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to Eureka Springs

Vol. 2 No. 6

– your camera-ready destination!

is all about fun and it’s actually a guide! What to do, where to go, how to get there and how to plan a day in order to get it all in – packed into one publication you can keep in your car or hotel room and consult about how to make the most of your time in Eureka Springs. Read it on line!

www.independentfunguide.com Story ideas and information for Independent Fun Guide can be emailed to newsdesk@independentfunguide.com. Chief Whipping Post C.D. White Hitching Posts Gwen Etheredge Enid Swartz Post Haste Mary Pat Boian Post-er Boy Jeremiah ‘Bullfrog’ Alvarado-Owens

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pril showers bring May flowers, it’s true, but around here April also brings blossoms of its own as hills and gardens come alive in pastel hues of primavera, white and ivory, pink, lavender and yellow. The city herself seems to wake up in the warmth and stretch out a welcome to winter-weary travelers. It’s time for something new. Restaurants may be trying new dishes, attractions like the Passion Play have new features and activities – and there may be a new gallery, shop or place to dine that will thoroughly delight you.

Spring is in bloom in

But no matter what you choose to do or where you go, make sure to bring the camera. Each springtime seems to offer different “Kodak moments” than the ones we saw the previous year – whether it’s in an in-town garden, out on one of the fine hiking trails at Lake Leatherwood or Black Bass Lake – or even from a canoe out in the middle of Beaver Lake. Take a deep breath, relax and let the sights and sounds refresh you on the road to discovering your uniquely-Eureka springtime adventure. +

See p. 21

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lso just outside of town is the Eureka Springs West area, with gorgeous retreat facilities, cabins, cottages, attractions, lake activities and things to do. It’s the perfect place for a romantic getaway, group meetings and more. Take a few minutes to explore it all at www.eurekaspringswest. com. +

EUREKA SPRINGS

Post-partum D(sigh)n Perlinda Pettigrew-Owens Post-ographers Melanie Myhre David Dempsey Steven Foster Post-it Notes: Event submissions, reviews and contests newsdesk@independentfunguide.com 479.253.6101 Advertising Sales

WEST

Anita Taylor | 479.253.3380 anita.ads.independent@gmail.com Advertising Deadline is approximately the 2nd of each month.

c Independent Fun Guide is a special publication to Eureka Springs Independent and is published 10 times a year.

Copyright 2014

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• Soar up to 300’ high with cable lengths up to 2,000’ long over vast gorgeous trees and limestone bluffs • Professionally guided Zip Line Canopy Tour – approx. 2 hrs. • Includes all equipment, 10 zip line cables, one swinging bridge and professionally trained guides

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Ready, set, GO...

Here’s where to Life in the Past Lane

6–7

Take a tour through Eureka Springs’ odd history.

People Who Knead People

Art Events & Galleries 8–9

10 – 11

Art & life spring eternal

Don’t go home in a twist

start

Events Calendar 14–15

Chainsaw Carvers & UFO Conference 17

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pen seven days a week, the Eureka Springs Chamber of Commerce Visitors’ Center is located in Pine Mountain Village on 62E just a minute or two from downtown. Racks of brochures and publications as well as maps and posters are on hand to make sure you get the latest information on places to stay, eat and visit. You’ll also find information on art galleries, attractions, events, restaurants, shopping, real estate and wedding services. Can’t find what you’re looking for? Friendly staff will help you with tickets to shows, direct you to points of interest, and are always happy to make a phone call to get any information that’s not already in print at your fingertips. Start your visit in the media room with a brief film on the history of Eureka Springs and you’re ready to plan your adventure! +

Both out of this world

Fun on Foot

18 – 19

It’s a perfect time to tour the springs – even if it is just an excuse to shop

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Life in the Past Lane

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Ever wondered what it was like to live here in 1880 … or 1980?

very town has a history, but none quite like Eureka Springs. While you’re here on vacation, we invite you to visit some of our historical 1800s buildings – each with quite a story of its own: the city auditorium, Carnegie Public Library, the Eureka Springs Historical Museum and our Landmark Hotels – the Crescent and the Basin Park.

ES Historical Museum Early Eureka Springs

Eureka Springs Historical Museum, 95 S. Main As a tourist attraction, the Historical Museum at 95 S. Main is definitely a “must see.” It not only houses history, but is itself a piece of history. The museum is located in the 1889 Samuel L. Califf home. To give your imagination some perspective when browsing the former family home, it may help to know the Califfs lived in the north side of the first floor and the second floor. They also ran a commercial store on the south side of the first floor and rented out the third floor. The building is made of limestone with metal clad roofing enclosing the top story. In 1948, the B.P.O.E. bought the house and opened it as the Elks’ Lodge, where the Elks met until 1970. In 1971, the Eureka Spring Folk Festival Board bought the building from the Elks and opened it as their museum. In 1980, the festival board turned it over to the city and the Eureka Springs Historical Museum was created. To this day, every donor to the museum is considered a museum member. Inside you’ll find the memorabilia of early Eureka Springs, the City that Water Built. It’s a “cure”-ious history – springing from the discovery of the “healing waters” by the Osage Indian Nation and the white settlers who came in the 1870s for the water cure. Learn how this chaotic tent city of 10,000 souls

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The former Califf house

exploded into a Victorian health spa with 54 luxurious hotels. The stories of the boomtown that formed, the several fires that destroyed it, and the founding of Eureka Springs on February 14, 1880, are only part of the interesting history housed in this beautiful Victorian home. Inside there are stories and memorabilia of the average, the important – and some the nationallyfamous – townsfolk who made Eureka Springs what it is today, including work by many of the town’s talented artists from the distant past to the present. The newly renovated first floor houses many permanent exhibits, including “Our Native American

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History,” “Eureka Springs, The City That Water Built,” “Fires-The Big Ones!” and “Travel and Tourism.” On the second floor are several more exhibits, including “Schools,” “Crescent College” (one of the early incarnations of the Crescent Hotel) and “Medicine” as well as an Art Gallery featuring artists who helped create the artist boom in Eureka Springs. For decades, water continued to play an important role in bringing visitors to Eureka Springs. Outside, on the north side of the museum is a small spring called Califf Spring. You’ll see a round stone silo-shaped structure there, which was built by the Arkansas Health Department in the 1920s to house a “water treatment facility.” Inside was an ultraviolet mechanism to treat the spring water that flowed through it. There once were


1880 (ca.) – Early settlers gather at Basin Spring

Building the Carnegie Library

1920s – Townspeople got scammed by Sure Pop Oil Co.

