Page 1


2•

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

K

ing Of The Highland, his name is legendary in the show ring circle of exceptional Saddlebred champions. His unbelievable motion and super star performance is something everybody wanted to see and talk about. He could get overexcited in the qualifying classes purely because he was so eager to get in there, but he relished and craved the Saturday night championship action, the audience and excitement. He never could wait for that gate to open, and he absolutely loved the lights, the vibe, King was thrilled by the wave of pure energy that exulted to extraordinary performances. King was never an easy horse to train, he worked every session at full throttle. It took a lot of planning and patience to leg him up, keep him busy, and hold his interest. The hardest part was to stay with him, and to match his pace. He has a never-ending supply of energy and to manage that was at times infuriating and unbelievably tiring. I could never take my eye or concentration off him for a single second.

He is incredibly sharp and extremely aware, he knew immediately if you were a little slow. I use a woman who has telepathic communication with horses and the very first session King made it very clear that it was a pity to come down to my level, what a shocker that was! He complained mostly that I was unconnected, over thinking and slow in reaction time! I had to up my game and develop enough staying power to help him achieve the level of fitness he needed without

Equestrian Express

overtraining him. He was an ove amazing horse, I could put him am on the wall at a parade walk and drop dr the long lines, matching in my stride to his front leg rhythm and he would just settle rh into in it and work without my hands. He would react to me h changing the speed or timing c of o my stride, when I took longer e steps he went faster, smaller steps slowed him down. To s stop I simply bend my knees s slightly, dragged the leg s closest to him and stomped softly into a standstill, and he would stop dead, wait a beat, then I’d better be ready with the next move. He really loved that game between us, and he really enjoyed a wits challenge. I finally understood that he is just a super intelligent horse, bored by repetitive work, and liked challenging himself and of course, me. He challenged me when mounting and expected me to solve that riddle every time. He didn’t mean harm, he didn’t want to be slapped or bullied about, he simply wanted me to outwit him. We had a very close relationship of little things, for example: when walking with my hand on his rump – no reign contact- I’d walk right against his flank with his stifle pumping up into my ribs. He’d never step on me though at times he’d whack me in the stomach with his hock motion on turning. When riding him I could drop the reins at a jog walk or trot without fearing a change in him- he was so light mouthed. I could ride him with a light rope string halter and he’d carry himself as perfectly as he was at any show. Show attire doesn’t allow anything but a double bridle with snaffle and curb bit, but mostly too much stuff in his mouth. I planned to drop my reigns at Bloemfontein last year on the victory round of honour, but got so overwhelmed by the idea of that being my last Bloem ride with him, it completely slipped my mind. His pet peeve was cantering, he passionately hated that gait as he had to look slightly down. He wouldn’t pull a cart with blinkers on because he hated not seeing, it seemed to close down his world. He loved looking, and I mean physically looking at the spectators next to the arena. We had to teach him to find a spot or person far ahead to centre on. He could not stand still or

keep still, not for a second, even while hand walking or grooming, he would find something to do to keep busy. Unfortunately the King had to take a bow last year from showing and retired to stud. He had a fracture on his cannon bone (possibly due to his enormous front stride and action), this is what made this decision inevitable. We feared that after having healed completely the cannon bone would compact ever so slightly, resulting in a shorter arc of flight. Kings leg will recover over time, but three quarters through the first of two recuperating years he is a fearsome force to be reckoned with in his stud’s bullring. He shows off and looks like nothing on earth is the matter. The way he spins, rears, mock attacks and makes statements about himself and his territory, has one fearing he will break all four legs instead of hurting just one! One could immediately tell that he missed working and had to get rid of his fuming energy by endlessly working himself in the bullring. We had to change his diet, banish him to the stallion stables and make him lose weight, so he lost a lot of muscle and has become lean and sinewy. As preparation for Bloemfontein Saddle Horse National Championships started and is now almost complete, we really miss training him as he was such a big part of the focus point. Knowing he has to stay home this year and won’t be there at Bloemfontein in all his glory is saddening, especially as we know he would do it in a heartbeat if asked for it. With his wild mane half grown, prancing, proudly and passionately expressing his joy of life, he is however, inspiring us to work relentlessly and consistently on each ach horse in the string. ng.

K

ing challenged d me on every ground and d d opened my mind out tremendously about teaching horses. It is nice and relaxing ng to work horses that hat d are not so primed and perfectionistic, but once exposed to that type of intelligence in a horse it is hard to becomee

Saddlebreds • 3

unplugged. It is impossible to look at him and not recognise and respect that flame of fiery spirit. I am so blessed with still being able to see him every day and spoil him wholeheartedly. King sired his first foal, Prince of Hearts, a top three 5Gaited Ladies horse. His second foal, Cherry Chief inherited his sire’s brilliance and ability. In a weak moment I castrated him and still bemoan that mistake. King also sired three mares, Kings Flower Song, Highlands Cherry Rose and Kings Eye Candy. His mares are as gifted as his sons, and I hope I will have many more of his magnificent genes pooled into off-spring that will keep me on my toes and fill my days with wonder and excitement. His full brother, Highlands Avatar, will start his show-career in September. These are the only two stallions I have of that cross, as I lost his full sister last September just after she was born. I hope to have one or two more foals from his dam, Highlands Diamond and Rust, and his sire Bay City Roller.

On the cover: King Of The Highland, owned by Petro Botha De Waal, Botha Stalle, Cell: 0825583680 Email: pbotha@jcbotha.co.za Cover photo by: Elpita Photography, Piet Scheepers, Cell: 0824140401 Email: piet@elpitaphotography.com Other photos by: Colas Photography, Nicola van der Walt, Cell: 0727581703 Email: colasphotography@vodamail.co.za


4 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012

A local face at W

hat’s one thing that you will always find at the SA Saddle Horse Championship show in Bloemfontein each year? Well that would be the friendly face of Paul Scholtz from the Pauls Bits and Tack shop where all your equine equipment can be bought. Paul has had horses all his life, buying his first Saddle Horse from Pieter Van Zyl from Elliot in 1962, the horse was a son of Proud Bourbon O-Gosen. Pauls Bits and Tack was proudly opened 25 years ago in 1987 and has had the stall as portable tack shop at Bloemfontein Show for the last 20 years. Paul’s favourite thing about going to all the horse shows is seeing the newest upcoming horses, riders as well as the judges. He says the one thing that makes Bloemfontein show different to all the other horse shows in South Africa is that it’s near home for him, and it attracts horses and riders from all over South Africa making it the one show of the year where everyone is seen. According to Paul, being someone that has seen all the horse trends over the last 50 years, the biggest must have item used to be the Dumb Jockey, whereas nowadays he says it is the tooth rasp. Paul says that the South African Saddle Horse trainers have changed over the years by visiting The United States of America and learning from trainers like Mike Arnold, Bill Rowan and Harold Poil. Paul recons that there are many important items that should be in a stable yard but above all the Dumb Jockey is a must have item, as well as a tooth rasp, market harbourer, stethoscope, thermometer, safety stirrup irons, hoof pick and a good quality curry comb are things that everyone needs in their

tack room. At Pauls Bits and Tack this year you can look forward to seeing jewellery that Pauls daughter, a jeweller, has imported from America. When asked if he plans to retire anytime soon, Paul says:

‘‘ Only the good Lord will decide on this.’’ Paul Scholtz with his Pauls Bits and Tack shop is a must have at every horse show that is attended, they stock everything from emergency rain gear to the littlest thing like a safety pin which can be found at this amazing place. Visit them at the 2012 SA Saddle Horse Championships, in the Sieberhagen Hall on the Bloemfontein Show Grounds.


