hospitality and retail industries. Social benefits are increased civic pride and community involvement, improved

quality of life and participation from all ages and walks of life in the community. The enhancement of green spaces are beneficial for environmental stewardship. March believes the parks in the city are looking pretty good, and he stressed that beautification plays an important role in attracting businesses. “I think the community, from the feedback we’re getting, thinks we’re looking after things,” said March. The city has been busy with other parks initiatives this summer. The spray parks at Royal Heights Veterans’ Memorial Park and Padwick Park have been very busy, and now the city is looking to add a third splash park at the Trojan Park. That spray park is expected to be among March’s requests for the 2019 budget. Originally the third splash park was to be at the Kensington Greens Park, but March said Trojan is a better location. “To put it into Kensington Greens would have cost a lot more, because I’d have to directionally drill to hit all of the utilities that are required,” said March. “I’d have to lift, by one metre, the elevation grade at Kensington Greens. And then you’re limited to parking.” Trojan has lots of room, and utilities that are already in place, which will save the city about $35,000. There is ample parking along Heritage Drive, a play structure already in place, and close proximity to the Estevan Shoppers Mall. But there is work that will take place at Kensington Greens to improve the drainage at the park. “I am determined to fix up that park and get the drainage working properly. What that entails is digging a 500-metre long ditch, a swale that will be dug down with proper piping and drainage running through it,” said March. Until the drainage is fixed, it won’t reach its potential as a park due to soil issues. A2 » NUMEROUS

Centennial Park is one of numerous parks in Estevan. It and other parks in the city will be evaluated when judges visit the city for the Communities in Bloom competition.

Upgrades have been made to the medians on Souris Avenue North this year. File photo

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A2

SOUTHEAST LIFESTYLES, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2018

Construction underway on new Oxbow pool

It was a day that Oxbow area residents have been waiting for: the start of construction on the town’s new outdoor swimming pool. Construction officially began on Monday. Jen Buchanan, who is the chairperson of the committee, said a lot of people have been asking questions about when the project would begin, and now they can see some work. Some were watching at the site once construction began. The new swimming pool is near the community’s town hall, about a block north of the present swimming pool. Materials and equipment have been brought in, and excavation is underway. The fencing was set up on Tuesday. “The new pool is a junior Olympic pool, so it will have the six lanes, so then our speed swimming club (the Oxbow Silver Seals) can host provincial swim meets,” said Buchanan. There will also be a splash park area and a zerobreach entry for easy access. Other highlights will be a diving board and a climbing wall at one side of the pool. “It angles back into the

pool, so it’s like a rock climbing wall, and you can go up. If you fall off, you fall back into the pool,” said Buchanan. A slide could be added in the future. The new pool will be bigger than what the town has now. The current pool is too small to host higher-level speed swimming events. It’s also harder for some people to access because it doesn’t have a zero-breach entry. And the smaller and larger pools are separate. “We currently don’t have any spray features,” Buchanan said. While the old pool, which is nearly 50 years old, has been able to remain open, Buchanan doubts it would have survived through to the 2019 season. “We were hoping that the old pool would open this year, and it did, but it probably wouldn’t last another year,” said Buchanan. “The pumps were breaking down, the boiler quit last year, and then it was in such rough shape it couldn’t be sand blasted any more. The ground water was coming up through the cement.” The town has been filling holes, and patching and

An overhead view of the site that will be home to Oxbow’s new swimming pool. Photo submitted

painting over them, in the last couple of years to keep the pool running. The pool has received “amazing” support from the community, she said, as the

committee has generated $1 million in donations and fundraising. Fundraising began six years ago, when the energy sector was thriving, but after the price of oil

plunged in 2014, the new pool committee continued to receive support. A couple of big donations recently helped out with the fundraising.

Buchanan hopes the new pool will be finished in the first or second week of July next year, but that will be dependent on weather conditions and other factors. The opening of the new pool would be a little later than when the current pool’s traditional opening date, which is in late May or early June; this year the pool opened in the middle of June. But Buchanan said people are looking forward to when the new pool is finally open, as she believes it will be worth the wait.

Numerous parks projects underway « A1 Other projects are taking place this summer. About 80 trees will be planted at the Pleasantdale Softball Diamonds, thanks to support with the Rotary Club of Estevan’s Foundation. It’s a project that is also tied into Communities in Bloom. March noted that the softball players have to look into the sun during their evening games because of

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the facility’s location. The trees will be planted along the fence lines for the outfields. “In time, maybe 10 years or so, they won’t be looking into the sun when they’re playing ball.” The process has also started of changing steel flagpoles in the city. One at Centennial Park has already been installed. Poles at Cactus Park will also be changed. March hopes to replace six per year at facilities around the city. A new liner has been added to the pool at the Hillcrest Play Park, in time

for the start of play parks season. Once the spray park season is over at the end of August, construction will begin on new washroom facilities and the accessible playground structure at Royal Heights. The city is also expected to wrap up the paving stone project for the medians on Souris Avenue North this year. Work in the cemetery will be taking place this September, with a new columbarium structure and a pathway into the columbarium, with roman stones and

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wheelchair accessibility. A facelift is taking place for the south and the west sides of the Power Dodge Curling Centre as well, and new siding is being added. Posts have been reinforced and meshing has been installed at the tennis courts. Planters are being transitioned to self-watering, and have done well even amid the storms the city has received. All irrigation is being shifted to timers, so they won’t be on during the day. “We’re switching them to better control the application of water on all of the irrigated type 1 properties that we have. That also helps us out in terms of vegetation control, and in terms of mowing.”