There was a story told in the old days about a man digging for water on East Mountain St. He reached 43 feet when, to his amazement, the bottom fell out and he slid down the well shaft landing on Main Street! In redesigning his well, he had to dig upwards from his cottage in order to strike water. + seven of these built around the town, and Califf Spring has the only remaining facility. South of the museum stands the Cora Pinkley Call cabin, built in 1930 from hand-hewn logs taken from the James Seaton cabin built at Blue Spring in 1830. Ms. Call was a noted Ozark folklorist and author who used her cabin as her home and writing studio. The museum also contains papers, artifacts, clothing and treasures from a colorful past, chronicling the growth and progress of small town Midwestern America. Come, step back in time and see life as Cora and the Califf family saw it. The museum is open seven days a week, Monday thru Saturday, 9:30 a.m. 4 p.m. and

Sunday from 11 a.m. – 3 p.m. For a sneak peak, see www. eurekaspringshistoricalmuseum.org. (479) 253-9417. Carnegie Public Library The Eureka Springs Public Library, dedicated in 1913, is one of only two remaining Carnegie libraries in Arkansas. (The other is in the town of Morrilton.) Initial funding from Andrew Carnegie was granted in 1906, but the library would be plagued by unexpected setbacks that delayed the opening for nearly eight years. In 1908, Richard Kerens, a distinguished member of the Eureka Improvement Company, donated a section of land just below his newly constructed Kerens Memorial

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Chapel (now St. Elizabeth’s Church) for construction of the new Carnegie Public Library. Mr. Kerens had a list of contingencies included in the deed. One required that the construction work begin in six months and be completed within two years (it wasn’t). The library building was designed by St. Louis architect George W. Hellmuth in the Classicalrevival style, complete with Doric columns. Prior to construction, there was a long set of wooden stairs leading up the mountain to the Crescent Hotel. At the base of this long staircase was a gazebo with stone steps that inspired the design of the current library steps. Locally quarried stone from the Beaver area was used in its construction. +

Welcome Easter sunrise at the Great Passion Play

he first Easter sunrise service at the Great Passion Play was held in 1968. The tradition continues this year at the foot of the Christ of the Ozarks memorial statue on April 20, at 7 a.m. The free service is open to all denominations and will feature a community choir. It’s the perfect place to celebrate the coming of the Light. Regular performances of the Passion Play resume on Friday, May 2. The Save A Seat fundraising campaign introduced in 2013 will also be continued this year. A $250 contribution provides individuals or businesses with two season passes and a personalized name plaque placed on the back of a theater seat in honor of an event or loved one. You can also make a donation to light the Christ of the Ozarks Statue for a night! For details and ticket information, visit http:// www.greatpassionplay.org. +

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Artists & Galleries

The Art Colony –

Preparations for the month-long May Festival of the Arts are already taking place in Eureka Springs, but you don’t have to wait for May to see some a magical wonderful art mini-village and take home a masterpiece.

G host O rchid : V isitation –

oil painting by

B arbara K ennedy

Sweet Spring Studio is the signature gallery and working studio of local artist, Barbara Kennedy. In addition to bold, vibrant oil and acrylic paintings, the studio features fine art reproductions, cards and one of a kind beaded jewelry. Come see where the art is created. Sweet Spring Studio is located in the historic Sweet Spring Building, 123 Spring Street, around the corner from the Post Office. Kennedy was recently commissioned by the Eureka Springs Arts Council to create our May Festival of the Arts poster, and you can be the first to have one during a postersigning event on Saturday, April 26, from 1 – 4 p.m. and 6 – 9 p.m. at the studio, 123 Spring St. The new posters will be for sale at that time – get your autographed copy! For more information about Barbara, see www. barbarakennedystudio.com or phone (479) 253-6652. Zarks is pleased to welcome intaglio artist Sarah Bolerjack for the first Gallery Stroll of the 2014 season. Her collection of popular original intaglio etchings will be available and Sarah will unveil a large new original work not previously seen by the public. A former local currently residing in Ferndale, Washington, her Bolerjack Intaglio Works has an intriguing physical location six miles from the Canadian border and four miles from the Pacific Ocean. Sarah will be available from 2 – 4 p.m. and from 5:30 p.m. on April 12 in the gallery, 67 N. Main. Intaglio prints can be traced to the work of 15th-century European metal craftsmen. Goldsmiths and armorers were engraving on metal long before the first engravings were printed on paper. A print is made by inking incised lines and

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I ntaglio

artist

– S arah B olerjack

recessed textures of a plate, wiping the surface, placing damp paper over the plate, and running it through an etching press. Sarah uses 100 percent rag paper and permanent pigment ink.

Coming to Zarks in May

Tim Cotterill will be at Zarks, May 2 – 4. Internationallyknown sculpture artist Tim Cotterill is such a favorite that his appearance schedule has expanded to three events during the opening weekend of May Festival of the Arts. Drop by Friday evening, May 2, from 6 – 9 p.m.; Saturday, May 3, 6 – 9 p.m.; or join us for Sunday morning Bloody Mary brunch on May 4. A collection of rare and hard-to-find frogs will be on exhibit along with Bling, the Zarks 2014 Show Frog.  Former Eureka Springs resident Dustin Atnip will accompany 2014 S how F rog : B ling Frogman Cotterill and


Art and love are the same thing: It’s the process of seeing yourself in things that are not you. ― Chuck Klosterman looks forward to visiting with his Arkansas friends. Attendees will have the opportunity to have their pieces double-signed by Tim, including previously purchased works.   For more information, email info@zarksgallery.com, see www.zarksgallery.com or phone (479) 253-2626.

On the Gallery Stroll …

The Eureka Fine Art Gallery at 63 N. Main will feature the work of plein air painter Jody Stephenson for the entire month of April. An artist’s reception will be held Saturday, April 12, from 6 – 9 p.m. during the Second Saturday Gallery Stroll. Eureka Fine Art Gallery is open daily from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. Studio 62, 335 W. Van Buren (US 62W), will feature “All About Town” – Paintings of Eureka Springs by Jody Stephenson. Come enjoy more of her work, along with photography by Ron Lutz who specializes in alternative photographic processes including pinhole cameras, Van Dyke Brown prints and silver prints. You’ll also find watercolors and gourd artistry by R.W. Stephenson. Hours are 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. year-round. Closed Wednesdays. See more at www.studio62.biz or phone (479) 363-9209. Don’t want to throw that beautiful piece of art in the trunk with the luggage? No problem. Almost all our galleries will ship your purchase for you. And while you’re looking for the art that grabs your heart, you’ll find Eureka’s gallery managers knowledgeable and happy to answer any questions about the art and artists P leasant H ike by J ody S tephenson they represent – and in some cases, you’ll get to meet the artists themselves. So take time to linger and enjoy. Following is a list of Eureka Springs galleries, most with websites you can browse while planning your stroll through the world of art. We think you’ll be surprised and delighted. +

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Design your own Art Adventure at Eureka Springs School of the Arts ow you can say, “we came, we saw, we made art!” Gather your closest artsy friends and let ESSA design a dream class for you! Select the medium of choice (wood, metal, two-dimensional, fiber or clay) and ESSA will find the ideal instructor to make it happen. Let your imagination run wild – ESSA can help provide the artistic experience of a lifetime at their studios. Build your own weekend, weeklong or midweek art vacation! There’s a whole palette of inspiring resorts, cabins, B & Bs, hotels and motels to choose from, in town and out. See www.ESSA-art.org to get your creative muse excited, and contact ESSA at (479) 253-5384 for group package class/workshop pricing and further details. +

