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Nutrition & Food Safety  Communications

Today’s Agenda What Is IFIC? The Nutrition & Food Safety Environment

International Food Information Council (IFIC) Lauren Verduin Lauren Verduin Sarah Alligood , MPH, RD Sarah Alligood, MPH, RD Kerry Robinson, RD

What Are Consumers Saying?  Developing Messages that Resonate How Communications are Changing 

February 23rd, 2009

International Food  Information Council (IFIC) Mission:

What Is IFIC?

To communicate science‐ To communicate science‐based  information on food safety and nutrition to  health and nutrition professionals, educators,  journalists, government officials and others  providing information to consumers. Primarily supported by the food, beverage, and  agricultural industries.

IFIC & IFIC Foundation Partners American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and  Immunology

Inter‐ Inter‐American Institute for Cooperation on  Agriculture

American Academy of Family Physicians  Foundation

International Consultative Group on Food  Irradiation

American Academy of Pediatrics  American Association of Diabetes Educators 

National Association of Pediatric Nurse  Associates and Practitioners  National Center for Food Protection & Defense

American College of Obstetricians and  Gynecologists

National Institutes of Health

American College of Sports Medicine

National Policy and Resource Center on  Nutrition and Aging, Florida Int’ Nutrition and Aging, Florida Int’l University

The American Dietetic Association Association of Women's Health, Obstetric,  and Neonatal Nurses  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Consumer Federation of America The Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network  Food Marketing Institute Harvard School of Public Health

Institute of Food Technologists

President’ President’s Council on Physical Fitness and  Sports  School Nutrition Association Scripps Clinic and Research Foundation  U.S. Agency for International Development U.S. Department of Agriculture U.S. Department of State U.S. Environmental Protection Agency U.S. Food and Drug Administration University of Illinois Functional Foods for  Health Program

IFIC Foundation Web Site In English and Spanish

ific.org and

ific.org/sp


IFIC Foundation’s Food Insight

IFIC Provides Helpful Communication  Materials

•Moving online! •45,000 circulation •7% international •6,000 media

Continuing Professional Education Now available on IFIC.org Now available on IFIC.org:: 2008 IFIC Foundation Food and Health Survey All About Caffeine All About Carbohydrates and Health Food & Agricultural Biotechnology:  Health Impacts in Developing Nations  Food Biotechnology 101: A Primer on  the Science & the Public Debate Food Science Meets Nutrition New Nutrition Conversation with Consumers New Nutrition Conversation with Consumers A New Nutrition Conversation with Consumers About Fats in Food Understanding and Effectively Communicating Food and Nutrition Science:  Leading Consumers to Better Health  Sugar Alcohols Understanding Food Allergy: A Primer for Dietitians The Lowdown on Low‐ The Lowdown on Low‐Calorie Sweeteners

IFIC Explores Consumer Insights Consumer Research  –

Food & Health Survey Consumer Attitudes Toward Functional Foods/Food for  Health

Food Biotechnology: A Study of U.S. Attitudinal Trends

Qualitative Studies & Ethnographic Research

And more… And more… www.ific.org/research

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey Trended Research

IFIC Foundation Programs Media Program 2007‐ 2007‐2009 IFIC Foundation Media Guide  on Food Safety & Nutrition A resource guide with contact information  for more than 300 science experts and  updated backgrounders and Web‐ updated backgrounders and Web‐based  resource lists, the 2007 resource lists, the 2007‐‐2009 IFIC  Foundation Media Guide on Food Safety  and Nutrition has been disseminated to  approximately 1,000 journalists and  opinion leaders since its December 2006  launch. 

2006 2007

2008

http://ific.org

Moving Online!


IFIC International Relations The Food Information Organization (FIO) Network

AFIC – Asia AFGC – Australia CFIC – Canada CLIA – Latin America EUFIC – Europe IFIC – USA JFIC – Japan NZNF – New Zealand

Monitoring the Environment Academic Research  Government Actions   Health Professional Groups Media Coverage of Issues New Media Sources 

The Nutrition & Food Safety  Environment

Top Sources of Health & Nutrition  Information 71%

Media Medical Sources

36% 18%

Friends/Family/Self

10%

Library/Reading

– blogs, vlogs , social networking sites blogs, vlogs, social networking sites

Advocacy Groups  Industry Innovations 

5%

Labels on Products Diet/Health Book

3%

Teacher/Instructor

2%

IFIC 2007

Consumers Exposed to Confusing &  Conflicting Messages

Most Believable Sources of Health &  Nutrition Information 24%

Media Medical Sources

“Coffee May Reduce Stroke Risk”

