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WELCOME y p p i n y t f t o n i ve m b e r No

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here’s a nip in the air and a nosh on the table. November is full of fun in Eureka Springs – a Food and Wine Festival, Fall Art Show, Veterans’ Weekend activities and a cornucopia of events before and after Thanksgiving. And there’s something just for you at the Fall Antique Show, whether you love retro, vintage or bona fide antiques. It’s a great month to be outdoors, too, when vistas are open and the ancient Ozark Mountains reveal their secrets. Early holiday shopping is just the ticket this month, while the brisk air beckons you to walk the hilly streets and browse our many galleries and downtown merchants. We’ve got great trails at two city parks for hiking and biking, too, and excellent massage therapists and spas to pamper your tired muscles afterward. As always, there’s good fishing and expert guides to show you where to sink a line. Outdoors or inside, there’s a November adventure waiting just for you here in the “Extraordinary Escape.” +

Head West ...

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lso just outside of town is the Eureka Springs West area, with gorgeous retreat facilities, cabins, cottages, attractions, lake activities and things to do. It’s the perfect place for a romantic getaway, group meetings and more. Take a few minutes to explore it all at www. eurekaspringswest.com. +

See p. 21

Eureka Springs

WEST

Vol. 2 No. 3

is all about fun and it’s actually a guide! What to do, where to go, how to get there and how to plan a day in order to get it all in – packed into one publication you can keep in your car or hotel room and consult about how to make the most of your time in Eureka Springs. Story ideas and information for Independent Fun Guide can be emailed to editor@independentfunguide.com.

Chief Whipping Post C.D. White Hitching Post Gwen Etheredge Enid Swartz Post Haste Mary Pat Boian Post-er Boy Jeremiah ‘Bullfrog’ Alvarado-Owens Post-partum D(sigh)n Perlinda Pettigrew-Owens Post-ographers Jeremy Mason McGraw Melanie Myhre Richard Quick

Post-it Notes: Event submissions, reviews and contests editor@independentfunguide.com 479.253.6101 Advertising Sales Anita Taylor | 479.253.3380 anita.ads.independent@gmail.com Advertising Deadline is approximately the 2nd of each month.

c Independent Fun Guide is a special publication to Eureka Springs Independent and is published 11 times a year.

Copyright 2013

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Catch a falling star and put it in your pocket ...

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idden above Crescent Moon Beads, up a flight of stairs at 28 ½ Spring St., is Arnold Meteorites and More – an out of-the-way shop with an out-of-this-world collection of meteorites from small to anvil-sized (about 85 lbs.) gathered from all around the globe. The largest meteorite in the store is a 431 lb. tombstone-sized specimen that contains gemstones from space. Steve Arnold, owner and operator, started his meteorite career as a cache hunter searching for coins in fields. After learning of a Kansas woman who found and sold a meteorite to a university for a good chunk of money, Steve decided this was the job for him. Switching from hunting change to hunting meteorites with a metal detector, Steve went in search of the big one. And found it. Since his world record meteorite find of the 1,430 pound Brenham, Kan., Pallasite Main Mass in 2005, Steve Arnold has been featured in more newspaper articles, magazine stories, radio interviews, live TV news broadcasts and featured on more TV shows than any other meteorite hunter on the planet – and eventually he landed three seasons as host of the Science Discovery channel’s Meteorite Men.

After the series ended, Steve opened Arnold Meteorites and More in Eureka Springs and operates it with his wife, Qynne, and daughter, Kelsey. Any of them can answer your questions about meteorites, and will guide you through the shop’s displays with expert information. Steve’s last trip, a recent excursion to Morocco, netted 2,000 pieces of the Aguodal meteorite between what he found himself and purchased from other hunters. Also new at the shop are fragments of the huge fireball that exploded over Chelyabinsk, Russia, on Feb. 15 this year. This is the one you probably saw on the news that blasted out all the windows and was captured on video. If you’ve ever seen a meteor streak across the sky and wondered what actually hit the ground, or if you’ve ever dreamed of touching the moon … what’s stopping you? Arnold Meteorites can make that dream come true – because standing on the moon is actually an option in Eureka Springs! Steve has lots of moon rocks, one of which is in a package designed to be stood on. So get someone to grab the camera, and after taking a few small steps up the stairs you can take that one giant leap for mankind yourself! You’ll be able to tell the folks back home you stood on the moon, and your Facebook page will make history. +

Reprinted from August 2013 Fun Guide

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Here’s where to

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pen seven days a week, the Eureka Springs Chamber of Commerce Visitors’ Center is located in Pine Mountain Village on 62E just a minute or two from downtown. Racks of brochures and publications as well as maps and posters are on hand to make sure you get the latest information on places to stay, eat and visit. You’ll also find information on art galleries, attractions, events, restaurants, shopping, real estate and wedding services. You can find what you’re looking for or friendly staff will help you with tickets to shows, direct you to points of interest, and are always happy to make a phone call to get any information that’s not already in print at your fingertips. Start your visit in the media room with a brief film on the history of Eureka Springs and you’re ready to plan your adventure! +

Fun (Guide) facts

Ready, set, GO... Bearded wonders

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How to make not shaving pay off

Art Galleries

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Create your own gallery stroll, find a treasure

Hike ‘em or bike ‘em

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Happy trails through the woods

Food and Wine Weekend

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Never stop wining!

Events at a Glance

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A cornucopia full

Antiques forever Fashion fades, style never

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he Ozarks are not really a mountain range, they’re a geological plateau that rose out of the seabed 380 million years ago. The dome-shaped plateau was eventually weathered and eroded by abundant rains, and temperature extremes carved out caves, hills and hollows. Evidence of humans living here 10,000 years ago has been found underneath bluff shelters. Varied seasons made this “island” in the middle of the country a sanctuary for numerous plants and animals that would not normally be here, thus earning the name bioregion, meaning the natural order itself took care of finding a place to live. The Ozarks are headquarters for songbirds, eagles, hummingbirds, butterflies, elk, deer, wild turkey, chinquapin, persimmon, paw paw and black walnut trees. Traditional Ozark culture includes stories and music passed down through generations for so long there is no telling what’s true and what’s a fascinating embroidery of the truth. +

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UPPER SPRING – worth the climb

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ne of the many intriguing things about shopping Spring Street is the plethora of eye-catching stores lining both sides of the pavement. In the summer, some folks tend to start from Basin Park, head up one side of Spring and come down the other – often heading back down before the uphill climb past the Fine Art of Romance – especially in hot weather. But in November, there’s no excuse. Flatlanders who still don’t want to tackle (what we consider) the small hill can simply take the trolley to the top of Spring, right around the corner from the Post Office, and just zigzag back and forth all the way down to Basin Park in comfort. Four of our newest venues reside on what locals refer to as “Upper Spring.” At the top of Spring on the right is Sweet Spring Studio at #123 in an 1890 limestone building. Artist Barbara Kennedy, who excels in many mediums, owns the working studio and shop. She prefers to paint with oils for the vibrant color, but also uses acrylic paints, colored pencils and graphite in her twodimensional work. She also does beadwork and makes jewelry. Kennedy opened her studio in April 2013. Take a left at the post office and continue down to Allison Art Company at 77 Spring. This is another working studio and gallery, owned by Lyla Allison, a metal artist extraordinaire who also repairs jewelry. The shop opened in December 2012 and features paintings and sculptures. Do take time to stop in at Nibbles, our newest eatery at 79 Spring. The café is owned by Nick Roberts and Garnet Blanchette who can whip up some mighty tasty dishes. Try their special Panini of the Day, a smoothie or the “Nibblesburger.” Everything is always fresh. The fourth new business is across Spring at #82, Gallery 127. The gallery opened at this location in July 2013 and is jointly owned by artists Arthur Perry and Hugh Naftel. Upon