Create a personal gallery stroll If you find something spectacular to take home, have someone snap your photo with it and email to newsdesk@eurekaspringsindependent.com … you could win tickets to a great show or attraction! Allison Art Company, 77 Spring, (479) 253-7635. ARTifacts Gallery of American Art, 37 Spring, www.artifactseurka.com, (479) 363-6660. Cherokee Mountain Gallery, 5307 US 62E www.mcallistergallery.com, (479) 253-5353. 83 Spring Gallery, 85 Spring, www.83spring.com, (479) 253-8310. Eureka Fine Art Gallery, 63 N. Main, (479) 363-6000. Eureka Thyme, 19 Spring, (479) 363-9600. Eurekan Art Studio, 150 N. Main, (479) 253-0928. Fantasy & Stone, 81 Spring, www.FantasyandStone.com, (479) 253-5891. Fusion Squared, 84 Spring , www.eurekafusion.com, (479) 253-4999. Gallery 127, 82 Spring, (479) 981-9713. Gryphon’s Roost Gallery, 137 Spring, www.gryphonsroost.com, (479) 253-5667. Harris Art Garden and Gallery, 2427 Hwy. 23N, by appointment only, (479) 2532090. Iris at the Basin Park, 8 Spring, www.irisatthebasinpark.com, (479) 253-9494. J.A. Nelson Gallery, www.janelsongallery.com, (479) 253-4314. Jewel Box, 40 Spring, www.thejewelboxgallery.com, (479) 253-7828. Keels Creek Gallery and Winery, www.keelscreek.com, (479) 253-9463. Lady Bug Emporium, 11 Spring, www.ladybugemporium.com, 479-363-6566. Larry Mansker Studio, 711 Mill Hollow Road, www.larrymanskerstudio.com, (479) 253-5751. Mitchell’s Folly, 130 Spring, (479) 253-7030. Mosaic Studio, 55 N. Main, (479) 253-5544, (479) 244-5981. Muse, 12 S. Main, (651) 472-1621. Out on Main, 1 Basin Spring Ave, www.outonmain.com, (479) 253-8449. Paradise Pottery, 320 CR 210, www.paradisepottery.us, (479) 253-1547. Prospect Gallery, 42 Prospect, www.theprospectgallery.com, (479) 253-5012. Quicksilver Art / Fine Craft Gallery, 73 Spring, www.quicksilvergallery.com. (479) 253-7679. Sacred Art Center, Passion Play grounds, www.greatpassionplay.org, (800) 8827529. Sacred Earth Gallery, 15845 US 62 W, www.TheSacredEarthGallery.com, (479) 253-7644. Serendipity at the Crescent Hotel, www.serendipityatthecrescent.com. (479) 253-2769. Studio 62, 335W.VanBuren (62W), www.studio62.biz, (479) 363-9209. Susan Morrison Signature Gallery, 78 Spring, www.susanmorrisonstore.com, (479) 253-8788. Sweet Spring Studio, 123 Spring, www.barbarakennedystudio.com, (479) 2536652. The Art Colony, 185 N. Main, www.theartcolonyeurekasprings.com Tinmaker & Glitz, 45 ½ Spring, (479) 253-6601 or (580) 399-5887 Treehouse Gift Shop, 165 W. Van Buren, www.treehousecottages.com/gifts, (479) 253-8667. Wilson & Wilson Folk Art, 23 Spring, www.wilsonandwilsonfolkart.com, (479) 253-5105. Wildlife Gallery, 34 N. Main, (479) 244-6950. Zarks Fine Design Gallery, 67 Spring, www.zarksgallery.com, (479) 253-2626, (877) 540-9805. +

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Meet some

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People who knead people

ealing is at the core of Eureka Springs’ history, dating back to at least the mid-1800s, and Eureka’s modern-day massage therapists are a result of the evolution of this tradition. Cynthia Covel of the Eureka Massage Center says one of the things that makes Eureka an especially great place to get a massage is that so many therapists chose this place: “We are really into the healing; that’s why we’re here.” There are a surprising number of places to get a massage in “the town founded on healing waters,” at least 20 in a town of 2200! And the options are vast. Alexa Pittenger, of Eureka!! Massage Therapy, says if you’re seeking massage in this resort town, “Whatever your goal is, whatever your need, you can find it in Eureka.” Master Massage Therapist Carol Brown echoes that sentiment, naming a

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plethora of massage styles: Reiki, Shiatsu, polarity, Hawaiian lomilomi, aromatherapy, myofacial, aruvedic, reflexology, Swedish, deep tissue, Rolfing, hot rocks, energy work, craniosacral, essential oils and chakra balancing along with all the spatype services – wraps, eucalyptus steam, clay masks, exfoliating scrubs, facials, and mineral baths. Although all of the treatments listed are offered, many experienced massage therapists use intuition and experience to guide them to tailor to the needs of the individual. With a great many of our therapists having 20 or even 30 years in the field, experience is another thing that makes Eureka Springs stand out in the world of massage. “You take classes,” says Covel,

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“but pretty soon your hands feel it; you make it your own.” Pittenger explains that the massage philosophy of many of those working in Eureka is “Wellness oriented, working towards vitality,” stressing how physical well-being affects emotional and spiritual well-being. If you’ve come to Eureka to be rejuvenated during this season of renewal, yes, walk our streets of budding trees and enjoy art and architecture, explore our natural wonders, dine in our fabulous restaurants, listen to some great music and sleep in a beautiful room – but be sure to top it off with a healing massage. You’ve treated yourself to time away, so make the experience complete – you know you deserve it! +


Need to relax?

Welcome to the Land of Ahhhhs Carol Brown Massage Therapy, 210 Stadium Road, (479) 253-5644, www. carolbrownmassage.com. Carol Brown, BS, MA, MTI and therapy associates are licensed and experienced. Various relaxation and massage modalities and spa packages include body and/or face and/or feet. Deep tissue massage and therapeutic bodywork. The Mobile Masseuse service brings massage to your event, home or lodging. Eureka Massage Center, 117 Wall Street, (479) 253-5663, www.eurekamassagecenter.net. Four therapists with decades of experience offering a variety of bodywork techniques including spa packages, rehabilitation, steam and couples’ massage. Located in a quiet, comfortable, private setting just off Highway 62 on Wall Street, you’ll discover the difference experience makes. Ask about our special! Free parking. By appointment. Eureka!! Massage Therapy, 147 W. Van Buren, (479) 253-9208, www.eurekamassage.com. Alexa Pittenger, NCTMB, MMT has been helping people feel better with massage and wellness therapies since 1990. Relaxation massage with hot rocks and facials, injury rehabilitation, pain management, lymphatic decongestion and energy balancing sessions are available by appointment. Mobile and Couple’s Massage is also available. Focus Therapeutic Massage, 41 C Kingshighway (in Vintage Cargo), (479) 253-5744, www.Eurekafocusmassage.com. Focus Therapeutic Massage has been at the same location, the Vintage Cargo building, for more than ten years. Our therapists are experienced in Swedish Massage and deep tissue work. We also offer steam treatments, hot towel foot treatments and Reiki. Healing Benefits, 31 Kingshighway, (479) 253-6751, www.healingbenefits.net. Nurturing therapeutic massage from head to toe. Health Works Massage, Reflexology and Wellness Center, 75 Mountain Street, (479) 253-7977, www.healthworksmassagecenter.com. Health Works Massage, Reflexology and Wellness Center has been helping to bring calm, balance and health to locals and visitors for 20 years. See Trip Advisor reviews!

Owner Mary Sue is a Master Massage Therapist who specializes in Hawaiian LomiLomi massage. She also offers couples massage, hot stone massage, facials and reflexology. Laughing Hands also sells the noted Hawaiian artwork of Patrick Ching.