Friends/Family/Self Library/Reading Labels on Products

“No bones about it: Study firmly links obesity, cancer”

36%

“Coffee raises miscarriage risk”

“Extra Weight Won’t Raise Death Risk”

5% 2% 2%

Diet/Health Book

0%

Teacher/Instructor

0%

IFIC 2007


Health Professionals are the Most Influential Sources of Information Health professional 6% 10%

28%

Dietitian 11% 13% Health association 10%

17%

Food label 10%

28%

TV news program

13%

34%

Magazine article

13%

35%

Newspaper

28% 17%

Product or company advertising

23%

Radio news program

23%

Not at all

30%

To a small extent

– Consumer perceptions/knowledge/beliefs

37% 39%

13%

Understand:

44%

37%

Internet article

Government official

56% 32%

RDs Are Positioned to Communicate  Credible Food and Health Information!

23%

41%

17%

40%

14%

42% 32%

39% 42% 41% To a moderate extent

Develop messages that resonate

11%

30% 35% 26% 30%

10% 9% 8%

Multiply credible & consistent messages

6%

To a great extent

IFIC 2007

Responsibilities of a Communicator Enhance public understanding of diet and health Use understandable language Disclose important facts  Be clear about dietary risks and benefits Meet the needs of the media

What Are Consumers Saying?

Communication Best Practices Effective communication is an ongoing process Pre‐ Pre‐planning and preparedness Form partnerships Listen to concerns Be positive, honest, frank and open Collaborate and coordinate with credible sources Meet the needs of media and remain accessible Accept uncertainty and ambiguity Communicate with compassion, concern & empathy Give the consumer actionable steps


It’s Confusing Out There Video

Methodology Methodology

Web Survey

Population

Representative Sample of Americans Aged 18+

Data Collection Period

February 21-March 11, 2008

Sample Size (Error)

n=1,000 (+ 3.1 For 2008) (+ 4.4 Among 2008, 2007, 2006)

Data Weighting*

Data Weighted on Age, Income, Education and Race

*Weighting is a widely accepted statistical technique that is used to ensure that the distribution of the sample reflects that of the population on key demographics. With any data collection method, even when the outgoing sample is balanced to the Census, some populations are more likely than others to respond.

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

While the majority are interested in food and health information, nearly half feel it is confusing and conflicting.

The Concept of the “Diet Disconnect”

Reading or hearing about the relationship between food and health is of interest to me

I feel that food and health information is confusing and conflicting

9%

25%

27%

Disagree

67%

28%

45%

Neither Disagree Nor Agree

Agree

2008 (n=1000) To what extent do you agree or disagree with the following statements regarding food and health information? IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

The 7 “Diet Disconnects”

Total does not add to 100 percent due to rounding

1 - Food Safety


The majority of consumers are confident they can safely prepare food.

Some consumer food safety practices do not match confidence. Cook to required temperature (such as 165 degrees F for poultry)

To what extent, if at all, do you feel confident that you know how to safely prepare foods for yourself or your family?

7%

12%

Unconfident

76%

82%

Neither Confident Nor Unconfident

Confident

Use a food thermometer to check the doneness of meat and poultry items

29%

2008 (n=1000) 2008 (n=1000)

Which of the following actions do you perform regularly when cooking, preparing, and consuming food products?

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

Consumers implement some but not all microwave cooking practices. Follow all the cooking instructions

Check microwave wattage

Use a food thermometer to make sure the food reaches the required temperature

79%

2 – Counting Calories

15%

7%

2008 (n=1000) Which of the following actions do you perform regularly when preparing microwavable meals (e.g., frozen meals, pre-packaged meals that contain cooking instructions) at home? IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

The majority of Americans have made changes to improve the healthfulness of their diet in the past six months.

Losing weight (and improving health) is a top driver of dietary change. 69%

To lose weight

↑’06

2008

↓’06

67%

33%

Yes

No

To improve my overall well-being *

69%

To improve my physical health *

64%

Specific health condition Maintain my weight

↑’06

34% 11%

↓’07/’06

2008 (n=669)

2008 (n=1000) Over the past six months, have you made any changes in an effort to improve the healthfulness of your diet?