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entering the shop, visitors are struck first by the photography chosen by Perry and are then drawn to jewel cases displaying Naftel’s lovely copper, silver and pearl jewelry. All this beauty is displayed in a cozy space with a fireplace. See what you missed by not climbing the hill last summer? These four newer businesses are nestled among other long time residents – Gazebo Books, Granny’s, Magee Jewelry and many more browsing and shopping-worthy spots. Stop and visit them all. As you approach Pendergast corner, take another zigzag to a convenient bench and rest your feet while people watching – another shopping activity in Eureka Springs. It’s all downhill from there. +


Don’t fear the beard

– cheer the beard at the Great Ozarkan Beard-Off

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Share the hair and win prizes during this fun new event for a good cause

he first-ever Great Ozarkan BeardOff is Nov. 29 – Dec. 1, so guys, hang up your razors. Besides being a good excuse for not shaving, the BeardOff is a great fundraiser for the Arkansas Prostate Cancer Foundation. Men of all ages are invited to compete in several categories of hairiness – from all around great hair to beards, mustaches and freeform styling. Sounds like fun, but I don’t have a beard … No problem. In one of many contests, guys can start out with a clean shave on Nov. 1 and grow as much hair as they can before Nov. 29 to win prizes. There are also five other categories containing three contests each for those who already have a good start – from mustaches to sideburns, partial beards, styled beards, free form and naturals – at least 15 chances to share your hair with flair and win cash and prize packages, including a Grandpa Beard category. (Can you out-beard Santa Claus? We hear he signed up.) Isn’t that a bit sexist? We knew you’d ask. So ladies, there’s a Fake Beard category in which you can compete along with the gents. Be creative. We don’t care if you make a beard and/or moustache out of potholders (but if you can grow it, flaunt it!). So, what do we win? The top three competitors in each category win tremendous bragging rights, cash and/or prize packages. Better still, men win awareness about prostate cancer and the Prostate Cancer Foundation wins funding for its programs dealing with this serious issue. Here’s how it stacks up, but be sure to check the website and Facebook pages for additions and updates. Facial Hair Categories Prized Mustaches: 1) Natural: grooming, but no aids allowed, up to $100. 2) Groomed: styled, aids allowed, up to $100. 3) Freestyle: up to $100. Prized Partial Beards: 1) Sideburns: natural, up to $200. 2) Partial Beard: Freestyle, aids allowed, up to $200. 3) Partial Beard: natural, up to $200. Prized Full Beards: 1) Full Beard: freestyle, aids allowed, up to $250. 2) Full Beard: with styled mustache, up to $250. 3)

For all contests, sponsorships, information, registration and updates: www.goboeureka.com, GOBOEureka on Facebook, email goboeureka@gmail.com , (417) 310-2605. Full Beard: natural, up to $250. No Shave Nov. 1 – 29: Most growth in November, up to $300. Other Beards: 1) Best Fake Beard: up to $100. Best Grandpa/Santa Beard: up to $100. Group Beard Categories: 1) Most Bearded College Campus: Roving Trophy. 2) Most Bearded Workplace: Roving Trophy. 3) Band of Beards: up to $100 Most Popular Beard(s) in the Ozarks: Winner receives up to $100 (Winner established by greatest number of beard sponsors. All individual beards and group beards will be eligible for sponsorship.) Grand Prize: Grizzly Adams of the Ozarks Award for Best Overall Hair, $1000 ($500 cash and $500 Prize Package). All

contestants are heartily encouraged to enter the Grizzly Adams category. (Hosted at Cat House Lounge, this contest will take place after 9 p.m. and is shirts optional.) Where do we compete? The contests for different categories take place at various venues around town. There is a “Bingo” card to be stamped at each venue. This can then be turned in for prizes. A full schedule and locations map is posted on the website below. Entry Fees Individual Categories: $10 for all categories; $5 additional to enter Grizzly Adams category. Entry Fee in Group Beard categories: $5 per registered beard. www.goboeureka.com Don’t have a beard? Sponsor one! + November 2013

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www . thisiscolossal . com / tags / beards /

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Galleries Create a personal gallery stroll If you find something spectacular to take home, have someone snap your photo with it and email to newsdesk@independentfunguide.com … you could win tickets to a great show or attraction!

is everywhere in Eureka Springs

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ovember is a great time to get started on the ubiquitous holiday gift list. If handmade art is your giving passion, you’ll find plenty of it from one corner of Eureka Springs to the other. Rick and Iris Feutz at Iris in the Basin Park, next to Basin Park at 8 Spring, exhibit the work of more than 150 local and regional artists in their eclectic gallery of American fine arts and crafts. From paintings to pottery and whimsical art to wastebaskets, there’s something for every taste and budget. Beautiful works in glass, metal, clay and some surprising materials make for an interesting browse. On the Nov. 9 Gallery Stroll author, illustrator and artist Valerie Damon will be present to talk about her art and answer questions about her whimsical characters from 1 – 4 and 6 – 9 p.m. The gallery is open 9:30 a.m. – 5 p.m., and later on Saturdays. (479) 253-9494. +

Allison Art Company, 77 Spring, (479) 253-7635. ARTifacts Gallery of American Art, 37 Spring, www.artifactseurka.com, (479) 363-6660. Cherokee Mountain Gallery 5307 US 62E www.mcallistergallery.com, (479) 253-5353. 83 Spring Gallery, 85 Spring, www.83spring.com, (479) 253-8310. Eureka Fine Art Gallery, 63 N. Main, (479) 363-6000. Eureka Thyme, 19 Spring, (479) 363-9600. Eurekan Art Studio, 150 N. Main, (479) 253-0928. Fantasy & Stone, 81 Spring, www.FantasyandStone.com, (479) 253-5891. Fusion Squared, 84 Spring , www.eurekafusion.com, (479) 253-4999. Gallery 127, 82 Spring, (479) 981-9713. Gryphon’s Roost Gallery, 137 Spring, www.gryphonsroost.com, (479) 2535667. Harris Art Garden and Gallery, 2427 Hwy. 23N, by appointment only, (479) 253-2090. Iris at the Basin Park, 8 Spring, www.irisatthebasinpark.com, (479) 253-9494. J.A. Nelson Gallery, www.janelsongallery.com, (479) 253-4314. Jewel Box, 40 Spring, www.thejewelboxgallery.com, (479) 253-7828. Keels Creek Gallery and Winery, www.keelscreek.com, (479) 253-9463. Lady Bug Emporium, 11 Spring, www.ladybugemporium.com, 479-363-6566. Larry Mansker Studio, 711 Mill Hollow Road, www.larrymanskerstudio.com, (479) 253-5751. Mitchell’s Folly, 130 Spring, (479) 253-7030. Mosaic Studio, 55 N. Main, (479) 253-5544, (479) 244-5981. Muse, 12 S. Main, (651) 472-1621. Out on Main, 1 Basin Spring Ave, www.outonmain.com, (479) 253-8449. Paradise Pottery, 320 CR 210, www.paradisepottery.us, (479) 253-1547. The Prospect Gallery, 42 Prospect, www.theprospectgallery.com, (479) 2535012. Quicksilver Art / Fine Craft Gallery, 73 Spring, www.quicksilvergallery.com. (479) 253-7679. Sacred Art Center, Passion Play grounds, www.greatpassionplay.org, (800) 882-7529. Sacred Earth Gallery, 15845 US 62 W, www.TheSacredEarthGallery.com, (479) 253-7644. Serendipity at the Crescent Hotel, www.serendipityatthecrescent.com. (479) 253-2769. Studio 62, 335W.VanBuren (62W), www.studio62.biz, (479) 363-9209. Susan Morrison Signature Gallery, 78 Spring, www.susanmorrisonstore.com, (479) 253-8788. Sweet Spring Studio, 123 Spring, www.barbarakennedystudio.com, (479) 2536652. Tinmaker & Glitz, 45 ½ Spring, (479) 253-6601 or (580) 399-5887 Treehouse Gift Shop, 165 W. Van Buren, www.treehousecottages.com/gifts, (479) 253-8667. Wilson & Wilson Folk Art, 23 Spring, www.wilsonandwilsonfolkart.com, (479) 253-5105. Wildlife Gallery, 34 N. Main, (479) 244-6950. Zarks Fine Design Gallery, 67 Spring, www.zarksgallery.com, (479) 2532626, (877) 540-9805. + November 2013

