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WHEN SELF SERVE BECOMES HELP YOURSELF P. 13

Q&A with CPMA chair Rick Alcocer P. 46

MARCH/APRIL 2018

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CONTENTS

COVER STORY

INTO THE WEST

36

March/April 2018 Volume 132 Number 2

From the coast to the Prairies, we shine the spotlight on some of Western Canada’s outstanding grocery retailers

OPINIONS

05  18  19  20  72 

Front Desk Food Bytes Eating in Canada Behind the Trends Checking Out

PEOPLE

6  Arnaud Petitvallet & Max Rivest

Wize Monkey’s co-founders are causing a stir with coffee leaf tea

10  The Buzz

Comings and goings, store openings, awards, events, etc.

IDEAS

13  Sizing up self serve

Self checkouts may not be the cost-cutting cure we expected

FEATURES

15  Brave new waves

TIME TO FIRE UP SALES!

Once the domain of the blandly inoffensive, in-store music is getting more adventurous

COVER IMAGES L TO R, ROW 1: 49TH PARALLEL GROCERY & NATHAN ELSON; ROW 2: CURTIS COMEAU, LUCAS FINLAY, JANIS NICOLAY; ROW 3: COLIN WAY, NATHAN ELSON, JANIS NICOLAY;  ROW 4: NATHAN ELSON, JANIS NICOLAY, NATHAN ELSON

41  Brush up on the latest trends ahead of barbecue season

16  Loblaw bets on bugs

The grocery giant adds cricket powder to its private-label lineup

FRESH TALK

AISLES

46  From food safety issues to NAFTA challenges, CPMA chair Rick Alcocer tells Canadian Grocer about his busy year

61  The art of selling suds

Despite some challenges, there’s still lots of opportunity for grocers to brew up beer sales

65  Find your inner peas

The small but mighty pea is hitting it big on store shelves

66  Clean sweep!

With spring cleaning on our minds, Nielsen reveals how household cleaning products are performing

FRESH

69  Waste management

Grocers are coming up with smart ways to tackle food waste

FOLLOW US ON

61

@CanadianGrocer Canadian Grocer Magazine @CanadianGrocerMagazine March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

3


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PRESIDENT, ENSEMBLEIQ-CANADA Jennifer Litterick jlitterick@ensembleiq.com

VICE PRESIDENT/ GENERAL MANAGER EVENTS Michael Cronin

FRONT DESK

mcronin@ensembleiq.com

EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Shellee Fitzgerald

sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com

MANAGING EDITOR Carol Neshevich

cneshevich@ensembleiq.com

ONLINE EDITOR Kristin Laird

klaird@ensembleiq.com

SENIOR DESIGNER Josephine Woertman

jwoertman@ensembleiq.com

CONSULTING EDITOR George H. Condon condug@sympatico.ca

DIRECTOR OF PRODUCTION & DESIGN CANADA Derek Estey

An Amsterdam Ekoplaza store now has a plastic-free aisle

destey@ensembleiq.com

PRODUCTION MANAGER Michael Kimpton mkimpton@ensembleiq.com

AUDIENCE DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Lina Trunina ltrunina@ensembleiq.com

WEB OPERATIONS MANAGER Valerie White vwhite@ensembleiq.com

SALES ASSOCIATE BRAND DIRECTOR Vanessa Peters vpeters@ensembleiq.com

SR BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT MANAGER Chantal Barlow cbarlow@ensembleiq.com

EDITORIAL ADVISORY BOARD Tom Barlow, Ross Bletsoe, François Bouchard, André Gagné, Annick Gazaille, Denis Gendron, Lorelle Gilpin, Florent Gravel, Won Suk Ha, Jessica Kim, Les Mann, Ken Schley, Peter Singer, Mondella Stacey, Mike Venton SUBSCRIPTION SERVICES Subscriptions: $85.00 per year, 2 year $136.00, Outside Canada $136.00 per year, Single Copy $12.00, Groups $59.00, Outside Canada Single Copy $16.00. Email: contactus@canadiangrocer.com Phone: 1-844-694-4422 between 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. EST weekdays Fax: 1-844-815-0700 Online: www.canadiangrocer.com/subscription

REPRINTS, PERMISSIONS AND LICENSING Please contact Wright’s Media ensembleiq@wrightsmedia.com 1-877-652-5295

CORPORATE OFFICERS

CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER  David Shanker EXECUTIVE CHAIRMAN  Alan Glass CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER/ CHIEF BRAND OFFICER  Richard Rivera CHIEF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT OFFICER Korry Stagnito PRESIDENT OF ENTERPRISE SOLUTIONS/ CHIEF REVENUE OFFICER  Ned Bardic PRESIDENT & EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, P2P1 Mike McMahon CHIEF DIGITAL OFFICER  Joel Hughes CHIEF HUMAN RESOURCES OFFICER Jennifer Turner MAIL PREFERENCES: From time to time other organizations may ask Canadian Grocer if they may send information about a product or service to some Canadian Grocer subscribers, by mail or email. If you do not wish to receive these messages, contact us in any of the ways listed above. Contents Copyright © 2018 by EnsembleIQ, may not be reprinted without permission. Canadian Grocer receives unsolicited materials (including letters to the editor, press releases, promotional items and images) from time to time. Canadian Grocer, its affiliates and assignees may use, reproduce, publish, republish, distribute, store and archive such submissions in whole or in part in any form or medium whatsoever, without compensation of any sort. ISSN# 0008-3704 PM 42940023 Canadian Grocer is Published by Stagnito Partners Canada Inc., 20 Eglinton Avenue West, Ste. 1800, Toronto, Ontario, M4R 1K8.

EKOPLAZA

Printed in Canada at Transcontinental.

PRESSURE ON PLASTIC

We’ve got gluten-free and organic sections in our grocery stores—is it time for a plastic-free aisle, too? WHEN RETAILERS grab headlines these days it’s more likely than not to be about the latest tech wizardry they’ve added to their arsenal. But recently, a supermarket in Amsterdam managed to make waves around the globe when it announced it had introduced a plastic-free aisle in one of its stores—touted as the first of its kind for a traditional grocer. At the Ekoplaza store, signage on the aisle’s shelves and floor invite shoppers to “step into a plastic free world.” Within this “world” everything from tea to trail mix, 700 products in all, is free of plastic. Instead, packaged items are presented in glass or wrapped in a biomaterial that looks and functions like plastic, but is fully compostable. The retailer says it plans to roll out the plastic-free aisle to all 74 of its stores by the end of the year. Ekoplaza partnered with U.K. environmental group A Plastic Planet on the initiative. According to the British group, 40% of all plastic is used in packaging and half of that for food and drink packaging. The Dutch retailer’s launch also comes at

a time when reducing plastic waste—particularly in Europe—is gaining momentum. Earlier this year, as part of a pledge to ban all avoidable plastic by 2042, British Prime Minister Theresa May called on U.K. supermarkets to do their part by carving out plastic-free aisles. How long before pressure mounts on this side of the pond? Of course, not everyone is cheering the plastic-free movement with some (namely plastic-packaging suppliers) defending its use, arguing it’s necessary to protect food. Consumers, however, do seem to be on board. A Populus poll conducted last year revealed nine in 10 Britons want plastic-free aisles in their grocery stores. And if there’s one thing we know in this business, it’s that if customers want something, retailers best deliver.

Shellee Fitzgerald

Editor-in-Chief

sfitzgerald@ensembleiq.com

The grocery industry is changing rapidly. Keep up to date on the latest news by signing up for our e-newsletter. It’s free and we’ll deliver it to your inbox three times a week. We acknowledge the financial support of the Government of Canada through the Canada Periodical Fund of the Department of Canadian Heritage.

VISIT CANADIANGROCER.COM TO SUBSCRIBE.

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

5


PEOPLE The Facts Who

Arnaud Petitvallet and Max Rivest Positions

Co-founders of Vancouver-based Wize Monkey What’s New?

Expansion into U.S. market, plus two new flavours: Strawberry Hibiscus and Ginger Lemon

COFFEE, TEA, OR WIZE MONKEY? Arnaud Petitvallet and Max Rivest are causing a stir with coffee leaf tea By Carol Neshevich Photography by Adam Blasberg

 Who you need to know  


PEOPLE

W

hen Max Rivest and Arnaud Petitvallet first met in France while doing a master’s program at Kedge Business School in Bordeaux, they couldn’t have guessed they would end up starting a tea business together. Rivest was a Canadian who wasn’t happy in his job at a Vancouver finance company, so he decided to go back to school and chose to study abroad. Petitvallet was a Frenchman with a bachelor’s degree in international business and a handful of internships under his belt. The pair immediately hit it off and while working on a school project in 2013, became convinced that making tea from the leaves of a coffee plant would be a great business idea—not only for their project, but in real life too. “This idea interested us because it’s kind of a hybrid product: you’re using the leaf of the coffee plant, not the bean, and it still has a little caffeine, but really strong health benefits,” says Rivest, explaining that coffee leaf tea has similar amounts of caffeine to a light green tea and is packed with antioxidants. While coffee leaf tea had long been consumed in parts of Africa, it was virtually unknown in the rest of the world. As Rivest and Petitvallet researched their idea more, they discovered there could be other benefits, particularly for coffee growers in developing countries. “We recognized there’s a really pressing need for annual recurring, consistent income because the season [for coffee harvesting] is so short, and the rest of the year the majority of the industry is out of work,” says Rivest. By finding a use for the leaves of the coffee plant in the off season, they would be able to generate year-round jobs for growers. Excited by the prospect of launching this as a real business after graduation, they travelled to Nicaragua and spent several months visiting coffee farms and exploring their idea’s potential. When Rivest returned home to Vancouver, Petitvallet joined him, and the building of Wize Monkey began. The company made its official launch through Kickstarter in late 2014, and Wize Monkey coffee leaf tea was in its

30 SECONDS WITH...

first grocery store (Greens Market in Vancouver) by the end of 2015. Business was slow and steady at first, but once they partnered with a broker and distributor in late 2016, growth skyrocketed. Today, the tea is available in more than 230 stores across Canada. And it’s not just appearing on Canadian shelves now: in October, Wize Monkey made its debut at more than 300 U.S. grocery stores. The co-founders have made it a priority to be as active as possible at the store level to educate consumers about coffee leaf tea. Last summer, for example, they put on a sangria party to celebrate the summer solstice at a Vancouver Whole Foods Market location (using Wize Monkey tea to create an iced tea sangria); they’ve also partnered with health food store Replenish in Calgary, where Wize Monkey tea is being used in the store’s in-house kombucha. “We’re really keen to get creative and do something that would be totally out of the box compared to what’s typically happening at a grocery store,” says Rivest. Wize Monkey comes in seven varieties: Original, Earl Grey, Jasmine, Mango Party, Minty Marvel, Strawberry Hibiscus and Ginger Lemon (the latter two were just launched at the CHFA West show in February). Rivest says some consumers are drawn in by the social impact of the product, but it’s really the taste that holds the biggest appeal. “It’s smooth and complex, but it’s not overwhelming or bitter,” he explains. “You can steep it as long as you like and it never gets bitter—that’s a big thing for people who aren’t necessarily regular tea drinkers and might be kind of afraid of tea.” Rivest and Petitvallet know from experience that tea can be a little intimidating; neither drank tea very often before founding Wize Monkey. “Being French, Arnaud was obviously an espresso drinker,” Rivest says with a laugh. “As for me, just a few weeks before we discovered the idea of coffee leaf tea, I had actually overdosed on coffee and it was a horrible experience. I told myself, ‘Okay, I’ve got to start drinking tea’ ... and three weeks later, we fell on the idea of coffee leaf tea, which spurred our curiosity into the tea world. Now, we look at tea in the same way someone might look at a fine wine.”  CG

ARNAUD PETITVALLET & MAX RIVEST What do you like best about being entrepreneurs? PETITVALLET: The food space in general is very dynamic; and the tea space itself has a lot of variety, a lot of complexity. There’s so much room to innovate. RIVEST: It’s also just really fun to try to write our own history and create our future with something that’s never really been done before. We’re definitely pioneering something new, and that always keeps it fresh.

Are people sometimes confused about coffee leaf tea? PETITVALLET: We’re always educating people about our product. We often face that initial reaction to coffee leaf tea—questions like, “So, do you mix the coffee beans with the tea leaves?” RIVEST: There are always questions. But honestly, if something doesn’t make someone ask a question or get curious, they won’t bother learning anything about it. Because there’s a sort of slight mystery to our product, it drives people to get to the bottom of it and understand what it is.

Why is it important to innovate? RIVEST: If you don’t innovate, everything gets really boring. The market has evolving tastes and demands all the time. And sometimes people don’t even know what they want until you present it to them.

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

7


Introducing REESE Miniatures Stuffed with Pieces LEVERAGE THE SUCCESS OF REESE BIG CUP STUFFED WITH PIECES KING FOR CONTINUED SUCCESS IN 2018! • REESE Peanut Butter Cups Stuffed with PIECES King Bar is the #1 everyday innovation item with over $2.2M in 2017 sales1 generating over 2x more dollars than the second highest volume innovation item1 • REESE Peanut Butter Cups Stuffed with PIECES King Bar has driven 6.6% incremental volume to the category2 • Stand-up pouch segment delivers 7% growth outpacing total everyday chocolate (+3%)3

ASSORTED STAND-UP

Pouch Prepack 68 count

12 units – REESE Miniatures with PIECES Candy 24 units – REESE Minis 24 units – OHHENRY Bites 8 units – HERSHEY’S COOKIE+ Caramel Bar

1 Nielsen MarketTrack, National 5 Channels, Everyday Chocolate, YTD PE May, 2017 2 Nielsen Homescan, Nat’l 5 Channels, Nov 11, 2016 –May 27, 2017 3 Nielsen MarketTrack, Nat’l All Channels, L52 Wks


SCALE OF THE CATEGORY Confection is a growing segment and represents 3 out of the 15 top impulse categories, making in-store conversions more likely.1

3

2

1

confection

cheese

milk

HOUSEHOLD PENETRATION Confection reach 97% of Canadian households, and have appeal across ALL ages, genders and ethnicity groups.2 PROFITABILITY

97%

6%

8% larger

At retailer X baskets with sweets were shown to be larger, with confectionary and larger with seasonal confectionary.3

16%

CONSUMER TRENDS Consumer habits are constantly evolving. 90% of consumers snack multiple times throughout the day.4

MODERN SNACKING MODEL breakfast

snack

lunch

snack

dinner

snack

snack

DRIVE IMPULSE PURCHASE 77% of confection purchases are decided in-store.5

77%

PROMOTIONAL RESPONSE

50%

Of chocolate purchases were influenced by display.6

50%

50% did not plan to buy candy. 6

2 in 3 chocolate bar purchasers are influenced by at least 1 in-store activation.

1. Shopper Intelligence (Lucros); Planned vs. Impulse, All retailers, 2016 2. The Nielsen Company, Homescan, 52 Weeks ending July 01, 2017 Vs YAG Vs 2YAG, 3. Basket Size Comparison – L13W 11/11/17 4,5,6. International Food Information Council Foundation Food and Health Survey 2015, 7. IMI International, 2016, Recommendations only. All pricing, distribution, shelving, and promotional decisions are at the sole discretion of the retailer


THE BUZZ

The latest news in the grocery biz  OPENINGS 

AWARDS 

Agropur named Ferme Jolipré Holstein Milk Quality Champion at its 29th Club of Excellence gala in Quebec City. The event recognizes dairy farms that record the best milk quality results among Agropur members. Kruger Products has been ranked No. 2 on Forbes’ Canada’s Best Employers List for 2018 and has also been named one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies for 2018. (L to R): Régis Lepage, Marie-Josée Turcotte of Ferme Jolipré Holstein and René Moreau, president of Agropur

Quinta Quinoa from Quinta Local Superfoods won the Best New Product award at Montreal’s Eat Better, Live Better DUX contest. The award recognizes innovation.

Langford, B.C. is home to a new grocery store. SAVE-ON-FOODS opened for business on Feb. 23 at the Gateway Station shopping centre. Among the store’s features: a full-service pharmacy, fresh sushi made in-store daily and an extensive selection of natural and organic foods. In other company news, three B.C. Overwaitea stores were converted to the Save-On-Foods banner in March. The stores are located in Burns Lake, Fort St. James and Fort Nelson. GIANT TIGER is expanding again. The discount retailer has announced opening dates for five new locations: St. Thomas, Ont. (March 10), Steinbach, Man. (April 7), Renfrew, Ont. (April 28), Rouyn-Noranda, Que. (June 16) and Hamilton, Ont. (Oct. 13).

ÉRIC LAJEUNESSE, SOBEYS

(Above) Ribbon cutting ceremony at the grand opening of the new Sobeys store in Hamilton, Ont. (Right) Farm Boy’s new Toronto location

Sobeys has opened a brand new 50,000-sq.-ft. store in Stoney Creek community in Hamilton, Ont. The store offers full-service bakery and deli departments, a sushi bar and a full Natural Source section featuring hundreds of organic and gluten-free products. Sherry Cockwell, a 20-year Sobeys employee, is store operator. Farm Boy is continuing its aggressive expansion with a new store—its 25th— in the Toronto suburb of Etobicoke. At the store’s grand opening in early March, Farm Boy CEO Jeff York told Canadian Grocer the company’s goal is to open another 12 to 15 locations in the Greater Toronto Area/Golden Horsehoe region within the next three years. The new 20,000-sq.-ft. Etobicoke store, which York describes as not so much a grocery store but “a food experience,” has a focus on fresh and prepared meals and reflects Farm Boy’s longstanding commitment to local, with more than 500 Ontario products including about 30 hyperlocal items.

Want more? Visit CanadianGrocer.com for 10

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer


Food Banks Canada is proud to welcome a new CEO and two new board members to the organization. They will all play an integral role in helping to drive forward Food Banks Canada’s new, refreshed structure and strategic plan.

EVENTS

SIAL Canada returns

to Montreal’s Palais des congrès, running May 2 to 4. Visit sialcanada.com for more info.

The Sweets and Snacks Expo will be held at McCormick Place in Chicago, running from May 22 to 24. For more info visit sweetsandsnacks. com Retail Council of Canada’s Store 2018 conference is set to take place at the Toronto Congress Centre on May 29 and 30. Visit storeconference.ca to find out more.