Community A3

Friday, July 13, 2018

Theatre’s summer camps offer lots to students By Brady Bateman bbateman@estevanmercury.ca

Estevan’s Souris Valley Theatre youth summer camps for ages six and up are in full swing starting this week. The camps are offered for three separate age groups which are categorized into Act 1 for ages six to eight, Act 2 for ages nine to 12, and Act 3 for ages 10 and up. Ran by actors, summer volunteers and other local instructors, each camp is specifically designed to teach the children a variety of the-

atre related skills and express themselves on stage, and each camp ends with a performance put on by the youths for family and friends. “Right now we have the Act 1 kids, so around ages six to eight, we have them for this week and then beginning next week we have the nine to 12 year-olds,” said Kelsey Potoma, who is in charge of running the youth camps for the first time this year. “This is definitely the most kids I’ve ever seen in Act 1. I’ve been doing the camp for about three years

Young people gather around to play a game of handshake murderer during a day of youth theatre camp hosted by the Souris Valley Theatre.

now and we’ve got about 24 kids for this first week which is quite a few more than we had last year.” Located at Frehlick Hall in the Woodlawn

Regional Park, the Souris Valley Theatre has been open and an active part of the community since 1989 and produces two main stage productions during

Literacy group enjoys summer with Nature Smarts By Brady Bateman bbateman@estevanmercury.ca

A little bit of summer rain didn’t stop kids from attending the Estevan Area Literacy Group’s (EALG) Nature Smarts summer camp program held at Hillcrest Play Park on Tuesday. Founded in 2007, the literacy group is a nonprofit group with the mission of providing childhood, family, workplace and Indigenous literacy, as well as English as an additional language programs. “Tuesdays and Wednesdays we host Nature Smarts where we talk with the kids about all kinds of nature events and the Thursdays are held at St. Paul’s United Church and are for summer English Fun, for kids whose first language is not English. It’s a smaller group with only around 20 kids,” said Regina Barz, who is the new literacy co-

Cody Maley looks up from her crafts with Margaret Duncan while attending the Estevan Area Literacy Group’s Nature Smarts summer camp.

ordingator for the EALG. “Last week we were almost immediately fully booked, but with the thunder and rain this week we’ll sometimes have kids who are scared, so they just don’t show up. “We also have the drop in kids, kids whose parents will come line up and wait to see if someone else doesn’t show up so they can have the spot.”

Nature Smarts has been hosted in the city by the EALG for several years as a continual summer program with free admission for youths between the ages of five to 10 thanks to their sponsors. Tuesdays are at Hillcrest Play Park and Wednesdays are at the Nicholson Centre. “Our costs are actually totally covered through funding, with our major

funds coming from United Way (Estevan), Saskatchewan Lotteries and Access Communications Children’s Fund.” Barz noted that the camps are a fantastic way for children to make new friends and learn useful skills while also allowing them some freedom away from their families during the summer months and getting an education, a service, which can be incredibly useful, especially to those families that are unable to plan trips due to busy work schedules. Running for roughly an hour and a half Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays throughout July and into August, the camps offer fun activities that are designed to keep the kids minds stimulated and provided an atmosphere to continue to develop mentally and create new friendships.

the summer months every year while also hosting their youth summer camps. “We’re hoping to bring an enjoyment of theatre to the kids,” said Potoma. “We teach them what it’s like to be on stage, and how to feel comfortable on stage performing.” The camps are designed as a way for young people to learn aspects of theatre

ranging from acting, lighting, choreography, sound design and positive peer interaction. Varying in length the camps range from one week with the youngest ages’ and two weeks in Act 3. As well, pricing varies depending on age groups, with Act 1 camp having the lowest cost at $125, Act 2 at $175 and Act 3 being the most expensive at $275. “We have Act 1 running from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. and have them all week until Friday with a performance at noon and then Act 2 is 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. all week with their performance on the Friday, and Act 3 we have them for two weeks and they put on a full length musical number for their family.”


Viewpoints A4

Friday, July 13, 2018

EDITORIAL Publisher: Rick Sadick Editor: David Willberg Editorial Staff: Brian Zinchuk Corey Atkinson Brady Bateman Sales Manager: Deanna Tarnes Advertising Sales: Teresa Hrywkiw Production Department: Fay Bonthoux Administration: Vaila Lindenbach Jennifer Bucsis

Published weekly by Prairie Newspaper Group Limited Partnership, 68 Souris Ave, Estevan, SK S4A 2M3. Advertising rates are available upon request and are subject to change without notice. Conditions of editorial and advertising content: The Southeast Lifestyles attempts to be accurate in Editorial and Advertising content; however, no guarantee is given or implied. The Southeast Lifestyles reserves the right to revise or reject any or all editorial and advertising content as the newspaper's principals see fit. The Southeast Lifestyles will not be responsible for more than one incorrect insertion of an advertisement, and is not responsible for errors in advertisements except for the space occupied by such errors. The Southeast Lifestyles will not be responsible for manuscripts, photographs, negatives and other related material that may be submitted for possible publication. All of the The Southeast Lifestyles' content is protected by Canadian Copyright laws. Reviews and similar mention of material in this newspaper is granted on the provision that The Southeast Lifestyles receives credit. Otherwise, any reproduction without the permission of the publisher is prohibited. Advertisers purchase space and circulation only. Rights to any advertisement produced by The Southeast Lifestyles, including artwork, typography, photos, etc., remain the property of this newspaper. Advertisements or parts thereof may not be reproduced or assigned without the consent of the publisher. Published weekly in Southeast Saskatchewan by the Prairie Newspaper Group, a division of GVIC Communications Corp. The Glacier group of companies collects personal information from our customers in the normal course of business transactions. We use that information to provide you with our products and services you request. On occasion we may contact you for purposes of research, surveys and other such matters. To provide you with better service we may share your personal information with our sister companies and also outside, selected third parties who perform work for us as suppliers, agents, service providers and information gatherers. Our subscription list may be provided to other organizations who have products and services that may be of interest to you. If you do not wish to participate in such matters, please contact us at the following address: 68 Souris Ave. N., Estevan, SK S4A 2M3; or phone (306) 634-2654. For a complete statement of our privacy policy, please go to our Website at: www.estevanmercury.ca The Southeast Lifestyles is owned and operated by Prairie Newspaper Group, a subsidiary of Glacier Media Inc.