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Grab a walking stick

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he Ozarks are filled with geographic wonders, and though some might think exploring nature should be left for summer, anyone who’s lived in in these parts a while knows it’s better hiking in the winter. November through March offers relief from such un-pleasantries as

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extreme heat, ticks, snakes, poison oak/ivy and chiggers. (And the views are incredible without all those leaves in the way.) Although some winter days may not be hospitable to extended outdoor exposure, here in the Ozarks it’s mild most of the time, and temperatures in the 50s or warmer


HIKING

or your bicycle shorts ...

and put on a healthy glow Spend a day on some great hiking/ biking trails without leaving the city!

are quite common – perfect for outdoor adventure. One of the many things people love about Eureka Springs is that beautiful nature is so close at hand. Not only is the city filled with trees, gardens and spring reserve parks, but we also boast two beautiful city parks, excellent for long walks or extended hikes. Black Bass Lake You’d never see it driving in, but Black Bass Lake is one of Eureka’s best hidden treasures – and it’s less than 5 minutes from Historic Downtown! Heading west on US 62 from Inn of the Ozarks, turn left onto Oil Springs Road just past Tad’s Quickstop (if you reach Caribe Restaurant you missed the turn). Black Bass Lake is at the end of the dirt road (stay left where it forks). There are minimal amenities at this park (use the restroom before you drive there), but you’ll be awed by the natural beauty and serenity. Black Bass Lake was Eureka’s main source of water until 1970, and a kiosk in the parking area explains the history of the dam, which was constructed in 1894 to create a water supply for the town. There is also informative information about the Karst geological makeup of the underground. Cyclists and hikers alike will enjoy the rough terrain and seasonal images these trails unveil. All trail access is from the parking area beneath the dam, where handicapped parking is also provided. Black Bass’s Standing Rock Trail is well maintained, wide and flat and leads to a lovely picnic table. Named for the interesting rock formation that rises along

the edge of the trail, this half-mile flat trail follows an old roadbed and is handicapped accessible. The trail terminates at a quaint picnic area. Continuing around the lake, Sycamore Spring Trail is narrower, slightly more challenging and crosses several springs. A small display about the healing history of the springs, 17 of which feed Black Bass Lake, is worth stopping to read. Above Sycamore Spring Trail is Bluff Trail, more challenging still, which overlooks the lake and follows interesting limestone outcroppings. The parking lot side of Bluff Trail leads into Oil Spring Trail. Dramatic bluffs flank the route as it winds through gnarly terrain. Faded slogans hide on rock faces and historic debris echo activities of the past. Connecting Oil Springs Road to Black Bass Lake, only half of the trail is on park property and meanders through the bluff line, away from the lake and back to upper Oil Springs Road. This trail can also be accessed halfway up (or down) Oil Springs Road. Lake Leatherwood Eureka’s claim to fame in the world of city parks is Lake Leatherwood, about 15 minutes from downtown. Turn right just before the big bridge on US 62 W, headed toward Rogers, not far after the Thorncrown Chapel turnoff. Lake Leatherwood is one of the country’s largest city parks with 1600 acres. The springfed lake and focus of the park encompasses 85 acres and boasts one of the country’s largest hand-cut native limestone dams; built in the 1940s by the WPA and listed on the National Register of Historic Plac-

es. Birders will be happy to know the park is home to more than 120 different bird species including heron, duck, geese, bald eagles and wild turkey. The woodlands surrounding the lake also support many species of non-winged wildlife. There are about a dozen trails at Leatherwood for a combined total of more than 21 miles varying from flat and wheelchair accessible to rugged, steep and narrow. All trails are shared with bicyclists. There are seven Valley Trails from a half-mile to four miles long. These stay on or near the valley floor and have fewer hills; however, many of them include rugged terrain and more creek crossings. Seeps may keep these trails slick and silty during wet conditions, but rarely muddy. Consider avoiding during excessively wet conditions. The most popular of these, Beacham Trail, is about 4 miles long and encircles the lake. Part of this hike involves walking across the dam itself – which provides a gorgeous view of the lake. Hikers also walk through the quarry that provided stone for the dam. A quick jaunt off the main path to The Point, on the western side of the trail, is recommended. Views from many of the trails are stunning and there is an excellent viewpoint here as well as a nice fishing spot and a picnic table. Leatherwood Trail, shorter and easier, leads from the main campground across Leatherwood Creek and runs along it to Leatherwood Fields. The trail continues around the soccer and baseball park. The half-mile Mulladay Hollow Trail offers a leisurely tour of several Civilian Conservation Corps structures. It passes the old CCC Barracks foundation and water source, and runs under an arched stone bridge before terminating at an old spring box. Access is at the head of the

Lower Field in the main park facility. There are also five Ridge Trails, from a half-mile to three miles in length, following mountain ridges and benches and featuring steep extended grades and varied terrain. The majority lead to the park’s deeper recesses and extremities. A rocky gravel base creates a durable tread surface even in wet conditions for most of these trails. Some with curvy, steep switchbacks explore hillsides overlooking the lake and meander through interesting rock formations and even some small sink holes. Two of the trails, Lost Ridge and Miner’s Rock, are popular with cyclists due to their elevation and series of benches and switchbacks. And for cyclists only … There’s just one more trail to conquer – the park’s newest – a one-way specificuse trail catering to advanced mountain bikers, the one-mile Downhill Challenge Trail. Riders must negotiate the climb on Miner’s Rock access road to the top. The fun begins there! The trail is littered with Technical Trail Features (TTF), so riders should use extreme caution and scope the trails before riding. Appropriate gear and bikes are recommended to safely attempt all TTFs. (These are marked with the international difficulty rating system.) Whether hiking or biking, before you head out stop by the bait shop at the boat dock and pick up the handy, clearlymarked map of the trails. Each trail is also described in detail to make it easy to plan your outdoor adventure. If the shop is closed there are usually maps in a pocket on the screen door. You can also download a map at leatherwoodcitypark.com. And don’t forget the camera! Happy trails… +

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DINING OUT Restaurant Quick Reference Guide

HOLIDAY ISLAND

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1. Angler’s Grill 2. Autumn Breeze 3. Bavarian Inn 4. Blarney Stone 5. Caribe 6. Casa Colina 7. Chelsea’s 8. Cottage Inn 9. DeVito’s 10. Ermilio’s 11. Eureka Live 12. Forest Hill 13. Fresh 14. Grand Taverne 15. Horizon Lakeview Restaurant 16. Island Grill & Sports Bar 17. Knuckleheads Pizza 18. Legends 19. Local Flavor Cafe 20. Mordour’s Pizza 21. Mud Street Cafe 22. Myrtie Mae’s 23. New Delhi 24. Pagoda Box 25. Roadhouse 26. Rowdy Beaver 27. Smiling Brook Cafe 28. Squid & Whale 29. 1886 Steakhouse 30. Sparky’s 31. StoneHouse 32. Thai House 33. Voulez-Vous 34. Wild Hog Bar-B-Que


As new events, venues and menus are added, they will be posted at www.eurekaspringsfoodandwine.com or www.facebook.com/eurekaspringsfoodwinefestival so be sure to check for prices, updates and changes before finalizing your plans!