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 5

Middelburg Show By: Anika Botha

T

he Middelburg Agricultural Show was held from the 8th to the 10th of March 2012, with the showground’s situated on the eastern side of the town opposite the railway station. The Agricultural Society had been established by 1904, and the Agricultural Society and sports club agreed that the sports grounds stables were to be built with tin sheeting. The Agricultural Society was also given permission to have its show there. In 1908 the Agricultural Society took over the sports grounds and then sold it in 1936. The Agricultural Society however still remained in charge of the sports grounds after selling it, but they later bought the sports grounds back in 1949. From the earliest existence of the district there has been Gymkhana events held, usually on the Saturday of the show. Since the start of the Agricultural Society in 1904 there have been regular agricultural events held at the Middleburg show grounds. During the first years of the Agricultural society’s existence the buildings on the showground were built as we see them today. At a time the agricultural events held by Middleburg were the

best in South Africa. People that were important in the development of the district were people like Pietie Joubert, Ernst Sykes, Cecily Norden en Janet Mellville who were big names in the horse industry and each made a contribution to the show and still do. In 2006 the Middelburg show was in its 150th year of existence, and in 2009 it hosted the international competition with the South African Cape Boerperd Saddle Seat Equitation team against the American Morgan Horse team, and in 2011 the first African Saddle Horse Futurity classes were held at Middleburg show. This year’s Middleburg show had 60 horses, and show organization was lead by Middleburg show president Stefan Erasmus, and Horse Chairman PJ Slabbert and his committee. The community did a great job in supporting the show with sponsorship, including GDE Leather and many other sponsors, which made for excellent prize money! The show is also well supported by ECASA (East Cape Agricultural show Association). The show had competitive classes for Saddle Horses, Cape Boerperd and Welsh ponies. The show also has open classes where anyone, w any clothes can compete on any kind with o horse, these classes were created to get of t children and even the adults from the the c community involved in the show. Classes w judged by Johan Lambrecht from were P Phillippolis, and he was assisted by Jakkie E Erasmus. The Youth Show (horses) was held on Thursday and it was also the first trials for t Eastern Province Saddle Seat equitathe ti team. George Borcherds also organtion iz an Interschool’s class where riders can ized c compete for points for their school. On Thursday night the show had a function for fo the exhibitors and sponsors with their le legendary Potjiekos made by Andries Melle and also a performance by Zak Steyen. let,

On Friday the horse classes continued, and later on the Friday evening the show has its JIDDAN open 5Gaited class. This class was name after the first Arab named Jiddan who won the 5Gaited class at Middelburg show. Jiddan results: 1. The Gulf War ridden by Francois Van der Merwe. On Friday night the Pom-Poms from Karel Theron Primary School entertained the people with their dances. Grootfontein Agricultural College students entertain the people with “Boere” sport after the show, and it is very entertaining. There was also a sheep and goat show, as well as stalls where goods could be bought, and talks were also held for the ladies. The show also hosts the ATKV Charity Class. This is a class where all riders must compete with any breed of horse. All the entry money and prize money is donated to Huis Karee old age home. Middleburg show is the only show in the Eastern Cape which has an Arabian horse costume class where riders show off in traditional Arabian clothes, this class is well supported by

De Nova Boerdery. On Saturday afternoon it was time for the Championships. Cape Boerperd 3Gaited Champion: 1. Inka Fire Chaser ridden by Ciska Pienaar Cape Boerperd 5Gaited Champion: 1. Smallies Bobby ridden by Rochelle Stander Saddle Horse 3Gaited Champion: 1. Shakira ridden by Elbie Van Der Merwe Saddle Horse 5Gaited Champion: 1. The Gulf War ridden by Francois Van Der Merwe In the Saddle Horse 5Gaited Championship there were 4 horses in the ring owned by Francois van der Merwe, it was great to see someone support and enjoy the show as he did. For stable bookings and enquiries for Middleburg show 2013 contact: Anika Botha 0738702250


6 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

“HAROLD POIL SOLO” SOUTH AFRICAN SADDLE HORSE TACK LINE

Equestrian Express needs of the Saddle Horse community. For more information contact Solo Saddlers at info@solosaddlers.co.za or 078 804 9994

P

rofessional horseman of 50 years and four time trainer of the year Harold Poil together with saddle crafting master and Solo Saddlers owner John Booth are proud to be introducing a line of tack specifically for the South African Saddle Horse industry. The “Harold Poil Solo” line will bear the well know Harold Poil Stables horse head logo and will feature tailsets, harnesses, bridles, saddles and custom items Harold uses in his barn to name but a few items. Solo Saddlers has long been in the business of providing quality tack at affordable prices and this line is their answer to the need for a locally produced quality line of tack at affordable prices for the South African saddle horse owner and trainer. The first product in the line to be released to the public is the highly anticipated “Harold Poil Solo” saddle: “the Professional.” The top of the line features included in this saddle ensure a competitive edge even when compared to top international brands (see pg 18 for more details). The saddle will be available for consumers to test and purchase at the 2012 S.A. Saddle Horse National Championships in Bloemfontein.Solo Saddlers and their competent staff in partnership with Harold Poil look forward to addressing all of the

PRODUCTION SALE

15 AUGUST 2012 20 BULLS & 100 FEMALES TED GROENEWALD 082 892 8192

Saddlebreds • 7


8 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 9


10 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 11


12 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012

Nutraceuticals check the quality! Dr H.J. Marais, Equine Clinic, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria.

N

utraceuticals are becoming an increasingly important part of equine nutrition. The word ‘nutraceutical’ combines ‘nutrition’ and ‘pharmaceutical’, suggesting a food or food product that provides health and medical benefits. For horses, nutraceuticals are sometimes used as specialised dietary supplements with the aim of boosting performance or improving health or behaviour, by increasing the supply of natural ‘building blocks’ in the body. As nutrition can play an important part in treating or managing certain equine conditions, nutraceutical products may have a beneficial effect on the performance of horses when included in their ration, and may also lower the need for medicinal products such as phenylbutazone (Bute). Most of the nutraceuticals are oral supplements that claim to help regenerate and/or replace damaged cartilage and also serve as an anti-inflammatory e.g. Arthri-Joint. These products contain varying amounts of chondroitin sulphate, glucosamine, MSM, fatty acids and avocado oil and are available as dietary supplements for the treatment of osteoarthritis in horses. Anecdotal evidence gained from many thousands of human patients or animals that suffer with joint pain associated with degenerative joint disease, suggest that reduced symptoms of pain and improved joint function following supplementation with these products can be achieved. Chondroitin sulphate and glucosamine have both been suggested as being slow-acting, diseasemodifying agents in osteoarthritis or as cartilage protective agents.

Many of these products claim to have varying amounts of nutraceuticals in the product, but unfortunately major shortcomings have been recorded in some of these products. If the product is making health or structure/function claims to the consumer, there must be efficient amounts of the ingredients in the product. The efficacy of a nutraceutical should be evaluated based on a thorough review of the literature. Many manufacturers have been known to put small amounts of a popular ingredient in a product as “label dressing.” This practice is misleading to consumers and triggers strong negative reaction from public interest and consumer groups. A recent study was conducted by scientists to compare the label claims of fourteen products containing glucosamine hydrochloride or sulphate and eleven products containing chondroitin sulphate with the actual composition found in the product. The amounts of glucosamine and chondroitin found after analysis were significantly different from the label claim in quite a few of these products, with deviations from label claims ranging from as low as 0% to over 115%. Products with very low retail prices were found to be seriously deficient in meeting label claims of especially chondroitin sulphate (less than 10% of label claim). These low levels of either glucosamine or chondroitin are quite significant as these nutraceuticals are dose dependant, meaning that there has to be a certain amount of intake for these products to be effective. The efficacy of the product must also be evaluated post-manufacturing, meaning that the ingredient must survive the food or supplement process and not create potential impurities during processing. There are lots of differences in quality of nutraceutical products so check with your vet for recommendations.


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 13

Frankfort NGSU Regional Show Preparing for Bloem By: Ockert Botha

T

he Frankfort North Gauteng Saddle Horse Union’s Regional Show was held from the 9th to the 10th of March 2012. The show attracted an oversubscription of entrants with a final tally of 130 horses, and was particularly rewarding to see that there were very few classes with only single entries and many classes with more than four horses competing. Every aspect of the show was executed professionally and with the same easygoing and “nothing is to much trouble” attitude that Frankfort has become known for in the past. The choice of three female judges, namely Eliska Jordaan, Karin Schellink and Sumeri Botha was an initial concern from many of the opposite sex, but it soon became evident that the judging was of high standard and very fair. The surface of the ring was excellent and in spite of a deluge of rain for a short period on Friday and Saturday afternoon the abundance of water was drained away in record time so that the show could go on. The by now well known team of announcers Dawie Lotter and De Vos Malan were highly entertaining and kept the spirits and excitement going with their humor and knowledge of our beloved sport. As has become customary Tertia Malan ran a tight no nonsense ship with the entries and was capably and professionally assisted by Piet Ferreira as ringmaster and Louis Schellink in the collecting ring thereby ensuring a flawlessly executed show. As is the case at all regional shows some exciting new prospects and “wow who is that” horses were shown. They could not have been more different but as was to be expected Harold Poil again surprised everyone with the gutsy and exciting 5Gaited prospect Nite of Clouds shown in the four year old 5Gaited division, and the bold harness horse True Star winning Buenos Aires in the Men’s Fine harness division. Jabula Skipper, ridden by Neil Valentine, although still in need of show experience shows great potential for the future and may well become a force to be reckoned with in the 5 Gaited division. The sensational split eared mare Bon Petit bred by Pieter Jacobs, trained and owned by Sanna Botha and ridden by Nicola van der Walt came floating into the ring with perfect balance and grace. She competed in the four year old 3Gaited class and her poise and grace was enhanced by moments of “watch me I am special exuberance”.