OKANAGAN SPECIALTY FRUITS, SPUD.CA

The International Deli-Dairy-Bakery Association’s IDDBA 18 is heading to New Orleans from June 10 to 12. Visit IDDBA.org for details. The DCI/CFIG Charity Golf Classic will be held on June 11 at Crosswinds Golf Course in Burlington, Ont., and the DCI Business Summit will take place on June 12 at the Sheraton Toronto Airport Hotel & Conference Centre. Visit distributioncanada. ca for details.

Chris Hatch CEO, Food Banks Canada

 ANNOUNCEMENTS  SUSTAINABLE PRODUCE URBAN DELIVERY (SPUD) has announced an agreement to offer its food delivery service Food-X Urban Delivery Inc. to Walmart.ca customers in Metro Vancouver. Deliveries will be made from a new 74,000-sq.-ft. warehouse located in Burnaby, B.C. and Walmart will begin using the platform this summer.

C

M

Y

LOBLAW is partnering with METROLINX on a new ser-

vice this spring that will allow GO Transit riders to pick up groceries at five stations—Bronte, Oakville, Rouge Hill, Whitby and Clarkson— in the Greater Toronto Area. Grocery orders will be filled from nearby Fortinos and Loblaws stores.

CM

Conagra Brands

APPOINTMENTS

Okanagan Specialty Fruits Inc. has promoted Jenn Armen to the role of vice-president. Armen has been with the com­­­pany since 2010, serving in a multitude of capacities including overseeing business development and marketing.

is selling its Canadian Del Monte processed fruit and vegetable business to Bonduelle Group for $43 million. Bonduelle, a French company, currently sells vegetables in 100 countries under various brand names. The sale is expected to close before the end of May 2018.

 the latest industry news

Carlos Piani President, Kraft Heinz Canada

MY

CY

CMY

K

DEALS

Food Banks Canada welcomes new Chief Executive Officer, Christopher Hatch. Chris will direct the organization through its next phase of evolution and growth. Prior to this role, Chris was Executive Director at The Mississauga Food Bank. There, he achieved the implementation of a sophisticated inventory management system and launched the first aquaponics farm at a food bank. Chris also had a distinguished career as a human resource management consultant and is the recipient of the Queen Elizabeth II Diamond Jubilee medal for dedicated service to the community.

The Food Banks Canada Board of Directors welcomes Carlos Piani. Carlos is the President of Kraft Heinz Canada, Canada's largest consumer packaged goods company. Prior to joining Kraft Heinz Canada, he was the CEO of PDG Realty, S.A., one of the largest listed home builders in Brazil. Carlos also held a number of senior leadership roles in several Brazilian investment firms.

John Bayliss Senior VP of Logistics and Supply Chain, Walmart Canada The Food Banks Canada Board of Directors welcomes John Bayliss, the Senior Vice President of Logistics and Supply Chain for Walmart Canada. In this role, he leads the national logistics and transportation teams which support over 400 retail stores and the company’s ecommerce business. Prior to joining Walmart Canada, John worked for over 16 Years with The Boston Consulting Group (BCG). Most recently, he was a Partner and Managing Director with BCG Canada based out of Toronto. www.foodbankscanada.ca @foodbankscanada 905.602.5234 Charitable Registration Number: 13064 3737 RR0001


WESTERN CANADA'S PREMIER GROCERY SHOW April 23 & 24, 2018 | Vancouver Convention Centre WEST Building www.GSFShow.com | #GSFShow18 CONFERENCE SESSIONS April 23 | 7:30am – 10:30am April 24 | 7:15am - 10:30am

Rory Capern, Tech & Media Expert

Gary Saarenvirta, Daisy Intelligence AI and Retailing

Giancarlo Trimarchi, Vince`s Market Social Media & Your Business

Katie Martin, Progressive Grocer & Gourmet Retailer magazines

Mark Petrie, CIBC Capital Markets

Stewart Samuel, IGD Retail Trends Expert

TRADE SHOW April 23 | 11am – 4:30pm April 24 | 11am – 4:00pm Over 300 booths! Discounts and show specials only for attendees! Find all your grocery & specialty food needs under one roof!

Tech

Equipment

Local

Specialty

Foodservice and More!


IDEAS

Retailers, suppliers, shoppers, insights

SELF CHECKOUTS

Self serve or help yourself? Self checkouts might not be the cost-cutting cure they’re touted to be ALEX SEGRE/ALAMY

By Chris Powell

T

he humble carrot has long been synonymous with better vision, but it has become something of a blind spot for those grocery retailers becoming increasingly reliant on self-serve checkouts. Alongside other low-cost items such as onions and bananas, the root vegetable has become a cost-effective “substitute” for more expensive items such as grapes and cherries at self-checkout stations around the world. • In 2012, a supermarket chain in Australia found that it had somehow sold more carrots than it had in stock. Upon further investigation, it discovered more than 1,000 self-checkout transactions involving more than three 1-kg bags of prepacked carrots in a single week; • A U.K. store, meanwhile, reported one instance of a single shopper scanning 18 bags of carrots and nothing else; • “Everything is carrots,” quipped one commentator on a Reddit thread asking March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

13


IDEAS if anyone had ever stolen from a self-serve checkout, and how they did it. Also known as “the banana trick,” substituting a lesser-priced item is among several tactics that otherwise law-abiding citizens use to save a few bucks at the self-serve checkout. Not scanning an item before placing it into a bag is known as “the pass around,” while “the switcheroo” requires placing the scan sticker of a lower-priced item over the actual price sticker. A study by criminologist Emmeline Taylor even came up with a catchy acronym for these opportunistic grocery thieves: SWIPERS (Seemingly Well-Intentioned Patrons Engaging in Routine Shoplifting). First introduced in the U.S. in 1992, self checkouts are part of a growing wave of automation sweeping through the retail industry as it looks to mitigate rising labour costs and remain competitive with online giants like Amazon. According to a recent study from Atlanta, Ga.-based NCR Corporation, the global installed base of self-checkout machines will reach 325,000 by 2019, up from 191,000 in 2013. Late last year, Walmart Canada introduced a new scan-and-go system that enables customers to scan their items and tally their bill while shopping. Metro currently has self-checkout terminals in 24 Ontario stores, and has announced its intention to add them in seven more stores before the end of summer. The Montreal-based retailer also plans to add a self-checkout option at six stores in its discount banner, Food Basics. Loblaw Companies Ltd., which has estimated that minimum wage increases in Ontario and Alberta could add up to $190 million in labour costs across its operations this year, also continues to introduce self-serve checkouts at both Loblaws and Shoppers Drug Mart locations (neither Metro or Loblaw responded to interview requests). Meanwhile, other regional chains such as Farm Boy have thus far resisted the shift towards automation on principle. “We want to say thank you for spending money in our store. It’s the last point of contact. You spend all this money and now you’ve got to check yourself out?” says Jeff York, co-CEO for the chain, which operates 25 stores across Ontario. Indeed, some experts contend self-­ service technologies (SST) aren’t the cure,

14

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

necessarily, for what ails retailers. In a 2017 essay entitled “The Economics of Self-Service Checkouts,” Australian academics Gary Mortimer and Paula Dootson wrote there are no clear signs that self-serve checkouts represent an “easy win” for retailers. The authors argued that self checkouts aren’t necessarily faster, don’t translate to lower staff numbers, and carry numerous indirect costs—including customer resistance, anger when the system doesn’t work as it should (when it doesn’t recognize a particular item, for instance) and the fact they are not designed to handle a full grocery shop. Theft, also known as “external shrinkage” in industry parlance, is also an unavoidable by-product. One study of 12 million self checkouts across eight retailers in the United States, Britain and the Netherlands found that about 850,000 of approximately six million items checked­ —a shrinkage rate of 3.97%—were never actually scanned by customers. And in a survey of 2,634 shoppers by U.K. digital couponing company Voucher Codes Pro, nearly 20% admitted to stealing something at a self-serve checkout. Retailers aren’t saying what percentage of shrinkage comes from self-serve checkouts, but one independent grocer in Ontario told Canadian Grocer that he has heard anecdotally that shrink is a “big problem.” Part of the issue, explained Mortimer in an e-mail interview, is that customers are more easily able to rationalize theft from a faceless corporate entity. “When people deviate from a social norm, they often rationalize and justify the behaviour [by saying] ‘It’s a victimless crime,’ ‘No one got hurt,’ or ‘It’s a big company, they can afford it,’” he said. Mortimer said customers might also regard theft as the price retailers have to pay for making customers do everything themselves. “[They say] ‘If I have to select my goods, ring them up and bag them, they’re going to have to compensate me for my time,’” said Mortimer. In a separate e-mail, Dootson was asked if perceived wrongdoing, such as being involved in a decades-long bread price-fixing scheme, would make it easier for thieves to justify stealing from grocers at the checkout. Her response: “So much yes.” Looks like it’s going to be another bumper year for carrots.

POLL RESULTS

CHECKING IN ON SELF CHECKOUT IN THEORY, it’s easy to see the appeal of self checkouts for both retailers and shoppers. Retailers get shoppers to do some of the work so they can save on labour costs, while consumers get a convenient, potentially speedier checkout. But a recent article in The Atlantic suggests there lurks “an ugly truth” in supermarket automation: theft and lots of it in the self-checkout lane. We wondered: Are you worried?

We asked readers on CanadianGrocer.com:

Are you concerned about theft at the self checkout?

34%

SOMEWHAT. THEFT HAPPENS BUT NOT THAT OFTEN

24%

YES. IT’S STARTING TO IMPACT THE BOTTOM LINE

22%

NO. WE DON’T HAVE SELF CHECKOUT

20%

NO. WE HAVE STAFF KEEPING WATCH


IDEAS IN-STORE MUSIC

Hey! Ho! Let’s go shopping Once the domain of the blandly inoffensive, supermarket music is getting a little more adventurous

POP PAUL-CATALIN/SHUTTERSTOCK

By Chris Powell David Hanson was making his way through a Winnipeg No Frills recently, when he noticed the in-store music wasn’t the bland assortment of songs that had soundtracked so many of his previous trips. Hanson, one of the admins of a Facebook music group called No Hipsters Allowed, couldn’t help but notice the store was playing songs from music nerd-approved artists like Elvis Costello and the Ramones. “I remember thinking that it certainly enhanced my shopping experience, and was a welcome change for a person like me, who feels life is too short to listen to crappy music,” says Hanson. It seems to be part of a broader trend. On Facebook, a page called Kroger Music highlights songs heard by customers while shopping at the U.S. chain. It reads like a college radio playlist from the 1980s: The Ramones’ “Blitzkrieg Bop,” the Replacements’ “Kiss Me on the Bus,” and Joy Division’s mope rock classic “Love Will Tear Us Apart” (heard in the detergent aisle, apparently). It’s no coincidence that grocers are getting more musically adventurous, says Jake Yakobi, director of business development at Toronto’s PCMusic, which develops playlists for hotel chains, restaurants and some grocery retailers including T&T Supermarket and Organic Garage. “Retail is taking a hit across the board, so proprietors are looking to be even more impactful, from their displays, to their lighting, to the vibe,” says Yakobi. “We’re telling a branded story through music.” Yakobi says there is currently a “retro-renaissance” being led by ’80s artists like Madonna, George Michael and Devo. “People love those tracks, mainly because they make you feel good when you hear them,” he says. Studies show an indisputable link between in-store music and customer behaviour. The much-cited 1982 study “Using Background Music to Affect the Behaviour of Supermarket Shoppers” found the tempo of the music played in grocery stores had a direct impact on in-store traffic flow and sales, with slower-tempo music capable of producing up to a 38.2% increase in daily sales. With an emphasis on what the Los Angeles Times once described as “face-punch brevity,” bands like

the Ramones might seem to run counter to that study’s findings. Still, retailers are increasingly mindful of making sure in-store music reflects their brand. “Music is tough because it’s so subjective,” says Matt Lurie, president and CEO of the Toronto-area chain Organic Garage. “The question is, what is most suitable for a shopping experience? The style of music has to match the brand image we’re trying to convey.” When Organic Garage opened its newest store in Toronto’s Junction neighbourhood last year, Lurie insisted the in-store soundtrack developed by PCMusic feature only recordings of live music, reasoning it was a better reflection of the company ethos. “Live music is not perfect; there’s no hiding the imperfections,” says Lurie. “I felt that it matched well what we’re trying to convey—which is that our store is not perfect. We like to be a little bit rough around the edges.” Lurie says it’s impossible to assess what impact the in-store music has on sales, although customer feedback has generally been positive. “For customers that really clue in, the feedback has been very good,” he says. “It’s accomplished what we wanted, which is that it’s different and people have noticed.”

CONGRATULATIONS Rosa Francavilla 2017 Recipient of the Keith Conklin Sales Excellence Award, Nestlé Canada Inc. Steve Fox, Senior Vice President, Customer Development, Nestlé Canada, is pleased to announce Rosa Francavilla as the 2017 Keith Conklin Sales Excellence Award winner. Keith Conklin, former Nestlé Canada CEO, had a lasting impact on the company during and beyond his 30-year career. To sustain his legacy of excellence in sales leadership, execution and transformation, we created an award in his honour. Rosa Francavilla, Key Account Manager, Walmart, is an excellent role model within Nestlé and the highly deserving recipient of this prestigious award. Rosa is a true leader, exemplifying Keith Conklin’s determination and “Passion to Win” spirit. Her ability to inspire her colleagues through her professionalism, integrity and outstanding performance in sales is unwavering. Rosa's focus on building strong relationships externally, collaborating internally to elevate performance, and optimizing activities to find learnings, consistently drives future change for improved results. Her best-in-class communication and collaboration skills combined with her drive to build external relationships has been a key enabler in accelerating growth in 2017!

On behalf of the team, it is with great pride that we honour Rosa’s leadership and talent at Nestlé. Congratulations Rosa!


IDEAS

LOBLAW IS BETTING ON BUGS Canada’s largest grocer adds cricket powder to its privatelabel lineup

16

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

Survey says: shoppers like their grocers Despite price-fixing scandal, Canadians’ relationship with grocers remains strong By David Brown WHILE CANADA’S largest grocers have been accused of conspiring to overcharge consumers for bread, most of those consumers still feel good about those retailers, according to a new survey. In fact, 13% of Canadians surveyed said they actually feel better about their grocery store after finding out about the alleged price fixing. “It looks like Canadians are giving their grocers a second chance to make things right,” says Daniel Tisch, CEO of Toronto-based Argyle Public Relationships. The survey of more than 1,500 Canadians by research firm Leger for Argyle’s third annual Public Relationships Index found a strong majority of respondents (86%) said they are very or somewhat satisfied with the grocer they use most often, and 79% said they trust that retailer. Canadians feel better about their grocers than any of the other categories Leger and Argyle survey about: banks, credit cards, airlines, insurance companies, communications providers and professional sports teams. “No industry has been better than the grocery sector at building relationships with Canadians,” explains Tisch. Canada’s grocery retailers have spent a long time building relationships with their customers, and they’ve generally been perceived as good corporate citizens who care about their customers and their communities, he said. That good will

appears to be helping them weather the recent storm arising from allegations of bread price fixing. The bread story has had an impact on customer trust levels, but not as severely as might have been expected. Asked specifically about bread price fixing, 9% of respondents said the price-fixing allegations “significantly worsened” their views of their grocery retailer, while 24% said it “somewhat worsened” their view. (When asked first about trust levels without specific mention of the bread allegations, just 22% of respondents said their trust had decreased in the last six months. That number rose to 33% when reminded of the bread price fixing.) And 13% of respondents said the allegations actually improved their view of their grocery retailer—5% said significantly while 8% said somewhat. Another 47% said it had no real effect on how they view their grocer. The survey did not explore why the respondents feel the way they do, but it seems likely the neutral to positive sentiment comes from Canadians either believing their retailer was not involved or, if they were, their retailer has addressed the problem responsibly. “I think what it shows is the importance of investing over the long term in one’s public relationships because they really influence reputations,” said Tisch. “Relationships create resilience.” CG

SYDA PRODUCTIONS/SHUTTERSTOCK, LOBLAW COS. LTD.

Loblaw is attempting to move edible insects to the mainstream with the launch of its President’s Choice 100% Cricket Powder. The new addition to the retailer’s popular private-label brand is touted as a product that answers a need for a protein produced in a more sustainable manner. Raising crickets, after all, requires far less resources than other animal proteins. “By making products like cricket powder widely available in our grocery stores, we are giving Canadians the option to not only try something new, but to also make a conscious decision on what they eat and how it impacts the environment,” says Kathlyne Ross, Loblaw’s vice-president of product development and innovation. Loblaw is betting consumers will get past their squeamishness and recognize the benefits of cricket powder for its versatility (it can easily be added into baked goods or smoothies) and nutritional virtues—in addition to protein, the cricket powder provides a boost of vitamins, calcium and fibre. Time will tell if consumers hop on the cricket trend.