Volume 3 Issue 43 We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Publications Assistance Program toward our mailing costs.

Contact us: (306) 634-2654 68 Souris Avenue N. Estevan, SK S4A 2M3 www.estevanmercury.ca @Estevan_Mercury facebook.com/EstevanMercury

The wait will continue for twinning We’re getting a clearer picture of how Highways 39 and 6 will look in a few years. You can’t blame local residents for being frustrated. The federal government announced last week that it would contribute $53.3 million towards the construction of passing lanes and double lanes on the highways over the next few years. It will also support resurfacing the roads and some intersection upgrades, although the location of those upgrades weren’t disclosed. Sixteen sets of passing lanes will be constructed. The first two sets, on Highway 6 south of Regina, will be built this year. Remaining sets will be coming in the next few years. And there will be twinning south of Regina, between Milestone and Corinne, and south of Weyburn. There won’t be double lanes northwest of the city, to the dismay of many local residents. It would be nice to have double lanes from the junction of the truck bypass to Hitchcock. And there are unanswered questions regarding the project. Perhaps the biggest is timing. It’s supposed to take five years to complete. Does that mean we won’t see passing lanes down here for another few years? If construction starts in Regina, and it works its way down here, then we will be at the bottom of the completion list. If the passing lanes start at Regina and Estevan, and work their way to the middle, then the construction of the first passing lanes locally will occur sooner. And it means the last of the passing lanes would be constructed around McTaggart. We’ll take passing lanes when they’re built, but we want twinning. Passing lanes might be an effective system for highways such as No. 10 from Regina to Yorkton, or Highway 5 from Saskatoon to Humboldt. But Highways 39 and 6 are a different story due to the heavy truck traffic that exists in this trade corridor. Semi-trailer units make up a significant portion of the vehicular traffic on Highway 39. Work trucks for the oil and gas sector and other industries also account for a significant amount of traffic on the highway. If activity levels in the oil and gas sector return to their pre-2015 levels, then we’ll see even more traffic on these two highways. With 16 sets of passing lanes between Estevan and Regina, and three stretches with double lanes, we should see passing lanes every 10 kilometres or so. But will they alleviate the traffic bottlenecks that we encounter on a regular basis that can be eight, 10 or even 12 vehicles in length? Probably not. You’re likely to see vehicles in the lefthand passing lane who have no business being there. And once the passing lane is finished, you’ll still have too many motorists trying to make aggressive passes. Passing lanes will make a difference, but they won’t make the difference that some would have you believe.

A new place for me to hang my proverbial hat Words have always been a tool to me, something I’ve been able to mould to fit any and all situations, a dagger hidden behind a cloak ready to be unsheathed at any moment. I found my passion for storytelling at a young age, while other youths escaped reality through television; I found respite in putting pen to paper. My grandma would pay me for every short story I brought her; at the time I saw nothing more in it than a way to make a few easy dollars. It spurred me on, however, to continue honing my craft, belated to deliver my next masterpiece to my grandma’s eager eyes. Throughout my teenage years, I fell away from writing. As these things go, you become busy with friends, girls and filling the daytime hours causing mischief wherever possible. It wasn’t until I found myself dreading my job, a terribly boring 5 a.m. maintenance gig, that I decided I needed to walk a path that would lead to not just another job, but a career that I could be truly passionate about. I began scouring the web for college courses that spoke to my interests. I debated the idea of business administration, but wanted something that would allow me the freedom to be both in and out of an office whenever I chose. Shortly after I began my search, I was reminiscing with my mother about the stories my grandma had paid me for years ago, and I realized my path was always in front of me, I just had to look behind

workforce with zero experience, and in an industry that has seen large layoffs in recent years. I persevered, however, and sent my resumé across Canada in hopes that I would stand above the rest of the competition and have a publication take pity on my student loan debt-ridden soul. My prayers were answered by the team at Estevan Mercury Publications, who had received my resumé and were intrigued by my previous work and ability to put thoughts to paper in a provoking manner. Intense conversations were had, by way of calls, emails and texts and after what, to me, felt like an eternity, I was offered a position as a reporter with Estevan Mercury publications. The “fun” wasn’t over yet though, as now I had to find accommodations, transportation and family help to uproot my life from Calgary, and transition to Estevan in only a few weeks. I had fears of moving to Saskatchewan as I’ve become acquainted to living near mountains and trees and had heard stories of how flat and “boring” the landscape could be. Upon my arrival in Estevan, I couldn’t have been more elated. The town that I had envisioned as flat and dreary was actually green and lush; there were even trees and hills. I knew the second I arrived I could call this place home, and that’s what I plan to do. As I write my own story in my new home, I hope to be able to help write a bit of yours as well.

Brady Bateman None but a blockhead me to remember. I applied to the Southern Alberta Institute of Technology (SAIT), hoping to gain admittance to their journalism program. From the research I had done, it is renowned for their hands on, practical teaching style. A few weeks passed before I received word from SAIT regarding my acceptance, and one day I got bad news. I had been accepted into the program; however, the classes were full, so I had been put on a wait list and would probably have to wait until the upcoming year to reapply. Come late August I got a phone call that would change my life. Someone had dropped out of the program and a spot was now open for me, the only issue was that I had less than two weeks to organize tuition, acquire student loans, and get prepared to start my schooling. Never one to run from adversity, I gladly accepted the challenge, and with the help of my parents I got all my proverbial ducks in a row in the knick of time. Two years of schooling flew by before my eyes. My passion for writing had been reignited and a new passion had been found in the art of photojournalism. The hunt was then on. I shuddered at the thought of having spent two years in school and returning to the


Cheers & Jeers A5

Friday, July 13, 2018

Cheers Cheers to the Estevan Motor Speedway for the beautiful facility, well-run racing program and a great opportunity for family-friendly fun. Don’t say there’s nothing fun to do in Estevan. Cheers to all of the local youths who participated in the 4-H show and sale last week. It’s good to see young people engaged in constructive activities. Cheers to the different organizations in the city offering summer camps for young people. It helps to keep kids from spending too much time in front of a screen. Cheers to everyone who was involved with the Saskatchewan Lacrosse Association provincials on the weekend. A lot of people were involved to make this event a success. Cheers to the Souris Valley Theatre for a great start to the season with the performance by Tenille Arts on Saturday and the opening nights for Homecoming.