She ought to be a serious contender to be watched for at the Bloemfontein National Championships. As in previous years the “Ladies of the Night” fine harness class turned out to be a fine affair. The ladies that described themselves as “beyond their best before date but willing” did their best to attract the attention of prospective clients around the ring. What Tilly Groenewald, Andrea Vermaak and Fransiena Krugel lacked in beauty they amply made up in their attire and enthusiastic

Photos by: Colas Photography, Nicola van der Walt, email: colasphotography@vodamail. co.za

Charone Groenewald and Nite Spring Boy

“showing of some leg”. Congratulations to the NGSU equitation teams that were announced at Frankfort: Team manager, Dalien Strydom and team coach Madre Brand. 3Gaited riders – Dane van Niekerk, Johane Venter, Vanessa Rossam, Jana van der Watt, PJ Krugell and Wernice Venter. 5Gaited riders – Dane van Niekerk, Johane Venter, Vanessa Rossam, Jana van der Watt, Nicole Bester and Wernice Venter. And so finally it was time for the Grand Championship classes. Striking Jack ridden by Madre Van Heerden won the Grand Champion 3Gaited Parkhorse class, this amazing foal of the legendary Call me Jack stallion befits his name. He is a truly striking horse and is perfectly suited to this fast growing and exciting 3Gaited class. I believe he will be a serious contender to take top honors in Bloem. Beunos Aires driven by Ted Groenewald pranced into the ring like a South American flamenco dancer and it was immediately evident that she was in fine form and would be difficult to beat. Although she had some serious competition from Nite in a Million driven by Andrew Vermaak she was awarded the blue ribbon and was the first of three incredible Grand Champion Frankfort wins by the Groenewald family. Although Naughty Nite was excellently ridden by Mikhael van der Westhuizen, Wings of Glory and Andre Du Plessis deservxciting Children’s 5Gaited edly soared to victory in the incredibly exciting Grand Championship class. From the moment that Chaka Khan first entered the ring in the 3Gaited Grand Championship class it was evident that he was the one to beat. Harold rode him with perfect balance and brought out the best in this stunning 3Gaited horse. With his high, balanced motion and perfect setting he must also be a serious Bloemfontein blue ribbon prospect. Nite of Roses entered the ring at full pace and it was obvious that she was in fine form and could possibly ensure Ted Groenewald his second Grand Championship win of the evening. And so the ever consistent Nite of Roses won convincingly, making it the second Frankfort Grand Championship win for the Groenewald’s! He was big he was bold and tonight would be his night. Spring Power the w massive chestnut gelding, that up to now always had to be content with second

place in other Championship divisions, burst into the ring and unequivocally announced tonight I would be number one. Dane van Niekerk, his mount and soon to be new owner, realized that this was to be their moment of glory. After having lost to Mikhael van der Westhuizen in the qualifying class she knew they had to raise the bar to win this - their first ever Grand Championship class. Dane and Spring Power after only their second ride together, became like one and a new formidable pair was born. They won their first Grand Champion Children’s 3Gaited title and the smile never left her face for the rest of the day! And now time for the big moment - a well contested 5Gaited Grand Championship class was suddenly underway. They streamed into the ring and Ted “with two wins under his belt” Groenewald was standing right next to me. Could his daughter Charone put the cherry on the cake and make it three? Fifteen minutes and later a beaming Ted congratulated Charone with a reserved “well done Charone “. Charone rode like a true champion and Nite Spring Boy never looked less than that the deserved winner of the ultimate crown of the day. Charone had her first sip of the big win champagne and I am sure she will drink from this cup again in future. And so it ended another amazing show of the greatest horse breed on earth came to a stunning end. See you all in Bloem!


14 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012

Equestrian Pilates By Mieke Le Roux, Equestrian Pilates instructor at Val de Vie Wine & Polo Estate

T

echnique and the riders need. It is helpful to have a basic knowledge of the techniques that the sport demands, as well as the goal of those participating when compiling a Pilates program for a specific sport or activity.

these signals, so it is easy to see why a rider who’s body is balanced physically, and who has finetuned control over their movements will achieve much more efficient communication with their horse, and consequently enjoy a better ride!

Pilates demands strength, balance and concentration as you focus on your movements and breathing. When combined with equestrian sport, horseback riders may find that Pilates improves their seat in the saddle and the overall control of the horse.

Aspects of exercising that riders neglect Warm up, Strength and Conditioning and Stretching! Just as we need to warm up our horse, we need to warm up as well for riding! You’ll be surprised at how many muscles the body uses for riding. If we don’t do the above three we’ll get “stuck” meaning less mobility and much more aces and pains. For example feet – ask any endurance rider what their feet feel like after an 80km endurance race; unable to move, stiff as a result of no blood circulation, and stretching. Upper and Lower Back - Ask any Polo Player how he feels the day after a game…

Significance of Pilates Equestrians in the English discipline of jumping, dressage and racing must balance their bodies on the horses back while keeping their ears, shoulders, hips and heels in a straight line and simultaneously lifting their entire body weight 5 to 10cm out of the saddle for long stretches of time. This balancing act involves maintaining a firm set of core muscles while relaxing the buttocks, thighs, shoulders, heels and arms so as not to interfere with the motion of the horse. Pilates training also focuses the equestrian’s mind on body awareness, promoting the development of a good rider’s independent seat and hands and empathy with the horse. If you think about it, cross training with Pilates exercises for horseback riding makes perfect sense. Key elements of Pilates like pelvic and shoulder stability, core strength and flexibility are essential for the equestrian. The principals: centering, concentration, control, precision, breath, and flow are directly translated to horseback riding. That’s why there’s been a significant rise in interest among equestrians in the benefits of Pilates training. Harmony of movement Both the horse and the rider have their own physical strength and weaknesses that need to be addressed, and obviously those of the horse are outside the scope of the Pilates studio, but within it, much can be done to help the rider achieve their goal. The kind of movement that is optimum for the rider is a combination of: Core Stability Core stability is needed for the rider to remain secure in the saddle, given the constantly changing (and often unpredictable) nature of the horse’s movements. This involves not only core strength, but the balance of the rider’s right and left sides and sling patterns. Core stability is also very important for any kind of performance horse sports like Polo, Jumping, Saddle Seat riding etc. If your core muscles are not strong I can guarantee you that at the end, you end up with back pain and problems because if you don’t use core muscles you automatically use your back muscles. This can be very strenuous in riding and have terrible long term effects. Fluidity of movement Fluidity and movement is needed so that while the rider is stable, they are not in any way stiff or restricted in their movements, in turn allowing the horse’s movements to be more fluid, and enhancing communication between horse and rider. Fine tuned body control Body Control is needed for effective communication to take place between rider and horse. Harmony of Communication Horses are extremely sensitive animals, which is both good and bad for the rider. They respond to extremely subtle signals, whether those signals are deliberate or not. The rider’s primary means of communication with their horse is not always necessarily with their hands or feet, but through their pelvis or “seat”. A horse can feel if a rider has engaged their pelvic floor or no, can feel the difference in rotational mobility between one hip and the other, and can feel immediately if the rider has more weight on one sitting bone than the other, or has their weight on the back, middle or front of their pelvis. They can also tell when the rider is holding their breath, breathing shallowly or deeply, or holding tension in their upper body. The horse will respond to every one of