FOOD BYTES

Joel Gregoire

MEAT OF THE MATTER Companies are coming up with sophisticated plant-based and lab-grown alternatives to conventional meat. Will consumers bite? SEVEN-AND-A-HALF-billion people live on the planet currently, and the United Nations forecasts that number will rise to 9.8 billion by 2050. The Earth is quickly becoming more crowded, increasing the strain on its resources. The UN also estimates that 70% more food will be needed to feed the world’s population in 2050. Raising animals for meat is a relatively inefficient way to provide the calories needed for a growing population. Estimates suggest that 100 calories of grain is needed to yield three calories of beef. This taxes the planet’s resources, particularly fresh water and agricultural land. With the spectre of climate change further straining our precious resources, the race is on to find more sustainable ways to feed the world. One challenge to this goal is that consumers love meat. Eighty-two per cent of

Canadians identify themselves as omnivores, with just 7% claiming to be vegetarian or vegan, according to findings from Mintel’s Meat Alternatives Canada 2018 report. It’s difficult to imagine fourfifths of consumers suddenly shunning meat for the sake of sustainability, particularly given that preference for meat ranks as the top reason for not using meat alternatives. The good news, however, is that just over half of Canadians claim to have eaten meat alternatives at one time or another, and innovators are also looking for ways that allow consumers to “have their meat and eat it too.” When Canadians eat meat alternatives, it’s most likely to be a meatless burger. The ideal is to create a meatless burger that doesn’t taste like a meatless burger. There are two paths to achieving this: one is to use plant-based proteins, such as pea protein, and the second is

MEATY EXPECTATIONS: WHAT CONSUMERS WANT

“What qualities are important to you when buying meat alternatives (eg. meatless burgers, sausages, etc.)?” Reasons for purchase

40% 37% 36% 31% 18

Protein content Low price

to harvest cells from animals and grow meat in a lab. While this sounds like the stuff of science fiction, it’s not. Impossible Foods has created The Impossible Burger, a plant-based burger that uses heme, an iron-containing compound, as its “magic ingredient.” While heme is present in plants, it’s abundant in meat and gives meat its smell, sizzle, bleed and taste, making The Impossible Burger comparable to meat-based burgers. Memphis Meats, by contrast, grows its “cultured meat” in a lab. The process involves extracting cells (painlessly) from animals and then growing them. The real story is in how the process is becoming more cost effective. In 2013, Maastricht University in The Netherlands “grew” a five-ounce burger from cow shoulder stem cells at a cost of US$330,000. By 2021, Memphis Meats’ goal is to have lab grown meat commercially available. Even with all of this innovation, the question remains: will consumers bite? Consumers cite a desire to “eat less meat overall” as a reason for consuming meat alternatives, and say “protein content,” “price,” “no artificial ingredients” and “meat-like flavours” are important to them. So, while considerations around animal welfare and the environment remain important, companies have to lead with what’s in it for the consumer. What’s the future for meat alternatives? The simple fact is that while only 7% of Canadians claim to be vegetarians or vegans, over half of Canadians consume meatless products. This suggests that the true opportunity extends beyond those consumers who avoid meat to those who love meat. Meat alternatives that are indistinguishable from “real meat” stand the best chance of realizing the category’s potential.  CG

No artificial ingredients Meat-like flavours SOURCE: LIGHTSPEED/MINTEL | IMPORTANT QUALITIES WHEN BUYING MEAT ALTERNATIVES, NOV. 2017  BASE: 1,068 INTERNET USERS AGED 18+ WHO USE MEAT ALTERNATIVES

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

Joel Gregoire is associate director, Food & Drink at Mintel, the world’s leading market intelligence agency. Based in Toronto, Joel researches and writes reports on Canada’s food and drink industry. @JoelDGregoire


EATING IN CANADA

Kathy Perrotta

BREAKING DOWN BREAKFAST

The most important meal of the day is undergoing a transformation. Success in the category depends on how well you know the breakfast consumer HURRIED AND HECTIC lifestyles, commuting gridlock and the increasing need to juggle work and family responsibilities have all paved the way for a transformation of breakfast. Ipsos FIVE reports that 79% of Canadians claim breakfast remains “the most important meal of the day,” but for most adults today, the notion of sitting down to a family breakfast table has given way to a quick, convenient bite on the go that’s often the first of multiple food occasions throughout the day. Here are some other breakfast insights:

although expanding foodservice options are increasingly attracting consumers to out-of-home venues. This slow movement away from home has, in part, contributed to declining consumption rates of traditional at-home breakfast foods such as ready-to-eat cold cereal and toast, while consumption of handheld foods such as bagels and muffins have benefitted from the shift. While consumers report portability as a driver of food choice, interestingly, just 8% of breakfast occasions are carried from home. Eggs take a leadership role— As consumers’ needs have evolved at breakfast, demand for protein—especially for non-meat options— has grown. The beneficiary of this shift is eggs. Eggs now hold the top spot among foods consumed at breakfast, on both weekdays and weekends, with consumption rates growing in year-over-year tracking by Ipsos FIVE. But don’t forget grains and fibre—Although protein is important to consumers, fibre holds the top spot among labels of importance at breakfast, followed by “all natural” and “contains whole grains.” As the definition of healthy evolves, consumers seek products that functionally benefit, support and enhance overall wellness. An opportunity exists to better communicate the benefits of fibre and whole grains, particularly to younger consumers.

The key to tapping into new morning opportunities will be to put the consumer at the centre of decisions Breakfast skipping is an opportunity—Despite wide acknowledgement of

breakfast’s importance, 21% of Canadians report skipping breakfast in an average day. Breakfast skipping has grown by 15% since 2014, indicating a significant opportunity to convert these individuals back to early day eating routines. Slow movement of breakfast out of home— The majority of breakfast occasions (78%) remain in-home affairs,

Make room for fruit and veggies— Across all dayparts, including breakfast, Canadians remain fresh obsessed and are increasingly drawn to foods that are fresh and minimally processed. Ongoing tracking through Ipsos FIVE reveals that not only have consumption rates of eggs (+3%) and fresh fruit (+4%) increased at breakfast, but the inclusion of vegetables in early day eating occasions has also grown considerably. Although breakfast options such as omelettes have traditionally been veggie heavy, the increased use of produce such as avocado, spinach and kale in breakfast foods is notable. Beyond the traditional daypart—In a world where consumers are short on time to fit cooking, healthy choices and feeding families into their busy schedules, nutritious, convenient breakfast foods have found their way into new dayparts. Eggs, for instance, currently enjoy high consumption rates at both lunch and dinner, while cereal is finding new life as a snack. It’s also worth noting that bacon consumption is growing at dinner and bagels are increasingly a lunch choice.

Given that eating habits have become less structured and more spontaneous, today’s consumer is empowered to eat what they want when they want. The key to tapping into new morning opportunities will be to put the consumer at the centre of decisions. And while there is no crystal ball to allow a glimpse into the future of breakfast, by continuing to evaluate the evolving consumer—keeping track of demographic, life stage and situational dynamics—and using this knowledge to guide your decision making, success with this most important meal of the day should follow.  CG

Kathy Perrotta is a VP of Marketing with Ipsos Canada and leads the FIVE service, a daily diary tracking of what individuals ate and drank yesterday across all categ­ories/ brands, occasions and venues. Kathy.perrotta@ipsos.com

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

19


BEHIND THE TRENDS

Amanda Bourlier

SHOPPING REINVENTED

shoppers quality food in a format more suited to unique daily needs. Encouraging a restart of the shopper journey

Competition for relationships, not just sales, is intensifying in retail. To win, grocers need to demonstrate value to consumers that goes beyond price and product mix THE RETAIL ENVIRONMENT is rapidly changing, thanks to technological, economic and cultural shifts in Canada, North America and the world. At Euromonitor International, we’ve identified the eight most influential megatrends affecting consumer goods and services worldwide to help businesses understand and respond. One of these megatrends is the idea that shopping is being reinvented, which reflects how economic and technological shifts have rewritten

before the moment of purchase. Growing numbers of consumers not only weigh price when making shopping decisions, but also evaluate convenience as part of the purchase cost. This shift explains, in part, the recent flurry of activity around online ordering and grocery delivery in Canada, with Whole Foods products for sale on Amazon.ca now and Loblaw available on Instacart. Even Sobeys, a latecomer to e-commerce, recently announced concrete plans to partner with Ocado Group to launch online sales. These initiatives touch on two features customers increasingly look at: convenience—including the opportunity to grocery shop from one’s couch—and personalization through greater variety of products.

Today’s shoppers are increasingly armed with information and a greater ability to switch their loyalties the shopper journey holistically. Several Canadian grocery retailers exemplify the principles of “shopping reinvented” by focusing on three key customer points of engagement: Signalling value before the transaction

Moving beyond the transaction to build a relationship with consumers requires that retailers communicate their value

20

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

Meeting consumers when, where, and how they want to buy

Top grocery retailers are expanding their offerings beyond traditional fresh and prepared food to increase the frequency of their interactions with customers. The technological and consumer trends driving a reinvention of shopping are also driving new grocery models, including meal kit providers such as Goodfood and MissFresh. Grocers (or “grocerants”) serving up restaurant-quality food is another example. The proliferation of options offer Canadian grocery

Retailers that are the best at building relationships with their customers generally find they are selling lifestyles in addition to products. Lifestyles, of course, do not disappear when a consumer leaves the store. Grocery retailers have an advantage in this respect: given the repeat nature of grocery purchases, there are more obvious opportunities to continually engage the consumer. Exclusive, personalized offers in the form of tailored coupons have long been a mainstay of grocery marketing, but now there are more ways to offer this sort of follow-up online. Lufa Farms, a Montreal startup, achieves this particularly well. Lufa Farms’ shoppers sign up to receive a box of fresh food sourced from local urban farms that the shopper customizes on a weekly basis. The subscription model ensures consumers continue to make purchases by forcing them to opt out rather than opt in, and there is the lifestyle appeal of locally sourced fresh food that taps into growing interest in ethical and healthy living. The initiatives by established Canadian grocers and the early success of grocery startups reflect the fact that competition for relationships, not just sales, has intensified. Today’s shoppers are increasingly armed with information and a greater ability to switch their loyalties. In the years ahead, retailers in Canada and beyond must demonstrate value through services that personalize the shopping experience—not just price and product mix.  CG

Amanda Bourlier is a consultant at Euromonitor International, an independent provider of strategic market research. Euromonitor.com


Canada’s largest event dedicated to the fruit and vegetable industry Join us at the 2018 Canadian Produce Marketing Association Convention and Trade Show in Vancouver

Now that we’ve Takin’ Care of Business...

ACHMAN YB

Don't miss the Annual Banquet featuring Rock Music Icon

PM

A

RAND

Tuesday, April 24 to Thursday, April 26 in Vancouver, BC

LIV E AT C

convention.cpma.ca

Randy Bachman!

#CPMA2018 @CPMA_ACDFL\


Welcome Message

Ron Lemaire, President Canadian Produce Marketing Association

I’m absolutely thrilled to welcome our participants to gorgeous Vancouver! This vibrant and culturally diverse city is the perfect backdrop for three days of learning and networking with the produce industry. Vancouver is the true embodiment of the “Live Healthy, Eat Fresh!” theme, and I encourage you to check out the Granville Island Market, Gastown, Robson Street, Chinatown, and the Punjabi Market for a unique assortment of all the foodie fun this city has to offer. The Tuesday morning retail tour will stop in some of these spots, accompanied by a guided trolley tour. Check out convention.cpma.ca to grab your ticket in advance or visit the onsite registration desk.

THIS VIBRANT AND CULTURALLY DIVERSE CITY IS THE PERFECT BACKDROP FOR THREE DAYS OF LEARNING AND NETWORKING WITH THE PRODUCE INDUSTRY

Beyond the sights of Vancouver, our 2018 show features an exceptional combination of social networking events and learning opportunities. The show will kick off on Tuesday night with our first International Chair Rick Alcocer’s Welcome Reception at the TELUS World of Science. Wednesday night’s After Party will again start later, giving you plenty of time to grab dinner with colleagues or clients before joining us for drinks and networking.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

And finally, our ever-popular Annual Banquet will close off the show’s social events with Canadian rocker Randy Bachman! We’ve also added some new networking receptions this year, including an International reception, a Women in Produce reception, and a Fresh Drinks for Young Professionals reception. We’ve included the program at a glance on the following page for all the details. Our learning experiences this year will feature two keynotes and two business sessions on innovation, global markets, new technologies, and the future of produce. And the learning doesn’t have to end once the trade show opens! We’ll be hosting seven unique learning lounges this year. The learning lounges are quick, 20-30 minute sessions presented right on the trade show floor. They’re the perfect way to learn more about current industry issues without stepping away from the trade show. And how could we forget the trade show? With over 500 exhibit spaces and over 250 unique exhibiting companies, the show floor is the perfect place to make new connections and reinforce existing business relationships. We’re also bringing back the “Taste of CPMA,” your guide to discovering all the exhibitors offering new flavours and cooking techniques through product sampling. And finally, a special thanks to Canadian Grocer for partnering with us on this New Product Showcase (NPS) supplement. In these pages you’ll find information about the products being submitted for our NPS awards. We look forward to celebrating the Best New Product, Freggie Approved Product, Packaging Innovation, and Organic Product Award winners on the trade show floor. Enjoy the show!

Ron Lemaire, President Canadian Produce Marketing Association


Program at a glance Monday, April 23, 2018  12:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Location

Registration Area Open

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

VCC West   Location

7:30 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Registration Area Open

VCC West 

8:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

Retail Tour

8:00 a.m. Departure from

1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

CPMA Members’ Annual General Meeting

Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

4:00 p.m. - 7:00 p.m.

Half Your Plate Hockey Game

Britannia Rink, Vancouver

8:00 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Chair’s Welcome Reception

TELUS World of Science

Vancouver Convention Centre

Location

Wednesday, April 25, 2018  6:30 a.m. - 7:30 a.m.

Freggie Fun Run (5K run or 2K walk)

Jack Poole Plaza

7:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m.

Registration Area Open

VCC West

8:00 a.m. - 9:45 a.m.

Delegate and Companion Breakfast

VCC West - Ballroom C

9:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Retail Produce Manager Session

VCC West – Room 114/115

10:00 a.m. - 11:15 a.m.

Business Sessions

VCC West – Room 109/110

10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Companion Program

VCC West – Room 113

11:30 a.m. - 1:15 p.m.

Delegate Lunch

VCC West – Ballroom C

1:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Trade Show Opening Ceremony

VCC West – Hall C Foyer

1:30 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

Trade Show

VCC West – Halls B2-3 & C

2:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Learning Lounges

Trade Show floor

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Fresh Drinks for Young Professionals Networking Event

VCC West – Room 109

5:30 p.m. – 6:30 p.m.

Women in Produce Networking Reception

VCC West – Room 110

9:30 p.m. – 1:00 a.m.

After Party

Fairmont Waterfront Hotel

Thursday, April 26, 2018

Location

8:00 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.

Registration Area Open

VCC West 

9:30 a.m. - 11:30 a.m.

Awards Brunch

VCC West - Ballroom C

11:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

Trade Show

VCC West - Halls B2-3 & C

12:30 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

Learning Lounges

Trade Show floor

6:30 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

Annual Banquet Reception

VCC West – Ballroom Foyer

7:30 p.m. - 11:00 p.m.

Annual Banquet plus concert

VCC West - Ballrooms C & D

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE


Visit us at

CPMA Booth #1120 to learn about our newest PRODUCT LAUNCH

Driving Growth THROUGH

INNOVATION www.litehousefoods.com


New Product Showcase

Canadian Grocer is proud to sponsor the CPMA New Product Showcase 2018. Today’s produce departments are overflowing with items that are innovative, convenient and, of course, healthy. This year’s New Product Showcase highlights some of the best. Check them out here in our sneak preview, and see them first hand at the CPMA Convention and Trade Show April 24-26, Vancouver.

APIO INC.

BAY BABY PRODUCE, INC.

Eat Smart’s NEW TimeSavours™ are ready-to-cook, fresh vegetable kits offering a variety of delicious side-dishes to complete any meal. Eatsmart.net | Booth # 1223

Organic Delicata Squash is the PERFECT addition to any meal. Each Grab & Go bag includes 2 Delicata Squash with a delicious & easy to prepare Delicata Pizza Boat recipe. Baybabyproduce.com | Booth # 1154

ATLAS PRODUCE & DISTRIBUTION, INC.

New Branding from an old favourite. Fresh Energy by Caramel Naturel. Medjools from Coachella, California. Bold colours attract new buyers. Targeting millennials that are looking for high energy foods that are healthy and easy? Let us show you how to differentiate your store offerings in the growing date category. Atlasproduce.com | Booth # 751

BC TREE FRUITS

BC Tree Fruits Broken Ladder Pears & Peaches is back with a new vintage! With flavours of fresh stone fruit and floral notes, it’s refreshingly crisp with a tropical finish. Bctreefruitscider.com| Booth # 625

BCfresh

Turn up the flavour with the Pacific™ family of premium potatoes. For over 25 years BCfresh has searched the globe for the most flavourful potatoes. We plant them in BC’s fertile soils and nurture them to be healthy and fresh, rich in nutrients and great tasting! Meet Pacific Sunset™, Pacific Sunrise™ and Pacific Pearl™! Bcfresh.ca | Booth # 1437

CAVENDISH FARMS BC HOT HOUSE FOODS INC.

Our greenhouse grape tomato is now packaged to showcase its Big Taste®. This refreshed honeycomb design will attract tomato snackers and creative cooks alike. Big-taste.com | Booth # 1031

BRAGA FRESH FAMILY FARMS

BOLTHOUSE FARMS

With real fruit juice in Bolthouse Farms B Balanced™ and 16g of protein in Bolthouse Farms B Strong™, our new B Line smoothies and protein shakes contain 50-70% lower sugar. Bolthouse.com | Booth # 614

A deliciously, organic 10oz blend of green cabbage, julienne-cut broccoli stalk, green kale, and julienne-cut rainbow carrots. Josiesorganics.com | Booth # 236

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

Garlic & Rosemary Roasting Tray – Small Yellow Potatoes with Seasoning & Oil comes in a 2lb family size, ready to bake or BBQ right in the tray! Cavendishfarms.com | Booth # 433

CFP LTD.

Artisanal Growers™ brings you premium berries, picked from the fields of the Fraser Valley. Grown by experts, and collected for their large size and sweet taste. ArtisanalGrowers.com | Booth # 1031


Fresh from the

HEART EUROPE of

Taste our fresh produce AT

CPMA BOOTH # 520 April 24-26, 2018

Y

BELGIUM Q

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www.europeanvegetables.ca For more informations, please contact your local distributor.

CAMPAIGN FINANCED WITH AID FROM THE EUROPEAN UNION

The content of this advertisement represents the views of the author only and is his/her sole responsibility. The European Commission and the Consumers, Health, Agriculture and Food Executive Agency (CHAFEA) do not accept any responsibility for any use that may be made of the information it contains.


DEL MONTE FRESH PRODUCE CANADA, INC.