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ome savor exceptional dishes and extraordinary wine pairings during Eureka Springs’ Food and Wine Weekend Thursday, Nov. 7 through Sunday,

At the Grand Taverne, Chateau Ste. Michelle Wines will be featured and are available by the flight or by the glass with any combination of food the guest desires, or guests can just order the wine. In addition to the full menu, a special three-course dinner includes appetizer Sautéed Foie Gras with Peaches and Black Truffle, an entrée of Grilled Filet of Beef and Panfried Lobster Medallions with Roquefort Cheesecake with Poached Pear Raspberry Coulis for dessert. Saturday night the Cottage Inn presents a Tour de France French Wine Dinner with Hugel, Alsace wines and Smoked Salmon Rillette (delicious spread with fresh bread); Les Setilles White Burgundy with Baked Cod Tapanade on Greens; Chateau Senailhac, Bordeaux to enjoy with French Onion Soup and Crozes Hermitage “Les Jalets” Rhone to accompany Beef Bourguignon – Julia Child’s favorite dish! Finish with Sauternes, Bordeaux and Profiteroles (small cream puffs) filled with Pastry Cream, dipped in Chocolate. Nov. 10 The Cottage Inn travels next to Italy with an Italian Wine Dinner at 6 p.m. (one seating). Sip some Prosecco with a Fresh Fruit with Balsamic Vinegar Glaze starter followed by Calasole, Vermentino (crisp white wine) served with Minestrone Soup; Vietti, Barbera d’Asti Tres Vignea accompanying Oil Poached Tuna on Arugula Salad and Castello Banfi, Belnero Super with Tuscan Roasted Lamb with Vegetables on Shiitake Mushroom Risotto. Finish with a flourish of Banfi, Rosa Rigale and Flourless Chocolate Mousse Cake. And that’s not all! There are several more participants not mentioned above, including wine tastings and wine history lectures at Keels Creek Winery, US 62E. Dr. Doug Hausler of Keels Creek Winery and Greg Schneider of Railway Winery will present a series of lectures & discussions each day including wine tasting from 2013 production (in progress) and recent vintages. Details are on page 14. The Garden Bistro, 199 North Main, is a long-time festival participant and brings their mission, “From the garden, to our kitchen to your plate,” to the party. Expect a wonderful meal featuring an appetizer, salad and soup and a choice of two entrees with hearty portions. Garden Bistro has a full bar with organic wines, and delicious dessert choices. Locavores love the use of just-picked fruits, vegetables, herbs and locally produced meats and dairy. Also participating are the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow’s CulinArts Center, Eureka Thyme Gallery, KJ’s Caribé Restaurant & Cantina, The Jewel Box Gallery, Crystal Dining Room at the Crescent Hotel and the Balcony Bar & Restaurant at the Basin Park Hotel. +

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Photo by Jeremy Mason McGraw

Nov. 10. Take a taste tour of Eureka Springs’ award-winning restaurants and eateries, many offering special Food and Wine Festival menus including anything from a six-course meal with wine pairings to a flight of wines. There’s still more to be added to the information below, but for now, here’s a teaser to whet your palate: Nov. 7 The festival begins Thursday, Nov. 7, with events at four different locations. The StoneHouse on 89 S. Main Street kicks things off with wine and cheese pairings at 1 p.m. The Grand Taverne Restaurant and Lounge in the Grand Central Hotel at 37 N. Main will be offering its full dinner menu with Locals’ Night specials, Tilapia Picatta or Beef Bourguignon, and Chateau Ste. Michelle wines. Beginning at 5 p.m. Thursday, DeVito’s at 5 Center St. will have a special menu through Nov. 10 at 9 p.m. In addition to regular fish and lasagna specials, DeVito’s will offer Raimondo Winery Wine Flights, (and the Pumpkin Spice Martini returns along with their newest fusion, The Autumn Apple Martini), Spiced Pumpkin Soup and Farmers’ Market Pasta made with fresh, seasonal produce from our local farmers’ market. Also on Thursday, the Cottage Inn, 450 W. Van Buren (US 62 W), offers a Taste of Spain Wine Dinner from 6 – 8 p.m. On the menu is Caldo Gallego (white bean & kale soup of Galicia), Tapas – Warm Goat Cheese with Caramelized Onions, Savory Lamb Meatballs in Spicy Tomato Sauce, Shrimp a la Plancha, Roast Pork with house made Fig Chutney with Roasted Potatoes and a dessert of Torta de Santiago (classic almond cake) – accompanied by wonderful Spanish wines for each course. Call for reservations (479) 253-5282. Nov. 8 Friday at The Grand Taverne you’ll find the full menu plus a threecourse dinner (Rabbit Confit in Phyllo appetizer, Grilled Veal Chop a la Perigourdine, and Pumpkin Cheesecake with Port Wine Glaze) for dessert; paired with Chateau Ste. Michelle wine in flights or by the glass. The Cottage Inn will be serving Pizzorno Family Wines of Uruguay and Trapiche Sparkling from Argentina. The menu includes Empanadas filled with spinach, Sweet Potato Bisque, Hearts of Palm and Avocado Salad, a flavorful Estofado Beef Stew and Dulce de Leche Cheesecake. Reservations, please. On both Friday and Saturday local chef and culinary instructor, Karen Gros, will hold two special Cuisine Karen cooking classes featuring locally grown ingredients and French-inspired menus. Cuisine Karen, 10 Woolridge, offers the hands-on classes from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. The menu includes local grass-fed pork shoulder roast braised in white wine with bay leaf and sage, sautéed Brussels sprouts with vinegar reduction sauce and a touch of Sorghum molasses and Swiss chard dessert tart with raisins and pine nuts on a marzipan crust. Advance reservations are required. (479) 253-7461. Nov. 9 The StoneHouse will be featuring Pinot Noir and cheese pairings from around the world from 1 – 9 p.m.

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Events at a glance Nov. 8 – 10

Nov. 1 – 3


Fall Diversity Weekend: The GLBT community celebrates in Eureka Springs with at least 24 fun events in venues all over town. Dances, shows, meet ‘n’ greets, a parade and special events, including the Big Fat Gay Wedding. Locations, times, details and a printable schedule can be found at www.outineureka .com.

Nov. 2


Family Fest 2013 and 3rd Annual Fall Craft Fair at Pine Mountain Village: Browse and shop hand crafted items created by dozens of regional artists and craftsmen/women from 9 – 5 p.m. at Pine Mountain Village, US 62W. Love the sound of Southern gospel? Family Fest also features concerts by the Lesters at the Pine Mountain Theater at 2 and 8 p.m. with a lively variety of southern gospel favorites. Admission $15 adults. Children under 12 free. (479) 244-6907 or (479) 253-2583.

Fearless Writing Workshop: Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow, 515 Spring. Author of 50 children’s book and cookbooks, Crescent Dragonwagon, leads this energetic workshop. You don’t have to be a writer, or would-be writer, to get a lot from this workshop. On the other hand, if you are, you’ll get a double-dip: skills and techniques that will serve you – not just in writing but in almost every other life-endeavor. If you’ve ever found yourself stopped cold by unexpected change, doubt in your own abilities, uncertain outcome, other peoples’ needs, or unfamiliar economic, technological, or social conditions…you need this. To register, email director@writerscolony. org or phone (479) 253-7444.

Nov. 8 – 11

Veterans’ Day Weekend & Parade: Start with the Bragging Rights Hamburger Cook-off Friday at 10 a.m. at Pine Mountain Village and come back Saturday for a Kids’ Carnival and Face Painting followed by Pick-Off in Basin Park for all manner of stringed instrument players. There’s also an art show, silent auction and a Veterans’ Ball on Sunday. Don’t miss the Veterans’ Day Parade and Gun Salute on Monday. We tell you where and when it all happens with more details on page 19.

Nov. 7 – 10


Food and Wine Festival: This gourmet’s weekend includes a host of activities. Enjoy the fun, and when it’s time to dine, check out everything from special six-course meal menus with wine pairings to a flight of wines in participating restaurants. For menus, restaurants and information see the “Eureka Springs Food & Wine Weekend” page on Facebook or whet your appetite now on page 13.

Nov. 9 


Second-Saturday Gallery Stroll: Galleries around town host special exhibits and artists’ receptions, usually from 1 – 4 and 6 – 9 p.m. For instance, Eureka Thyme at 19 Spring celebrates Food and Wine Weekend with special guest Carrie Marry of Weaving Your Wellness showing us how to make healthy sugar-free holiday candies and other treats from 6 to 9 p.m. See more: www. artofeureka.com.