Several lodgings also offer the comforts of massage and pampering spa packages: Grand Central Hotel & Spa, 37 N. Main Street, (479) 253-6756, http://grandcentralresort. com/spa A quiet, elegant atmosphere for pure selfish indulgence. Licensed, professional massage therapists. New Moon Spa & Salon in the Crescent Hotel, 75 Prospect, (800) 599-9772, www.newmoonspa.com Comforting, private spaces with spa, salon and bridal party services offer a rejuvenating environment year round. Palace Bath House, 135 Spring Street, (479) 253-8400 or (866) 946-0572, www. palacehotelbathhouse.com. Northwest Arkansas’ only historic Bath House still in use since 1901. Mineral baths, steam cabinets, massage, clay masks, facials and body scrubs. Ruby’s Spa in the Quality Inn, 3010 E. VanBuren, www.rubysspa.net. Body wraps and glow, balancing face treatment, deep tissue, hot stone, maternity massage, Swedish massage and more. Serenity Spa in the Basin Park Hotel, 12 Spring St., (479) 253-2796, www.serenityspa-eurekasprings.com A variety of stress-relieving spa services including massage therapies, facials, and body wraps. +

Laughing Hands Massage, 121 E. Van Buren, (479) 244-5954, www.laughinghandsmassage. com.

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DINING OUT Restaurant Quick Reference Guide

HOLIDAY ISLAND

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1. Angler’s Grill 2. Autumn Breeze 3. Bavarian Inn 4. Blarney Stone 5. Caribe 6. Casa Colina 7. Chelsea’s 8. Cottage Inn 9. DeVito’s 10. Ermilio’s 11. Eureka Live 12. Forest Hill 13. Fresh 14. Grand Taverne 15. Horizon Lakeview Restaurant 16. Island Grill & Sports Bar 17. Island Pizza and Pub 18. Legends 19. Local Flavor Cafe 20. Mud Street Cafe 21. Myrtie Mae’s 22. New Delhi 23. Mountain Sushi 24. Roadhouse 25. Rowdy Beaver 26. Smiling Brook Cafe 27. Squid & Whale 28. 1886 Steakhouse 29. Sparky’s 30. StoneHouse 31. Thai House 32. Voulez-Vous 33. Wild Hog Bar-B-Que


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Events at a glance APRIL

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First Friday, Holiday Island Park, Hwy. 23N: A new art, flea, music and crafts fair plus a farmers’ market. Browse and enjoy from 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. www.holidayislandchamber@ gmail.com (479) 363-6425.

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Murder Mystery Weekend: The 1884 Bridgeford House Bed and Breakfast Inn and 1881 Crescent Cottage Inn host this exciting bed and breakfast murder mystery package. Phone (800) 223-3246, (888) 567-2422 or see www.1881crescentcottageinn.com or www. bridgefordhouse.com

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Spring Diversity Weekend: Events, music and fun all about town designed for LGBT travelers and friends. Everyone is welcome. For information and a schedule of events visit www. outineureka.com or email info@outineureka.com.

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6th Annual Preservation Society Tea and Bonnet Contest: Crescent Hotel Conservatory, 2 – 4 p.m. Limited seating. Tickets $20 in advance, reser vations only. (417) 861-9887.

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27th Annual UFO Conference, Inn of the Ozarks: Speakers, vendors and more. Two films, Hidden Hand: Alien Contact and the Government Cover Up, and Zipper will premier Friday, April 1 at 7 p.m. For more information visit http://www.ozarkufo.com/ or email ozarkufo@gmail. com.

Women be Wise Retreat at Fire Om Earth, Mill Hollow Road: Sessions include “Living the Dream Time,”“Weaving the Sacred Chant” and “The Theater of our Dreams, Gestalt Dream Interpretation.” 12 A celebration and sharing retreat for women. 2nd Saturday Gallery Stroll: Meet artists and Registration and details at www.fireomearth.com enjoy special shows at Eureka Springs’ art galleries in the evening. See p. 8 for details. or phone (479) 363-9402.

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Eureka House Concerts presents Michael Reno Harrell: Noted singer/ songwriter/storyteller performs in an intimate setting at 17 Elk St. at 6 p.m. Michael’s recordings top the Americana Music Association charts year after year. See www. michaelreno.com, www. eurekahouseconcerts.com. For tickets, (479) 2440123 or email nlpaddock@gmail.com.

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Into the Light: Storytelling through photography with Melanie Myhre. Includes four days’ lodging at Dragonfly Mountain Lodge for photographers of all levels. Workshop, studio and outdoor shoots, sets and meals all included. Registration deadline is April 6. To enroll, phone (479) 981-3765. View schedule at www. melaniemyhrephotography/workshops.

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5th Annual Carol Helmer Memorial Run/Walk for Ovarian Cancer, Holiday Island: Spaghetti Dinner and Silent Auction on April 11, 5 – 7:30 p.m. Eureka Springs Rotary Interact pancake breakfast starting at 8 a.m. Saturday. The USA Track and Field sanctioned race begin 9 a.m. Proceeds benefit The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. To participate or for more info, phone (479) 253-5986 or email joaniekesa@ gmail.com

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Movies in the Auditorium: Three-dollar movie night features the classic Singing in the Rain. Showtime 7 p.m.

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Poetluck at The Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow: Potluck dinner and literary salon


April showers us with things to do all month … featuring readings by visiting and local writers. For Easter Brunch 9 a.m. – 2 p.m. Egg hunt begins at 1 more info see writerscolony.org or phone (479) 253- p.m. in the Fountain Garden. 7444.

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Cocktails for a Cause: Farm-toTable FRESH, 179 N. Main. Raise a glass for the Carnegie Public Library at this fun fundraiser in one of Eureka’s newest restaurants. 5 – 7 p.m. (479) 253-9300.

youth hunting clubs throughout the nation. PokerRun, gun show display, banquet and prize awards. For information email ajwilhelm@ymail.com or phone (870) 545-3690.

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Herbs & Botanical Weekend at Fire Om Earth, Mill Hollow Road: Informational and explorative workshops with Steven Foster, photographer 22 and author of numerous books on medicinal 17, 18, 19 Earth Day: Booths and demonstrations in Basin plants and others. Registration and details at www. 38th Annual Springtime in the Ozarks AA Park from noon – 7 p.m. fireomearth.com, or phone (479) 363-9402. Convention at the Inn of the Ozarks. For more information visit www.nwarkaa.org/springtime. 25, 26 htm. 27 10th Annual Carving in the Eureka Springs School of the Arts ReArt Chair-ity Ozarks Festival. Watch 20 auction fundraiser at Inn of the Ozarks: Doors open 18, 19 to 25 chainsaw carvers create at 6:30 p.m. Free Celebrate Jesus Parade exciting artistic displays admission. Bid and Music in Basin that will guarantee you’ll on fabulous Park: Enjoy a variety never look at a chainsaw art, jewelry, of styles of Christian the same way again! Two antiques and music in Basin Park carving events: Friday and exciting gift from 11a.m. – 5 Saturday starting at 8 a.m. packages in the p.m. Friday and All pieces will be offered at silent auction 11 a.m. – 2 p.m. auction. Enter drawing for and stay for Saturday. Parade at 2 a free carving. Located behind Cornerstone Bank the lively live p.m. downtown flowed by and McDonalds on US 62. (479) 253-2080 or email auction of onemore music until 5 p.m. For info, sleepy@ipa.net. For an application, visit www. of-a-kind chairs call (479) 253 8925 or email lardellen@gmail.com. carvingintheozarks.com. made by local artists at 8 p.m. See www.essa-art.org or phone 20 25, 26 (479) 253-5384 for more information. Easter Sunrise Service at Spring Yards & Yards of the Christ of the Ozarks Yard Sales. Shop yard statue on Great Passion April 27 – May 1 sale bargains all around Play grounds: Service begins at 7 Carroll County Bible Reading Marathon in Green town. Bring a U-Haul! a.m. See www.greatpassionplay.com for Forest. Volunteers Maps available so you more info. read around the can find them all. For info visit www. clock from Genesis eurekaspringschamber.com or call 800-6EUREKA. to Revelation. Bring your 25, 26 church group 20 2014 Eureka Springs Friends of NRA 2nd and volunteer! Easter Brunch and Annual Amendment Freedom Rally & Ride. A 2nd For more information Egg Hunt at the Crescent Amendment Freedom Ride fundraiser for Friends of visit www.ccndpevent.org or Hotel. Reservations required NRA. Funds are used to produce gun safety videos, www.biblereadingmarathon.org. for Brunch, (479) 253-9652. implement various marksmen events, and support