Grilled pineapple rings. Freshdelmonte.com | Booth # 1215

DOLE FOOD COMPANY

Dole’s New Organic Salad Kits feature nutritious baby lettuce and unique flavours combinations to prepare a restaurant salad at home. Kit flavours include Caesar, Apple Dijon, Sweet Citrus, Savory Balsamic. Dole.com | Booth # 1015

DUDA FARM FRESH FOODS

Dandy® Super Sweet Corn is packed fresh to order in a 100% recyclable tray – the first ever to the corn category. Year-round availability. Dudafresh.com | Booth # 821

FRESH DIRECT PRODUCE LTD. EARTHFRESH

Eat Your Colours with EarthFresh’s Vitality blend of yellow, red and purple potatoes. One medium Vitality potato provides 566.5 mg of anthocyanins, while one medium standard potatoes provides 137.5 mg of anthocyanins. Earthfreshfoods.com | Booth # 845

EMERSON

Oversight Mobile enables you to view critical shipment details including temperature and location in real-time, direct from your smartphone. Available on Android and iOS devices. Emerson.com/Cargo | Booth # 951

Fresh Direct presents Simply Fresh ® Asian Vegetables in a convenient minimum 1lb BOPP film bag: Baby Bok-Choy, Shanghai Bok-Choy, Gai-Lan and Yue-Choy. Sweet, Fresh and ready to ring up at the till. Freshdirectproduce.com | Booth # 1044

GIRO PACK INC.

FRESH DIRECT PRODUCE LTD.

Fresh Direct presents Simply Fresh® Organic Shanghai Bok Choy in a convenient minimum 1lb BOPP film bag. Sweet, Mild, and Organic! Pre-packaged and ready to ring up at the till. Freshdirectproduce.com | Booth # 1044

Giro Pack, Inc.’s new ‘HANDLE BAG’ offers an easy to grab handle for “on-the-go” shoppers, while offering more content breathability and visibility due to the net sides. The bag’s horizontal orientation not only makes it easier for consumers to see, touch, and smell the fruit, but it also offers a superior display in store. The ‘HANDLE BAG’ satisfies consumer demands for more convenient and environmentally friendly packaging, and is ideal for Organic packages and Organic consumers who want less plastic compared to that of pouch and poly bags. Giropack.com | Booth # 651

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

GOURMET GARDEN

Gourmet Garden™ Herbs & Spices is bringing four (4) new flavours to Canada in 2018! Chunky Garlic Stir-in Paste Thai Seasoning Stir-in Paste Lightly Dried Chili Pepper Lightly Dried Chives Gourmetgarden.com | Booth # 450


HIGHLINE MUSHROOMS

Discover the culinary versatility of our Organic Mushroom Medleys and feel good feeding your family fresh, nutritious, organic mushrooms. Available in three organic formats – Organic Steakhouse Style, Organic Pasta Perfect and Organic Sizzling Stir Fry. Highlinemushrooms.com | Booth # 1231

HIGHLINE MUSHROOMS

Highline continues to innovate by offering top seal packaging that is consumer-friendly, easyto-use, and presented with a premium look for a unique and consistent merchandising option at store level. Highlinemushrooms.com | Booth # 1231

HOUWELING’S GROUP

DELIGHTS premium cherry tomatoes on the vine. Flavourful, brilliant red snacking tomatoes with vibrant green vines. Juicy texture with intense tomato flavour, DELIGHTS are appropriately named for their premium experience. Houwelings.com | Booth # 115

LAKESIDE PRODUCE INC.

Come see what’s new at Lakeside Produce in booth 245. Lakesideproduce.com | Booth # 245

LITEHOUSE INC.

Litehouse Caesar, Chunky Blue Cheese, Homestyle Ranch Dip, Dilly Dip, Balsamic, & Poppyseed. Litehouse introduces FRESH, innovative packaging. Litehousefoods.com | Booth # 1120

MANN PACKING CO. INC.

Featuring unique, chef-inspired cuts of on trend, nutrient-rich superfood veggies. Think outside the pasta box! Veggiesmadeeasy.com | Booth # 1215

LOVE BEETS

Beet Salsa – Sweet with a light, spicy kick – our SweetChili beets are combined with the perfect balance of fresh green pepper, onion, jalapeno, and cilantro to create the ultimate beet salsa experience. Light, sweet, and dicedthese golden delights are cooked with the perfect balance of honey and vinegar to complement the natural sweetness of our newest product, the delicious golden beetroot! Lovebeets.com | Booth # 317

MASTRONARDI PRODUCE LTD. MARZETTI

Marzetti’s Ranch Veggie Dip has gone ORGANIC! A classic flavour your entire family will love whether dipping their favourite veggies or used in one of our delicious recipes. Marzetti.com | Booth # 545

These mesmerizing peppers are as colorful as they are flavourful, so you can create beautiful island-inspired dishes, any time of the year. Sunsetgrown.com | Booth # 531

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

MASTRONARDI PRODUCE LTD.

This innovative new line is comprised of four unique pasta kits containing fresh tomatoes, perfectly portioned pasta, and flavourful spices for every taste. Sunsetgrown.com | Booth # 531


MUCCI FARMS MJO SOLUTIONS LTD.

Made with just Sweet Fruit™ Blueberries, citrus fruit and natural sweetener.  Try our best-tasting and healthy Sweet Fruit™ No Sugar Added Blueberry Jam with 75% lower sugar and calories! Mjosolutions.ca | Booth # 855

#GreenhouseGrown365 in North America’s largest indoor strawberry farm, Smuccies™ Sweet Strawberries are clean, aesthetically perfect and bursting with juicy flavour! Muccifarms.com | Booth # 921

MUCCI FARMS

MUCCI FARMS

Our Natural Organics lineup of products are not only great tasting, they are as safe and wholesome as they are delicious! Ask us about them in Booth 921! Muccifarms.com | Booth # 921

Veggies To Go™ is a healthy on-the-go snack pack conveniently sized, easy to fit in school bags, and equipped with EZ Snap packaging to take convenience to the next level! Muccifarms.com | Booth # 921

MUCCI FARMS

Smaller, crunchier and more convenient than the original, CuteCumber™ Poppers are the new one-bite snack that you just “pop” in your mouth! Offered in assorted pack styles. Muccifarms.com | Booth # 921

NATUREFRESH FARMS INC.

As a year-round provider of Organic Sweet Bell Peppers, NatureFresh™ Farms is committed to high quality, consistency, and flavour. Expanding our organic offerings is how we put the consumer first. Naturefresh.ca | Booth # 425

ORGANICGIRL

organicgirl’s NEW fresh designer dressings are artfully blended in small batches, using fresh organic ingredients and no preservatives, keeping you dressing your salads with great taste! iloveorganicgirl.com | Booth # 1422

NATURIPE FARMS LLC

Naturipe Snacks’ perfectly portioned fresh fruit cups are packed with 5 ounces of fresh fruit and a handy spork, perfect for the on-the-go consumer with a busy and healthy lifestyle. Naturipefarms.com | Booth # 539

OPPY

Oppy.com | Booth # 915

ORGANICGIRL

organicgirl’s NEW salads are ingredient and nutritional breakthroughs. Rebel Greens is “not kale, not sorry” with its tender, mild, nutritious baby bok choy leaves! Protein Greens delivers 5g plant protein from our sweet pea leaves! iloveorganicgirl.com | Booth # 1422

REDHAT CO-OPERATIVE

The Grower Give Back Pack - a fresh, local multi pack featuring undersized product, 2 short cucumbers, 2 45 count tomatoes and 2 medium peppers packaged conveniently to take home or away for a weekend adventure. For every case sold in Western Canadian Sobeys stores last summer, 1 case was donated to local area Food Banks! redhatco-op.com | Booth # 1131 SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

RED SUN FARMS

Red Sun Farms is very excited to announce the addition of Golden Sun Avocados to our portfolio. Providing the rich, creamy, goodness, that can only be found in Mexican avocados. This addition will complement the existing Red Sun Farms portfolio. redsunfarms.com | Booth # 1115


SLICED FC LTD.

Our line of Inspired Salads™ are proudly Canadian – our greens are greenhouse grown without pesticides in Coaldale, AB and other ingredients are sourced from our friends in the West. inspiredgreens.ca | Booth # 1031

THOMAS FRESH

New at Thomas Fresh, trendy superfoods that are a staple for every kitchen, White Turmeric and Ginger! Our breathable mesh toppers are conveniently sized in distinctive packaging. thomasfresh.com | Booth # 723

WINDSET FARMS

Introducing Duet Snack Pack! This irresistible pack pairs super sweet mini grape tomatoes with bite-size cucumbers, creating the ultimate on-the-go snack! Windsetfarms.com | Booth # 1331

STAR PRODUCE/ THE STAR GROUP

TANIMURA & ANTLE

Green Oak is the newest addition to the Inspired Greens™ living lettuce line. Mellow, smooth, & nutty; these leaves give you a burst of water with every bite. inspiredgreens.ca | Booth # 1031

THE LITTLE POTATO COMPANY LTD.

The best Little potato, bar none. Growing small Creamer potatoes is all we do, so we have to be the best! Visit us at Booth 415. Littlepotatoes.com | Booth # 415

Tanimura & Antle Organic Artisan Romaine has the refreshing crunch of iceberg lettuce and the sweet flavour of romaine hearts. More salad, less waste with premium quality and consistency. Taproduce.com | Booth # 538

VEGPRO INTERNATIONAL INC.

Fresh Attitude prewashed baby lettuces blends and ready to eat salad kits newly grown and packed locally to provide the freshest lettuces in Western Canada. Attitudefraiche.com/fr | Booth # 715

WONDERFUL CITRUS

Wonderful Halos launched produce’s biggest ever POS display program this season. Halos Grove of Goodness displays drove 2.5X velocity growth for the #1 category leader. Wonderfulcitrus.com | Booth # 1315 SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

VILLAGE FARMS

An exciting orange tomato with a blissfully bright® citrus essence, Lorabella Blossom® is unlike any other! Part of the San Marzano family this tomato is great for snacking, cooking, grilling and roasting. Villagefarms.com | Booth # 742

ZESPRI INTERNATIONAL LIMITED

Zespri SunGold Kiwifruit is revolutionizing the kiwifruit category with its tropical-sweet taste & longer shelf life. Try this delicious, nutritional powerhouse that consumers can’t get enough of! Zesprikiwi.com | Booth # 1250


At P∂M, we’re the perfect partner to ensure your stores have a Wonderful Spring and Summer. Especially if your produce department is fully stocked with P∂M Wonderful 100% Pomegranate Juice. Our juice, together with our P∂M P∂MS and P∂M Wonderful fresh pomegranates, will be supported with a national marketing campaign this fall, including in-store POS, promotional support and public relations! To help sweeten your season, our tasty trio will be supported by the biggest merchandising team in produce. Get ready. It’s gonna be P∂M time all the time. Contact your local Wonderful sales representative at 877-328-7667.

trademark of POM Wonderful LLC or its affiliates. PN17058

© 2018 POM Wonderful LLC. All Rights Reserved. POM, POM WONDERFUL, POM POMS WONDERFUL and the accompanying logos are registered trademarks of Canada Bread Company, Limited, and used by POM Wonderful LLC under license. The Double Bubble Bottle Design is a registered

It’s P∂M Time!


COVER STORY

5

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INTO THE WEST

By Shellee Fitzgerald, Rebecca Harris and Carol Neshevich

WESTERN CANADA ISN’T JUST HOME TO MAJEStic mountains, stunning shorelines and expansive prairies, it’s also where you’ll find outstanding grocers. From large regional players to single-store operators, we’ve compiled a snapshot—by no means an exhaustive list, but as many as we could squeeze on these pages—of some of the best the West has to offer.

1. Buy-Low Foods Location:

British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan Number of stores:

50 stores under four different banners What’s new?

Recently acquired Choices Market BUY-LOW FOODS has come a long way from its early days as a single store in Vancouver in 1966. Part of The Jim Pattison Group since 1995, the company now has 50 stores under the retail banners Buy-Low Foods, Nesters Markets, Meinhardt Fine Foods and Choices Market, which Buy-Low Foods acquired earlier

36

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

this year. Through its Associated Grocers and Van-Whole Produce wholesale divisions, Buy-Low Foods also supplies nearly 2,000 independent grocers, produce markets and small restaurants in the West. As a community-oriented grocer, Buy-Low Foods prides itself on being in touch with customers on a personal level. “Customers’ wants and needs change very frequently—and what they need in a grocery store can vary from one visit to the next,” says president Dan Bregg. “With our unique setup of store formats, we’ve got something for everyone—whether it’s a hot meal, the ingredients for a home-cooked dinner from scratch, or fast and convenient healthy choice options, we are focused on delivering the quality products customers are looking for.” The company has a number of new stores in the pipeline across Western Canada, but none have been announced just yet. However, acquiring 11 Choices Market stores was a big win for the company, allowing it to expand its reach in Western Canada. “[Choices Market stores] are well known as fine health and well-

 KEN KEELOR

2 ness-oriented supermarkets, and have been leaders in offering local, organic and specialty natural food items in a warm, welcoming environment for 27 years,” says Bregg. “We’re very excited to join forces with them.”

2. Calgary Co-op Location:

Calgary and surrounding area Number of stores:

24 food centres, 24 pharmacies, 30 gas bars, 24 car washes, 28 liquor stores and three home health care centres What’s new?

“Everyday Awesome” marketing campaign CALGARY CO-OP is not your average local grocery chain. As a retail co-operative, it’s owned by the very people who shop there—more than 460,000 of them, in fact. “We don’t just have members; we have member-owners who share in our profits and have a voice in how we run our business,” says Ken Keelor, CEO of Calgary Co-op.

FROM TOP LEFT, CLOCKWISE: CURTIS COMEAU, LUCAS FINLAY, NATHAN ELSON, LUCAS FINLAY, 49TH PARALLEL GROCERY, NATHAN ELSON

FROM THE COAST TO THE PRAIRIES, A ROUNDUP OF GREAT GROCERS


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4

First established in 1956, the co-op has now grown to include 24 food centres, 24 pharmacies, 30 gas bars, 24 car washes, 28 liquor stores and three home health care centres, all located in Calgary and its surrounding area. Keelor says the co-op has been able to thrive for the past six decades—even successfully weathering storms like Alberta’s recent economic difficulties—by offering exceptional customer service and remaining dedicated to the community. This March, it launched a new marketing campaign called “Everyday Awesome,” which encapsulates Calgary Co-op’s strategy in this regard. “In a world of service reduction and increasing automation, we believe what our team members do to personally go the extra mile to service our customers makes us stand out,” explains Keelor. “Some examples of how we add value to our customers’ experiences with a personal touch include full-service gas (even in the extreme cold weather of the Calgary winter!), free delivery on prescriptions, grocery carry-out, and a free cookie or piece of fruit for kids to munch on while mom shops.” With more than 3,850 employees, Calgary Co-op was recently selected as one of Alberta’s Top 70 Employers for 2018 (the second year in a row it has achieved this honour). “The real secret to success is our people,” says Keelor.

3. 49th Parallel Grocery  Location:

Vancouver Island Number of stores:

Four

What’s new?

Exploring additional locations

 THE RICHMOND FAMILY

3

OVER THE 40 years the Richmond family has owned it, 49th Parallel Grocery has managed to do better than merely fend off its bigger competitors—it has grown. Named after the original store’s geographical latitude, 49th Parallel Grocery has expanded from its first location in Ladysmith to the neighbouring communities of Cedar, Duncan and Chemainus on Vancouver Island, adding a flower shop and café to the mix along the way. Peter Richmond, president and CFO, chalks up the company’s success to a number of things including outstanding customer service, which his parents

Wayne and Harmina established as a priority when they took over the business in 1977. Good selection and value, a deep involvement in the four communities 49th Parallel Grocery serves, and loyal, empowered employees are also part of the winning formula. “We offer a good career for a lot of our employees,” says Richmond. “Quite a few of my staff are running their own shop; they get to decide where they buy their oranges from and what price to set. I’m not telling them what to do and that makes the job more fun for staff—they tell me that on a regular basis.” While Richmond says there are no plans to have “20 stores up and down the island,” he is looking to expand the operation to new locations where it makes sense.

4. Fresh St. Market Location:

Vancouver area (West Vancouver and Surrey) Number of stores:

Three

What’s new?

Becomes part of the Georgia Main Food Group, a new subsidiary of H.Y. Louie Co., when H.Y Louie restructures in late March 2018 AS THE NAME suggests, fresh food is front and centre at Fresh St. Market, the newest banner (introduced in 2013) from a company that also operates a few dozen IGAs in British Columbia. The Fresh St. Market concept is Georgia Main Food Group president and COO Gary Sorenson’s vision. Last year, when Canadian Grocer profiled the newest store, in Surrey’s fast-growing Panorama neighbourhood, Sorenson said the inspiration for Fresh St. Market came from a visit to Whole Foods Market’s flagship store in Austin, Tex. At the Fresh St. Market, dried goods are moved to the side aisles to allow fresh foods to shine in the centre of the store. In fact, the traditional grocery ratio of 60% dry goods and 40% fresh has been reversed at Fresh St. With fresh meat and seafood, an array of ready-toeat meals, a bakery brimming with rustic breads and a produce department with plenty of local items, there’s lots to satisfy foodies and families alike. March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

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COVER STORY

Location:

Alberta Number of stores:

15

What’s new?