Nov. 8 – 10

Pottery Show/Sale and Wine History (and tasting) Weekend: Keels Creek Winery, US 62E. See and buy beautiful pottery by seven remarkable potters from the Boston Mountain Potters’ Association and enjoy a glass of wine. Learn about the history of wine presented by Keels Creek Winery and Railway Winery: the History of Wine in the World, Nov 8; The History of Wine in the Americas, Nov. 9; and The History of Wine in Arkansas, Nov. 10. $10/day per person or $20 for the complete series. Includes wine tasting from 2013 production and recent vintages. Open 12 – 5 p.m. (479) 253-9463, email winery@keelscreek.com, see www.keelscreek.com.

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Nov. 9 – 10

Sacred Space/Sacred Point of View: Fire Om Earth Retreat, Mill Hollow Road 10 – 5 p.m. Learn from the indigenous wisdom of Native American teacher Bob Nitsch and his wife, Lee, in inspirational workshops presenting traditions still vitally relevant and applicable. (See Wolf Clan Teaching Lodge Seneca Indian Historical Society www.wolfclanteachinglodge. org.) Registration ($60 per day) online at www.fireomearth.com. Come early for a drumming event ($15) around the Council Fire on Nov. 8 at 7 p.m. Bring your own drum, rattle or percussion instrument. (479) 363-9402.


November’s “event”ful in Eureka Springs Nov. 9 – Dec. 21

Christmas Snow Village and Trains: Carnegie Library Annex, 192 Spring St. The kids will love this, and so will you! A wonderful, enchanting Snow Village all dressed for Christmas with trains transporting visitors back to the 1930s – 1950s landscape of small town America. See the village of more than 300 pieces plus three Lionel 0 scale trains and a Lionel 0 scale trolley. Opens Saturday, Nov. 9 – after that, open Saturday/Sunday Nov. 16, 17 and 23, 24. Saturdays from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. and Sundays from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. until Dec. 21. Beginning Nov. 29, the exhibit will also be open Fridays (5 – 7 p.m.). Proceeds benefit the Eureka Springs Historical Museum and the historic Carnegie Public Library. Visit eurekaspringshistoricalmuseum.org online, see “Christmas Snow Village and Trains Display” on Facebook or phone (479) 253-9417. Admission $5 adult, $2 children.

Nov. 13

Deep Feast: Writing the World Through Food: Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow, 515 Spring. Tell your story about food in words. Whether you love cooking or writing, you’ll enjoy this workshop by Crescent Dragonwagon, author of 50 children’s books and cookbooks. Wednesday evening, 6 – 9 p.m. For costs and to register, www.writerscolony.org or phone (479) 253-7444.

Nov. 15


Nov. 22, 23

Holiday Cooking Workshop: Put something spectacular on the table this holiday season. Take these hands-on classes at the new CulinArts Center at the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow and wow family and friends. Classes taught by Margie Raimondo, cook and winemaker. Check for updates on Facebook on the “Writers Colony” and “Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow” pages. Seating limited. For costs and to register, email director@writerscolony.org or phone (479) 253-7444.

Nov. 24

Procrastination: Stop it. Write now! Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow, 515 Spring, 1 – 4 p.m. Author Crescent Dragonwagon returns to help writers move their writing from thinking about it and endless postponement to action in an exuberant afternoon workshop. Check for updates on Facebook on the “Writers Colony” and “Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow” pages. Seating limited. For costs and to register, email director@writerscolony.org or phone (479) 253-7444.

Nov. 29 


Santa in the Park: Bring the family and visit with Santa Claus in Basin Park beginning at 5 p.m. For more information call 800 – 6EUREKA, (479) 2538737, or visit www.eurekaspringschamber.com.

Nov. 29 – Dec. 1

Preview & Sale for Fall Antique Show: From 5:30 – 7 p.m. at the Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center. This is the perfect time for a preview and chance to buy that one awesome Christmas gift from among trusted antique vendors stuffed chock-a-block into two floors of the convention center. For more information see www.eurekaspringsantiqueshows.com or phone (337) 298-4886.

The (first ever) Great Ozarkan Beard-Off: Santa has nothing on these guys! Contests all over town for all sorts of hair-growing feats and groups with the most facial hair. Too much fun. Tons of prizes and prize packages. Visitors can sign up too! Check out the Great Ozarkan Beard Off at www.goboeureka. com and see contest details on page 7.

Nov. 16 – 17


Nov. 29 – Dec. 21

25th Annual Fall Antique Show & Sale: Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center. This is the big one! Wear some comfy shoes and clothing because it will take a long, long time to visit all the booths and displays. Every kind of antique imaginable from buttons to furniture and everything in between. Saturday 10 a.m. – 6 p.m., Sunday 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. For more information phone (337) 298-4886 or visit www.eurekaspringsantiqueshows.com. More about antiques on p. 17.

Nov. 18

B.B. King – one night only: City auditorium, 7:30 p.m. Don’t miss the chance to get the blues up close and personal with legendary performer and Hall-of-Famer B.B. King. It’ll be a night of blues you won’t forget! Opening for B.B. are some amazing A-list session players out of Tulsa, The Governor’s Blues Revue, featuring Jimmy Markham’s awesome harmonica skills and downhome blues style. Tickets are dwindling, but there are still good seats left. Get your advance ticket now and save a few bucks for a CD at www.theaud.org or phone (479) 253-7333.

Coming in December

Dec. 1 – 31
Eureka Springs’ Christmas Forest at the Crescent Hotel. Dec. 5 
42nd Annual St. James Episcopal Church Silver Tea at the Crescent Hotel

Experience the Light: Great Passion Play grounds. Get into the true spirit of Christmas at the Live Nativity with actors and animals, enjoy a drive-through light display and hear beautiful Christmas music in the Great Hall. And don’t miss the exhibit of Nativity sets from around the world in the Chapel. Friday and Saturday evenings, from 6 – 8:30 p.m. See more at www.greatpassionplay.org.

Nov. 30 – Dec. 1

Fall Fine Art & Craft Show/Sale: Best Western Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center. A goldmine of fifty or more awesome regional artists and artisans with their art in one location. Browse the beautiful displays in comfort, get the jump on your holiday shopping and gift your family and friends with something original. Everything from paintings to pottery, jewelry, hair art, clothing and more – all handmade and all unique. You’ll be amazed at the range of creative art suited for every budget. Meet the artists and learn about their process, too! Open Nov. 30 from 10 a.m. – 7 p.m. and on Dec. 1 from 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. If you want something unique, don’t miss this! (479) 253-5384.

Dec. 6 
Eureka Springs Christmas Parade. Dec. 7 
Candlelight Tour of Homes and John Two-Hawks Christmas Concert November 2013

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Thanksgiving Nuggets (and we don’t mean chicken) Did you know it was once called Franskgiving? (and we don’t mean hot dogs)

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fter the Pilgrims’ first successful corn harvest in November 1621, Governor William Bradford organized a celebratory feast and invited a group of the young colony’s Native American allies, including the Wampanoag chief, Massasoit. Unlike our daytime feast and nighttime leftovers, this celebration lasted for three days. The historic event’s exact menu isn’t known in detail, but Pilgrim chronicler Edward Winslow wrote in his journal that Governor Bradford sent four men on a “fowling” mission in preparation for the event. The Wampanoag guests also arrived bearing five deer. By the fall of 1621, the colonists sugar supply had dwindled, so the meal did not include pies, cakes or other desserts. Historians suggest many of the dishes were likely prepared using traditional Native American spices and cooking methods. It’s likely that the proteins on the Pilgrims’ menu were lobster, seal and swans – along with the venison. How we inherited a national holiday About 200 years later, in 1817, New York became the first of several states to officially adopt an annual Thanksgiving holiday. Each state celebrated it on a different day, however, and the American South remained largely unfamiliar with the tradition. In 1827, the noted magazine editor and prolific writer Sarah Josepha Hale launched a campaign to establish Thanksgiving as a national holiday. For 36 years, she published numerous editorials and sent scores of letters to governors, senators, presidents and other politicians. Abraham Lincoln finally heeded her request in 1863, at the height of the Civil War, with a proclamation entreating all Americans to ask God to “commend to his tender care all those who have become widows, orphans, mourners or sufferers in the lamentable civil