Jeers Jeers to the adults that serve liquor to under-age youths. It’s a very irresponsible action. Jeers to SaskPower’s decision to retire Units 4 and 5 at the Boundary Dam Power Station. Natural gas might seem like a good idea now, but what about when the price eventually soars? Jeers to those who ignore the “no right hand turns on red lights” signs for eastbound traffic on Fourth Street and westbound traffic on Perkins Street, at that intersection of Fourth, Perkins and Kensington Avenue. Jeers to those who bring their pets to the walking track at the Estevan Comprehensive School. There’s a reason why it says no pets. Jeers to the number of mosquitoes that we see in the region this summer. They’re really becoming a bother in many parts of the community.

To submit a cheer or a jeer, please email it to dwillberg@estevanmercury.ca, or visit www.estevanmercury.ca.

Summer camps underway at Estevan Art Gallery and Museum The Estevan Art Gallery and Museum (EAGM) has seen a good response for the summer camps it is offering this year. Four weeks of summer programming started with the Art and Activity Camp from July 9-12. Arts and crafts met running and playing throughout the four days. The bulk of the activities were held outside, and some of the activities were messy. The Art and Advertising Camp, which is offered through a partnership with Estevan Mercury Publications, will run from July 1619. Participants will learn about the workings of the newspaper and advertising. Children will also design an ad that will be published in the Mercury in August, and young people will tour the newspaper’s office. “They will have time every day to focus on their ads,” said Broster-Paradis. Participants will also look at print and comics in the fictional world, including comics and fairy tales. The last two camps for this year are new. Forts, Flags and Fortresses will happen from July 23-26, and will feature activities

Programmer Raven Broster-Paradis offers instruction for a game at the Estevan Art Gallery and Museum.

focused on building, breaking and exploring. “We’re making some really big flags, so I have four official-sized flags,” said Broster-Paradis. “So the kids will get to design those throughout the week and make them, and then we actually have the city coming down, as we’re going to make a little ceremony of it with parents, and we’re going to have the flags hoisted up on our flagpoles for the rest of the summer.” The i-Magic-nation camp will run from July 30 to Aug. 2, and will allow children to make potions and wands, tame

magical creatures and fly broomsticks in a celebration of fantasy. This year marked the first time the EAGM has had camps for full days rather than half-days, and BrosterParadis said it has been a positive move, thanks to a balance of physical activity and artistic time in each camp. It helps keep energy high throughout the day. “We weren’t sure at first how it would go over, if parents would prefer the half day because it’s a shorter time span,” said BrosterParadis. During the camps offered for spring break in

April, parents were lamenting the half-day schedule, because they couldn’t take half a day off from work. “Having this full day is really helpful for parents,” said Broster-Paradis. Now that they’re a fullday camp, the EAGM can provide better services to parents who have to work eight hours per day. Most of the camps are full, and the final camp was so popular that it had to be expanded to 30 participants. “It got so much attention right away, and it filled up so fast,” said BrosterParadis.

SaskTel improving rural Internet SaskTel has announced plans to improve 4G LTE cellular services in 43 rural communities throughout rural Saskatchewan by deploying a small cell site solution. Among the communities that will benefit are Kisbey, Manor, Midale and Torquay. The announcement includes the first 43 locations of Phase 2 of the Government of Saskatchewan’s December 2017 announcement of a four-phase initiative to provide rural communities with enhanced access to reliable cellular and high speed internet services. The upgrades on the first 43 towers will be completed by March 31, 2019 and the remaining 57 locations for Phase 2 will be announced when details are finalized.

“Our government understands that having access to fast and reliable communications services are vital in today’s digital world,” said Don Morgan, the minister responsible for SaskTel. “This most recent round of wireless upgrades from SaskTel will greatly benefit many residents, farms, and businesses who call rural Saskatchewan home.” “Today’s announcement further demonstrates our commitment to deliver world-class communications services to our customers throughout the province,” SaskTel acting president and CEO Doug Burnett said. “These upgrades will help bolster our network and add capacity to address the ever-growing demand for wireless data.”

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Faces A6

Friday, July 13, 2018

Cattle country

The Estevan Rotary Regional 4-H Show and Sale took place from July 3 to 5 at the Estevan Exhibition Grounds. Members of the Benson, Browning, Crossroads and Outram-Madigan 4-H Clubs participated in activities on July 3 and 4, and then judging, awards and the beef auction happened on July 5. Fifty youths were part of this year’s events.

Cooper Brokenshire was among the participants in the sale.

Casie Brokenshire parades her animal around the arena.

Gavin Fleck was among the youths in the sale.

Keara Christensen was entered in the sale.

Brenna Fornwald accepts the overall judging award from Chad Ross.