Announcement of two new stores (Fort Saskatchewan and Edmonton); the launch of a new digital version of its loyalty program; and a new line of private label products WITH ITS network of 15 grocery stores (and counting) across Alberta, Freson Bros. has come a long way from the tiny butcher shop Frank Lovsin set up in the town of Hinton back in 1955. As a nod to its heritage, Freson Bros. still places a big emphasis on fresh Alberta meat today, with all stores having butchers on staff. It’s also a detail that helps the independent grocer deliver its promise to serve up “a unique Alberta food experience,” which also includes using as many local, clean ingredients as possible in its extensive range of house-made products. “What sets us apart from the competition is our commitment to traditional food processes,” says Doug Lovsin, part of the second-generation of Lovsins (along with brothers Mike and Ken) running the business. “We consider food and shopping for food an experience.” In 2013, the chain launched its Freson Bros. Fresh Market banner in Stony Plain. The new concept amped up the fresh experience with hot kitchens, hot food buffet, from “scratch” bakery, and a smokehouse along with an in-store restaurant. New stores in Fort Saskatchewan this year and later in Edmonton (the company’s first foray into a major urban market) will continue to deliver the best of the Fresh Market with some “new ideas” thrown in.

tainably-raised meat section, everything about Vancouver’s Greens Organic + Natural Market screams local, sustainable and community-focused. Opened in 2010 by T Senthivel and Norm Chan, two friends who met as students at the University of British Columbia, Greens is a 7,000-sq.-ft. store located in the city’s Kitsilano neighbourhood. The small size was a deliberate sustainability-related choice. “The smaller footprint allows us to be agile enough to serve the local community needs and preferences,” adds Chan, who says the residents of the Kitsilano neighbourhood “tend to be health- and fitness-focused and at the same time progressive and excited about food.” The owners strive to provide a place where their customers feel at home. “We are truly a local neighbourhood store where our staff knows your name,” says Senthivel. Greens boasts a nose-to-tail butcher, meaning the store buys the whole animal and uses every part. This allows the butcher to offer any cut the customer wants, and also boosts the sustainability factor as very little is wasted; they even make all their own patés, sausages, charcuterie, deli meats, stocks, stews and dog food in house. Green’s also has a kitchen/deli where everything is made from scratch, including soups, salads, sandwiches and breakfast burritos. “We have world-class butchers and chefs that are constantly creating amazing value-added product,” says Senthivel, who notes they are looking into the possibility of opening a second store.

7. Italian Centre Shop Locations:

Edmonton and Calgary Number of stores:

Four stores with 509 employees What’s new?

Actively seeking new locations in Calgary and other areas TAKING OVER the family business was not part of Teresa Spinelli’s master plan, but when her brother (the intended successor) passed away, followed by her father a few years later in 2000, Spinelli found herself with a grocery store to run. While it was a bit of rough start, Spinelli soon developed a passion for the business and set about finding ways to grow the Italian Centre Shop. “When I took over, we were at $8 million in sales with 30 employees,” says Spinelli who has expanded the operation

8

 DARREL L JONES

9 7

6. Greens Organic + Natural Market Location:

Vancouver (Kitsilano neighbourhood) Number of employees:

30 to 35

What’s new?

Exploring the possibility of a second store FROM THE 100% certified organic produce department to the impressive sus-

38

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

FROM TOP RIGHT, CLOCKWISE: ITALIAN CENTRE SHOP, GREENS ORGANIC + NATURAL MARKET, JOHN ULAN, JANIS NICOLAY, JANIS NICOLAY, COLIN WAY

5. Freson Bros.

9


7

6

from one to four stores. “Today, we’re at $70 million in sales and 509 employees.” The store was also listed on the 2017 PROFIT 500 ranking of Canada’s Fastest-Growing Companies. What’s behind the Italian Centre Shop’s success? Part of it, says Spinelli, is always being ahead of the game. “At one time, we were the only store [in Edmonton] that sold panettone, an Italian Christmas bread. Now, of course, Costco sells it and Walmart,” she says. “We have to always be thinking about what’s going to make us different.” And what sets her stores apart is an extensive range of European specialties, in-house cafes and impressive delis— which at the Calgary location includes a “cathedral of cheese.” Most importantly, though, Spinelli says the Italian Centre Shop is more than a grocery store. “We’re a gathering place; people feel at home, very connected to their roots, and they just like to hang out here.”

 8. Save-On-Foods  Locations:

164 stores across the West with one store in the North (Whitehorse) Number of employees:

+17,000

What’s new?

Plans to open 10 new stores across the West in 2018

 TERESA SPINELLI

7

A KEY INGREDIENT to Save-On-Foods’ success is listening to its customers, according to Darrell Jones, president of the Overwaitea-owned banner. “Each store is customized to suit the neighbourhood in every respect: from the product mix we carry that suits the tastes of the population base, to the special local items we carry that customers tell us are important to them,” he says. Nurturing an entrepreneurial spirit amongst all staff is also an important contributor to Save-On-Foods’ success. “Collectively, we have a real passion for continually looking for ways to evolve our business and deliver what our customers are looking for,” says Jones. One big achievement on this front is online grocery shopping, which the grocer has offered since 2014. “We were the first major grocer to offer home delivery as well as the click-and-collect option,” he says. With nearly 80 communities

already being serviced, the company plans to roll out online grocery to a “significant number” of new communities, adds Jones. The 164-store chain is also expanding its brick-and-mortar footprint, with plans to open 10 new stores across the West in 2018. Save-On-Foods is also big on giving back to the community. The retailer is a supporter of children’s hospitals ($30 million since 1986), food banks and school nutrition programs.

 9. Stong’s Market  Location:

Vancouver Number of stores:

Two

What’s new?

In-store “Cooking with Cori” program MORE THAN 85 years after Carson Stong set up shop in Vancouver during the Great Depression, Stong’s Market is still going strong. And it’s still a family affair, now helmed by the founder’s great granddaughter Cori Bonina, while her son Carson Bonina manages the North Vancouver location. While Stong’s has opened and closed stores in different parts of the city over the years, there are currently two locations— Dunbar and North Vancouver—and both are thriving. The North Vancouver store, in fact, recently won the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers’ Independent Grocer of the Year Award (medium surface) for 2017. Stong’s has been on the cutting edge of online delivery with its Stong’s Express service. It first launched online delivery in 1998, far ahead of most of the industry. “We recently invested in a new website and upgraded our online shopping service,” adds Bonina. And in a time when “experience” is being touted as a way to keep customers coming back to physical stores, Stong’s just launched an in-store “Cooking with Cori” program. Often the pilot store for small, local suppliers that want to launch their products, Stong’s has advantages as an independent, says Bonina: “We have the ability to react to current and emerging trends right away and offer a huge variety of unique, gourmet and natural products that are often not found anywhere else.”  CG March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

39


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GRILLING GUIDE

TIME TO FIRE UP SALES

ILLUSTRATIONS: ALONZODESIGN/GETTY IMAGES

Before you know it, barbecue season will be in full swing. Here are some things to keep in mind as you gear up for this crucial selling period  By Laura Pratt IT’S THAT TIME OF YEAR AGAIN, WHEN winter-weary Canadians are itching to get outdoors, soak up the sun and light up that most-favoured cooking apparatus: the barbecue. And there are plenty of reasons why people love their grills. According to marketing agency Acosta, 33% of consumers feel grilling is easier than the ho-hum in-kitchen alternative. It’s also a flavour thing: 79% choose grilling because food prepared this way tastes better. But more than practicalities, barbecue reigns because it’s a way of life for many folks. “It’s about slowing the pace and taking something from the beginning all the way to the end,” says “godfather of the grill” Ted Reader, a Toronto chef and food innovator who’s written 21 cookbooks, most of which are about grilling, smoking and barbecue. It’s also worth noting that eight in 10 Canadians own a grill or smoker, says the Hearth, Patio & Barbecue Association (HPBA) in its 2017 State of the Barbecue

Industry Report. “It’s a fast-moving business, the world of barbecue right now, and it just keeps growing,” says Reader. Social media has a lot to do with the growing popularity of grilling, as does convenience, the higher costs of eating out, and cooking shows (Food Network launched The Grill Dads in 2017, for instance). But this return to hands-on cooking is also powered by Canadians’ growing interest in savouring their summers with friends and family. And barbecue enthusiasts are burning to fire up their grills as soon as a whiff of spring hits the air, says Cheryl Radisa, vice-president of marketing at McCormick Canada. “It’s a longer season now, which enables retailers to get into merchandising earlier.” MASTER THE MERCHANDISING “You have to tell a story,” says Matt Lurie, president and CEO of Toronto’s Organic Garage. That may mean pairing a frozen burger with fries, peas and buns, all March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

41


GRILLING GUIDE in the same spot in the store. “People don’t want to think. They want to see the whole meal right there in front of them—boom.” Chef Reader suggests grocers sweeten the tale with inspirational recipe cards in dedicated barbecue displays and cross-merchandising. Grocers could offer spice rubs with steaks and a selection of vegetables that grillers can prepare alongside them. They can also expose consumers to ideas they might not have considered such as pairing a quinoa-cranberry salad with fish or preparing lamb spiedinis. At Pete’s Fine Foods in Halifax, meat bunkers are offset by a full aisle of hot and barbecue sauces, marinades, spices and barbecue salts. There are also accessories such as cedar and maple chips and planks, and grilling papers and twine (along with instructions for wrapping salmon or asparagus to create an attractive presentation). Toronto’s Summerhill Market features a selection of grilling accessories—covers, baskets, silicone tools, etc.—around its refrigerated meat case. “The more inspiration stores can pro­­vide for shoppers, the better,” says McCormick’s Radisa. “Consumers don’t just want products. They want solutions.” OUT OF THE FRYING PAN The charcoal grills that were backyard staples during the 1970s, before hightech gas alternatives displaced them, have made a nostalgic comeback (“It’s about flavour,” Reader enthuses); and today’s avid grillers will often keep both. According to the HPBA, gas remains the most popular (64%), but charcoal lovers (44%) aren’t far behind. Charcoal selections can offer up oak, hickory, apple and coconut notes to food. Up next for the true fan? Smokers, or smoker/grill combos. The range of options here is impressive, and includes pellet, charcoal-based, vertical, horizontal, water and electric varieties. Pecan, peach, cherry and other wood types can add another dimension to food. And the digital revolution means people can run their smokers from their iPhones. INTO THE FIRE There’s also a lot of chatter on the subject of what to put on your grill. From unconventional cuts of meat to innovative non-meat proteins, choice is rampant.

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March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

The National Restaurant Association’s What’s Hot? 2018 Culinary Forecast named “new cuts of meat” the top trend for the year. Among them: shoulder tender, oyster steak, Vegas strip steak and merlot cut. Also hot are meats cut thinly so they cook faster (and relieve the griller of having to fuss over internal temperatures). Health consciousness means meat servings are smaller, too, and grillers are chopping up 32-oz. porterhouses to feed multiple guests. Michael Young, vice-president of technical programs and marketing services at Canada Pork International, says North American grills are increasingly hosting “underutilized cuts” such as pork bellies, and dishes like pulled-pork carnitas and artisan-style sausages. A growing contingent of barbecuers are taking pride in leading the new meat charge, says Young, and are hungry for more ideas. Florentine steaks—the centre cut of a short loin cooked on high heat, finished on low to medium rare and shingled off the bone—are hot at the moment, says Cynthia Beretta, co-founder of Beretta Farms, a Toronto-based supplier of organic meats. Same goes for skirt steaks, cut against the grain and flash-grilled in a butter, sea-salt, ground-pepper and chimichurri sauce bath, she says. Fish on the grill is another trend. Frank Yunace, operations manager at Pete’s Fine Foods in Halifax, says barbecue fans are discovering grilled octopus and squid, perhaps set off with a punchy ancho chili sauce. His store has also added line-caught Icelandic char and cod, and is pushing them as grill-friendly alternatives to red meat. British Columbia manufacturer Simply West Coast offers four flavours of salmon sausages, another relative novelty to the grill. But at the end of the day, there’s no denying the enduring star of the barbecue scene. Says Yunace: “The burger trend is not going away.” BARBECUING FOR VEG-HEADS There’s long been a range of plant-based burgers to entice vegetarian and vegan shoppers craving grilled dinners. Now, flavoured vegan sausages are also becoming more popular. Summerhill Market distinguishes itself by selling Beyond Meat burgers, plantbased alternatives to the real thing that have attracted attention for being “the meat that bleeds.” Additionally, the


BRING HOME THE Flavours of a

CANADIAN SUMMER

*Reg. TM/MD McCormick Canada, ®Reg. TM/MD McCormick & Co., Inc. ™Stubb’s is a trademark of One World Foods, Inc. ® Reg. TM/MD The French’s Food Company, Inc. Used under license.


GRILLING GUIDE Toronto retailer offers such meat-free grill options as sliced portobello mushrooms, stuffed mushrooms, veggie kebabs and grilled Mexican street corn.

TOOLS AND TOYS “I can’t stress enough the importance of a good digital probe thermometer,” says Reader. Other toys include pizza stones that can fit onto grills and silicone grill mats, which protect veggies from falling in while giving them desirable grill marks. Finally, grill brushes are essential parts of the barbecue display. The conventional metal ones have been under fire for the potential health risks their wire bristles present. The reigning alternative is a slab of hardwood that develops grooves the more it’s scraped across the grill. Reader urges retailers to educate consumers on the value of spending money on grill brushes, and to expect to burn through at least two a summer. Grilling, says Pete’s Yunace, is a redhot consumer category that’s filled with energy and inspiration. The Food Network and foodies’ Instagram tributes to their barbecued efforts means “everybody’s an expert on barbecuing these days, and people are definitely open to experimenting on the grill. That method of cooking is just sizzling with innovation right now.”  CG

CONDIMENTS ARE QUEEN Condiments and seasonings are central, with consumers looking to try more global flavours. Last year, McCormick introduced a Brazilian barbecue-style seasoning; this year, it’s launching a Hawaiian woodfire seasoning. “Every year it gets more exotic,” says Radisa. “I don’t think we can ever get enough condiments,” says Reader, who claims to have 15 jars of mustard in his fridge. Barbecue sauces, he believes, are now getting their time in the sun, shifting from their tomato roots to carrot- and beet-based sauces. “We’re seeing people get a lot more adventurous in their toppings,” explains Stephanie Egan, marketing manager at Piller’s Fine Foods. Whether it’s slaws and fresh greens, or condiments that wander into red-pepper aiolis and sriracha-, garlic-, and wasabi-based territory, it’s all about heightening flavours.

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Thank you for this messy moment. Thank you for the food in her hair, the stained cheeks, floor spills, and smiles. Thank you for the full breakfast bellies, nutritious lunches, and family dinners. The food donations from our corporate partners enable the food banking network to be a lifeline for 860,000 Canadians each month. Not a corporate partner yet? Learn how your company can donate food at: foodbankscanada.ca/donate-food

Thank you to our Key Food Supporters:

Food Contributors: B&G Foods Barilla Pasta Bonduelle Campbell Company of Canada All marks and designs are trademarked and / or copyrights and used under license.

Egg Farmers of Canada Johnson & Johnson Kellogg’s Luvo Charitable Registration Number: 13064 3737 RR0001

McCain Foods Peak of the Market Pepsico TreeHouse Private Brands

@foodbankscanada

A special thank you to Candian Grocer for donating this advertisement space.

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Fighting for 46

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer


Q&A

From dealing with issues of food safety, campaigning to boost consumption of fruits and veggies, oh, and navigating NAFTA too, it has been a busy year for CPMA chair Rick Alcocer. But the easygoing Californian wouldn’t have it any other way

fresh By Shellee Fitzgerald Photography by Jennifer Roberts

THE PRODUCE BUSINESS is a complicated one. Few know that better than Rick Alcocer, who’s spent his entire career in the business. As a fresh-faced grad, he landed his first gig at Dole as a financial analyst. Bored and craving more excitement than the company’s accounting department could offer, he soon seized the opportunity to jump on the sales desk. The move was the right one. “I knew that I had more of a personality for sales and that was what I was going to enjoy,” he says. From Dole, Alcocer moved to produce firm Tanimura & Antle for a stretch, and eventually to his current role at Duda Farm Fresh Foods, where he is now senior vice-president of sales. During the nearly 40-year span of his career, the produce business has undergone tremendous change and challenges aplenty—ranging from labour woes to safety concerns, not to mention thorny trade issues. With his term as chair of the Canadian Produce Marketing Association (CPMA) drawing to a close in April, Canadian Grocer chatted with Alcocer—who is, incidentally, the CPMA’s first international chair—about everything from climate change to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) and the need for a federal Food Policy Statement on Fruit and Vegetable consumption. Here are edited excerpts from the interview. March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

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NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT

Q&A

What are some of the most significant changes you’ve seen in the produce department over the years?

Giulia Oppedisano

Thomas, Large & Singer is pleased to announce the appointment of Giulia Oppedisano as Vice President, Corporate Brands effective February 1, 2017. Julia will be responsible for leading the Corporate Brand sales team as she oversees strategic growth within the division.

Dave Hodson

Thomas, Large & Singer is pleased to announce the appointment of Dave Hodson as Vice President July 1, 2017. Dave will continue to manage the Trade Promotion Management Team with the added responsibility of overseeing Information Technology matters for Thomas Large & Singer and Emblem Logistics Inc.

Dave Singer

Thomas, Large & Singer is pleased to announce the appointment of David Singer as Senior Vice President effective July 1, 2017. David will continue to manage Business Development and Broker Management matters for Thomas, Large & Singer. In addition, he will oversee the Warehouse Operations team at Emblem Logistics, leading the strategic development of business operations.

The continued growth of bagged salad varieties and healthy snack packs. I think that is really changing the way all of us are looking at the business. As a producer, it’s huge. It’s continually changing for us, and we’re much more quickly having to come up with new things to put on the shelves to sell to the consumer because the consumer is changing so much. Also, the abundant choices of fruits and vegetables in the supermarket. I remember going into a store as a young kid and literally the produce section was probably one aisle—maybe 20 to 30 feet, and that was the entire produce department. Now, it’s close to 10 times that size. When you think of the logistics of getting that produce from all over the world or 250 miles away, it’s mind-boggling how we’re able to get beautiful healthy food on the supermarket shelf.

Produce is an industry impacted tremendously by weather and climate change. Is the industry doing enough or moving quickly enough to mitigate effects of climate change down the road? Tough question. Are we in a new shortor long-term climate pattern and is it different from what we’ve had before? Who knows? But I think some of the things we’re seeing growth in is a move in the right direction; certainly greenhouses and hydroponic gardens can be made portable and moved to avoid the negative impacts of some of these natural occurrences. Another one that we’re hearing more and more about is aquaculture—the cultivation of aquatic plants for food. If we can start really looking at that type of food source, that can help. Another move in the right direction are the regional programs throughout Canada and the U.S. that continue to grow. So, in essence, the more you have things spread around, it becomes less likely that it is all going to get taken out by a natural disaster.