* Modification from 2006: “To improve my overall health” (69%) was changed to two items, including “To improve my overall wellbeing” and “To improve my physical health”.

For which of the following reasons, if any, are you trying to improve the healthfulness of your diet? ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008


The majority of Americans inaccurately estimate daily calorie needs. ↓’06 2008

↑’06

29%

↑’07

42%

Unaware

15%

14%

Underestimate

Overestimate

CORRECT ESTIMATE

3 - Diet and Physical Activity

56 percent responded but estimated incorrectly.

(n=1000) As far as you know, how many calories should a person of your age, weight, height, and physical activity consume per day? IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

Americans’ Approach to Diet and Physical Activity • 88 percent of Americans report being physically active for health benefits at least once a week.

4 – Breakfast

• 44 percent of Americans who are active do not balance diet and physical activity to manage weight.

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

The majority of Americans perceive breakfast to be “extremely important” to an overall healthful diet. ↑’07

↓’07 16%

77%

Breakfast

Despite its perceived importance, less than half of Americans eat breakfast everyday.

92% Breakfast

Lunch

Lunch

Snacks

42%

47%

Dinner

25%

29%

"5" Extremely Important

46%

83%

46%

37%

89%

54%

54%

82%

Dinner

"4" Somewhat Important

7 days

2008 (n=1000) How important, if at all, are each of the following eating occasions to an overall healthful diet? ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

2008 (n=1000) In general, how often do you eat each of the following (per week). . . ↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

↑’07


Consumers remain very concerned with amount and type of fats.

Concern with amount of fat consumed

5 - Dietary Fats

Concern with type of fat consumed

14%

15%

13%

19%

70%

68%

Not Concerned

Neither

Concerned

2008 (n=1000) IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 Total does not add to 100 percent due to rounding

Many consumers do not understand that unsaturated fats are healthful. Percent Healthful Polyunsaturated fats

2008 (n=714)

Monounsaturated fats

2008 (n=630)

Unsaturated fats*

2008 (n=778)

23%

↑’06

28%

6 - Carbohydrates

↑’06

37%

How would you rate the healthfulness of each of the following types of fat?

↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008 *Added in 2008

Consumers remain concerned with amount and type of carbohydrates consumed.

Consumers are trying to consume more fiber and whole grains. ↑’07 Whole grains

Concern with amount of carbs consumed

22%

23%

27%

Not Concerned

(n=915)

77%

(n=578)

33%

27%

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

40%

Concerned More

↑ Significant increase from year indicated ↓ Significant decrease from year indicated

4%

↑’06 Complex carbs

52%

Neither

18%

↓’07

↑’06 21%

5%

55%

Fiber

Concern with type of carbs consumed

↓’07

78%

(n=874)

2008 (n=1000)

Less

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

Neither

19%


Majority Believe Foods & Beverages Provide Benefits; Fewer Consuming Percent Somewhat/Strongly Agree

7- Foods and Beverages with Added Benefits

Percent Currently Consuming

1. Improve heart health

78%

40%

2. Improve energy or stamina

77%

38%

3. Improve digestive health

76%

37%

4. Improve mental performance

71%

5. Improve immune system function 71%

To what extent do you agree or disagree that some specific foods or beverages can provide the following benefits?

29% ↑’07 31%

Please indicate your current or future interest in foods and beverages that provide each of the following benefits:

IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

2008 (n=1000)

Foods and Beverages with Added Benefits

50 percent or more are not currently consuming foods for their benefits, but are interested in doing so.

Developing Messages that Resonate

Please indicate your current or future interest in foods and beverages that provide each of the following benefits: IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008

2008 (n=1000)

Creating Consumer‐Centered  Messages

Step 1: Define Issues What motivates your audience?

Message Development Model

– Qualitative Research Focus groups Informal channels

– Psychographics Family structure, interests and hobbies, preferred  recreational activities, values, life goals, concerns, and  biases  Source: Wirthlin Worldwide


Step 2: Develop Initial Message  Concepts

Step 3: Assess Message Concepts Testing your messages: qualitative research

Use information collected in STEP 1 to  identify: – Specific actions – Specific behaviors

Develop positive messaging

What do initial messages mean to target  audience? How do they react? Does the message motivate them? Does it fit in with their other values?