SOUTHEAST LIFESTYLES, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2018

Street Fair will draw people downtown The Estevan Downtown Business Association hopes to see a large crowd for its annual Street Fair on July 14. The 1200-block and part of the 1100-block of Fourth Street will be shut down for the event. Activities will run from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Jennifer Pettitt, who owns the Jenny Joans clothing store on Fourth Street, said there will be a wide variety of activities taking place. Activities for children will include bumper cars, face-painting and bouncy castles. Businesses will have instore specials during the day. “Each merchant will have their own sidewalk sale going on outside, so they will have deals, discounts and special promotions going on, as well as in-store specials,” said Pettitt. Charitable organizations will have booths set up to

raise funds for their community initiatives. Food trucks and other food vendors will be set up on Fourth Street. She hopes the local members of the Estevan Police Service and the Estevan Fire Rescue Service can be present for tours of their vehicles. Since the street will be closed off, it will allow people to take their time and browse the merchandise in a relaxed setting. Pettitt said the downtown merchants are always excited to get people to come take a look at what they have to offer. “There are always new businesses to check out, and we have some new members to the Downtown Business Association, so we like to bring everyone for a community event, to do it together and have a familyoriented event. It’s a really fun day.”

Co-op supports 4-H

From left, Barb Fornwald from the Southern Plains Co-op presented cheques for $1,000 each to local 4-H Club representatives Mason Mack from the Benson 4-H Club, Cassidy Ross from the Outram-Madigan 4-H Club and Gavin Fleck from the Browning 4-H Club during the Estevan Rotary Regional 4-H Show and Sale on July 5 at the Estevan Exhibition grounds.

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JULY 14, 2018 @ 10AM - 3PM

DOWNTOWN ESTEVAN

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SOUTHEAST LIFESTYLES, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2018

Five tile trends for the bathroom

NOW OPEN IN ESTEVAN! YOUR RESTORATION SPECIALISTS

Thinking of retiling your bathroom to update its look? To achieve a modern design, get inspired by these five trending tile styles.

1. Textured

Both modern and chic, textured ceramics are great for achieving a bold and unique look. Thanks to their abstract patterns and 3D effect, textured tiles are the perfect choice for creating a refined bathroom design.

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2. Herringbone

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Traditionally reserved for flooring, herringbone-patterned tiles are becoming increasingly popular on walls, especially when it comes to showers and backsplashes. This bold pattern is great for adding depth to any space.

4. Concrete

For an avant-garde, industrial design, opt for tiles that imitate the look of concrete. Incredibly modern, this ceramic style is the perfect complement to an urban-inspired bathroom.

5. XXL

Extra-large tiles are making a definite comeback in the bathroom. Ideal for smaller spaces, oversized tiles create an impression of depth that make rooms appear much bigger.

3. Imitation wood

Ceramic tiles that mimic the raw look of natural wood are in high demand this year. Available in a wide range of shades from light to dark, they’re perfect for giving your bathroom a warm, rustic feel.

Tips for designing the perfect home gym Do you feel like having a space where you can exercise (without judgment!) in the comfort of your own home? Here are a few tips to help you design the perfect home gym. First, whether you choose to use your garage or your basement, make sure that you set up your personal gym in a brightly lit and well-ventilated area. In order to maximize the square footage available and create a space that’s conducive to exercise, divide the room into different sections. For example, you could dedicate one area to cardio, another to strength training and yet another to stretching.

Stay motivated!

Design a space that’s visually appealing and that you wouldn’t mind spending a few hours each week in by painting the room your favourite colour or hanging some inspiring art on the walls. You could also put up a chalkboard (or bulletin board) to track your progress on. Finally, consider investing in a good sound system that will encourage you to keep moving to the beat of your favourite tunes.

In terms of equipment, always keep your budget in mind and evaluate your needs accordingly before making purchases you may regret. You can surely find a multipurpose, high-performance exercise machine at a specialty retailer in your area that won’t break the bank! Furthermore, stocking up on basic equipment, such as free weights, elastic bands, an exercise ball and a yoga mat, is always a great way to start.

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Energy A9

Friday, July 13, 2018

Saskatchewan rig count continues to climb By Brian Zinchuk brian.zinchuk@sasktel.net

Saskatchewan’s active rig count hit 58 on July 10, a bit better than the 51 it was at on July 12, 2017, but a massive improvement over the 15 working on July 12, 2016. Those numbers, according to sister publication Rig Locator (riglocator.ca), are welcome news to Bob Betts, general manager of Carnduffbased Betts Drilling. “I’ve got three drilling rigs out working. The third moved out today,” he said. “Two are in Saskatchewan, and one is in Manitoba.” Asked how things were looking for the rest of the summer, he said it was a bit patchy, and the phone was not ringing off the hook. But compared to previous years, hearing that there were 58 rigs working was welcome

news. “Great news. I’m super happy,” he said. Perhaps more significantly, not only has the rig count gone up, but there are several instances where rigs are pushing the boundaries of where activity has been in the recent years. This includes pushing northwards toward Kipling in the southeast, eastward from Turtleford in the northwest, and southward from Elrose in west central Saskatchewan. The active rig count got a big boost in the second week in July as Crescent Point Energy Corp. got in the game, rapidly climbing the leaderboard to tie for first place across the nation with 14 rigs working. This was most noticeable in the Torquay area, where the company recently deployed four rigs south of the village. Torc Oil & Gas Ltd. also had one rig working

in that area. Crescent Point had nine other rigs working in Saskatchewan. One was an outlier at Moose Valley, roughly 17 kilometres east of Corning. That rig was the furthest north in the southeast Saskatchewan area (excluding potash), in a region that generally has seen little to no activity for the last several years. Another rig was working a little closer to Stoughton, and a third was south of Kisbey. A singular Crescent Point rig was also working at Gainsborough. In southwest Saskatchewan, Crescent Point had three rigs, one at Rapdan, and another two at Leitchville, just northwest of Shaunavon. Two more rigs were working in close proximity at Dodsland. While Crescent Point has the most rigs, by far, it was only one of 23 oil companies drilling in Sas-