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EVENTS AT A GLANCE, continued from previous page

MAY 1- 31

27th Annual Eureka Springs May Festival of the Arts. City-wide celebration of the art of Eureka Springs in all of its forms will feature dozens of exhibits, artists’receptions, demonstrations, Gallery Strolls, the White Street Studio Walk, free concerts and much more. For more information visit www.eurekaspringsfestivalofthearts.com and be sure to pick up the May Arts Fun Guide for a list of participants and locations.

May 2

Opening performance of the Great Passion Play. All-day event begins at 10 a.m. with lots to do and dinner on the grounds. Play begins at 8:30 p.m. For information and tickets call (800) 8827529 or visit www.greatpassionplay. org.

Before you make plans …

visit individual websites and Facebook pages for possible updates and changes, and check out www. eurekaspringschamber.com or www.iloveeurekasprings.com for additional events.

Opening April 4 … Pine Mountain Theater Mike and Dale Bishop and the gang kick-off their 2014 season Friday, April 4 with a Gospel pre-show at 7:30 p.m. followed by their popular variety show at 8 p.m. Come see what’s new this year at Arkansas’ first and most attended family show. Arrive early, browse the gift shop and be sure to try the fresh baked cookies! Tickets $24 for adults, children under 12 free. For information and ticket call (877) 504-2092 or visit www.pinemountaintheater.com. + Ozark Mountain Hoe-Down The Hoe-Down has a new show and star this year! The Carl Acuff Jr. Show comes to Eureka Springs for the 2014 season and beyond. The variety show featuring country, pop, funky disco and rock opens April 4 for weekend shows, with full schedule beginning April 29. You can meet the Carl Acuff band, watch a video and find out more at www.carlacuffjr.com. Tickets are $25. Showtime is 7:30 p.m. Call (479) 253-7725 for reservations. + 16

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t n e v e l a u n n a t a f f o z z u b s r e v r a c Chainsaw

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here’s a treat in store April 25 and 26 as a couple dozen chainsaw artists gather in the field behind Cornerstone Bank and McDonald’s on US 62 for the Carving in the Ozarks Festival. If you don’t believe chainsaw carving is an art, prepare to be amazed. You’ll never look at a chainsaw the same way again as delicately feathered birds, happy bears and other creatures emerge from big chunks of tree trunks. Watch all the fun for free Friday and Saturday starting at 8 a.m. On Saturday, all pieces will be auctioned off with proceeds benefitting local charities. One lucky bidder will also win a beautiful piece in a drawing following the auction. It could be you – so save some room in the trunk! Don’t miss this popular display of heartland craftsmanship for a good cause. Look for the large tents; you can’t miss it. For more information, see www.carvingintheozarks. com. +

The truth is out there … 27th Annual Ozark Mountain UFO Conference APRIL 11–13

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re crop circles a hoax? Have human beings really been abducted by aliens? Is it possible the government isn’t really telling us everything? (Never mind, we know the answer to that one.) The UFO Conference at the Inn of the Ozarks Convention Center draws people from a wide area who are interested in serious discussions about and possibly some explanation of the phenomena that surround us. Speakers include world-renowned UFO and paranormal researchers, authors, documentary filmmakers and former members of US and British government Defense departments. Vendors and booksellers will also be on hand with some serious and not-so-serious materials and fun stuff for followers of the UFO controversy. See www.ozarkufoconference.com for a complete schedule of topics and speakers, or contact kristy@ozarkmt.com or (479) 738-2348 for registration information. +

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Fun on Foot

Tour the city’s springs for free fun, exercise and plenty of diversions along the way Photos by Steven Foster

Sweet Spring

Harding Spring

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f you’re new to Eureka Springs, one of the questions eventually asked is “How did the city get its name?” The first part relates to the second part – in 1879, someone really did say “Eureka! I found it!” What they found was the same thing a lot of other folks already knew: this area sparkles with natural cold water springs, and many believed the water had healing properties. That’s why (before the Internet and WebMD) thousands of people flocked to our brand new city and scooped up, bathed in and bottled the water reportedly responsible for many cures. Some springs were named for the particular properties they carried, which is why you’ll see names such as Sweet Spring for the taste, or Magnetic Spring because the surrounding rocks had magnetic properties and certain metal objects placed in the spring were said to become magnetized. There are dozens of springs within the city limits, and more than 100 counting those nearby. You’ll find a lot more about the springs and Eureka’s amazing early history at the Historical Museum, but for now we’ll take you along a tour of those springs open, available or on city property. Start out with a short drive to see the most impressive spring. It’s outside city limits on US 62W, about 15 minutes from town. This is Blue Spring, gushing more than 30 million gallons of cold water from the earth each day, creating a gorgeous lagoon. The spring was a Native American camping spot and sacred site for centuries, and was a stop on the Trail of Tears along the forced relocation 18

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route of Native Americans in 1839. There’s also ancient history under the bluffs near the spring; archeological digs have unearthed fragments and artifacts that can be traced back to 8,000 B.C. Blue Spring is the central gem of the Blue Spring Heritage Center attraction, which also includes acres of seasonal gardens, a historical film and more; there is an admission charge, but it’s well worth it. You can easily spend a morning at Blue Spring, then drop by Angler’s Restaurant for lunch on your way back into town to see the rest of our featured springs. As you come back into town, you’ll see the intersection of Historic Loop and 62 by the Best Western Inn of the Ozarks. If you bear left you’ll pass many lovely Victorian homes and artists’ studios on the way up to the Crescent Hotel. Make a left before the hotel parking lot and continue your drive down the hill; you’ll soon pass the Writers’ Colony at Dairy Hollow on your left, and within a few yards you’ll see Grotto Spring on the right. This spring is located in the back of a little cave, and it has a bit of a dark Victorian/Gothic vibe. It’s very popular for weddings, and sometimes if you drive past at dusk, you’ll see candles burning inside. Don’t worry, there’s nothing nefarious happening in there, sometimes people just like a bit of genuine Victorian atmosphere, and it’s very romantic. You’re now on Spring Street, so continue on past some of the oldest Victorian homes in the downtown area; this is one of the most photographed parts of town. Within a half-mile, you’ll find Crescent Spring on your right, just