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strife” and to “heal the wounds of the nation.” He scheduled Thanksgiving for the final Thursday in November, and it was celebrated on that day every year until 1939, when Franklin D. Roosevelt moved the holiday up a week in an attempt to spur retail sales during the Great Depression. Roosevelt’s plan, known derisively as Franksgiving, was met with passionate opposition, and in 1941 the president reluctantly signed a bill making Thanksgiving the fourth Thursday in November. Want to celebrate with an authentic Thanksgiving menu? Foods that may have been on the first menu – Seafood: cod, eel, clams and lobster. Wild fowl: wild turkey, goose, duck, crane, swan, partridge and eagles. Meat: venison. Grain: wheat flour and Indian corn. Vegetables: pumpkin, peas, beans, onions, lettuce, radishes and carrots. Fruit: plums and grapes. Nuts: walnuts, chestnuts and acorns. Herbs and seasonings: olive oil, liverwort, leeks, dried currants and parsnips. Surprisingly, the following foods, all considered staples of the modern Thanksgiving meal, did not appear on the Pilgrims’ first feast table Ham: There is no evidence the colonists had butchered a pig by this time, though they had brought pigs with them from England. Sweet potatoes/potatoes: These were not common. Corn on the cob: Corn was kept dried out at this time of year. Cranberry sauce: The colonists had cranberries but no sugar at this time. Pumpkin pie: It’s not a recipe that exists at this point, though the pilgrims had recipes for stewed pumpkin. Chicken/eggs: The colonists brought hens with them from England, but it’s unknown whether any were left or if the hens were still laying. Milk: No cows had been aboard the Mayflower, though it’s possible the colonists used goat milk to make cheese. +


Eureka Springs – your one-stop shop for antiques, collectibles and vintage

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Let the quest begin at the

ho doesn’t love a mystery? What on earth could be hiding in that pile of decades-old stuff? Maybe there’s a letter or a valuable document stuck behind one of the drawers of that old desk, you never know. Antiquing – it’s one of the most enjoyable treasure hunts on earth – and X marks the spot on a big treasure map every year right over the Annual Fall Antique Show and Sale at the Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center. No need to drive all over the map, antiques from around the country and abroad are all here in one place. Now in its 25th year, the show and sale includes a Friday night preview on Nov. 15, from 5:30 – 7 p.m. This is your opportunity to view the wares of more than 80 dealers who really know their business. This year, there’s a new sports memorabilia booth and two new dealers bringing an array of retro items for the younger collectors. Tickets are $10, and are also good for the next day. And there’s a new twist to the Preview Show this year. Guests who have antiques

25th Annual Antique Show and Sale!

and collectibles they’ve been thinking about selling are invited to bring them along to see if a dealer might be interested in purchasing them. A phone call to the show director, Cathy Handley at (357) 298-4886 is required beforehand to set up an appointment. On Saturday and Sunday, the big show begins when doors open at 10 a.m. Two floors of antiques and collectibles from apple corers to zithers (well, you never know – there could be one), all cleanly displayed by reputable dealers who can answer questions about each item. From dolls to desks and buttons to bayonets, you never know what you’ll discover at the next booth. And that’s a good reason to wear comfortable clothes and shoes, because you’ll want to see everything – and there is a lot to see! You’ll want to attend the show on Sunday if you have an heirloom you’d like to have appraised. An appraiser will be on hand between noon and 4 p.m. on Sunday only. Admission is only $5 for a

whole day. Doors close at 6 on Saturday and at 4 p.m. on Sunday. What, you missed the show? No problem. Here in America’s Victorian Village, antique and collectible shops abound. In November, you may have to phone for shop hours, depending on the days you’re here, but you won’t be disappointed at the variety. And again, you never know what rare piece is out there waiting for you to discover it. If you want to plan an antiquing day, there are plenty of places in town to take a break and enjoy a meal or a massage during your treasure hunt. Happy antiquing! Antique Affaire, 14 Center, (479) 253-1746 Castle Antiques at Inspiration Point, 16436 US 62W, (479) 253-6150 Country Antiques, 243 Stadium Rd., (479) 253-8731 Crystal Gardens Antiques, 190 Spring St., (479) 253-9586 Deja Vu of Eureka Springs, 184 North

Main, (479) 282-8191 Gingerbread House Antiques, 185 E. Van Buren, (479) 253-7177 Just Reminiscing, 2058 E. Van Buren, (479) 363-6424 Little Bo Peep’s Yarn and Antiques, Center St., ‎ (479) 253-0711 Mitchell’s Folly Antiques, 130 Spring St., (479) 253-7030 Mountain Eclectic, 104 N Main, (479) 363-9059 The Barn Shoppes (Old Sale Barn Antiques), 65 Stadium Rd. (Hwy. 23S), (479) 253-5388 Sweet Spring Antiques, 2 Pine St., (479) 253-6644 Tinmaker & Glitz, 69 S. Main, ‎ (479) 253-6601 Velvet Otter at Inspiration Point, 16498 US 62W, (479) 253-8611 Wonderland Antiques, 6981 US 62W, (479) 253-6900 There’s more information about each of these on a handy brochure (with map) you can pick up at the Chamber of Commerce in Pine Mountain Village. +

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Trolleys, Trams

and Tours

See the sights on a trolley ride through town. Purchase a one- or two-day pass and get off and on as many times as you like! Tuesday through Saturday – 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Buy tickets at the Eureka Springs Transit office, 137 W. Van Buren (US 62 across from the Matterhorn Towers) (479) 253-9572. City tram tours also leave from the Transit Office and run only on Friday and Saturday, November 1, 2, and 8, 9 at 1 and 3 p.m. Eureka Van Tours leave from the Chamber of Commerce in Pine Mountain Village at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. Tour lasts approximately 2 - 2½ hours. Drivers in Victorian garb share history and humor while highlighting favorite spots in town. Reservations required – limited seating. (479) 253-8737. +

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eterans’ Day falls on Monday, Nov. 11 this year, but we’ll be celebrating beginning Nov. 8, adding one more day to the festivities. This is also Food and Wine weekend, and there will be plenty to do and see. For more information on any of the events below, see the Facebook Page “Eureka Springs Veterans Day Parade” or phone (479) 2532519. Friday, Nov. 8, 2nd Annual Bragging Rights Hamburger Cook Off 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Out at Pine Mountain Village on 62W, you can get a tasty lunch for only $2, but you have to sample the best burgers around and vote for your favorite. Competing area restaurants and grill cooks, as well as individuals who think they have a special way with a burger, will be serving up their best meaty creations. Visitors who might be camping in the area are also invited to bring along their own grill, table and burger-dressing person and vie for trophies and bragging rights along with the locals. Entry fee is $25, with all proceeds going to support the American Legion’s community services. There are trophies and bragging rights for the restaurants, and prizes and trophies for the best grill cook and any individual who thinks they can grill as good as the restaurant cooks. The public gets to judge! There will be a Special Veterans Appreciation Show at the Pine Mountain Theater at 7 p.m. featuring patriotic music presented by several guest

performers, along with a flag presentation and program by the American Legion color guard. There is no admission, but a $10 suggested donation will be accepted. Money raised will go to a Flag Fund which will put an abundance of American flags on display throughout Eureka Springs on national holidays. Saturday, Nov. 9, Kids Carnival and Face Painting 11 a.m. – 4 p.m. Bring the family back to Pine Mountain Village for a fun kids’ event. SkyWalk Entertainment will also be in the Village with inflatables and Glitter Dazzle will be painting little faces ... and big ones, too! (Nobody’s too old to get his or her face painted!) Saturday, Nov. 9, Pick Off In The Park 10 a.m. – 2 p.m. Meanwhile, downtown in Basin Park, stringed instrument players will be competing for cash prize and a trophy – and they don’t even need a pick! This is for anyone who plays a stringed instrument with a pick, a bow, or even toes. All that matters is the instrument must have strings. Entry fee is $10. First place winner gets $50, plus a trophy. Second and third place winners get a trophy and restaurant coupons. Good fun and good music. This event will be held indoors in case of bad weather. Sunday, Nov. 10, 2nd Annual Vet Art Show/Sale and Silent Auction Noon – 5 p.m. Make your way to Caribé Restaurant, 309 W. Van Buren (US 62W), just outside of town and enjoy