Warm up: Just as a gymnast or runner must warm up prior to practicing or competing, so must an equestrian. It is a proven fact that warming up helps to prevent injuries as it works to increase blood flow to the muscles to gradually prepare the body to handle the demands of more strenuous or vigorous activity. A proper warm up routine can not only help to increase the efficiency of your muscles, but it can also reduce the potential for pulled muscles and decrease the severity of muscle soreness after your exercise. Strength & Conditioning: in other words PILATES - Training and exercise will keep the body in optimum form thereby minimizing the risk of injury. Strength training helps to build increased strength in the muscles and tendons and over time can improve the overall function of the body’s joints. In Pilates we use weight and resistance training, equipment such as Swiss balls, Therabands, Fitness rings, Buso balls, Foam rollers etc. Stretching: Stiff muscles and joints are susceptible to injuries so flexibility plays an important role in their prevention. It is for this reason that one of the key components of an effective warm up is stretching. Stretching will improve performance! Exercises can be created around the rider’s specific need. Obviously, in a one on one situation exercises can become even more specialized and specific! Areas that are emphasized: •Pelvic mobility and control •Having the centre of gravity in the pelvis, not the chest/head – freeing the upper body •Abdominals: Below the naval and Balanced Sling Patterns •The Spine – fluidity and control of movement: Flexion/ extension/rotation •Hip joints: Freeing the joint; strengthening muscles that control the joint, Fine rotation control •Differentiation of the body parts – training the brain to multitask •Stretching


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 15


16 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 17


18 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 19


22 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 23

B

ack in 1911 SA was still recovering from a devastating war with Britain and farmers had to increase production to keep up with a growing population. John Roderick, the founder of Roderick Auctioneers, came up with the idea of a farming journal to disseminate agricultural news and to bring buyers and sellers together. He went with his idea to The Friend Newspaper Company based in Bloemfontein and the first Farmer’s Weekly went on sale on 15 March 2011. So you might all be thinking how does a woman become the editor of a farming magazine, seeing as the farming community is predominantly male? Well here is Alitas journey to how she became the first woman editor of Farmers Weekly magazine. As a child Alita grew up in the small town of Hartbeesfontein in the North West province. Her father a professional career by day and farmed the rest of the time, just as Alitas grandfather had done before him. Alitas afternoons and weekends were spent with friends, building tree houses and searching for treasure in the remotest parts of the farm. She always had a vivid imagination and loved dreaming up the most unbelievable tales for school speeches. Although the topic matter these days are of a more serious nature, capturing the interest of your audience is just as important now as it was back then. These days the wild tales are reserved for her children, Tiaan (8) and Alida (5). After school Alita went on to study B.Business communications at the Northwest University while it was still called the Potchefstroom University for CHE, one of her majors was graphic design. Originally she thought she’d end up in the communications industry, but luckily things turned out differently, and now loves what she’s doing. Alita joined Farmers Weekly magazine as a designer and worked her way through the ranks of production editor, managing editor and deputy editor. Chris Burgess, her predecessor, turned the magazine around from a struggling to an award winning publication, and taught her everything she knows about running Farmer’s Weekly. By the time Chris resigned Alita needed a new challenge and the editorship of Farmer’s Weekly promised to be just that. Being a female in a predominantly male farming community Alita finds that people treat you according to how you

conduct yourself, and that her actions are reflected in the quality of the magazine and the quality of the magazine determines the level of respect and acceptance she receives from readers. Farmer’s Weekly runs a monthly supplement on the Saddle Horse industry. The copy is provided by the SA Saddle Horse Breeders Society and all the members of the society receive a copy of the magazine. Farmers Weekly are also a sponsor of the National Saddle Horse Championships Show. Sadly due to the weekly print deadline it doesn’t give much off time to attend many horse shows so Alita has yet to attend a Saddle Horse show. Results of equestrian events are usually sent to Farmers Weekly by their event’s organisers or breed societies. The public can however contact Farmers Weekly on 011 889 0836 or email them at farmersweekly@caxton.co.za or visit the website www.farmersweekly.co.za.


24 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 25

2012 Hertzogville Agricultural Show T

he South African Saddle Horse Freestate Regional show championships took place on 1, 2 and 3 March, with more than 200 Saddle Horse entries , some being former and current South African champions. After a four year absence the Hackneys were back to show at Hertzogville with 50 horses that took part in the 17 Hackney classes. The absence was due to the shows dates clashing with Beaufort West show dates. This year’s show had quite the variety including the Non-halter tame Brangus Northwest Freestate Championships. In co-operation with the Brangus Breeders association the championships were once again held at the Hertzogville show due to growing interest and support. These championships are supported by most of the Northwest clubs and many new breeders enter. These exhibi-

tions and championships of the non-halter tame Brangus brought on great interest. Halter tame livestock included, meat, double purpose and dairy entries shown under the following breed categories: Angus, Brahman, Braford, Dexter, Hereford, Holstein, Santa Simmetaller Gertruides, and Sussex. And some of the most beautiful cattle in the country were to be seen. The judging of Dorper sheep and Boerbokke took place on Friday the 2nd of March, with the meat Merion sheep judging on the Saturday during which the SA Meat Merino flock championships took place. New to the show was the addition of the poultry exhibition and amateur competition which took place during the show. The Ladies morning with a theme of Chocolate for the soul, that took place on Saturday morning was a great success with an appearance from

Annie Malan - well-known actress, business woman, and charity person. On Saturday the 3rd of March there was a 20km fun horse ride, the ride went from the showground’s, through a wildlife camp, and ended back at the showground’s. Champion 3Gaited Childs Riding Horse: Miss Slender C riden by Inge Kruger, owned by Alex Swiegers. Champion 5Gaited Childs Riding Horse: Omar Khayam ridden by Henry Meintjies. Fine Harness Champion: Mr Universe driven by Christo Paneras.

Single Harness Champion: Pride and Glory driven by Christo Paneras. Champion 3Gaited Park Horse: Tamagotchi ridden by Michelle Emberson. 3Gaited Champion: Bachelor ridden by Rudolf Viviers, owned by Gida Moller. 5Gaited Champion: Superstroke ridden by Otto Bekker, owned by JJ Els. Photos by: Elpita Photography, Piet Scheepers Cell: 0824140401 Email: piet@elpitaphotography.com


26 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 27


28 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012

BENEFITS OF DENTISTRY IN THE COMPETITION HORSE Written by Andrew Portch AEDP-CEqD and AED-CEqD Part 1: Balance. hen discussing performance horses, the one thing we will probably all agree on is that regardless of the field of competition, in order to achieve success, the horse must be balanced. He must be supple to the left and right, he must move without restriction and be comfortable and not resist when performing the required task. Dentistry is no different. The most important thing when addressing any horse’s mouth is balance and harmony between all the points involved i.e. the temporomandibular joints (Jaw joint- now referred to as TMJ), the cheek teeth (molars and pre-molars) and the incisors. In the horses’ mouth there are two main excursions (movements) of the mandible (lower jaw). Firstly, caudal-rostral excursion. Caudal means back, rostral means forward, so caudal-rostral excursion is the forward and backward movement of the mandible. Secondly, lateral excursion, which is the left and right movement of the mandible which can be clearly seen when the horse eats. Both caudal-rostral excursion and lateral excursion are vital to all horses, especially in a horse expected to compete at any level of competence in any discipline. If these two excursions do not function correctly throughout the entire arcades (rows of teeth) the horse will be restricted whilst eating and his performance will be impaired through the lack of balance. Reasons causing this imbalance and subsequent restriction of excursion are sharp cingulae (sharp points), a protuberant (high) tooth, hooks (literally meaning a tooth is hooked over another tooth at the beginning or end of a dental arcade), ramps (ski jump effect of a tooth at the beginning or end of a dental arcade) or even a loose, diseased or fractured tooth. Abnormal pressures exerted due to imbalance in the horse’s mouth because of one or more of the above malocclusions (abnormality) results in the inability of the TMJ to relax. This in turn causes the horse pain and discomfort. Symptoms of an unbalanced mouth may manifest in a number of ways. In the performance horse this may include; stiffness to one side, reluctance to stop and/or turn, tossing/tilting/shaking of the head, over/under collection, opening the mouth when collected, being hard in the mouth, leaning on your hands, biting the bit, star gazing, excessive salivation and so the list will go on. A few general

W

symptoms to be aware of in all horses are dropping food, tilting the head while eating, packing feed in the cheeks, rinsing the mouth excessively in the water bucket and undigested fibres in the stool. These symptoms can very often be corrected by correct equilibration (term given to the treatment of horses dentition whereby one balances the mouth) by a competent and educated dental technician. To correct these symptoms balance must be achieved. Correct balance is obtained through correct dental equilibration whereby protuberant teeth, hooks/ramps and sharp cingulae are reduced where necessary, this is where the controversy begins. What is correct equilibration? There are two main methods to approach equilibration, either by manual floating (hand rasps) or by electrical floating (power tools), neither is incorrect, and both are beneficial, when performed correctly. I was most fortunate to have had the opportunity to begin my Equine Dentistry training in Australia. I was trained in manual equilibration under the Australian Equine Dental Practice, a course based on traditional horsemanship and methodology. Thereafter I returned to South Africa and began to practice as a dental technician. During my first year of practice I found that electric equilibration could be hugely beneficial in performance horses and advanced cases. Subsequently I enrolled and completed certification at the Academy of Equine Dentistry, in the USA. This course is based on advanced dental equilibration, through technological advances and modern ways of thinking. Having completed education in both fields of dentistry has helped me immensely in my practice, in that I can form accurate diagnosis and make educated decisions on what form of equilibration is necessary. Through my experience I have found that I prefer electric equilibration to balance the mouth and manual equilibration to maintain the balanced mouth, so I am actually in favour of both methods. My reasoning behind this is, is that I find electric equilibration more accurate as one is able to address the mouth completely meaning from the TMJ, to the cheek teeth, to the incisors. This procedure it is performed under sedation to start with. The horse stands still, therefore you do not need to worry about trying to perform accurate procedures on a horse that is not co-operating.