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a stone’s throw from the Carnegie Public Library. (Don’t worry, we don’t throw stones at our library. We looooooove our library, especially since it’s one of the last Andrew Carnegie-built, historic libraries in the state.) Crescent Spring is covered by a lovely gazebo topped with real brass. There are parking spots nearby, so feel free to stop and explore the gazebo and tiny park surrounding it, and continue on foot through town. This spring may look small, but at one time it supplied water to the Crescent Hotel, hence the name. You can still find old pictures of pipes running up the hill to the hotel, which was built in 1886. Those pictures can be viewed at the library next door, which has lots of history to explore, and you can also buy books and pamphlets about the town to learn more. To the right of Crescent Spring is a steep stairway connecting to a path up the hill; you can follow this path above the homes and come out on Crescent Drive. Turn right and hike up the hill, and you’ll find St. Elizabeth’s Catholic Church, the only church you enter through the bell tower. Just past the church on the right is the famed Crescent Hotel, widely believed to be haunted. Want to find out for sure? Try one of their Ghost Tours and see. Back at Crescent Spring, you have a choice: stay parked and walk to the other springs along Spring Street, or hop in the car for a drive past and come back to visit each one later. Your choice, but we always prefer to hoof it around town when possible. Frankly, that’s probably a big part of the historic cures, just


Grotto Spring getting some exercise and fresh air. Continue along Spring Street and you’ll see more Victorian homes and B&Bs, including the Piedmont House, the oldest continually operating inn in the city. Just around the corner you’ll find Adventure Mountain Outfitters, a great place to stop for bicycle and other outdoor gear, and catty-cornered from that you’ll see Harding Spring on the right. You can actually see the spring flow from the cliff itself. This spring is a lovely spot for a catered picnic from a downtown restaurant, or just to meditate and listen to the world around you. Walk up to the right of the spring

and you’ll see a staircase; this connects to a walking path through the old Spring Reservation, set aside in the 1800s, and the path ends by Sweet Spring. If you take this path, make sure you’re wearing appropriate shoes, because this one can be a little rugged at times. If you would rather save the hike for later, walk back down to the spring and follow Spring Street past the historic Palace Hotel and Spa, several shops and some fascinating houses built on the tops of precarious-looking stone ledges. Don’t worry, they’ve been there for more than 100 years, they’re not going to slip down the hill any time soon. Within a block, you’ll find Rogue’s

The tax man cometh and goeth

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Crescent Spring

ncome Tax was first introduced to the American public in 1861. A rate of 3% was levied on incomes above $800 per year, and the funds used by the Union to pay for the Civil War. However, in 1872, the income tax was abolished as unconstitutional and the law was repealed. Then the Revenue Act of 1894 was introduced, but the legal status of the act was unclear and dropped, again. In 1916, the 16th Amendment to the constitution was passed and Tax Day, or filing deadline, was fixed on March 1. However, it was moved to March 15 in 1918, otherwise known as “the Ides of March.” America’s Tax Day was finally moved to April 15 in 1955, and has remained there ever since.+

Manor restaurant, and just on the other side, Sweet Spring. This spring was once a very popular spot for sweethearts to meet and even marry. Take a rest on one of the benches, or go up the steps to the right of the spring for a nifty bird’s eye view of the street. The steps continue up the hill and connect to the Reservation path mentioned earlier. You can take the path back to your car if you’re walking, but we recommend taking a hike through town down one side of Spring and Main all the way to Califf Spring, and back up the other side. This will take you past the famous Basin Park Spring, where our history started. But before you get there, you’ll find

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interesting shops, galleries and places to eat along the way. Basin Park is a perfect place to commandeer a bench and do some people watching. Depending on the day, you may even be able to enjoy a little live music or a special event in the park. Trek on down Main after you’re rested and you’ll eventually come to the Historical Museum and Califf Spring, right next door. Cross the street and head back up the other side of Main and then Spring to take in the shops you missed going downhill. After all, you are in historic downtown Eureka Springs, and the only thing better than a historic cure from a cold spring is a little modern retail therapy. +

Getting around

ake your hands off the wheel and enjoy the sights. Relax on a trolley, take a city Tram Tour or experience life in the “past” lane on a Eureka Van Tour. You can even hire a carriage! Trolleys run Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. – 5 p.m. in April. A oneride pass is $4, and an all day pass is only $6 covering all routes. Children (7 –11) $2. Get tickets at the Transit Center, 137 W. Van Buren (US 62W), or call 253-9572. Eureka Van Tours can be booked through the Chamber of Commerce (479) 253-8737. Tour operator Michelle McDonald operates comfortable, heated/cooled vans leaving at 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. from Pine Mountain Village. Special groups by appointment. The educational tours with occasional stops last approximately 2 ½ hours. Cost is $25 per person, $10 for 12 and younger. Olden Days Carriage can be found on N. Main Street (www. oldendayscarriageservices.com). Rides are 30 or 60 minutes and can be booked at (479) 981-1737 after 10 a.m. Walk-ups welcome. Need a taxi or a limo? For fully metered taxis and full service limos phone (866) 304-0781 Ext. 3, or (479) 253-6699. +

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The fishing is best in Eureka Springs West Don’t let the big one get away! These folks know just where to put your line in the water, and some can even put your head in a bed… Beaver Dam Store at Spider Creek Resort www.beaverdamstore.com (479) 253-6154
 Beaver Guide Service & Lodging www.beaverguideservice.com (479) 253-5048 Big 1’s Striper Guide www.big1sstriperguide.com (479) 633-0662 Custom Adventures Guide Service www.yourriverguide.com (479) 363-9632 Hosanna Hills Guide Service www.hosannahillsfishing.com hosannahillsenterprises@gmail.com (479) 253-3199 or (479) 244-6255

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Ozark Cabins & RV www.eurekaspringsvacations.com ozarkcab@ipa.net (479) 253-2018 Parker’s Hideaway on the River www.parkershideaway.com parkershideaway@gmail.com (479) 253-6565 Riverview Resort & Country Store www.RiverviewCabinsAndCanoes.com (479) 253-8367 or (800) 418-1233
 Spider Creek Resort www.spidercreek.com (479) 253-9241 or (800) 272-6034 +

F ishing R egulations for A rkansas A fishing license can be purchased at either Riverview Country Store or Beaver Dam Store. The license is inexpensive and its purchase helps pay for fishery/hatchery management, lake maps, printed guides, other fishing-related projects and helps protect endangered species. A fishing license is needed by anyone 16 years or older, must be on your person, and cannot be shared with anyone else. Trout fishing may require an additional permit and there are special rules to be followed. Your fishing guide and the places mentioned above can explain them, and rules are posted along the riverbank as well. +