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11 new licenses issued to Monday, July 9 99998 Aldon Oils Hz........................................................................................................................ 3-14-6-7 101920 Crescent Point Energy Hz.................................................................................................... 16-29-8-9 101912 Crescent Point Energy Hz.................................................................................................. 16-12-1-13 102190 Adonai Resources II Vert....................................................................................................... 3-8-3-33 102071 Vermilion Energy Hz.............................................................................................................. 2-16-4-3 102102 Vermilion Energy Hz............................................................................................................ 18-12-1-3 102013 Arruga Resources Hz............................................................................................................... 5-6-7-9 102075 Torc Oil & Gas Hz................................................................................................................ 11-21-5-3 102575 Vermilion Energy Hz.............................................................................................................. 4-11-2-3 10000 Aldon Oils Hz...................................................................................................................... 12-11-6-7 102529 Crescent Point Energy Hz...................................................................................................... 9-19-7-9

katchewan. Newcomer Arruga Resources Ltd. was drilling at Huntoon, halfway between Stoughton and Midale. East of there, Midale Petroleums Ltd. had one rig east of Benson, Highrock Resources Ltd. had one rig at Minard, and Spectrum Resources Group Inc. had a rig in the same general area, too, although it was listed as Viewfield. Closer to Lampman, Torc Oil & Gas was drilling at Weir Hill. Southwest of Arcola, at Buffalo Head, Vermillion Resources Ltd. was working with one rig. It’s unclear if this is the same company, but Vermillion Energy Inc. had four rigs going, with one at Gainsborough, another at Alameda, a third at Oungre and a fourth at Openshaw, between Alameda and Northgate. Ridgeback Resources Ltd. had one rig at Handsworth. Burgess Creek Explora-

tion Inc. was at Star Valley with one rig, and Canadian Natural Resources Limited had rigs at Steelman, Golden Lake (just northeast of Maidstone) and Livelong. That last one at Livelong, east of Turtleford, is likely the furthest east a rig has been seen in that area since Pipeline News started doing these reports. Whitecap Resources had six rigs working, with one each at Weyburn, Kerrobert, Eagle Lake (south of Dodsland), Whiteside (east of Flaxcombe), Suffield and Bench (both near Gull Lake). Teine Energy Ltd. had four rigs split between Kindersley, Lucky Hills, Dodsland and Eureka. Raging River Exploration Inc., which is in the process of merging with Baytex Energy Ltd., had five rigs spread between Gleneath, Superb, Elrose, Onward and Plato. For its part, Baytex had one rig at Soda

Lake. Novus Energy Inc. had one rig at Flaxcombe. Steelhead Petroleum Ltd. had two rigs going, one at Kerrobert within throwing distance of a Raging River rig, and another at Mondou, along Highway 4, south of Elrose. This is the first time in the history of these reports over the past several years a rig has been seen in that vicinity. Rifle Shot Oil Corp. had one rig at Evesham, near Macklin, and Rife Resources Ltd. had a rig going at Battle River, just south of Lashburn. Husky Energy Inc. had three rigs going, one each at Edam, Dee Valley and Brightsand Lake. Gear Energy Ltd. had one rig at Celtic. Furthest north, and within sight of the Alberta border at Onion Lake, BlackPearl Resources Inc. had two rigs going in close proximity.

THE ESTEVAN MERCURY DRILLING REPORT Rig Report

86576 Trinidad Drilling..............................Crescent Point Energy..................................................... 8-14-3-9 100303 Stampede Drilling................................. Astra Oil Corp ........................................................ 14-19-2-4 96931 Stampede Drilling................................ Astra Oil Corp......................................................... 11-14-7-8 93K161 Precision Drilling.............................Whitecap Resources.................................................. 12-13-6-14 98543 Precision Drilling............................Crescent Point Energy................................................. 15-26-11-6 87440 Iron Hand Drilling...............................Vermilion Energy......................................................... 15-1-2-3 96442 Precision Drilling............................Crescent Point Energy................................................... 1-32-11-6 100259 Stampede Drilling................................. Astra Oil Corp......................................................... 13-32-5-7 89631 Horizon Drilling..................................Vermilion Energy....................................................... 3-18-2-13


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SOUTHEAST LIFESTYLES, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2018

Creighton Lodge residents excited for summer Submitted by Judy Pratt

The year is half over now and we’re all amazed how fast time flies. It doesn’t seem to matter how old you are, this comment is being made by people of all ages. It’s been said that it’s getting harder and harder to just enjoy the moment, although around Creighton Lodge that certainly isn’t true.

There are so many moments filled with music, fun, laughter and stories that most residents find life here very enjoyable. We’re enjoying our pots and hanging baskets of flowers all around the building (thanks again to the United Way Estevan Day of Caring and volunteers from Tundra Energy Marketing Ltd.) With all the rain we’ve been having, they are truly flourishing. 

There were a couple of forecasts for hail that prompted us to haul all the pots into the front entryway for protection. After two false alarms and a few pulled muscles, we decided to just leave them out there and hope for the best. We want to express our thanks to the Saskatchewan Lotteries for the grant they approved for us for the purchase of a

recumbent bicycle for the residents’ use. It is a wonderful piece of equipment, easy to get on, easy to operate and a gentle way to exercise the leg muscles without hurting ourselves. We once again are so fortunate to receive help from our community. June was quite full of music groups performing for us – a few more than we’ll see in July and August, I’m sure. Summer

is quiet as far as our entertainers go as they also need a break and we’re happy to see them return in September. We started the month with Mel Herman and Doreen Sanderson entertaining, followed shortly after by the Freebies, the Red Hat Ladies, the Happy Wanderers, Janice Hirsch and Bob Olson. We were also treated to a lovely piano recital of the students of Margaret Duncan. We want to thank all of you for your time and talents you shared with us. We were kept in shape with our weekly exercise programs. Tuesday, our instructor is Monica Mackenzie, Wednesday it’s Sharon Dayman and Friday it’s Irene Tarnes.    These women are so devoted to us and we appreciate the effort they put into making our exercise time so much fun. Sharon Dayman has completed the urban pole training and is going to help get our group going here in the lodge. It’s proven to be such a great physical program for seniors, helping them with balance, strength and posture, which is so important as we age.  Besides a big thank you to our exercise ladies, we’d like to thank Jessica Lewgood for doing an information session on urban poles with us. It was very interesting and a few new people are trying them out now. Our churches were