What are some of the other challenges? Labour! It’s a big one. Finding consistent and reliable labour year-round and seasonal has been a problem for the last four or five years, and every year it gets

tougher and tougher. And then a safe food supply—the real challenge about that is the inequity. We need to make food safety regulations the same for both domestically produced as well as imported fresh fruit and vegetables, and we don’t do that right now. It’s something we have to really look at.

NAFTA seems to be on everyone’s mind— in your view what are the worst case and best case scenarios to come out of the renegotiations? Worst case would be if any one of the three countries [Canada, United States, Mexico] decide to leave NAFTA. This would hurt all three parties, as this trade agreement has been mutually beneficial for all three parties. It could result in potential new trade tariffs, import fees and seasonal tariffs … all of which would raise overall prices for consumers. The best case would be that all three countries are able to negotiate changes and updates within the agreement that will help offset some of the inequities that were not evident at NAFTA’s inception, creating a modern and more equal NAFTA for all three countries. But our industry is a microcosm in the amount of total dollars involved in all of NAFTA; I really do think if you could get all of us produce folks together we’d have it done in a day. I think most of us have the right mindset and would like it to work out.

Your term as chair of CPMA is coming to an end. What would you say are some of the most important issues you worked on over the past year? NAFTA is probably where I’m putting in the most effort with continued lobbying efforts in the U.S. and Canada—meeting with officials and discussing the need for perimeter trade borders that really encapsulate North America, rather than the divisive trade border structure that we have currently. And the next one, which is dear to my heart, is we’ve been lobbying the government of Canada for a Proposed Federal Food Policy Statement, which would support the goal of increasing fruit and vegetable consumption of all Canadians by 20% by 2020. There are so many benefits to Canadians, health being a major one, if we can do that. It’s huge!  CG


A Special Thanks To Our Gala Sponsors The Grocery Foundation and Kids Help Phone would like to thank the following sponsors for their ongoing support of the Night to Nurture Gala:

Platinum Sponsors

™

Corporate Sponsors

Gold Sponsors

Silver Sponsors

Wine Sponsor

Floral Sponsors

Food Sponsors


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1. Reception at the 2018 Night to Nurture Gala 2. Friends and colleagues connect over dinner 3. Panel discusses the impact of the Night to Nurture on The Grocery Foundation and Kids Help Phone’s programs L to R: Tracy Moore, emcee; Mackenzie Wilson, Grocery Foundation Agent of Change; Shaun McKenna, Executive Director, The Grocery Foundation; Justin Preston, Kids Help Phone Ambassador; Katherine Hay, President, Kids Help Phone 4. Guests shop the silent auction 5. Platinum Sponsor banners line the red carpet on the way to the reception 6. Rob Thomas of Matchbox Twenty entertains the crowd 7. Live art created during reception for the silent auction 8. Tracy Moore breaks down where the dollars go 9. Chad Howsen, Don Valley Lexus (R) congratulates an excited Paul Librandi, winner of the 2018 Lexus IS 300

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NIGHT TO NURTURE 2018

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The industry turns up to support The Grocery Foundation and Kids Help Phone MORE THAN 3,300 MEMBERS of the grocery industry gathered at the Metro Toronto Convention Centre in early February for the annual Night to Nurture Gala. Since 2000, the gala—staged by The Grocery Foundation— has raised close to $39 million to support Kids Help Phone and school breakfast programs. “This event continues to demonstrate what our industry can achieve,” says Tom Gunter, chair of The Grocery Foundation and executive vice-president and general manager at Fiera Foods. “I wish everyone could see the difference we collectively make in our schools, providing kids with the fuel to succeed each day.” Highlights from the evening included an engaging performance from Rob Thomas, frontman for rock band Matchbox Twenty, and a moving panel discussion led by Cityline’s Tracy Moore in which youth ambassadors and leaders from The

Grocery Foundation and Kids Help Phone stressed how crucial it is for kids to have access to proper nutrition and counselling. “The impact we can have by feeding a child is great. Food gives them a chance and hope; it brings smiles to their faces, fuel to their brains and a feeling of protection and community,” says Shaun McKenna, the Foundation’s executive director. “We also need to be there to support them in any moment of crisis or need. The Night to Nurture helps us do both.” McKenna is quick to point out that the incredible event— which will mark its 40th anniversary next year—relies on the continued generous support of the grocery industry. “A special thanks to everyone who attended, our ticket sellers and sponsors,” says McKenna. “Without their support, the Night to Nurture and the work of both The Grocery Foundation and Kids Help Phone would not happen.” March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

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: LASSONDE a century of success From its humble beginnings as a vegetable cannery to a leading North American food and beverage manufacturer, Lassonde celebrates 100 years in 2018.

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1. Aristide Lassonde, 2. Jean Gattuso

aise your juice glass to Lassonde: the food and beverage powerhouse is celebrating its 100th anniversary. This remarkable milestone was achieved through a strong legacy of growth and innovation, which continues to fuel the company today. The 100-year history of Lassonde begins with Aristide Lassonde, an entrepreneur who, with his wife Georgianna Darcy, opened a vegetable canning facility in Rougemont, Que., a village located 50 kilometres outside Montreal. The company began by canning tomatoes and later added beans, which were sold in the surrounding region. The business continued to grow, and by 1925 Lassonde was producing enough canned goods to sell in the Montreal market. The company’s founder passed away in February 1944, and his son Willie (father of Pierre-Paul Lassonde, current chairman of the board of Lassonde) took over the business. An astute visionary, Willie diversified operations in 1959 by adding apple juice production, a shift in focus that breathed new life into the company. Like his father, Willie didn’t settle for the status quo, which set the foundation for the company’s culture of innovation. “Both Aristide and Willie understood that when you’re a smaller company, copying the big guy was not the answer,” says Jean Gattuso, President and Chief Operating Officer of Lassonde Industries Inc. “You had to be different

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


Congratulations to A. Lassonde on your milestone 100th Anniversary. Wishing you coninued success in the years to come. From your proud partners since 1985, Purkel Products Inc.


and you had to be innovative. Over time, this philosophy was built into the DNA of the company.” It’s a philosophy that led Lassonde to become a leading manufacturer of food and beverage products in North America, with more than 2,100 employees representing more than 35 nationalities, 14 plants in Canada and the U.S., and over $1.5 billion in sales. “Whether it’s new product lines or state-of-the-art packaging technology, innovation has continued to be our forte,” says Gattuso. “Another key to success is we don’t think of ourselves as a big corporation. We think like entrepreneurs, but with a great vision for the future.”

SOWING THE SEEDS OF GROWTH

Beginning in the late 1970s, acquisitions helped Lassonde grow in size and scope. In 1977, the company acquired Coopérative Montérégienne, another apple juice producer in Rougemont. In 1981, Lassonde acquired Produits Ronald, which specialized in processing corn on the cob. The subsidiary’s name was later changed to Lassonde Specialties Inc., which develops, manufactures and markets specialty food products. The 1980s were a time of diversification, with the acquisition of Vac-O-Nut, a nuts and dried fruit company, as well as BHR Bakers Specialties. However, those were later sold as Lassonde decided to focus on its core strength: the juice business.

“We had the know-how and we knew the market,” says Gattuso. “So, the objective was to put ourselves in a better position to win the market.”

BECOMING A NORTH AMERICAN LEADER

In the ’90s, Lassonde sought to expand outside of Quebec. Sales offices were opened in Dartmouth, N.S. to serve the Atlantic Provinces, and in Toronto to serve the Ontario and Western Canada markets. Lassonde also continued to expand through acquisitions, including the juice and beverage division of Nova Scotia-based Cobi Foods (1991); Ruthven, Ont-.based Mar-Brite Foods Co-operative (1996); and a juice processing plant in Nova Scotia and the rights to the iconic Allen’s juice brand (1999). The next decade saw Lassonde further expanding its juice portfolio through licensing agreements with Sunkist Growers and Sun-Maid Growers, both of California. Lassonde also acquired Alfresh Beverages Canada, adding well-known brands such as Everfresh, Fairlee and Tropical Grove to its lineup. This was followed by a series of high-profile acquisitions: the ready-to-drink fruit juices and fruit drinks of McCain Foods (Canada) in 2007; Mondiv Food Products, which manufactures long shelf-life specialty food products (2007) Clement Pappas and Company Inc., the second largest U.S. producer of private-label fruit juices and drinks (2011); and U.S. juice company Apple & Eve (2014).

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1. Pierre-Paul Lassonde and Nathalie Lassonde

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


Transport F. Lussier would like to congratulate

Lassonde on their 100 years of success!

Congratulations Lassonde for all these tasteful and nutritious years!

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We toast to your success! Here’s to the next 100 years.


GROWTH THROUGH INNOVATION

All along the way, Lassonde kept its focus on new products and packaging innovations. One early game-changing innovation came in the late 1970s, when the Oasis juice brand launched a new semi-flexible pack called Hypa. It had been almost 40 years since a new fruit juice packaging had been introduced, and for the first time, consumers were offered an alternative to metal cans and glass bottles. “With the launch of the Hypa packaging, sales started booming and the company moved up a gear,” says Gattuso. In the ’80s, Lassonde was the first company in North American to introduce juices in PET containers using an aseptic process. Lassonde became the first company in North American to use the Tetra Prisma Aseptic carton for the Oasis and the Allen’s line of juices and fruit cocktails. The company was also the first Tetra Pak customer to market both the family and portion sizes of the Prisma package anywhere in the world. The cartons, which Lassonde still uses today, are easy to grip and feature an easy-to-use closure system. On the product front, Lassonde has stayed ahead in the differentiation race by focusing on health and wellness in its juice business. “A human being loses 2.5 litres of liquid every day and we need to be part of the replacement,” says Gattuso. “So, we have to hydrate the consumer and at the same time, we are very much involved in health and wellness.” The Oasis brand in particular is at the forefront of this ever-growing trend. Oasis Health Break, which launched in the early 90s, is a line of fortified juices and smoothies developed with specific health needs in mind. For example, Health Break Immuniforce contains an ingredient to boost immune system functions. Another line, Oasis Active, is a

high-protein juice-based beverage that is gluten-free and contains no added sugar or sweetener. And Oasis NutriSolution is a meal-replacement beverage made with fruit juice. “We are facing an ever-changing consumer and the market is changing rapidly,” says Gattuso. “We used to launch 25 new products a year; now we launch 50. So, it’s a marathon all the time. But if you want to be ahead of the pack, you need to continue to innovate and accelerate.”

THE LASSONDE DIFFERENCE

Not only is Lassonde focused on healthier consumer products, it has made health one of three pillars in its corporate sustainability program. The company actively supports the health and well being of its employees with a number of programs, such as subsidies for fitness centres. In the community, Oasis is the flagship sponsor of the Oasis Montreal Marathon, and Lassonde supports other sporting events such as the Jeux du Québec and some 23 running events across Canada.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


years

CELEBRATING

of

HISTORY


Water and packaging are Lassonde’s two other sustainable development priorities. Lassonde works tirelessly to limit its water consumption and has reduced plant water consumption by about 25%. By investing in new technologies, Lassonde has made substantial progress in reducing the weight and volume of packaging and integrating recycled materials. “It’s our responsibility to be a good corporate citizen,” says Gattuso. “Business is not only about making money—it’s about doing the right thing.” Gattuso credits the company’s culture and employees for Lassonde’s enduring success. “At Lassonde, we have great people and a culture that is very focused on entrepreneurship, communication, team work and customers,” says Gattuso. “If we are not at the service of our customers, we are at the service of our competition. This mindset is what makes the difference at Lassonde, and why we have continued to be successful.” With a century of success now behind Lassonde, there’s no doubt the next 100 years will be just as bright.

Lassonde At a Glance

Lassonde has four subsidiaries: A. Lassonde, which develops, manufactures and markets fruit juices and drinks; Lassonde Specialties, which focuses on specialty food products with brands such as Canton, Sunbites and Antico; Arista Wines, which imports and markets wines and manufactures apple cider and cider-based beverages; and its U.S. subsidiary Lassonde Pappas & Company, which specializes in private label fruit juices and drinks. Juice brand Apple & Eve, which Lassonde acquired in 2014, is now under the Lassonde Pappas umbrella.

FRUIT-DOR.CA

CONGRATULATIONS TO LASSONDE ON YOUR 100TH ANNIVERSARY !

P RO U D PA RT N E R PATIENCEFRUITCO.COM


AISLES

Products, store ops, customers, trends

BEER

The art of selling suds There’s strong potential for grocers to brew up beer sales, despite some challenges

CP IMAGES

By Rebecca Harris

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iancarlo Trimarchi, co-owner of Vince’s Market, is brimming with big ideas for merchandising beer. He talks of bringing Corona into the lemon and lime section in the summertime and creating a cross-display, or featuring the boozy beverage in the meat section and educating shoppers about food and beer pairings. “It’s easy to quickly visualize how much fun and how cool it could be,” says Trimarchi, who operates four stores in Ontario—three of which are authorized to sell beer. His ideas are just wishful thinking at this point, however, thanks to provincial regulations. As of this April, there will be 370 grocery stores across Ontario authorized to sell beer; and while many cheered its introduction into select supermarkets in the province back in 2015, grocers who sell beer face a few challenges with the category. To start, the Alcohol and Gaming Commission of Ontario has placed restrictions on merchandising, pricing and promotional activity. One key rule March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

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AISLES is that beer must be displayed in one section of the store, which means grocers can’t bring beer into other departments to cross-merchandise. A more contentious issue is profitability—or lack thereof. “There is no margin in it … It’s costing us money to sell it on behalf of the government,” says Trimarchi. In the authorization process, grocers bid their margin rate on sales, between 2% and 6.99%. “And nobody’s winning licenses at 6.99%, so you can be sure that the average is well down in the 2% to 3% range,” he adds. “You can’t even staff the department for 2% to 3%.” So, why get into the business of selling beer? “We felt to not have it would be a competitive disadvantage … You don’t want to be the grocery store in town without it,” says Trimarchi. “And if customers want to shop for alcohol in their grocery stores, then we need to provide that to them.”

Peter Sulak, general manager of Starsky Fine Foods, says because of the restrictions, his stores don’t do “anything out of the box or extraordinary” on the beer merchandising front. “I think the biggest appeal is the convenience to the customer and the possibility of them having a one-stop shop,” he says. Despite the challenges, grocers can still boost sales of beer—and food items that go along with it. Heather MacGregor, executive director of trade association Drinks Ontario, says tastings (which are permitted where beer is displayed) are a great way to drive traffic and raise awareness that grocers are selling beer. “We say the best way to sell product is to put liquid on lips because it lets customers try before they buy,” she says. “And when you’re in a grocery setting, it’s an ideal opportunity because there are so many other things customers need or want to buy. If you’re trying a

BOTTOMS UP!

The buzz around booze-free beer There’s one beer category that doesn’t have merchandising restrictions and it can be sold in grocery stores in every province across the country: non-alcoholic beer. It’s a fast-growing segment and brewers are increasingly coming out with new products to meet consumers’ booze-free demands. Earlier this year, Heineken launched its Heineken 0.0 alcohol-free lager in Canada. “The alcohol-free beer market is growing globally, especially in more mature markets like Spain, Holland and Germany,” explains Jessica Vieira Teixeira, Heineken’s brand public relations manager. “In Canada, it’s really a booming category. We saw over 30% growth in the category in 2016.” While there are skeptics who ask, “what’s the point?” Vieira Teixeira says it’s about offering choice. “And it’s one that more and more people are considering taking,” she

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March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

says. “A lot of alcohol-free beer drinkers are also alcohol drinkers … They just are recognizing there’s a time and a place for both.” Last fall, Toronto-based Partake Brewing launched its craft non-alcoholic beer, Partake IPA, with a stout and lager coming soon. “We’re trying to create a product that has the taste people associate with craft beer, but that doesn’t have the baggage alcohol has in terms of the health impact,” says founder Ted Fleming. This summer, Fleming is planning to post marketing students outside retailers where Partake is sold, offering samples to shoppers. “We don’t have the constraints alcohol has, and sampling is something you can do easily with non-alcoholic beer, both in store and out of store,” says Fleming. “We have a lot more flexibility in how we market and sample products.”

really great beer, you might be thinking about what you’re having for dinner and whether that beer is a perfect match.” The person offering the tasting could talk to shoppers about food pairings or ask what’s their occasion for buying beer, she adds. “These are really great questions to not only close the sale on the beverage alcohol product, but also drive it to a different area of the store.” Scott Simmons, president of Ontario Craft Brewers, says data from grocery retailers shows that selling beer is indeed leading to bigger baskets. “Having a beer consumer in their stores is leading to purchases outside of beer because [the shopper] wanted to do some food matching, whether that’s premium cheese or premium deli meats or other food products,” says Simmons, who notes that the research has shown “basket size, which is critically important to any retailer, is the largest from a craft beer consumer.” Breweries themselves can also take an active role in educating consumers about food and beer pairings. “Years ago, people would say red wine goes with dark meat and white wine goes with white meat. Well, that’s what we’re doing with beer now,” says Scott Davies, key account director at Bracebridge, Ont.’s Muskoka Brewery. “So, we’re trying to pair our beer with complementary food categories to drive that basket.” For example, when Muskoka Brewery does tastings at grocery stores, it brings in Neal Brothers premium chips. “We are there to showcase our craft beer, but to also say, ‘This beer pairs really well with these food items,’” says Davies. David La Mantia, owner of La Mantia’s Country Market in Lindsay, Ont., says his store has done a lot of sampling with brewers including Magnotta Brewery’s Original Craft Lager and True North Inukshuk, as well as Coors Banquet. La Mantia also features a different Ontario craft beer each week in the flyer. “Obviously, I can’t put it on special because the price is set [by LCBO], but I promote the fact that I have a particular craft beer,” he says. “We have a large selection of Ontario craft beer and I like dealing with the craft people … I think as an independent grocer, our natural allies are the craft brewers. They’re very much like us.” Building relationships with suppliers—large and small—is a key part of building an effective merchandising program. MacGregor says beer company


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AISLES partners are in a great position to give advice on what will work for a particular grocer. “That opportunity is largely still untapped,” she says. “People in the beverage alcohol trade have deep knowledge about merchandising and have a lot of experience dealing with LCBO. They could be a huge resource for a grocer looking to set up a really well-organized and exciting beverage alcohol section.” One of Simmons’ merchandising tips is to have shelf signage and clearly delineated categories of beer. “Grocers can sub-set them into [categories] like lager, pilsner, ale, porter, stout … and create some impactful point-of-purchase materials for consumers,” he says. While grocers can certainly find ways to drive beer sales within the current rules, Vince’s Trimarchi is still hopeful that one day, some of the restrictions will be lifted. “I think that’s about showing that grocers are responsible, are capable of being good sellers, and are upholding the rules, which I think we have done,” he says. “And if we can show that, we can be given a bit more room.” CG

UNDERSTANDING BEER SHOPPERS

A new survey shows what makes beer buyers tick What do we know about beer shoppers and how do they differ from grocery shoppers? And what can grocers do with this info? These are questions Lucros Partners – Shopper Intelligence set out to answer in its survey of more than 104,000 grocery shoppers and 6,000 beer shoppers. Here’s what they found: • Beer shoppers tend to be younger (42% of beer shoppers are millennials versus 19% for grocery overall) and male (52% versus 38% for grocery in general). • Female beer shoppers gravitate to light brews while males tend toward the imports.