Where to stay ... Arkansas White River Cabins (479) 253-7117, (800) 494-2972 whiterivercabins.com Bear Mountain Cabins & Riding Stable (479) 253-6185, (800) 805-8005 bearmountainlogcabins.com Beaver Guide Service & Lodging (479) 253-5048 beaverguideservice.com Beaver Lake Cottages (479) 253-8439 beaverlakecottages.com Beaver Lakefront Cabins (479) 253-9210, (888) 253-9210 beaverlakefrontcabins.com Beaver Lakeview Resort & Roadrunner Inn (479) 253-8166, 888-253-8166 beaverlakeview.com Cabin Fever Resort (479) 253-5635, (877) 993-3837 cabinfeverresort.com CanUCanoe Riverview Cabins (479) 253-5966 canucanoe.com Harlee Country Inn (479) 253-1056 harleecountryinn.com Hidden Valley Guest Ranch & Stables (479) 253-9777, (877) 443-3368 hiddenvalleyguestranch.com Lake Forest Luxury Log Cabins (479) 363-9991, (888) 483-8735 lakeforestcabinsresort.com Lake Shore Cabins on Beaver Lake (479) 253-7699, (800) 597-9647 lakeshorecabins.net Ozark Cabins & RV (479) 253-2018 eurekaspringsvacations.com Parker’s Hideaway on the River (479) 253-6565 www.parkershideaway.com Pointe West Motel & Suites (479) 253-9050, (800) 352-6616 PointeWestMotel.com Retreat at Sky Ridge (479) 253-9465, (800) 242-3128 retreatatskyridge.com Riverview Resort & Country Store (479) 253-8367, (800) 418-1233 riverviewcabinsandcanoes.com Spider Creek Resort (479) 253-9241, (800) 272-6403 www.spidercreek.com Sugar Mountain Resort (479) 253-8398 visit-smr.com Sugar Ridge Resort (479) 253-5548, (800) TOP-VIEW sugarridgeresort.com Sunrise Sunset Vacation Rentals (479) 253-3450 eurekavacationrentals.com

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Spring into a fun shopping trip

ureka Springs West has some wonderful antique shops. Castle Antiques at Inspiration Point features three floors chock full of furniture from 1840-1940, country primitives (some original paints), hand-made American quilts and baskets, coins and currency, Belleek china, pottery and glass, tools and toys, jewelry, books, prints and art and a rare 6-month layaway plan and free long-term storage (are you building a home?). They also have the best view possible, from 600 feet above the White River at Inspiration Point! They’re easy to find on US 62W. (479) 253-6150 Gingerbread Antiques, also on US 62, specializes in primitives, Victorian and early American oak furniture, restored trunks, old boxes, machinist toolboxes, signs, oil and decorative lamps, pottery, collectibles and animal mounts. Many unique

items can be found here! (479) 253-2299. Just 5 miles west of Eureka Springs and on the same road as Blue Spring Heritage Center, Paradise Pottery is open Thursday – Monday, from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. all year. Decorative and functional stoneware is hand formed and wheel thrown. Custom orders are welcomed. See Paradise Pottery on Facebook or phone (479) 253-1547. The Velvet Otter makes old things new! Here you’ll find up-cycled and repurposed vintage furnishings and accessories, painted and upholstered furniture, antiques and unique home accessories such as shabby lace & burlap lampshades. Custom orders taken November through February. Located in the historic log cabin at Inspiration Point Overlook on US 62W. (479) 2535155. +

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and

2.

1.

Americans forfeit 226 million vacation days each year – don’t be counted in on that, those are the people who can’t focus, even for a selfie.

People are always telling us that when it rains on their entire six-night vacation, it’s the best one they’ve ever had. There is no shortage of reading material in this town.

5. 3.

4.

Walk around downtown for hours in the sunshine looking for where you think you left your car. It’s more fun than a game of flip cup.

Stop by an outside deck for a cold brew in the middle of the morning. If you already know where you left your car, you can start playing flip cup.

Fun (Guide) Facts The hand that writ it (probably wouldn’t have if he’d been born 430 years later)

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pril 23 marks William Shakespeare’s 450th birthday. That’s how long the influence of his fancy turn of phrase has affected the world; and who hasn’t quoted Shakespeare at one time or another – sometimes without even knowing where the famous line originated? (“Me thinks the lady doth protest too much,” “Boil, boil, toil and trouble” or “My kingdom for a horse!”) This year, Stratford-upon-Avon, Shakespeare’s birthplace in England, will lead the world in celebration of the Great Bard’s life on the weekend of April 26 and 27. Shakespeare went to London and became a playwright and actor in 1592. He wrote most of his comedies, such as The Comedy of Errors and Taming of the Shrew, first. At some point life apparently became less amusing and he began to write tragedies – the greatest, including Hamlet, King Lear and Macbeth, being written after 1600. The Bard retired in Stratford-upon-Avon in 1610, where he wrote his last plays, The Tempest and Winter’s Tale. Shakespeare died in 1616 on April 23, his 66th birthday. If he’d been born in modern times, he’d probably be making rap videos and be known as the Ba-shizzle. +

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Double dog dare you to tie 300 ft. ribbons to the Christ of the Ozarks statue and wrap it as a Maypole. Maybe you won’t do that, but just thinking it means you’re in the right place for a spring break.


By Rachel Brix

Barking up the right tree … Your pooch will love the new Eureka Springs Bark Park

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raveling with your pooch? Large or small, your pup will love Eureka Springs’ newest attraction. In addition to the long list of Eureka Springs’ dog-friendly lodgings, restaurants, shops and other establishments is our very own dog park! On land donated by the city’s Parks and Recreation Commission, a grass (no pun intended) roots group of volunteers did tricks, sat up and begged – and even wagged a few tails – to raise enough money to purchase the big

ticket item, fencing. The Eureka Springs’ Bark Park will be open sometime in April in Harmon Park, a beautiful area full of shade trees and interesting terrain. Just take the street going to the bottom of the hill below the Crescent Hotel parking lot. At the bottom you’ll see the vintage brown building that serves as the Parks & Rec office. Turn left after you pass the office, go down another short hill, and continue left to Bark Park parking. The park has two separate areas, one for large and one for small dogs (30 pounds or less). Entry to the park is free, but the pooches are asking those who can to lend a paw and please leave a donation at the kiosk’s donation box to help keep the park in good repair, stock helpful items (like poop bags) and help provide amenities including pools, gazebos and mulched paths. All dogs entering the park

must be spayed or neutered and current on rabies and distemper/parvo vaccinations. And don’t forget to pick up after your pooch and keep a close eye on him or her. If the weather cooperates, fencing should be installed and the park open for you to enjoy sometime in April. We hope to see you and your dog at Carroll County’s first and only dog park! If you want to check availability first, phone (479) 253-9393. +

When traveling with Fido, always remember to take along his immunization record and medications (if any) in case you have to visit a vet or groomer or wish to board him. To see a list of required vaccinations, see www.percyspetspa. com. +

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mNIGHTLIFE and socializing i

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f you appreciate a good choice of brew, wine or cocktails to go along with an evening of socializing, Eureka Springs has the place(s) just for you! Want a quiet corner for relaxing and conversation? We have it. Love to dance? You can do it here to DJs or live music. Crave pub grub?