as usual, tending to our spiritual needs with our weekly Sunday services. We look forward to the services, especially when we can’t get out to church ourselves.   We also thank Trinity Lutheran, St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic and St. Paul’s United for bringing communion/ mass to us on a regular basis. Joan and Christina Wock are dedicated volunteers at the lodge. Joan calls Bingo for us every week while Christina goes around visiting with her therapy dogs. Thank you ladies for all you do for us. Our birthday party/ KFC volunteers are also very dedicated ladies. Rain, shine or hail they appear to help carry out our special activity. Thanks again to Margaret Mack, Marge Heidinger, Jean Delorme, Doreen Hagen and Sylvia Prime for being our friends and supporters. We also keep ourselves busy with our melt ball program, our movie afternoons and our cocktail hours thanks to Sharon Dayman and Norma Blackburn. Outside the lodge, we’ve seen a little activity with the replacement of a section of concrete near the front parking lot and the preparation for a huge concrete pad at the back of the building where we host our barbeques and more.    After that work is completed we look forward to the repaving of all our parking lots. So there’s lots to keep up with over here. 

Creighton Lodge offers entertainment and activities for its residents. File photo

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Classifieds A11

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ANNOUNCEMENTS

COMING EVENTS

Grant Walkom Loved with a love beyond all feeling. Missed with a grief beyond all tears. Love you forever Elaine

Highways to Heroes 5th Car Show, Snowbirds aerial performance, Skyhawks parachuting, music concert, July 15, 10 am. 15 Wing Air Base Moose Jaw. Call 306- 692-4245 or see udon FaceBook.

Friday, July 13, 2018

APARTMENTS/CONDOS FOR SALE

FEED & SEED

Condo For Sale Condo for sale at 1637 1st Street, ECI Estates, Estevan 1046 square feet. 2 bedrooms and 2 bathrooms Open concept living area and kitchen with an island, pantry, fridge, stove, microwave and dishwasher. Large balcony with a storage room. Laundry room with front loading washer and dryer. New flooring, paint, blinds and light fixtures. Underground heated parking.Very quiet concrete building. Available immediately. For further details or viewing Please call 306-471-9953

SUITES FOR RENT For Rent Three bedroom duplex, with all appliances and a/c included. Suite is non smoking. No pets. Available Aug 1. For further information phone 306-421-6907 or 306-634-2527

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Free fishing weekend is July 14 and 15 Saskatchewan’s annual summer free fishing weekend is July 14 and 15. Residents and visitors to the province are welcome to fish in any of Saskatchewan’s public waters open to sport fishing without purchasing a fishing licence. “Saskatchewan offers some of the best freshwater fishing in the world,” Environment Minister Dustin Duncan said. “Free fishing weekend is a great opportunity for families and visitors to make summer memories at one of our province’s many lakes.” For those new to fishing or interested in learning more on fishing necessities, local fishing experts Jason and Jeff Matity will be leading free learn to fish sessions during free fishing weekend. Participants will learn about fish identification, how to pack a tackle box, the process to clean and fillet a CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

fish and more. These free lake-side sessions run at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. in Douglas and Moose Mountain provincial parks on July 14, and Buffalo Pound and Echo Valley provincial parks on July 15. Anyone planning to take part in free fishing weekend should note that all other fishing regulations, including possession limits, gear restrictions and size limits on some lakes and rivers, remain in effect. Free fishing weekend does not apply in national parks and anyone planning on taking fish out of the province must purchase a licence. The first free fishing weekend in Saskatchewan was held in the summer of 1989 to encourage participation in sport fishing and increase public awareness about the value and diversity of angling opportunities in the province. In 2015, the province held the first winter free fishing weekend. Approximately 250,000 people sport fish in Saskatchewan each year, including more than 50,000 out-of-province anglers. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES

COMING EVENTS

COMING EVENTS FOR SALE - MISC Advertisements and statements contained herein are the sole responsibility of the persons or entities that post the advertisement, and the Saskatchewan Weekly Newspaper Association and membership do not make any warranty as to the accuracy, completeness, truthfulness or reliability of such advertisements. For greater information on advertising conditions, please consult the Association’s Blanket Advertising Conditions on our website at www.swna.com.

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SOUTHEAST LIFESTYLES, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2018

Church Directories St. John the Baptist Roman Catholic Parish

Remember

Your Loved Ones with a Memorial Tribute in The Estevan Mercury

Stay well rooted By Linda Wegner For the first time in a number of years, I’m truly excited about my vegeta-

ble garden. For one thing, I’m finally retired from my work as a business writer and now have time to spend

CAREERS

Corner 12th Avenue & 2nd Street

Phone: 306-634-2190 Fax: 306-634-6845

MASSES: Saturday: 7:00 p.m. Sunday: 10:00 a.m.

CAREERS

68 Souris Avenue N., Estevan 306. 634. 2654 www.estevanmercury.ca

weeding and nurturing both the flowers and edibles. Digging in the dirt never felt so good. Because my situation has changed, I’ve been able to spend hours planting and pulling and while I admit it’s a job that’s never finished, it sure feels good to stand back and survey the results of my hard work. Next and just as vital as time, is the fact that this year we applied new and rich loam to the garden beds. Frankly, I can hardly believe how things have popped up. The cucumbers and squash are loaded with blossoms; the peas and bean vines are drooping with their respective crops. This afternoon I harvested our first cabbage. Yum, freshly made coleslaw with home-grown produce. Although loaded with flowers, the tomato plants are behind those of the neighbours but I’ll just have to trust that they, too, will reward us. I’ve learned that there are at least two essential elements to a successful garden: sufficient water and well-rooted plants. Hubby has been assigned the watering chores and his diligence, combined with the occasional West Coast downpour, have so far taken care of the moisture demands. The soil and the water make for roots that go down deep. Vegetables flourish and flowers grow tall. I was reminded of these simply profound truths while reading Proverbs 12:3. “The root of the righteous cannot be moved.” Later in the chapter he mentions the second result: “…the root of the righteous yields fruit” (12:12). Deep roots produce stability and healthy crops. Different results but the same principle, making me want to tend carefully to what grows in my heart.