• Shoppers view the beer category in terms of six distinct segments: craft, imported, core premium, core light, domestic specialty and value. And shopper behaviour varies widely between segments; for instance, in some segments shoppers like to browse and are open to increasing what they spend on the trip, while in others it’s a grab-and-go situation and they already have their particular product in mind when they enter the store. Retailers need to manage each differently. With the former, they need to engage the shopper at shelf, and the latter requires limited out of stocks and

making shopping effortless. • When it comes to the overall satisfaction of the shop, just 43% of beer shoppers say they are satisfied, compared to 55% for grocery shoppers. While grocery shoppers are looking for things like freshness, price and quality, beer shoppers want availability of brands and easy-to-find sections. “Of the 6,000 beer shoppers, the majority are looking for improvements in the section layout,” says Kelly McGinnis, president of Lucros Partners – Shopper Intelligence. “This represents a significant opportunity as layout is more important than price for the beer shopper.”

YOUR CUSTOMERS ARE ASKING FOR FRESH.

WE’RE DELIVERING.

Our 90+ members follow the OCB Brewing Philosophy. Which means that our over 500 beers are naturally brewed in small batches using no chemical additives, fillers or preservatives. That means your customers get fresh, great-tasting beer from real people who are passionate about their craft.

To help find just the right beer for you, try the Ontario Craft Beer Finder App. Available on iTunes or Google Play

ontariocraftbrewers.com Please enjoy responsibly.


AISLES

Find your inner peas

RIPPLE FOODS Silicon Valley startup Ripple Foods is making waves with its Nutritious Pea Milk. Available in Original, Unsweetened Original, Vanilla, Unsweetened Vanilla and Chocolate flavours, Ripple’s non-dairy pea milk has eight times the protein of almond milk and half the sugar of dairy milk. It also boasts a creamy texture that’s sometimes missing in non-dairy milk alternatives. In addition to its popular pea milk, Ripple recently introduced Half & Half (cream alternative) as well as a Greek Yogurt Alternative in five different flavours.

DAIYA FOODS Vancouver’s Daiya Foods has been on the cutting edge of using pea protein isolate in its products for some time now, and currently carries more than 35 non-dairy product SKUs that feature pea protein as an ingredient. Whether it’s Daiya’s Greek Yogurt Alternative, New York Cheezecake, Homestyle Ranch Dressings or Garden Vegetable Cream Cheeze Style Spread, Daiya is giving peas a chance with its wide range of pea protein-enhanced offerings.

The small but mighty pea is hitting it big. Whether it’s roasted peas in a packaged snack food or pea protein isolate in non-dairy milk or yogurt, manufacturers everywhere—from Silicon Valley to the Canadian Prairies—are increasingly capitalizing on the power of the pea in their food and beverage products. Here are just a few of the interesting pea products popping up on shelves:

THE GOOD BEAN

Saskatchewan’s own

The Good Bean’s Crispy Fava + Peas is a protein-packed crunchy snack mix, with each serving offering 7 grams of protein and 3 grams of fibre. Featuring roasted favas and green peas, this product is available in three tasty flavours: Sea Salt, Balsamic Herb, and Habanero Citrus. According to the Good Bean’s Californiabased manufacturers, Crispy Fava + Peas is ideal as an on-the-go snack, a healthy addition to a school lunch box, or even to add extra protein crunch to a salad.

THREE FARMERS Saskatchewan’s Three Farmers is encouraging hungry snackers to “ditch the chips” and grab a handful of Pea Pops instead. Pea Pops are a low-fat crunchy snack made from roasted green peas, available in three fun flavours: Wild Ranch, Dill Pickle Pow, and Sriracha Slap. These nutfree, gluten-free, vegan snacks are also a good source of potassium, fibre, phosphorus and iron.

MOUNTAIN MEADOWS Billing its spread as “the best thing on sliced bread,” Alberta’s Mountain Meadows Food Processing offers No Nuts Peabutter in several varieties: No Nuts Golden Peabutter (the original) as well as Extra Creamy, Cinnamon and Chocolate. Made from brown peas, this peanut butter alternative is aimed at people with peanut allergies or children who aren’t allowed to bring nuts to school. The spreads are also 100% free from gluten, soy, dairy, eggs and, of course, nuts. March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

65


AISLES NEW ON SHELF! Consumers want healthy and nutritious, but they also want great taste. Check out these three new products that offer the best of both worlds.

MAISON RIVIERA 0% GREEK YOGURT Features 40% less sugar than most 0% milk fat Greek yogurts

CLEAN SWEEP! SPRING HAS SPRUNG and cleaning is on our minds. Whether it’s mopping floors, scrubbing toilets, washing windows or doing big batches of laundry, one thing is certain: it all requires a solid supply of cleaning products. Check out the Nielsen data below to find out how various categories of household products have been performing.

Quebec’s Maison Riviera has launched a lactose-free, fat-free Greek yogurt with reduced sugar. Boasting 40% less sugar than most other popular 0% milk fat Greek yogurts on the market, this new Greek yogurt line comes in various flavours including Plain, Raspberry, Banana, Vanilla and Caramel.

Household cleaning product sales in Canada  - 52 weeks, ending Jan. 6, 2018 $ Vol % Chg

Units (000s)

Units Vol % Chg

632,999.53

0

76,899.80

-1

AIR CARE

168,279.70

4

48,884.23

-1

HOUSEHOLD CLEANERS

165,678.81

7

46,660.99

8

76,586.85

5

14,493.52

3

LAUNDRY CARE ACCOMPANIMENTS TOILET BOWL CLEANERS

59,939.25

2

19,006.28

5

SCOURING TOOLS & PADS

39,481.32

4

11,817.57

0

25,289.62

-4

6,094.63

-5

GLASS CLEANERS

8,223.29

4

1,296.34

2

PAPER TOWELS

FLOOR WAXES

402,847.84

4

64,579.60

0

GARBAGE BAGS

248,859.38

4

35,810.46

1

FABRIC SOFTENERS

237,263.46

3

36,756.23

1

FABRIC REFRESHERS

15,244.12

-9

2,826.65

-6

SURFACE CLEANING SYSTEMS

103,128.79

2

10,095.97

0

39,481.32

4

11,817.57

0

SCOURING TOOLS & PADS

1.  Laundry rules! Of all the cleaning

products, laundry detergents brought in the biggest sales by far at $633 million in the latest 52 weeks.

2. Mirrors and windows may be a tad less shiny these days: glass cleaners have declined in both sales and units, by 4% and 5% respectively.

3.  Canadians clearly love their paper

towels, spending nearly $403 million on those disposable rolls, up by 4% over the previous year.

4. Fabric refreshers aren’t feeling so

fresh anymore—sales of these sprays dropped by 9% to $15 million.

SOURCE: NIELSEN, NATIONAL, ALL CHANNELS, ALL SALES, EXCLUDING N.L.

66

March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

HALO TOP CREAMERY Low-cal, low-sugar ice cream with gourmet taste After hitting it huge in the U.S. last year with a gourmet-style ice cream that’s low in calories and sugar, Halo Top Creamery has finally come to Canada with 12 flavours, including Pancakes & Waffles, Peanut Butter Swirl, Birthday Cake and Sea Salt Caramel.

CLIF NUT BUTTER FILLED BARS Two new flavours join Clif’s Nut Butter lineup Building on the success of last year’s launch of CLIF Nut Butter Filled Bars, CLIF is adding two new flavours to the lineup: Banana Chocolate Peanut Butter and Caramel Peanut Butter, both available in May.

VGSTOCKSTUDIO/SHUTTERSTOCK

LAUNDRY DETERGENTS

$ Sales (000s)


100% NATURAL INGREDIENTS Trademarks owned or used under license by Parmalat Canada, Toronto, ON M9C 5J1. © Parmalat Canada, 2018. All rights reserved.

Join us at the 2018

Now that we’ve Takin’ Care of Business

Canadian Produce Marketing Association Convention and Trade Show in Vancouver

Don't miss the Annual Banquet featuring Rock Music Icon

Randy Bachman!

Canada’s largest event dedicated to the fruit and vegetable industry

Tuesday, April 24 to Thursday, April 26

convention.cpma.ca

@CPMA_ACDFL #CPMA2018


DCI Events www.dci.events June 11th, 2018 - DCI & CFIG Charity Golf Classic  June 12th, 2018 - DCI Business Summit

Learn. Network. Exchange. Celebrate.


FRESH

Food waste

Waste management Grocers are coming up with smart ways to tackle food waste. But there’s still more to be done

FOTOSR52/SHUTTERSTOCK

By Rosalind Stefanac

THE REALITY IS that every year, at least one third of all food produced globally is wasted or lost along supply chains. In Canada, that equates to $31 billion worth of wasted food every year, with an average loss (shrink) of 5% for retailers happening in the produce department alone. “Grocers really aren’t aware of the opportunities that can come from reducing shrink,” says Martin Gooch, CEO of Value Chain Management International, an Oakville, Ont.-based consulting firm focused on this very topic. “They see food waste as a cost of doing business, but it’s also a business opportunity.” Gooch says every 1% reduction in food waste can result in at least a 4% increase in revenue. “Not many opportunities offer that level of benefit, but retailers are often stuck in this mentality of volume and price only.” He also points to a common misconception among grocers that shrink happens in isolation. “That’s never the case,” he says, adding that grocers need to choose a produce item where they’re seeing a waste issue, and then map out the processes around it across the entire supply chain to get to the heart of the problem. He cites one example where a grocer had more than six weeks of perishable product on hand due to a lack of communication around promotions with the vendor and procurement department. Adversarial relationships among departments is a big contributor to the problem, says Gooch, with procurement, operations and merchandising often at loggerheads. “Every time you reduce shrink you also reduce the inefficient practices that go with it.” Grocers like Choices Markets in British Columbia have been ahead of the curve March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

69


FRESH in implementing supply chain strategies to curb food waste in the produce department. By designing all of its stores with minimal storage space, Choices relies on just-in-time ordering so it can’t overstock. “We don’t buy anything we don’t think we can sell in three days and we are always looking at improving efficiencies from the front lines back to the supply chain,” says David Wilson, program manager for Choices’ produce department. For one, the grocer works with wholesalers and growers to alleviate their excess food supplies by taking smaller margins on both ends. “I’d rather take a lower margin than see something go into the compost,” says Wilson. When composting is the only option, Choices donates the excess to farmers who can use it for pig feed, or composts the produce itself through a local facility. The compost is then used to make topsoil that Choices brands and sells back to its customers. As well as making some profit on the topsoil, he says this system has helped divert 50 metric tonnes of waste from landfills over the last decade. A few years ago, Choices also partnered with Vancouver’s Discovery Organics on its Rebel Food label initiative. This pro-

key priority. In addition to heavily discounting perishable items to encourage sales prior to their best-before dates, the company works with Food Banks Canada and its affiliates and has donated 11 million pounds of unsold food to these organizations since 2011. In this time, Walmart Canada and the Walmart Foundation have donated more than $12 million to help food bank processes. “This funding helps food banks invest in vital infrastructure including new trucks, refrigerators and staff to collect food donations from Walmart or any other organization including other retailers who have unsold food to donate,” says Rob Nicol, vice-president, corporate affairs at Walmart Canada. “… as a large retailer, we have a unique role to play in addressing this problem and we take this responsibility seriously.” Technology and education the key to less waste

In the meantime, a big part of the food waste solution still rests with the consumer, according to Smart Reduction of Consumer Waste, a global report released in March 2018. The vast majority of food waste still happens at home, with food gone past use or its best before date as the No. 1 reason. Other explanations for waste are consumers buying additional fresh food before they’ve consumed items they already have. The report, which was produced by Capgemini and the Consumer Goods Forum (a network of 400 retailers, manufacturers, service providers and other stakeholders across 70 countries), points to key strategies for curbing food waste using retail and consumer technologies. It notes that food retailers could use technology to have an influential role in helping consumers buy, cook, store and dispose of food at home, resulting in higher store profits as well as more cross-selling of products. One suggestion is to provide downloadable store apps with recipes for leftovers as well as online shopping lists. An app called Food Storage and Shelf Life, for example, helps consumers reduce waste by providing information on how to store some 350 foods. Or have shoppers validate product freshness through smart labels and receive customized store

“[Grocers] see food waste as a cost of doing business, but it’s also a business opportunity” gram repackages perishable food items (e.g. avocados, citrus and carrots) that don’t meet retail standards—due to size or scarring—to sell through retail channels at a 30% to 50% discount to the customer. “We typically have four to 10 items that we bag every week for retailers,” says Discovery’s general manager Damien Bryan, who works with mostly independent grocers from Western Canada to the Yukon. “Those that do best with the program are the ones who have produce staff on the floor helping customers understand what Rebel Food is.” Even grocery giants like Walmart are making the reduction of food waste a

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March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

offers based on pre-identified factors, such as their preference for ugly produce or their willingness to buy products close to their sell-by date. Toronto-based Josh Domingues was so fed up with the food waste he was seeing in his own community, he left a successful job in finance to develop Flashfood, an app that allows shoppers to purchase discounted surplus food from participating grocery stores directly through their phones. The company is working with Ontario grocery chain Farm Boy and just completed an eight-month pilot with Longo’s. “Around 70% of our customers are new to these stores and if they are spending $10 on Flashfood, they are spending at least $15 on other full-priced products in these stores,” he says, noting that millennials make up the bulk of Flashfood users. “We’ve seen people take a streetcar for 30 minutes in downtown Toronto to pick up Flashfood, which proves our customers are taking a real stance against food waste,” says Domingues. A Flashfood fridge is installed right on-site free of charge for participating grocers (requiring 7 to 12 feet of floor space) and is stocked with the discounted food for pickup. Shoppers still go through the regular store cashier so they can pick up other store items along the way. The company is also in the middle of a pilot program with London, Ont.based farmers and institutional growers who have food that would be rejected by grocers. “Whether it’s a partnership with forward-thinking grocers or we source the food ourselves, the research is showing that consumers want this because they are concerned about food waste,” says Domingues. Richard Baker, CEO and founder of Food Distribution Guy, says grocers can make a real difference by initiating in-store campaigns that help consumers recognize the real value of food—including ugly produce and items near (or past) their best-before date. “I really question whether the average consumer understands how much food we are wasting every year,” he says. “I would that hope every grocery banner in this country is playing some sort of role in addressing the problem.” If not, he says grocers do so at their peril. “Eventually the government will intervene to curb food waste and we all know that will mean more taxes,” he says.  CG


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CHECKING OUT George Condon

All grocers are looking to get home delivery right—which ones will succeed? CANADIAN GROCERS have woken up to the realization that they’re falling behind when it comes to e-commerce. The spark was Amazon’s purchase of Whole Foods Market last summer, with Amazon’s world-leading expertise in home delivery raising the bar for grocers everywhere. Experts say home delivery is the future of grocery retailing. Yet in Canada, aside from a few exceptions, we’re really still at the experimentation stage. One of the more fully developed grocer-organized home delivery systems in Canada is run by IGA in Quebec, where around 300 individual stores respond to online orders and deliver product. Then there’s Grocery Gateway by Longo’s in Ontario. Initially founded as an independent e-grocer in 1999 and taken over by Longo’s in 2004, Grocery Gate-

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March/April 2018 Canadian Grocer

way was an early entry into the online grocery delivery space in Canada. It now delivers from a large dedicated distribution centre and the company says it keeps on growing and expanding. Sobeys also recently announced it was partnering with U.K.-based Ocado Group, an expert in online grocery delivery, to build its own innovative home delivery system. The trouble is, it will take at least two years to get the service up and running as it requires a large distribution centre and robots to do the picking. Some analysts say two years is too long in the fast-moving digital world. In the meantime, several third-party home delivery services, such as Instacart and InstaBuggy, are already servicing customers in large Canadian cities. I’ve personally tried three grocery

George Condon is Canadian Grocer’s consulting editor. He’s based in Toronto. condug@sympatico.ca

DREW SHANNON

THE RACE FOR HOME DELIVERY

delivery services in Toronto: Grocery Gateway, InstaBuggy and Instacart. Here are my observations: With Grocery Gateway, you can access online hundreds of grocery products including Longo’s own private label. You can order for specific delivery times, usually the next day (some customers, however, don’t want to wait for nextday delivery). The service costs $9.99 for orders over $50 and can include beer and wine for a small extra charge. Drivers are professional and polite. I have had no problems at all. With InstaBuggy, the drivers can do the shopping at multiple stores including Sobeys Urban Fresh, Costco, Safeway, Pet Smart and Coppa’s Fresh Market and the service is now available in Toronto, Ottawa, Vancouver and Calgary. Deliveries can be made in as little as one hour. Customers pay a flat “packing, picking and delivery” fee of $19.98 on every order, no minimum purchase required. There’s a $9.99 fee for each additional store, with delivery fees for LCBO orders in Ontario rising to $19.99. Again, I have encountered no problems. Loblaw recently partnered with Instacart—a U.S. company that has now launched in Canada—for home delivery in as little as one hour. For me, there have been couple of glitches ordering from Instacart. With my first order, I got two packages of ground pork instead of ground beef. I was later given credit. Another order came short by four items, but the key items were re-picked and delivered in about two hours. Fees vary, but if you pay an Instacart Express annual membership fee of $99, you can get free delivery on all orders. The price of products is very close to the actual store price. With home delivery in one or two hours, grocers trying to provide their own solutions will need to be very creative in order to outdo some of these third-party companies. CG


SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


FRESHDELMONTE.COM

@DelMonteFreshProduce

1-800-950-3683

@DelMonteFresh

FRUITS.COM

@DelMonteFresh

FRUITFANATICS.COM ©2018 Del Monte Fresh Produce N.A., Inc.