You’re in the right town! Some of our night spots allow children until a certain hour, some serve food (and really good food) late, some have awesome house specialties and all of them have the flavor of a place “where everybody knows your name.” +

The Squid and Whale Pub m Fun Ahoy! i

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he Squid and Whale Pub in downtown Eureka Springs has two entrances – 10 Center Street and another one street level up at 37 Spring Street. Enter either door and you’ll be in a seafaring setting with plenty of great food, a full bar and live music in the ship’s hold. Joyce Carlson, co-owner with Tony Gallardo, is the force behind the unexpectedly unique menu – fresh, made from scratch meals that satisfy with something for everyone. In the mood for seafood? Try the Captain’s or Baja Bucket. The Baja (for one or two) includes charbroiled steak, grilled chicken, shrimp and snow crab legs, and the Captain’s Bucket adds scallops or calamari. Fish, clam strips, calamari and snow crab legs are also available every day. Not a fan of seafood? Other choices include a variety of “bodacious” burgers, grilled chicken sandwiches, a gooey toasted Reuben and even a plain grilled cheese sandwich. Thursday’s taco specials run all day, and the Mexican pizza and nachos are out of this world. Don’t miss the unique homemade slaw! There’s even “Pie Night” Thursdays when Joyce makes originalrecipe homemade pies. (Be there early that evening, the pies don’t last long!) Best of all, the kitchen is open noon ‘til close Thursday through Saturday and any night there is entertainment. The Squid and Whale is smoke-free, and the under-21 crowd is welcome until 9 p.m. Menu prices are reasonable and specials abound. Tony books the live music and works hard to ensure great talent takes the deck of the Pirate Ship stage. With acts from as far away as Australia, Europe or Southern California and as close as the next-door neighbor’s garage, it might

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be classic blues, alternative rock, folk, classic rock or amazing jam bands. Check the Eureka Springs Independent (www. eurekaspringindependent.com) to see who’s playing this week or phone the Squid at (479) 253-7147. Thursday nights Bloody Buddy hosts the Open Mic Musical Smackdown showing off the rich talents of our local musicians, and The Sweetwater Gypsies take the stage regularly on Pie Night. If you enjoy good food, drink and socializing visit The Squid for a whale of a good time, Arrrr-rr else! See the whole menu and a fun video at www. squidandwhalepub. com. +

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FUN SPOT of the Month


Get in the Spirit(s) m Pied Piper Pub/Cathouse Lounge, 82 Armstrong Street, is famous for their Reubens, fish & chips, burgers, and Irish dishes! The Corn Beef and Cabbage is just like Mrs. O’Malley’s. There is a full bar, cold beer, lots of parking, and friendly faces.
 Smoke free, full menu and live music on Friday and Saturday. Kitchen open late. www.piedpiperpub. com (479) 363-9976 Voulez Vous Lounge, 63 Spring Street, downstairs of the New Orleans Hotel, is a jazz lounge featuring a full menu, fresh takes on classic cocktails and live music in a nonsmoking atmosphere. Everything is beautiful at the Vous!
 Dancing and extensive drinks menu so you can make a night of it. www.voulezvouslounge.com (479) 3636595 The StoneHouse, 89 S. Main Street. A bright new star is on the culinary horizon in the form of the StoneHouse. Billed as the place for ‘wine, cheese and conversation.’ “An extensive, cutting edge wine and beer list that will transport you to faraway lands,” says a Yelp review.
 Smoke free. Appetizer menu with wine pairings, live music every Friday from 5–8 p.m. www.eurekastonehouse.com (479) 363-6411 Eureka Live Underground & Eureka Patio, 35 N. Main Street. 
A great place to hang out, dance and celebrate weddings, birthdays, anniversaries and more. Full menu, dancing, free pool and a full bar. Large patio for outdoor weather and big dance floor downstairs. www. eurekaliveunderground.com (479) 2537020 Henri’s Just One More, 19 1/2 Spring Street. The only Martini Bar and Grill

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in Eureka Springs. Great food, fabulous Martinis and fun locals. Full menu and extensive bar. www.henrisjustonemore. com (479) 253-5795 Lucky 7 Rooftop Billiards, Basin Park Hotel, 12 Spring Street. One of downtown’s favorite “21 and over” gathering spots. Located on the 6th floor of the 1905 Basin Park Hotel. 
Pool, great views, extensive bar. (479) 253-7837 Rogue’s Manor, 124 Spring Street. Rogue’s Manor at Sweet Spring is a fine dining restaurant and lounge in the downtown Historic District with romantic overnight rooms for couples. Full menu and extensive bar. www. roguesmanor.com 800-250-5827 Rowdy Beaver Restaurant & Tavern, 417 W. Van Buren. Good service, casual food in a fun atmosphere. The tavern side has live music on the weekends, full bar. www.rowdybeaver.com (479) 253 - 8544 Rowdy Beaver Den, 45 Spring Street. Food, fun and extensive bar in a casual atmosphere. There is live music here on Friday and Saturday nights. Recent remodel makes this an excellent place to stop while you are downtown. www. rowdybeaver.com (479) 363 - 6444 Chelsea’s Corner Cafe, 10 Mountain Street. One of the area’s favorite pubs. Large selection of beers, full bar and excellent food contribute to the unique atmosphere. Live music every Friday and Saturday and most week nights, open mic on Tuesdays. Upstairs in the Cafe they serve pizza and much more!
 www. chelseascornercafe.com (479) 253-6723 The New Delhi Café & Patio, 2 N. Main. The New Delhi Café on Main Street has live music every weekend, offering a great mix of local and visiting bands.

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With three decks you can sit as close or far away as you like. The restaurant/bar indoors is smoke free. thenewdelhicafe. com (479) 253-2525 The Balcony Restaurant in Basin Park Hotel is another spot where the family can dine to live music. Friday through Sunday evenings there is live acoustic music at 5 p.m., with noon shows added on Saturday and Sunday. http://www. basinpark.com 479-253-7837 Squid and Whale Pub, 37 Spring Street. One of Northwest Arkansas’ top music venues. With entrances on Spring and Center Streets, the Squid recruits talent from all over the country, there is a band there every weekend. In addition to the weekend entertainment, they feature a local band once a week for ‘Local Kine’ night and have an open jam on Thursdays that will blow you away. They offer a varied menu that includes American, Mexican and seafood. There is no smoking, which means children are welcome until 9 p.m. www. squidandwhalepub.com (479) 253-7147 Jack’s Center Stage, 37 Spring Street. This is a full service bar. Live entertainment Friday and Saturday nights with a variety of rock and blues. You can smoke here, so no kiddos. (479) 253-2219 Rockin’ Pig Saloon, 2039C E. Van Buren, in the Gaskins Switch shopping area is a full service dining, drinking and entertainment establishment. The menu includes pizza cooked to perfection in their Italian wood-fired oven, barbeque, ribs, steaks and sandwiches. They have eight beers on tap and a fully stocked bar. Biker friendly and non-smoking, kids are welcome. Open all year. www.

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rockinpigsaloon.com (479) 363-6248 Chasers Bar & Grill, 169 E. Van Buren, is a favorite among the biking crowd. They have a full bar and great pub grub on the menu. With drink and menu specials, pool and dart tournaments, this is always a fun place. There is live music on Friday and Saturday nights. You can smoke here, so 21 and up only. See the Chasers Bar page on Facebook. (479) 253-5522 The Blarney Stone, 85 South Main Street. An Irish pub with a full menu, breakfast served all day, kitchen open late. Savory Irish country fare, amazing desserts, even offering vegetarian selections. Live music with stages upstairs and down. Full bar. Open 7 days a week. (479) 363-6633 Legends Saloon, 105 E. Van Buren, is a full service bar and restaurant formerly known as The Lumberyard. Great food, full bar and DJ Karaoke or live music with a large dance floor. Weekly Texas Hold ‘Em (Sunday) and Pool (Tuesday) tournaments. Great place for large parties, plenty of parking. (479) 253-2500 +

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ES Independent Fun Guide April