Remember dentistry is an invasive procedure, and if a horse is sore due to oral lacerations or malocclusions causing discomfort, he is going to resist. In my practice I find that any protuberances and or angle variations that need to be addressed can be addressed more accurately and quickly with electrical equilibration and so the mouth can be balanced to a higher standard. A rostral profile (bit-seat) can be created accurately. When it is necessary to remove wolf teeth I have my supervising veterinarian administer local anesthetic to the region, and the horse remains still during elevation of the tissue around the wolf-tooth and wolf-teeth can be removed with a reduced chance of an apical break, as it is done without the horse fighting against pain. I always use a head lamp when working in the horse’s mouth with electric instrumentation, I think it is of utmost importance that when doing electric equilibration one uses a good strong headlamp and so one can see exactly what they are doing and where they are reducing tooth structure. Whilst the horse is sedated I am also able to reduce and buff the canines/tushes (fighting teeth). It is astounding the number of horses that I have seen that are having bitting problems, even to the point when bit-less bridles are used, that continue to play with their mouths and bleed from the mouth while being worked. I have found that when the mouth is opened for examination the canines are actually cutting the tongue or the opposing soft tissue. Reducing and buffing the canines are therefore an important part of my practice, especially in performance horses. Thereafter I am able to do incisor work if necessary. Incisor work is correcting abnormal curvature or wear patterns of the incisor tables, adjusting a steep or flat table angles and if necessary, although rare after correction, I may reduce the crown height of incisors to increase the amount of simultaneous occlusion (the meeting of upper and lower dental arcades whereby pressure is distributed evenly throughout the arcades across as many functional teeth as possible) of the cheek teeth. Many people shy away from incisor work and feel it is unnecessary, I feel they could not be more wrong. It is not only cheek teeth that can restrict caudal-rostral excursion and lateral excursion

but abnormalities on the incisors can cause just as much, if not more discomfort. I find that the majority of horses I treat will need incisor work. One needs to remember that stabled horses, that eat concentrated feeds, hay from a teff net and soft palatable grass in a paddock or from a bale are actually creating very little attrition (wear) to the incisors. They always wear the cheek teeth no matter what is being consumed and this will create un-balance in the mouth. The incisors will get too long and/or begin to have abnormal wear patterns. This will place abnormal pressure on the TMJ and the horse will feel discomfort. So this tells me that incisor work is quite simply a necessary part of balancing the mouth. I find manual equilibration is useful when maintaining horses that have been previously balanced by means of electric equilibration. In these cases sources of pain and discomfort were previously removed and horses are generally very relaxed during equilibration and one is able to complete the equilibration accurately and efficiently. This supports that where no incisor work is necessary and dentistry is simply removing the sharp points from the teeth, creating a rostral profile and performing minor correction to the cheek teeth, manual equilibration is adequate. However it is important to realise the limitations of manual equilibration in terms of balancing the mouth. It is possible to correct abnormalities in the mouth with manual equilibration, I have done it countless times, but, as you have now read there is a necessity for incisor work in balancing a horse’s mouth due to domestication. So if one was to then reduce the cheek teeth with a hand rasp, which in most cases is done by feel so small abnormalities could easily be missed reducing accuracy. This is less likely during electric equilibration as one feels and focuses constantly with a headlamp. Corrective manual equilibration generally does not include any incisor work, so in my personal opinion one is actually un-balancing the mouth. Routine and correct dental equilibration assists in optimum comfort of the competitive horse. It can improve the performance, demeanour and overall balance of the horse resulting in greater success.


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 29


30 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 31


32 • Saddlebreds

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012

Juliana Sieberhagen’s first Bloemfontein Show J

uliana Sieberhagen is 10 years old and rides at Wiggins Stables in Wellington. She started riding in June 2010 after deciding that she wanted to follow in her father’s Reinhard Sieberhagen and my grandfather Bill Sieberhagen footsteps. Her uncle Tokkas van Heerden then gave her the opportunity to ride some of his horses. Juliana’s love for horses and wanting to become the best SA rider at shows is what made her want to participate in horse shows. She rides and shows Guns A Blazing, a big bay gelding in the 10 and under walk / trot classes. She says: “these classes are very, very fun to ride in, and it is nice to hear the crowd cheering for you.” Particularly the best part of showing would be when she gets to trot around the ring, and when she does the victory pass. Juliana is looking forward to her first Bloemfontein show but says

she is somewhat stressed, but the excitement is overwhelming. Juliana says her mother, Salma Sieberhagen is her biggest supporter and is always there for her when the going gets tough. She takes away all the stress and calms her down before her classes. Her uncle Tokkas, is another one of her supporters and he inspires her to ride and do as well as she possibly can. Tokkas and Salma brag about Juliana’s riding regularly. She says it takes patience, effort, and self-confidence to prepare for shows. She says that she has to focus uninterruptedly when showing in the ring, but most of all if you focus you become better and better. As they say practice makes perfect. Her goals for this Bloemfontein SA Championship Saddle Horse Show, being her first ever, is to do well, build experience and therefore also enjoy another ride on her horse.


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 33


34 • Hackney

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Boerperd • 35

Cape Boerperd - Peacock from the South By: Ezelle Marais a year but were closed again. In 1981 SA Studbook accepted affiliation of the Cape Boerperd. Since 1981 stallions of other breeds have been eligible for recording in the stud book. In 1993, however it was judged that the Cape Boerperd was losing its identity. It was then decided to use fewer horses from outside breeds. Breeders Society members then nominated stallions of other breeds which could promote the Cape Boerperd. Such stallions and their existing progeny were inspected and in 1994 only 8 outside stallions were considered worthy of improving the breed.

W

h you speak hen k tto h horse llovers you will ill often hear the term “The horse that can do it all” – the Cape Boerperd.

The Cape Boerperd is one of four indigenous horse breeds in South Africa that developed from the legendary Cape Horse. (OK, five, if you include the Basotho Pony of Lesotho.) The idea to develop this breed originated in 1948 among a group of enthusiasts who were all lovers of horses and who realised that the horse was fast disappearing in our mechanical age – especially with the advent of the bakkie.These people realised how popular and sought after the Cape horse was throughout the world. These horses had been exported to Australia and were the first to land there. They were also exported for mounted duty in large numbers to India where they were regarded as some of the world’s best. Roughly 85% of the horses that were used were Cape horses. The Cape horse was famous for its hardiness, endurance and its capacity to work hard on minimum feed, yet still maintain condition. Furthermore, these horses were comfortable to ride and carry a heavy rider over difficult terrain for long hours on end. It was all these outstanding characteristics that made this group of people want to raise a breed that would display all the good characteristics of the Cape horse and they wished to refine and improve it without sacrificing any of its attributes. The appearance of the Cape horse made it ideally suitable to meet the harsh and extreme conditions of South Africa. It had to be a horse for pleasure considering its easy-going temperament, but it also needed to show off well in the show ring. Breeding animals with the required conformation and type were selected from the small stock of remaining Cape horses. An essential problem, however, was the acquisition of suitable male stock for breeding purposes. Stallions of other breeds which conformed to the required characteristics of the envisaged breed and could in any way improve the breed e.g. the Arabian, American Saddler, Flemish and Hackneys were used. These stallions of other breeds were used until their progeny exhibited all the requirements and standards of the new breed. The record books of the Boerperd were closed in 1964 and after this no foreign animal was taken up for registration. Later the books were again opened for about