some wonderful art by and about veterans. All vets can enter any artwork they choose. Non-vets are encouraged to enter work honoring vets, military, peace, patriotism, etc. Everyone is welcome to enter, but should phone (405) 320-0011 two weeks before the show. During the show there will be a Silent Auction of art, merchandise, gift certificates and more – all to honor and support our veterans. Sunday, Nov. 10, Marine Corps Birthday and Veterans’ Ball 5 – 7 p.m. Help the Marines celebrate their birthday, and enjoy food and fun with dancing to music from all eras at Jack’s Place (look for the sign, it’s down the stairway) at 37 Spring St. This Ball is “Eureka Style” which means fancy dress is optional. Monday, Nov. 11, Eureka Springs Veterans’ Day Parade 10 a.m. The weekend celebration ends on Monday with the parade, a Gun Salute and a meet-andgreet. The parade is open to floats, walkers, horses, motorcycles, bands, singers and anything honoring our veterans. If you can’t be in it, come watch and honor our vets and active military. The Gun Salute on 11/11 at 11:11 a.m. is performed by American Legion Posts all over the United States. The Salute will be followed by the Meet and Greet at the Pied Piper Pub. Be sure to check the Facebook page “Eureka Springs Veterans Day Parade” for updates and changes. +

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The best rest is in Eureka Springs West

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art of enjoying all there is to do in Eureka Springs West is the place you’re staying while you do it. When the November air is nippy, but the fish are biting, you’ll be thankful for a comfortable place to relax at the end of the day. Here are a few great Eureka Springs West retreats and lodgings to choose from. Visit the websites or phone for details and reservations.

Sugar Mountain: visit-smr.com (479) 253-8398 Sugar Ridge Resort: sugarridgeresort.com (479) 253-5548

Cabin Fever Resort: cabinfeverresort.com (479) 253-5635 Lakeshore Cabins: lakeshorecabins.net (800) 597-9647 Ozarks Cabins: eurekaspringsvacations. com (479) 253-2018 Red Bud Valley Resort: redbudvalley.com (877) 253-9028 Retreat at Sky Ridge: retreatatskyridge. com (800) 242-3128 Riverview: riverviewcabinsandcanoes. com (479) 253-8367 Silver Ridge: logcabinescapes.com (800) 410-4641 Spider Creek: spidercreek.com (479) 2539241

Don’t let the big one get away! These fishing guides and services know just where to put your line in the water … Beaver Dam Store at Spider Creek Resort, www.beaverdamstore.com, (479) 2536154


November 2013

Some have fishing guides, boating and horseback trail riding available. When you call for your adventure, be sure to tell your host you saw them in the Independent Fun Guide!

Beaver Guide Service & Lodging, www. beaverguideservice.com, (479) 253-5048 Big 1’s Striper Guide, www. big1sstriperguide.com (479) 633-0662 Butlers C&J Sports, www.candjsports. com, (479) 253-9799
 Custom Adventures Guide Service, www. yourriverguide.com, (479) 363-9632 Riverview Resort & Country Store, www. RiverviewCabinsAndCanoes.com, (479) 253-8367 Ryan’s White River Guide, www. ryanswhiteriverguideservice.com, (479) 244-6416 Spider Creek Resort, www.spidercreek. com, (479) 253-9241 or 800-272-6034
 Johnson Guide Service & Taxidermy (479) 253-2258 +


The “wild” west

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ureka Springs West is an unrivaled vacation destination offering extraordinary vistas, outdoor adventures, romantic getaways, shopping and arts – all in the heart of the beautiful Ozark Mountains just a few scenic miles from Eureka Springs on US 62W. It’s a place to unwind, go on a retreat, fish, swim, boat, picnic, paddleboard, take a horseback ride, dine out, get married, scuba dive, take an eagle watch boat cruise, shop for antiques and just give yourself time to relax and enjoy spectacular views of the Ozarks, Beaver Lake and Dam, the White River and Lake Leatherwood. There are lodgings suited just to your taste from quiet cabins, motels and B&Bs to campgrounds – all with plenty of parking! This is where friendly folks welcome you to a lovely, s-l-o-w-e-r pace, pamper you, and provide the family fun, adventure, or romance for two that will become your favorite memories. Eureka Springs West is an oasis of pleasure and fun in the midst of nature’s wild beauty and serenity, tended by really nice folks. Check them out at www. eurekaspringswest.org. +

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Bu ap ying ply lo to cal d a fi a h oe shi am s n ng bur ot j lice ge ust nse r an d .

1.

Antiques are not made in sweatshops. Carry Nation did not sleep on a futon. Antiques are so valuable they’re contested in a divorce. Antique jewelry is irreplaceable, individual and a looks better on you than ear buds. An tiq ue sm Th ake ey’ cr re eak jus in t fu g n n. oise s.

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2. 3. 5.

4.


ADOPT ME

You can’t buy love … but you can adopt it By Rachel Brix

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ur local Good Shepherd Humane Shelter (GSHS) is a no-kill shelter. The manager, Janice Durbin, tells us by adopting “you save a life – every animal that’s adopted opens a space for another to come in that may not have made it otherwise.” Surprisingly, many of our shelter animals hitch a ride home with tourists! Our animals are happy and friendly due to the many local volunteers who visit, walk and socialize the dogs and cats on a regular basis. GSHS currently has 48 dogs and 85 cats available for adoption. The shelter receives no state, county or city money, but relies solely on donations and grants. GSHS recently received a grant from Best Friends Animal Sanctuary for promotions related to black dog/cat syndrome, helping all- or mostly- black animals stuck in shelters across the country in high numbers because they aren’t “flashy” and tend to get overlooked. GSHS animals are already spayed or neutered, vaccinated, dewormed and can be microchipped, meaning paying an adoption fee saves on vet bills. When you adopt, you know just what you’re getting. Shelter workers will be able to tell you about the personality and temperament of the dog or cat you’re interested in, and if you adopt a full-grown pet you already know how big it’ll get. Plus, no housebreaking chores unless you adopt a puppy. If you’re in town Tuesday, Nov. 19, make sure to show up for Good Shepherd’s annual Doggie Style Show at the Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center from 6 – 8:30 p.m. It’s a fun show, plus you can meet some pets and check out the great stuff from our “Doggie Store” – high fashion to Christmas decorations and household goods. You can even buy a gift certificate or make a donation in the recipient’s name or an “In Memoriam” in their pet’s name. It’s a gala event. You can even see the animals and pick out your future pet now at www. goodshepherd-hs.org! As Janice, our Shelter director, says, “You can’t buy love, but you can adopt it!” +

Tourist testimonial –

From the GSHS Facebook pages: “Thanks to your shelter we have Hunny as a member of our Family! Who knew this wonderful girl was 10 hours away, waiting for us to come and adopt her? I can’t wait until we make a trip your way and you can see Hunny. She’s amazing!” November 2013

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mNIGHTLIFE and socializingi

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f you appreciate a good choice of brew, wine or cocktails to go along with an evening of socializing, Eureka Springs has the place(s) just for you! Want a quiet corner for relaxing and conversation? We have it. Love to dance? You can do it here to DJs or live music. Crave pub grub?