– Empower consumers to make the change

Step 4: Fine Tune Messages Did the message resonate or “ Did the message resonate or “miss the mark?” miss the mark?” Fine tuning may help make the message  resonate the second time around

Case Study: Breakfast 

Step 5: Validate Messages Does the message resonate with a larger  audience? – Telephone questionnaires, surveys, informal  conversations


Diet Disconnect: Breakfast • 92% of consumers feel that eating breakfast is either extremely or somewhat important

Top Reasons for Skipping Breakfast 59%

Not hungry right after I wake up

54%

Not enough time Is not convenient (e.g., food choices are not portable or easily accessible)

BUT

24% 20%

Forget

• Only 46% say they eat breakfast daily

15%

Not sure what to eat 2008 (n=477)

[Breakfast Somewhat/Extremely Important but don't eat it every day] What prevents you from eating breakfast every day?)

2008 Food & Health Survey n=1000

2008 Food & Health Survey n=447

Top Motivators for Eating Breakfast Percent Placing Benefit in Top Three Motivators Increase physical energy

74%

Increase mental focus

59%

Maintain a healthy body weight

54%

Maintain good health (i.e., keep the heart healthy, bones strong)

43%

Improve the healthfulness of your overall diet

38%

You get through your morning without feeling hungry

24% 8%

Bring families together

International Food Information Council (IFIC) Foundation MyPyramid Breakfast and Health Communications Program Consumer Messaging Testing Research Conducted in partnership with:

(n=541) [Don't eat Breakfast every day] Rank the top three benefits that would be most likely to motivate you to eat breakfast more often.

2008 Food & Health Survey n=541

Project Overview •

Goal: To test and refine messages aimed at improving perceptions and increasing consumption of breakfast foods and beverages – Research Objectives: • Confirm current attitudes and perceptions toward breakfast eating • Refine messages that will assist consumers in understanding the benefits of eating breakfast regularly for adults and children • Explore potential improvements in the communication of the benefits of eating breakfast to consumers

2008

Methodology First Discussion Board –

Research Team Meeting –

Second Discussion Board –

Test initial messages

Revise/Refine messages

Test refined messages

August August 12-13, 12-13, 2008 2008

August August 18-22, 18-22, 2008 2008

August August 26-27, 26-27, 2008 2008

Audience: Consumers with at least one child age 12 and under, nationally recruited on a mix of gender, education, and ethnicity Methodology: CoRe Boards™ - Two boards lasting two days each


68

Summary of Findings

Least Compelling Consumer Breakfast and Health Messages

• Stick to the basics • Provide solutions • Shorter is better, except when a barrier is involved • Inconvenient = Lack of time • Consumers love of a metabolism message

Statements least likely to impact breakfast behavior are those that are long and with terms that consumers consider vague or inappropriate, such as wireless, conquer and jumpstart Breakfast Can be Wireless Too, With All The New Portable Options “It makes no sense. Should I be looking for an antenna sticking out of my breakfast burrito?” Breakfast: Eat It for Energy to Conquer Your Everyday Activities “I just can't get over the use of the word conquer.” Eat the First Meal of the Day to Jumpstart Your Energy and Keep Weight Gain Away “Tries to throw too much into a single catch phrase.”

69

The Most Compelling Consumer Breakfast and Health Messages The messages that consumers found most compelling address mental focus, improved overall health, saving time, and flexibility

Breakfast is Fuel for School Breakfast Boosts Brain Power Breakfast Builds Better Bodies

Break for Breakfast: Take a Few Minutes to Fuel Up Brown Bagging Breakfast: It’s Not Just for Lunch Anymore You Don’t Have to Eat Breakfast Right Away, Eat it Within the First Few Hours of Your Day

Message Development Exercise What types of messages would you  develop based on the food safety “ develop based on the food safety “diet  disconnect?” disconnect?” – Consumer food safety practices do not  match confidence

MyPyramid Breakfast and Health Communicator's Tool Kit http://www.ific.org/publications/other/breakfast.cfm

• Tool Kit Components – IFIC Review: Breakfast and Health – IFIC Foundation Breakfast and Health Consumer Message Testing Research Report – IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey Breakfast Research and a corresponding Consumer Videos – Printable Handout on the benefits of breakfast – Printable Tip sheet with breakfast ideas and recipes – Tips on working with the news media – Message development checklist – Turn-key media materials such as: • Example Key Messages • Press Releases