Breeding policy The Cape Boerperd is a developed breed with the books finally closed since 1999. All foals are registered at birth in the “foal book”. All horses are inspected at the age of 3 years before being accepted into the registry of the Cape Boerperd. The horse is of average size (14.2hh – 16hh), strong yet not clumsy. It has plenty of quality, especially in the legs.The Cape Boerperd is used for hard, demanding farm work. Thus it must be a hardy animal with plenty of stamina, and be agile with firm tread.The Cape Boerperd is comfortable to ride, with enough speed at various gaits to make it a pleasure horse for all to ride it. It possesses enough style and action to compete favourably in the show ring in any breeding, harness or riding class. The Cape Boerperd is a horse with a proud and spirited head carriage. It moves with action, style and grace, rides with comfort and possess a good temperament. It is not easily excited or frightened. It keeps in good condition on minimum feed. If is adaptable and can work hard day after day for long hours and carry a rider tirelessly over uneven terrain. It is an outstanding horse of pleasure while faring excellently in the show ring. During the past 50 years the Cape Boerperd has gone from strength to strength. Breeders are scattered through South Africa but are mostly concentrated in the Eastern, Western and Northern Cape as well as the Free State, Natal, Limpopo and Namibia. South African Boerperd Amateur Union In September 1990 a long awaited dream of some members of the Cape Boerperd Breeders Society was realised when the South African Boerperd Amateur Union was formed and was allocated Amateur Status by the Department of Sport. This is the sporting body to accommodate horse sport using the indigenous Boerperd. It brought new life to the industry as the Boerperd breeds can now compete as an entity on its own not only at inter-provincial level but also internationally. Riders can earn provincial colours as well as national colours. The country was subdivided into regions and sub unions (provinces) each with its own team which are selected on merit and performance to compete at national level. The sub-unions compete at club shows and regional shows. A provincial team is then selected in each province to compete at the National Championships. A national team is selected annually. The SABAU national team has competed successfully against Namibia as well as against the SA Saddle Horse and even an American Morgan Horse equitation team in the past. Showing The Cape Bo-

erperd is shown in 5 divisions. 3Gaited, 5Gaited, Single Harness, Fine Harness and Equitation. The 3Gaited horse is shown at a walk, trot and canter. The walk is a flat foot walk. The trot is performed at moderate speed with extreme brilliance. The horse must be collected and stylish with high action front and back. The 5Gaited horse is shown at a walk, trot, canter, slow gait and rack (tripple). Speed at the trot is of great importance. Form and balance must be maintained at all time. Action should be bold, sensational, powerful, stylish, and flowing with great impulsion and propulsion from the hocks. The slow gait is the first of the two man made gaits. It is a lateral, slow, animated, highly collected and showy four-beat gait with an unevenly – cadenced beat, in that the hoof beats are not evenly spaced. The hind foot on one side strikes the ground a short interval before the fore foot on the same side, thus resulting in two sets of two beats each. The rack or tripple is a lateral, fast, animated, collected four-beat gait, with an evenly cadenced beat, in that each foot strikes the ground separately at exactly and regularly spaced intervals. Speed is of great importance. The Fine Harness horse is shown at a park trot and walk. The park trot is performed at slow to moderate speed. It is a rhythmic gait of great brilliance – a rolling, extremely collected, high, clean and decisive, light and airy, elegant, graceful and showy gait. The Single Harness horse is shown at a walk and trot. The trot is at first a collected trot performed slowly and stylishly with presence and animation. The horse is then asked to “drive-on”. There is no limit to speed as long as the horse stays in form and does not lose style, action and set.

Since 2008 a 3Gaited and 5Gaited performance team is selected annually to compete against other breeds in the show ring. The Cape Boerperd teams have done very well in these competitions. Equitation For showing a Cape Boerperd the “Saddle Seat” method of riding is used with a cut back saddle, thus positioning the rider towards the back of the horse, giving the added advantage that the neck of the horse appears longer, the front is better seen and the knee action is enhanced. The distribution of weight to the rear ensure that the hock can be forced well under to maintain the great showiness and peacock carriage which is the hallmark of the Cape Boerperd. The objective of the Cape Boerperd Society is to conserve and upgrade the true characteristics of the Cape Boerperd, to breed a multi-purpose horse for all South Africans. The Cape Boerperd must meet the requirements of all people under all circumstances as a pleasure, sport and work horse. The Cape Boerperd – a horse from South Africa for South Africa.


36 • Horse2012 News April/May

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012• 36 Saddle Breds

. . . snippets from GHS Rider’s Digest REACH FOR YOUR STARS!

T

he dressage committee is implementing an award system based on the upgrading of horse and rider combinations, to encourage and reward riders for upgrading their horses. This recognition is in the form of PIN’s or badges, ranked as follows: - Novice to Elementary | bronze star - Elementary to Elementary-Medium | silver star - Elementary-Medium to Medium | gold star, and - Medium to advanced | a horse pin These PIN’s will be distributed to the riders either at shows or via their respective region’s dressage selectors. For any queries regarding this new system, please contact Jacqui at jaxdegreef@gmail.com

From the judges box: A message to some top level riders: people do notice and report bad/rude behaviour experienced by other riders and the Marshall when you are wanting to get your ride in ahead of all others, abusing those around you as you go, especially when you thought there was something more exciting in another arena – causing this dreadful behaviour. It is so unnecessary and definitely uncalled for. When a rider elects to scratch from a competition rather than be subjected to this sort of attitude, behaviour and rudeness, it is a SAD day, indeed, for the sport! Respect the sport, Respect others and keep your self-respect intact. Vaulting: Arlene, co-opted Gauteng North Vaulting Chairlady The first show of the year took place at Riba Stables on the 3rd of March. This was attended by Riba, Riverpark, Willows and the new Sunlands Club sent 3 vaulters. Sara the coach from Milan was also present and her input was invaluable. There were rosettes, gift vouchers, soft toys and stunning T-shirts given as prizes. Arlene Mahon | 082 321 7778

5003 Supreme Champion Gelding Res. Champion Kondos Moleloa with Rika van Vuuren. Misty Meadows graded & training Show jumping show 17 March 2012 By: Eino Vuorinen , 2012 Equitation Chairperson - Gauteng North Another successful Equitation show was held at Misty Meadows on 17 March. Misty Meadows had prepared the show grounds beautifully and staff members were very helpful. Thank you to the judges Jenny Wyllie and Sigrid Sauter, announcer/recorder Gill Frost and scribe Sharon Newman for their professional help. Thanks to all the riders for their continued support for growing Equitation in Gauteng North, and also to the O’Connor family for their financial support. We had special prizes at the Equitation Show for the best scorers in their categories and the winners were: The Best Pony Rider - Kaylin du Toit The Best Junior Rider - Juan Jaques Koch The Best Adult Rider - Isabelle Schlunken The Best Rider in Training Classes - Liesl McGee Equitation in Gauteng North seems to be established and now we need just grow the numbers. Our last graded/training Equitation show before LIR is on Saturday 19 May at Misty Meadows. Qualified Judges Equitation Clinic Rider fee R150, Spectator fee R50 14 April- Zambezi stables Email: rechelle1@live.com Cell: 079 189 3576 27 April 2012 - Pretoria Military Equestrian club Email: macmav@iafrica.com Cell: 082 490 3131 The Gauteng North committee would like to say congratulations to Eino Vuorinen who has been promoted onto NATIONAL B dressage judges’ panel. Well done and congratulations to Eino! Photo: Eino Vuorinen 2012 Equitation Chairperson Gauteng North Dressage Events: Three judges in the north at Charvid Equestrian Centre (training) & Chez Charlene (graded) 16/17 June 2012 11/12 August 2012 17/18 November 2012 (champs) Enquiries contact: Caro Sykes 2012 Dressage Chairlady on 082 7 9033 773 G Grow gauteng north dressage: W are ready to run our first clinic! We 2 - 29 April 2012 27 2 - 29 July 2012 27 1 September 2012 1-2 1 December 2012 1-2 F more information go to www. For g ggnd.co.za E Enquiries contact: Caro Sykes 2012 D Dressage Chairlady on 082 773 9 9033