Fun Spot of the Month

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elcome to The Blarney Stone – Eureka Springs’ new Irishthemed Pub. The building at 85 S. Main is steeped in history, having been home to The Wagon Wheel – the very first bar in Carroll County – for decades. It was a good name then, since patrons actually arrived in wagons and on horseback. When the doors closed in 2010, the liquor license on the wall boasted being the first ever issued in Arkansas and held for 109 consecutive years! Gail and Dillon Sims purchased the property and invested in an extensive overhaul, exposing the nearly seven-ft. natural rock shelf that had been part of the women’s restroom for many years and making it the breathtaking centerpiece of the downstairs area. Guests can even down a shot off the massive rock if they dare – an Arkansas version of kissing the Blarney Stone! From the hearty mostly-Irish menu you can order anything from a Pot of Gold (creamy, chunky potato soup with bacon and cheese) to Shepherd’s Pie, Bangers and Mash or Grown Up Mac and Cheese. Breakfast is served all day and includes creative offerings such as the Whiskey Breakfast, Irish Slam and a Blarney Stuffed Breakfast Burrito. You can view the menu on Facebook and order ahead of your visit or to pick up to

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The Blarney Stone –Eat, Drink, Be Irish

bring to your hotel or picnic spot on the lake – just type “The Blarney Stone Irish Pub” on the Facebook search bar and let your mouth water. Onsite, a full bar serves all your needs on every level with indoor seating upstairs and down. Outdoor seating is available on the upstairs balcony on the street side or around back for a view of nature on patios providing a more intimate setting. The restaurant is nonsmoking inside and children are welcome until 9 p.m.

November 2013

You’re in the right town! Some of our night spots allow children until a certain hour, some serve food (and really good food) late, some have awesome house specialties and all of them have the flavor of a place “where everybody knows your name.” +

The Blarney Stone offers great music most Friday and Saturday nights. For instance:

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 Nov. 2 – Sweetwater Gypsies, a local trio playing Americana, Folk  Nov. 8 – Sam Clanton, bluegrass-jazz-Celtic rock  Nov. 9 – Ozark Thunder, classic rock  Nov. 22, 23 – J.D. and the Mudhounds, a blues experience  Nov. 29 – Sweetwater Gypsies

 Nov. 30 – 221, an acoustic band playing everything from Red Dirt to Billy Joel

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For music on dates not listed above please see the “Indy Soul” section in the weekly Eureka Springs Independent. (www.eurekaspringsindependent.com) The Blarney Stone is open Monday – Thursday from 11 a.m. – 11 p.m., Friday and Saturday from 11 a.m. – 2 a.m. and Sunday from 11 a.m. – midnight. (479) 363-6633 +


Get in the Spirit(s) m Pied Piper Pub/Cathouse Lounge, 82 Armstrong Street, is famous for their Reubens, fish & chips, burgers, and Irish dishes! The Corn Beef and Cabbage is just like Mrs. O’Malley’s. There is a full bar, cold beer, lots of parking, and friendly faces.
 Smoke free, full menu and live music on Friday and Saturday. Kitchen open late.www.piedpiperpub.com (479) 363-9976 Voulez Vous Lounge, 63 Spring Street, under the New Orleans Hotel, is a jazz lounge featuring a full menu, fresh takes on classic cocktails and live music in a nonsmoking atmosphere. Everything is beautiful at the Vous!
 Dancing and extensive drinks menu so you can make a night of it. www. voulezvouslounge.com (479) 363-6595 The StoneHouse, 89 S. Main Street. A bright new star is on the culinary horizon in the form of the StoneHouse. Billed as the place for ‘wine, cheese and conversation.’ “An extensive, cutting edge wine and beer list that will transport you to faraway lands,” says a Yelp review.
 Smoke free. Appetizer menu with wine pairings, live music every Friday from 5–8 p.m. www.eurekastonehouse.com (479) 363-6411 Eureka Live Underground & Eureka Patio, 35 N. Main Street. 
A great place to hang out, dance and celebrate weddings, birthdays, anniversaries and more. Full menu, dancing, free pool and a full bar. Large patio for outdoor weather and big dance floor downstairs. www. eurekaliveunderground.com (479) 2537020 Henri’s Just One More, 19 1/2 Spring Street. The only Martini Bar and Grill in Eureka Springs. Great food, fabulous Martinis and fun locals. Full menu and extensive bar. www.henrisjustonemore. com (479) 253-5795 Lucky 7 Rooftop Billiards, Basin Park Hotel, 12 Spring Street. One of downtown’s favorite “21 and over” gathering spots. Located on the 6th floor of the 1905 Basin Park Hotel. 
Pool, great views, extensive bar. (479) 253-7837 Eureka Paradise
 Bar & Grill, 75 S. Main Street. 
Dancing, DJ, smoke free. A big dance floor with great light and smoke effects. (479) 363-6574 Rogue’s Manor, 124 Spring Street. Rogue’s Manor at Sweet Spring is a fine dining restaurant and lounge in

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the downtown Historic District with romantic overnight rooms for couples. Full menu and extensive bar. www. roguesmanor.com 800-250-5827 Rowdy Beaver Restaurant & Tavern, 417 W. Van Buren. Good service, casual food in a fun atmosphere. The tavern side has live music on the weekends, full bar. www.rowdybeaver.com (479) 253 - 8544 Rowdy Beaver Den, 45 Spring Street. Food, fun and extensive bar in a casual atmosphere. There is live music here on Friday and Saturday nights. Recent remodel makes this an excellent place to stop while you are downtown. www. rowdybeaver.com (479) 363 - 6444 Chelsea’s Corner Cafe, 10 Mountain Street. One of the area’s favorite pubs. Large selection of beers, full bar and excellent food contribute to the unique atmosphere. Live music every Friday and Saturday and most week nights, open mic on Tuesdays. Upstairs in the Cafe they serve pizza and much more!
 www. chelseascornercafe.com (479) 253-6723 The New Delhi Café & Patio, 2 N. Main. The New Delhi Café on Main Street has live music every weekend, offering a great mix of local and visiting bands. With three decks you can sit as close or far away as you like. The restaurant/bar indoors is smoke free. thenewdelhicafe.com (479) 253-2525 The Balcony Restaurant in Basin Park Hotel is another spot where the family can dine to live music. Thursday through Sunday evenings there is live acoustic music at 5 p.m., with noon shows added on Saturday and Sunday. http://www. basinpark.com 479-253-7837 Squid and Whale Pub, 37 Spring Street. One of Northwest Arkansas’ top music venues. With entrances on Spring and

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Center Streets, the Squid recruits talent from all over the country, there is a band there every weekend. In addition to the weekend entertainment, they feature a local band once a week for ‘Local Kine’ night and have an open jam on Thursdays that will blow you away. They offer a varied menu that includes American, Mexican and seafood. There is no smoking, which means children are welcome until 9 p.m. www.squidandwhalepub.com (479) 2537147 Jack’s Center Stage, 37 Spring Street. This is a full service bar. Live entertainment Friday and Saturday nights with a variety of rock and blues. You can smoke here, so no kiddos. (479) 2532219 Rockin’ Pig Saloon, 2039C E. Van Buren, in the Gaskins Switch shopping area is a full service dining, drinking and entertainment establishment. The menu includes pizza cooked to perfection in their Italian wood-fired oven, barbeque, ribs, steaks and sandwiches. They have eight beers on tap and a fully stocked bar. Biker friendly and non-smoking, kids are welcome. Open all year. www. rockinpigsaloon.com (479) 363-6248 Chasers Bar & Grill, 169 E. Van Buren, is a favorite among the biking crowd. They have a full bar and great pub grub on the menu. With drink and menu specials, pool and dart tournaments, this is always a fun place. There is live music on Friday and Saturday nights. You can smoke here, so 21 and up only. https://www.facebook. com/chasersbandg (479) 253-5522 The Blarney Stone, 85 South Main Street. An Irish pub with a full menu, breakfast served all day, kitchen open late. Savory Irish country fare, amazing desserts, even offering vegetarian selections. Live music

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with stages upstairs and down. Full bar. Open 7 days a week. (479) 363-6633 Legends Saloon, 105 E Van Buren, is a full service bar and restaurant formerly known as The Lumberyard. Great food, full bar and DJ Karaoke or live music with a large dance floor. Weekly Texas Hold ‘Em (Sunday) and Pool (Tuesday) tournaments. Great place for large parties, plenty of parking. (479) 253-2500 +

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ES Independent Fun Guide November 2013