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Friday, July 13, 2018

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Estevan quartet wins PGA-Sask golf scramble event and qualifies for regional tournament

By Corey Atkinson sports@Estevan Mercury

The most fun four people can have on a golf course is a Texas Scramble event, but the RBC PGA Saskatchewan event earlier this month at TS&M Woodlawn Golf Course was a little bit different than most. The event was a qualifier to the regional event at Royal Regina Golf Club in September and teams like Jeff Ward’s had to have a mix of skills. “This was the first time I’ve seen something like that here,” said Ward, president of the golf course. “You could only have two members with a single digit handicap and all members of the team had to have a minimum handicap of 32.” Ward was joined on the team by Mark Spencer, Brad Wilhelm and Nathan Wilhelm. “We all have different skill sets,” Ward said. “We’re all pretty good off the tee so getting the minimum three drives per person wasn’t as difficult as maybe some teams have. We have some people that are fairly good from the fairway in so we gave ourselves some birdie putting opportunities and we drained quite a few of those that were pretty lengthy. I think that’s what made the difference in the scores in the end.” The team had a score of 59, 13 under par, to win. There were seven teams indexed on handicap and won the local qualifier to go to the regional event in Regina Sept. 10. The winning team there will go to the

Cabot Trail Golf Course in Nova Scotia. Ward and the team is fairly serious about their golf and the uniqueness of the event is what sparked their interest. “You put something with PGA in the title and RBC, you can tell it’s a little more serious. It’s not a golf scramble where you’re going to support a charity,” said Ward. “It’s actually a competitive tournament where there’s actually rules. It was interesting and we had a few other people who were interested, and we had the right type of handicap to create a team that we thought would be competitive.” Woodlawn held up well for the competition, Ward said. Woodlawn general manager Amanda Minchin, no stranger to highly competitive golf, will join the team for the Sept. 10 event. “At this point it becomes a five-person team so that will change the dynamic,” Ward said. Now that the qualifying event is under their belt, a couple of months of range work will help but also some familiarity with Royal Regina would be a good thing to have. “I think most of us have played that course before,” Ward said. “I know we played a practice round on the Sunday before. That’s actually the course that Kyle Mulligan, our previous general manager for a couple of years (is at now). I’ve been in contact with him already and I believe we’re going to get up there and have a couple of practice rounds.”

From left, Mark Spencer, Jeff Ward, Brad Wilhelm and Nathan Wilhelm won a scramble event at the TS&M Woodlawn Golf Club earlier this month. Photo submitted

Eels members swim for medals in Swift Current and Nipawin It was once again another busy weekend for the Estevan Golden Eels Swim Club as they travelled to a pair of places and gathered up some more medals. At the Swift Current meet July 7, Hayden Baniulis won silver in the age 7-8 boys, Alianna Young won silver in the age 9-10 girls, Blake Andrist won silver in the age 9-10 boys, Alandra Young won bronze in the age 11-12 girls, Josie Andrist won gold and sister Alex Andrist won bronze for the age 13-14 girls, and Charlotte Andrist won silver in the age 15-16 girls. A total of 12 Eels made the trip. On July 9, Emily Sauder went up to Nipawin as the Eels’ lone representative and won silver in the 9-10-yearold girls. The Eels will hit the pool for more competitive swimming Saturday in Weyburn and Sunday in Assiniboia.

Emily Sauder represented the Estevan Golden Eels at a meet in Nipawin on July 9. Photo submitted


A14

SOUTHEAST LIFESTYLES, FRIDAY, JULY 13, 2018

Tanner Froese will play pro hockey next season

Estevan’s Tanner Froese has wrapped up a successful collegiate hockey career, and now he’s turning pro. The Idaho Steelheads of the East Coast Hockey League (ECHL), who play out of Boise, Idaho, announced on Tuesday that they have agreed to terms with Froese for the 201819 season. Froese, 25, played three years with the Power Dodge Estevan Bruins of the Saskatchewan Ju-

nior Hockey League from 2011-12 to 2013-14. In his final campaign, he served as the team’s captain, and finished with 23 goals and 57 points in 55 regular season games. He then had a four-year collegiate career at St. Norbert College. He served as captain during his senior season in 2017-18, leading the Green Knights to a National Collegiate Athletics Association Division III national championship.

“Tanner was the captain of a national championship team and he knows how to lead,” said Steelheads head coach and general manager Neil Graham. “He knows what it takes to win the big game.” Froese tallied 14 goals and 34 points in 32 games last season with St. Norbert, leading the team in scoring and earning Northern Collegiate Hockey Association all-conference team and all-tournament

team honours. The six-foot winger was also named to the all-conference team in 2016-17, when he served as alternate captain. He capped his college tenure with three assists in the national championship game, including the primary assist on the doubleovertime winner. “I’m definitely very excited to have this opportunity to be a part of the Steelheads organization,”

said Froese. “I’ve heard nothing but great things about the team, the coaching staff, and the city of Boise. It seems like a place that every player wants to be, so I’m looking forward to helping this team achieve its goals in any way I can.” Following his senior campaign last spring, Froese made his professional debut with the Fort Wayne Komets, appearing in three regular season ECHL games.

Estevan’s Tanner Froese has signed with the Idaho Steelheads of the East Coast Hockey League. File photo

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