Autumn Gold Cup 2012 10 & 11 March held at Inanda Country Base. Supreme Champion Section: 5002 Supreme Champion ridden horse Caitlin Pitcher on Cloudy Bay with judges: Stephanie Turner (UK) & Bev Williamson Ridden section : Partbred / Anglo Arabs Champion & reserve champion riding horse Caitlin Pitcher on Cloudy Bay. 5001 Supreme Champion Breed horse Res. Champ Nooitgedacht Purebred Mare was Breivilo Golden Sunshine from the Destaalsmit Stud Arnold Madzivanyika

In Rhythm with your Authentic Se Self There will be an upcoming clinic he from 21-24 June 2012 at Chez held Ch Charlene Equestrian Centre with V Vanessa Malvicini. Website: www.cavalli.de or http://www. danceinfreedom.com/#!__news There is also a Facebook event for the workshop called: In Rhythm with your Authentic Self http://www.facebook.com/ events/310103419053283/ For more information contact Zaneta Georgiades | chez charlene equestrian centre Zaneta Georgiades | 082 499 1757

Eventing: Laverne Machiné , co-opted Gauteng North Eventing Chairlady At last the Winter Classic Series are starting. This is how I got hooked on Eventing. It is a combination of show jumping and eventing – with jumps and obstacles as well as rules from

both disciplines. The event takes place in an arena set up, at Northern Farms, it was done in and around the water jump last year and was lots of fun. Depending on the level you have from 16 jumps/efforts – up to 22 odd, so make sure you are fit and especially your horse. Do not be fooled by the height, if you can jump 90cm in show jumping do not think you can complete a 90cm Winter Classic course as it is the cross country phase that may catch you and your horse out with the banks, steps, water etc. It is a great training for potential Derby winners. You also need to have completed 2 Qualifying Rounds in a particular height before moving up, the same as Eventing. It is advisable to ensure you are 100% comfortable at a particular level before moving up as you do not want to scare your mount and set him/her back to beginners’ level. The schedules for the series are available on the GHS website – go to www.ghsinfo.co.za and look under Eventing. It is a one day event , but they have the different levels on different days. Dates are: 5 - 6 May 2012 at ICB 19 - 20 May 2012 at Le Godimo 2- 3 June 2012 at Fourways 16 - 17 June 2012 at Winstead Stables in Springs Any questions do not hesitate to contact me: Laverne Machiné , co-opted Gauteng North Eventing Chairlady Laverne Machiné | 082 490 3131 Sanesa eventing, ready for roll-out and to launch our first shows! The schedules for Gauteng Province will be available very soon. Keep an eye out on the website and check the relative Rules and Regulations in the meantime to make sure you are” in the know”. Eventing have 3 compulsory phases but we will allow learners to enter just the cross country sections in Level 1 and 2. It’s the perfect opportunity to try your hand at it if you have never had the chance to do cross country before, and also earn points for your school. It is however, very important to stress safety at all times. NO undisciplined and reckless riding will be allowed and the SANESA committees have the full right to withdraw a rider from these classes should they feel him/her are a danger to themselves or their mounts. Check the Gauteng Provincial news page for dates and venues. Hannelie Vorster | email gautengnorth@sanesa. co.za Jumping Events: 2012 Inter schools dates http://www.sanesa.co.za/province.php?in tProvID=1&intRegID=4&vURL=news_ display&intNewsID=121 Gauteng north Shows to be held at Misty Meadows Equestrian Centre: 26 May 2012 Qualifier 3 Preparatory School at Misty Meadows. 27 May 2012 Qualifier 3 High School at Misty Meadows. 14 July 2012 Qualifier 4 High School at Misty Mead-ows. 15 July 2012 Qualifier 4 Preparatory School at Mistyy Meadows. 26 May 2012 Open Show jumping shows Incl. Young Horse Performance Series 2nd Leg at Pretoria Equestrian Centre (PEC) website: www.yhps.co.za Pony Camps in April 2012 Mazz Vaulting & Riding Club Fernanda Thonger Cell: 083 602 2713 Email: fernanda@centurionhorseriding.co.za Website: http://www. centurionhorseriding. co.za

Any person who would like to communicate information within the Region must e-mail such information to Sheleph Burger before the 10th of each month for inclusion in the monthly newsletter. The deadline at GHS is the 12th of each month. Gauteng Horse Society * Gauteng North * Editor: Sheleph Burger Tel: 012-996 0753 (h) / 012-429-3175 (w) Cell: 082 925 4005 Fax: 086 511 3679 (fax to email) E-mail (h): sheleph@telkomsa.net E-mail (w): burges@unisa.ac.za Other Sporting horse events in South Africa: The Pharos Summer Series: Every Wednesday for the month of April Show jumping (2- 4:30 pm), mountain biking time trials (4:30 - 6:30pm: arrive anytime & ride), trail running / walking (arrive anytime & go) and social touch rugby from 5:30pm. Venue: The Durban Shongweni Club For further info contact Durban Shongweni Club on 031 768 1251 Top Hat Dressage: Come relax at Durban Shongweni Club with a picnic and watch the unaffiliated dressage training show. Food available at The Saddle Inn Bar and Restaurant. Date: 15 April 2012 Time: Starts approximately at 8am Venue: The Durban Shongweni Club (On the corner of Cliffdale and Kassier Road) . Triple P Shows: Join us at Durban Shongweni Club, for this spectacular Show Jumping show for adults, juniors and pony riders. The Saddle Inn Bar and Restaurant has the most scrumptious food available while you are enjoying the show. Date: 21st and 22nd April 2012 Time: starts at approximately at 8am Venue: The Durban Shongweni Club (On the corner of Cliffdale and Kassier Road) For further info contact Durban Shongweni Club on 031 768 1251 Durban Shongweni Club. (On the corner of Cliffdale and Kassier Road) Tell: 031 768 1251 Fax: 031 768 1267 or 086 546 7788 email: info@shongweniclub.co.za Inanda Polo Club is hosting the Africa Cup polo tournament from 20 to 22 July, For more information Contact Yvette Mason, email: yvettem@masonco.co.za.


April/May 2012

C

ertainly one of the most familiar and professional voices at our horse shows, the one of Hannes Spangenberg, is to be missed sorely by each and everyone around the show grounds of our country. Hannes started his involvement in the horse industry as announcer under the mentorship of the late Marius de Bruyn some 30 years ago. During the past three decades he developed with the business, as one of the most prominent announcers ever, as well as convenor of the riding horse section at Moorreesburg show and also as committee member of the Western Cape Saddle Horse Sub-union, which he also served as chairman for a few years. Hannes’s contribution towards the SA Show Horse Stewards’ Association has been tremendous. As member, committee member and chairman, he spent hours in meetings and discussions and was well known for his knowledge and application of rules in the show ring. His presence in the announcer’s box was always an advantage to the competitors, stewards and judges involved and it was always a privilege to have him in one’s team. When Marius de Bruyn passed away, Hannes became mentor to his great friend Braam

Equestrian Express

Horse News • 37

Lochner, and later also to his son, AD, both of whom became two of the national voices of our horse industry. Hannes had a passion for horses and a keen interest in whole of the industry. Even without the entry form in front of him he knew almost everyone of the exhibitors, especially the kids. He acted as announcer at the National Championships and World Cup competitions at various occasions and will especially be remembered for the great excitement and nail-biting anticipation he created before announcing the SA Grand Champion Five-Gaited Horse. Even when cancer kept him away from the microphone, he once again proved his versatility by acting as a very capable tabulator. Hannes shared his love for horses, fishing and hunting with his wife, Esma, and his two sons, AD (and his wife Reza) and Koos. Our condolences go out to them with this great loss. His place behind the microphone might be empty, but his contribution towards our industry will last forever. We salute a great man, with a great voice!

23 April 1953 – 03 Maart 2012


38 • Charity

Equestrian Express

April/May 2012

Cart Horse Protection Association T

he Cart Horse Protection Association (CHPA) was established in 1995, providing vital services and education to the cart horse owners from two rusty shipping containers in an attempt to address the appalling conditions in which these working horses lived and worked. Today, the Cart Horse Protection Association Clinic and Training Centre, located in Epping 2, boasts a farrier agency, harness shop, treatment stalls and paddocks, cart repair workshop, education and training room, administrative offices and a feed storage barn and provides services to over 400 working cart horses and their owners. The vision of the Cart Horse Protection Association is a regulated carting industry on the Cape Flats, with fit and working cart horses that are comfortable in their work. Their mission is to protect working cart horses and donkeys from abuse, and contribute to the social upliftment of the Cape Flats carting community. Subsidized services are provided at seven weekly clinics, here cart horse owners are able to access; feed, a professional farrier service, harness repairs, basic veterinary care and treatments, free de-worming and tetanus vaccinations. Education and handson practical training of cart horse owners and drivers, on proper care and health maintenance of their horse is also an integral part of the static and outreach clinics.