Some consumer food safety practices            do not match confidence. Cook to required temperature (such as 165 degrees F for poultry)

Use a food thermometer to check the doneness of meat and poultry items

76%

29%

2008 (n=1000) Which of the following actions do you perform regularly when cooking, preparing, and consuming food products? IFIC Foundation Food & Health Survey 2008


Changes in media relations Rise in the number of topics reaching the  public forum

How Communications are  Changing

Increase in the range of players in the  communications process Dramatic change in communication  technology

News consumers trust

People consumers trust? 70% 60% 50%

2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008

40% 30% 20% 10% 0%

A Person Like Yourself

Edelman Trust Barometer 2008

– Television – Radio

Doctor/Health Non-Proft/NGO Care Specialist Representative

Blogger

Edelman Trust Barometer 2008

Traditional media Newspapers Long‐ Long‐lead magazines Broadcast

Academic

New media Social Networking Sites Blogs Video Sharing and Podcasts


Social networking sites Web‐ Web‐based services that allow users to build  online communities of people who share  interests and activities, or who are interested  in exploring the interests and activities of  others. – Users create profiles to share their personal  information, photos, and interests – Users interact with one another through a variety  of methods 

Most popular  social networking sites MySpace (236 million users)   Facebook (80 million users) Linked In (23 million users)

Popular nutrition  and health blogs “Hungry Girl” Hungry Girl” “Diabetes Blog” Diabetes Blog” “3 Fat Chicks” 3 Fat Chicks” “Ethicurean” Ethicurean”

Blogs Online journal, usually maintained by an  individual, with regular entries of  commentary, descriptions of events, or other  material such as graphics or video – Provide commentary on current events – React to issues covered in the media – Forum to ask questions – Chronicle personal experiences

Interaction between old  and new media

Newspapers, Magazines, and Television

Blogs and Online Videos


Video sharing and podcasts Web site where users can upload, view and share  video clips – Most popular videos are humorous, surprising, or  illustrate how to do something

Digital‐ Digital‐media files distributed over the Internet  using syndication feeds for playback on portable  media players and computers

Examples of video  sharing sites YouTube  Monkeysee.com Google Video 

– Broadcasts on‐ Broadcasts on‐the‐ the‐go – School lessons to go

How to use new media at a  community level Lead information‐ Lead information‐seeking consumers to your  resources Provide credible information to “ Provide credible information to “message  multipliers” multipliers” Support individuals or groups as they strive to  change behavior

GoGo-To Source for Food Safety and Nutrition… Nutrition… IFIC Partners With Monkeysee.com Monkey See Topic Featuring: Safe food Handling

IFIC & Social Media

GoGo-To Source for Food Safety and Nutrition… Nutrition… “Do I Have to Eliminate Certain Foods from My  Diet” Diet”

Christine Bruhn*

Help Your Diet Survive the Wendy Reinhardt Office Kapsak* Eat More than You Think and Not Gain Weight

Liz Rahavi*

Nutrition Secrets

Sarah Alligood*

Microwave Safety

Sue Snider*

All About Food Allergy

Bob Gravani*

Christine Bruhn Video: 9,000+ views * Currently posted to MonkeySee.com and IFIC.org

Sarah Alligood, MPH, RD, Program Coordinator, IFIC


IFIC’ IFIC’s “ s “What’ What’s for Lunch?” s for Lunch?” on  MySpace An entertaining look  at some of the  issues related to the  ways food is grown! 

Food and Health http://www.ific.org/research/2008fandhsurve ywebcast.cfm

Posted to YouTube,  Facebook, MySpace  and IFIC.org 

Ask An Expert Videos

In Development Monitoring the blogosphere  YouTube channel Tweeting Web‐ Web‐site re‐ site re‐design  Food Insight Online

Questions? Lauren Verduin: verduin@ific.org Lauren Verduin: verduin@ific.org Sarah Alligood: alligood@ific.org Sarah Alligood: alligood@ific.org Kerry Robinson: robinson@ific.org Kerry Robinson: robinson@ific.org

Nutrition & Food Safety  Communications  

International Food International Food Information Council (IFIC) Information Council (IFIC) IFIC & IFIC Foundation Partners IFIC &...

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