They also offer a Patrol and Call - Out Response Unit which monitors the cart horse drivers whilst working on public roads by conducting patrols, scrap metal yard inspections and responding to reports of abuse and overloading from members of the public, law enforcement and traffic officials. The Cart Horse Protection Veterinary and Rehabilitation Unit provide a prompt and professional veterinary service to sick and injured working cart horses. Cart horses needing constant veterinary care and 24-hour observation are admitted to the Treatment Stalls at the Clinic and Training Centre or to the Recovery and Rehabilitation Centre, where they are treated, monitored and nursed back to health. The Recovery and Rehabilitation Centre provides a place of safety for working cart horses whose owners and drivers continue to abuse and neglect them, despite our efforts at education and the services offered at the static clinics, accommodation for sick and injured horses requiring palliative care and maternity care for foaling mares. In September 2010 the first step to the regulation of the carting industry was taken by the introduction of identification plates for the carts. The ID plate is affixed to the back of the cart and denotes the horses name and Cart Horse Protection Association unique registration number which is captured on a central database with all the horse and

Help Bella on her road to recovery. Wendy, her husband, and Heidi collected Bella from a smallholding at Trekoskraal , Nuwerus , which is on the West Coast , where she had been passed between two small holdings and was in obvious need of food and care. Karen who has a Border Collie rescue in the Malmesbury area was prepared to foster and rehabilitate Bella with LEAPS covering her feeding , medical , farrier and any other costs as she already takes care of 3 rescued geldings over and above 30 + rescue collies , other rescue dogs , 11 + monkeys and various birds. In helping Bella, Karen has already had to remove ticks, cut her tail as it was just one knotted mass. She scraped off so much blood out of her coat with the flies having a feast on her. Karen gave her half a de wormer and will give the rest in 6wks time. Bella then had a bath, and was sprayed with fly repellent and then our Bella trotted around the paddock as if to say look at me I am all nice and clean . Bella has an old fracture, which seems her leg was broken at one time and left to grow back skew, she however doesn’t seem to be in any pain or discomfort. She can

owners information. The ID plate ensures that the cart operators who contravene the Animal Protection Act or traffic regulations can be easily identified and traced through our Information Management System. Training is also provided by the Inspectorate to City Law Enforcement Officers on how to detect abuse and inspect a horse and cart. The training also offers an opportunity for Inspectors and Law enforcement to share information on challenges and problems faced on the road with cart horse operators and formulate solutions in partnership. Cart Horse Protection Association contributed Chapter 4 – Working Equines to the new City of Cape Town Animal by Law which was promulgated in August 2012. Cart Horse Protection Association is relies solely on fundraising efforts to fund the annual operational budget. Mr lonely update Mr. Lonely’s abusers trial started in the Bellville Magistrates Court on 6 March. Unfortunately, it didn’t get very far as one of the accused did not come to court and so the case has been postponed until the end of June beginning of July. The court will advise on the new trial date. Word on the “cartie grapevine” is that Duifkop is sitting in Goodwood prison for another case against him. A huge thank you to everyone who donated in memory of Mr. Lonely – we raised R127 193.63. Your generosity will ensure that we can continue protecting the working cart horse from abuse.

The worms turn! Thanks to being nominated as a beneficiary of the Old Mutual Care and Share initiative last year, we received not only 81 de worming pastes, but also the help of eleven volunteers to administer them at Epping where there was a large turnout of horses, carts and carties. For some volunteers, it was their first close encounter with a horse, but with the help of Inspectors Diana and Karen, the volunteers got on with the job and were then treated to a field trip to see at first hand where and how the horses live. With a further donation of 350 tubes of de wormer from the Department of Agriculture, we are able to continue our free de worming drive. Worm infestation is debilitating, it can cause illness and loss of condition, so regular treatment is really important to the health and wellbeing of our working horses. The ride into the unknown Barry Armitage and Joe Dawson finally arrived in Cape Town on 14 January after completing 10 000kms in 10 weeks on their “Ride into the Unknown “on their horses Pat, Jack, Cola and Cherokee. Throughout the long ride they linked however never be used for riding as any pressure placed on her back does cause her discomfort. A farrier has had a look at her, and attended to her hooves and did some adjustments to her hoof to compensate for her bad leg. An offer of an amazing home in Bethlehem has been received for Bella, where she will want for nothing and her new “mommy” will also treat her with herbal remedies. Astrid also has years of experience and d knowledge of horses and treating leg wounds. Bella will be given at least 3 months to recover with Karen and then arrangements will be made to get her to Astrid. Once Bella is ready for this trip any assistance in getting her to Bethlehem or any assistance in getting folk involved to help with this would be so appreciated. Make a donation to: LEAPS Nedbank, Current Account Account Number: 1232144525 Southern Peninsula, Branch Code: 123209 (00) Reference: Bella Should you require any further information please do not hesitate to contact us at: LEAPS Lamberts and Elands Animal Protection Services Wendy 0832705161 Email: info@leaps.co.za Website: www.leaps.co.za SMS the word ‘LEAPS’ to 40131 to donate R20.

up with various equine charities, helping raise awareness and invited South Africa to ride with them. Apon their arrival in Cape Town we met them with a parade of 10 carts at the Epping clinic to ride the final leg of their journey to Oude Molen Eco Village. At the start of Forest Drive in Pinelands, the parade grew with the riders from the Oude Molen Stables joining us. Barry & Joe were met by cheering crowds and champagne on their arrival the end of an incredible journey. To read more about Barry and Joe’s adventures you can visit their website www.barryarmitage.co.za Top left: - Barry Armitage and Joe Dawson. Bottom right: - Gladstone Solomons with his horse Piccadilly joining in the last leg of the journey. My school makes cart horse a winner! Cart Horse won R10 000.00 in the My School ‘Vote for your favourite charity’ competition held in December last year. Thanks everyone who voted for the Cart Horse Protection Association and for the kind words of praise and encouragement. Our My School fundraising initiative has really grown steadily since we joined. We raised R2 172.32 in January and have 403 donors who are swiping their cards for our cart horses. This is a very easy way to make a difference. Please call or email Megan on 021 – 535 3435 or megan@ carthorse.org.za for an application form. Hot of the press – cart horses rock t-shirts Our new promotion T – shirts! CART HORSES ROCK! Adults – R100 available in corn flour blue, black and pale pink. Kiddies – R80 available in orange, purple and lime green. Call Megan on 021 – 535 3435 or 072 786 7088 or you can email megan@carthorse.org.za to place your order. In order to increase our membership base – we ask you to pass onto a friend or colleague. Our members are an integral part of the Association. A strong and active membership base helps to ensure good governance and accountability. If you are already a Cart Horse Angel, we invite you to renew your membership, with your support we are the voice for the working cart horses of Cape Town. I want to be a cart horse angel by …… How to becoming a new member or renewing your membership for 2012/2013: Rates: R40 R100 R20 R20

SINGLE FAMILY PENSIONER JUNIOR

R500

CORPORATE

Deposit your membership directly or fax/email a copy your deposit to: Fax: (021) 535 3434 Email: info@carthorse.org.za. Please use your surname and send us your ‘membership’ information (name, address, email and contact number) as a reference or enclose a cheque/postal order. How you can help a working cart horse! 1 Report abuse – call 082 65 99 599 2 Give a regular monthly donation - sign a debit order 3 Post your cart horse sighting on our website or Facebook www.carthorse.org.za www.facebook.com/CartHorseProtection 4 Get a My School card 5 Leave a lasting legacy 6 Spread the word about our work. 7 Become a fan on Facebook www.facebook.com/CartHorseProtection Banking details: Cart horse protection association Nedbank, claremont Branch code: 104609 Account no: 1046395998 Physical address: 92 Bofors circle Epping Postal address: P o box 846 Eppindust 7475 Tel: (021) - 535 3435 Fax: (021) - 535 3434 Email: info@carthorse.org.za Website: www.carthorse.org.za


April/May 2012

Equestrian Express

Saddlebreds • 39


Equestrian Express  

First issue of this horsey paper. Informative and interesting article and launched at the SA Saddle Horse Championships in Bloemfontein.

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you