DelMonteFresh


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O

n a chilly winter morning at 888 Malkin Avenue in Vancouver, the loading dock at Fresh Direct Produce (FDP) is buzzing with activity as workers load and unload trucks full of produce. Inside the warehouse, workers sporting white hairnets and reflective coveralls and jackets zip around on motorized powerjacks, expertly weaving between pallets stacked with boxes full of fresh fruits and vegetables. The cool air carries a distinct whiff of citrus flowing from thousands of boxes of imported mandarins, oranges, lemons, limes, grapefruits and pomelos waiting their turn for distribution to retailers. Citrus is but one of hundreds of types of globally sourced produce stocked in FDP’s warehouse and distribution centre where bags and boxes contain everything from the conventional to the exotic, from onions and cauliflower to bananas, bok choy, persimmons, mangos, avocados, okra and strawberries. The depth and breadth of variety covers pretty well any kind of produce a customer may want, whether mainstream, organic, exotic, or ethnic. Founded in 2003, FDP has become a leading produce importer, marketer and distributor in Western Canada and a respected player — and only independent wholesaler — among the four big companies doing business on the Vancouver street known as Produce Row. In April, the company will mark its 15th anniversary with an open house and special events for staff, families, customers and visitors. And after 15 years in business, the company is proudly rebranding itself with a new logo and a revamped website where customers can peruse the ever-widening variety of products available from FDP. The dream shared by Davis Yung, FDP’s President, and his partners Albert Lum, Director of Sales, and Kam Chiu Lee, Sales Manager, back in 2003, was to build a successful business based on sourcing top quality fruits and vegetables from all over the world to sell in the Canadian market. “At first we focused on survival as we developed the infrastructure,” says Yung. “And, even at our 10th Anniversary that was true, but we’ve continued to grow and now five years later we have built a firm platform poised for the next stage of growth.” Over the last five years alone, FDP doubled its business, increased its fleet of trucks to 26 and expanded warehouse facilities from 55,000 sq. ft. to 150,000 sq. ft. spread across three locations, two in Vancouver and a brand new state-of-the-art building in Calgary. As well as increasing sq. footage at the Malkin location, FDP established a repackaging facility on Kent Avenue North in Vancouver with brand new ripening rooms, grading lines, packaging and bagging machines. The

company now offers over 1000 different SKU’s sourced from 32 countries on six continents – a considerable jump from 600 items on offer five years ago — and an expanding number of products packaged under its Simply ® lines, the company’s house brand. While FDP is proud to celebrate the remarkable achievements of the past years, Yung prefers to focus on new strategies that will drive future growth. “As the company has grown, the business has become more complex with increased obligations and responsibilities,” he says. “While it may seem overwhelming at first, the challenges energize our team and make our journey more exciting.”

Understanding the changing market, the key to growth

The key to success in any business is understanding the market you serve and the FDP team puts a lot of thought into analyzing demographic and consumer trends. As Yung explains, two main factors drive FDP’s market: mainstream consumers’ increased interest in tropical, ethnic and specialty products, and the arrival of immigrants who want the food they had at home.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


HSBC congratulates Fresh Direct Produce on their 15th Anniversary. www.hsbc.ca/business

Issued by HSBC Bank Canada

IF THERE’S ONE THING WE KNOW, IT’S CITRUS

LI

IA

GR

OWN IN

Get a taste by contacting us at sales@sunkistgrowers.com or by visiting sunkist.com.

WE ARE CITRUS

CA

It’s what we grow. It’s who we are. And as the longest-standing cooperative in the nation, it’s something we have pretty deep roots in. With thousands of growers across California and Arizona, we’re proud to say we grow over 40 citrus varietals every year. And right now, the latest crop is in season.

N FOR

Sunkist and We Are Citrus are trademarks of Sunkist Growers Inc., USA. © 2017

TM


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Yung, a director for the Canadian Produce Marketing Association (CPMA), points out that many Canadians now aim to consume five to 10 servings of fruit and vegetables every day as part of a healthy diet. “Produce consumption is robust, especially in Western Canada where there’s more focus on having an active lifestyle and eating plant-based protein,” he says. “We are fortunate to be well positioned for this growing market trend.” Immigration also pushes up demand for certain products, but top countries for immigration change over time. Although people from China, India, the Philippines and the Middle-East may have some commonalities in their diet, there are differences based on culture, income levels, and whether one is newly arrived in Canada or second generation, explains Yung. “So our buying team works diligently on sourcing products to meet these diverse and changing market demands.” After gaining a foothold by serving independent stores, FDP’s customers now include national and regional retailers, such as Thrifty Foods, Fairway Market, Safeway, Sobeys, Whole Foods, Walmart, Loblaws and T&T Supermarket. Independent retailers still make up about 50% to 60% of FDP’s customer base but Yung believes grocery chains will be the fuel propelling FDP’s future growth. “We now have the scale and capacity to service national and regional grocery chains when it isn’t as efficient or strategic for them to source directly.”

Although the majority of FDP’s produce offerings come from the U.S. and Mexico, a huge variety is sourced from hundreds of suppliers all over the world, including Latin America (Chile, Brazil, Peru, Argentina, and Guatemala), Asia (China, Taiwan, Korea, Japan, Thailand, and India), Europe, Israel, New Zealand, and Australia. Growers/vendors include a number of well-recognized brands from Dole, Del Monte, Family Tree Farms, Calavo, Sunkist, Naturipe, Driscoll’s, and Organic Girl.

With Fresh Direct I can buy a large assortment of quality ethnic produce that I can’t find anywhere else. Trust is a big issue and I know that I can call my Fresh Direct sales rep to follow up and take care of things. — Bedford Williams, owner/co-founder, H&W Produce, Edmonton and Calgary, Alta. “We offer the advantage of a one-stop shop for our customers who can choose any mixture of our three main categories: conventional, organic, and exotic/ethnic,” says Lum, who as a director at the B.C. Produce Marketing Association (BCPMA), also keeps an eye on the market to better understand customer needs. “Our service sets us apart from other companies that don’t have the infrastructure to deliver store to store,” he notes. “From Vancouver we deliver to stores as far away as Whitehorse in the Yukon, and the

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


congratulations

Fresh Direct Produce on 15 years! from all of us at


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Cariboo and Okanagan in B.C. With our new facility in Calgary, we service stores in Alberta and will gradually move further east. We have 30 people on our sales team, including 14 buyers, and orders come into our customer service desk almost 24/7 — we are open 365 days a year.” With a sales philosophy that looks at vendors and retailers as an extension of their own business, FDP emphasizes partnerships to promote market growth. “Over the past 15 years, each year is an improvement over the prior one,” says Lum. “We are proud of our teams that have consistently delivered double digit sales growth. Our sales teams are always on the road acquiring new customers and last year we captured 189 new accounts. It’s never a boring day with the challenges to get products to market at the right temperature and condition. We bring in five million cartons of produce a year and our turnover rate is three to four days.”

Fresh Direct Produce represents the ‘new’ breed of produce companies. They PARTNER with their vendors and in turn that inspires us to be the best we can be. They continually strategize at ways to grow OUR business, not just theirs. — Ahsan Faheem, Sales Executive, Vision Produce Company, Los Angeles, CA

The Fresh Direct difference

Since FDP opened its doors, two factors helped promote success: a focus on customers’ needs and being a leader in ethnic, tropical and specialty items, says Jozef Hubburmin, FDP’s Chief Financial Officer. “That was the beginning of our differentiation in the market. We were nimble and we focused on helping our customers in all grocery aisles. We’ve become a market leader with our unique product offerings and our width and depth within these products. Others may emulate the things we do however, not to the same degree.”

In the last 15 years, Fresh Direct Produce has provided Kin’s Farm Market with stellar support, superior product selection and superb quality. — Kin Wah Leung, President, Kin’s Farm Market, Richmond, BC The way FDP sells ethnic, tropical and specialty items also sets them apart from competitors. “Being independent, we can create campaigns that help our retail customers not only sell our products but also cross-sell in every aisle,” explains Hubburmin. “We bring in the whole cultural experience so the retailer receives the full benefit across the entire store rather than just the produce aisle.” Since many tropical and ethnic products may be unfamiliar to some retailers, FDP helps them to

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


Postharvest Acquisition

採后收購

Vertically Integrating Produce Cultivation

Import Purchase

進口採購

種植管理

Frozen Testing Storage

檢測

冷藏

Processing

加工

Proprietary Shop

直營店

E-Commerce

電商平台

Cold Chain Distribution 冷鏈配送

Supermarket

Wholesale Market

超市

批發市場

Export

出口


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understand what’s behind the food. “We aren’t just delivering the product but providing the understanding and the background to help them sell the proteins, sauces, and packaged goods that go along with those items. We want them to know how the food connects to various cultural experiences, holidays and events to inspire in-store promotions. Our approach increases the size within the shopping cart and creates an experience for the end user consumer within the retail store.”

“We are committed to providing awareness on an ever expanding list of ethnic and exotic fruits and vegetables to a multitude of retail buyers, and we’re often called upon to educate in-store produce managers as well,” Hubburmin says. “It’s important for in-store retail staff to be aware of the cultural nuances around ethnics and tropicals, to understand the right mix of products and how to properly merchandise them.”

Fresh Direct offers consistent, top quality produce with a solid team to back it up. Their commitment to service, level of care and attention to detail give us confidence and ability to deliver on our promise to our customers. — Maria Dalziel, Produce, Dairy & Local Specialist, Gordon Food Service, Vancouver, BC

For example, a recent issue of Direct News, FDP’s external newsletter for customers, featured the customs and foods that are part of Lunar New Year celebrations. FDP’s internal marketing coordinator also creates media ads, banners, and posters to promote in-store events such as the Taiwan Fruit Festival with guava and starfruit. FDP also arranges in-store cultural experiences such as drummers and traditional dancers from Korea performing while consumers sample Korean Jeju mandarins.

On the vendor side, FDP takes a similar approach. “Our vendors are treated like our customers,” Hubburmin says. “We assist overseas growers and shippers to enter the Canadian marketplace and we aggressively promote their products for them. As we expand our sales routes in B.C. and into rural areas of Alberta, we’ll grow the market for ourselves and for our suppliers.” Packaging and wrapping has become increasingly important to retailers and consumers and FDP’s facility on Kent Avenue in Vancouver is dedicated to repacking and regrading produce. At Kent Avenue and Calgary, double-bagging machines allow workers to empty produce boxes onto a conveyer belt to inspect and discard any items not up to par. As the belt proceeds through the machine, the product comes out the other side bagged in mesh and ready for distribution. “The days of opening up your mandarin box and finding a spoiled one in the bottom are over,” says Hubburmin. “A lot of customers want packaged product because the quality is better. The standards keep increasing but we try to stay ahead of industry standards.” Repackaging also allows FDP to add labels with information about the product and to differentiate organic from conventional produce. Value-added packaging of select Asian vegetables satisfy consumers’ demand for quality and convenience. It’s the same for FDP’s packages of organic garlic, ginger, shallots, turmeric, avocados and more. FDP launched the Simply® lines, its house brand, in 2010 and the brand now includes five lines of packaged produce: Simply Fresh ® (mandarins, oranges, gai lan, Asian pears, Fuji apples and Shanghai bok

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


THANK YOU FOR HELPING KIDS SHINE Congratulations to Fresh Direct Produce on their 15th anniversary of providing healthy foods for healthy kids. Here’s to another 15 years.


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choy; Simply Hot ® for a variety of hot peppers; Simply Exotics ®; Simply Ripe ®; and Simply Fresh ® “Organics” for garlic, ginger, turmeric and shallots. As part of FDP’s rebranding this year, the packages now display the new Simply logos.

Global sourcing expands possibilities for ethnic and organics

Behind the wide variety of produce arriving daily by air, sea and truck, Susan Leung, FDP’s Senior Procurement Manager for Import and Export, heads a strong buying team connected to a global supply network. Just back from a trade show in India and preparing to travel to Germany next, Leung explains that travel helps her gain a better understanding of the supply and demand trends for produce available from around the world. In India, she discovered that carrots grown there look and taste different than mainstream North American carrots. “When people leave their home to come to Canada they miss the taste of their traditional food,” Leung says. “So people from India want to buy carrots from India. It’s the same for Chinese carrots and Taiwan cabbage. People might think a carrot is just a carrot or a cabbage is just a cabbage but it is my job to bring in all the different varieties to meet developing niche markets within Canada.” Changing immigration patterns can also influence demand for different types of ethnic and exotic food. “In the past, most Chinese immigrants came from the southern part of China like Hong Kong,” she explains. “However recently, more immigrants originate from the north of China with a very different produce diet than folks in the south. As such, we now import different varieties from various locations in Asia to broaden our retailers’ selection to meet these new end consumer needs.” When a chain store decided to sell more products catering to South Asian consumers, Leung helped to

develop the line. “Sourcing produce for customers to satisfy their demand for ethnic food is one of the most important jobs I do at FDP,” she says. “It is very interesting to discover the multitude of different tastes, shapes and varieties of produce. Before I joined the produce industry, to me citrus was something orange with juice inside but now I know there are many varieties of citrus. Even the way produce is grown — in the field, on a tree, or in a hothouse — creates differences in look, smell, taste, and texture.”

During 10 years working with Fresh Direct Produce, we’ve seen substantial growth in our business together. We appreciate the loyal business and positive attitude of the entire Fresh Direct staff and look forward to continued growth together!” — Danny Fleming, Export Sales Manager/ National Accounts Manager, Beachside Produce, Nipomo, CA Sourcing product from around the world makes it possible to not only meet diverse consumer demands but also to expand the window of availability. Take persimmons, for example. Leung points out that not long ago California persimmons were only available in October and November. But now FDP’s global sourcing from China, Korea, Spain, Israel, Brazil, Chile and New Zealand means that persimmon availability can stretch almost year round. “It’s similar for Asian pears,” says Leung. “In the past, we only had pears from California in September and maybe October. But now we can provide Asian pears from China nearly year round.” Global sourcing adds variety, as well. Chinese mandarins, typically associated with the Christmas season, used to be…well, just a Chinese mandarin. But today there are many different varieties: big and

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


Fresh Direct’s ongoing commitment to generously donate high-quality produce to support our community is commendable! In partnership with Fresh Direct, Quest is proud to serve our community as together we can reduce hunger with dignity.

1-800-4Calavo

© Calavo Growers, Inc., Santa Paula, CA

www.Calavo.com

Community Kitchen Program of Calgary 3751 21st Street NE Calgary, AB T2E 6T5

Phone: 403-275-0258 www.ckpcalgary.ca

Congratulations Fresh Direct Produce on 15 years of tremendous growth!

Fresh ideas that help you get your produce to market quicker.

LEADING CANADA - U.S. CUSTOMS BROKERAGE & LOGISTICS SERVICE PROVIDER

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Thanks to Fresh Direct, Community Kitchen Program of Calgary fed 144, 172 children and families in 2017. We appreciate all your support and wish you more years of success. Congratulations Fresh Direct 15 Years and Going S trong


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Susan Leung, Sr. Import & Export Procurement Manager, with South American Suppliers.

small, seeded and seedless, packed in boxes or mesh bags. And mandarin season has extended by bringing in dozens of different varieties from China, Taiwan, Japan, Korea, Australia, Israel, Pakistan, Peru, and California. “These new varieties are very nice quality and customers are impressed by how good they look and taste,” Leung says. Delivering all this produce to market in top condition can be a challenge. Products such as lychee have a very short shelf life, Leung says, but advances in trucking allow the item to move across the country in three days. As well, improved refrigeration technology allows better control of temperature, atmosphere and moisture to prolong shelf life during transportation. “This means we can import on a bigger scale and get products to market faster,” Leung says. And while some consumers may worry about the safety of imported products, she stresses that FDP’s supplier partners are required to be food safe certified. “Since we sell to chain stores, we must also have food traceability in place, too.”

every day. One needs a lot of passion to be a good buyer and sometimes it is stressful but I have a youthful and energetic team and we work well together.” As one of FDP’s young and energetic produce buying managers, Steven Moi, who manages the procurement of Organics, heads a small team focused on sourcing an expanding variety of organic produce. “We always sold organics but they were embedded within conventional products,” he says. “Over the past couple of years, organics grew rapidly so we strategically created an Organics Department in 2015.” He’s not kidding about rapid growth: just three years ago, organics represented a mere 3% of FDP’s sales and the segment now makes up nearly 15% of sales. Most organic produce comes from California and Mexico but Moi points out that local and over-seas growers increasingly offer organics, too. China, for example, has a good program for organic citrus during October to December. “More and more conventional growers are now offering organics which means more supply to satisfy a constant increase in consumer demand,” Moi says. “Now almost any conventional vegetable can be grown organically. In just a couple of years, our list of organic offerings has significantly expanded — everything from tomatoes and mushrooms to apricots, apples, kale, beets and zucchini. The broad selection is good for our customers who can buy the whole range of conventional and organic product from us.” With supply increasing, the price gap between organic and conventional produce has considerably narrowed. “Lower prices provide a better platform for consumers to choose between organic and conventional,” Moi says, noting that not long ago conventional cauliflower retailed for $2.99 while organic cauliflower

Fresh Direct Produce provides T&T with quality products as well as innovative ideas, thumbs up service and warm and friendly environment. — Ivan Tan, Produce Category Manager, Western Region T&T Supermarket Inc., Richmond, BC The perishable nature of fruits and vegetables creates a very dynamic and fast-paced industry. “Weather changes can affect supply and demand every year, every growing season is different,” Leung says. “There are so many changes and so many different scenarios that each of our 14 buyers have to be on their toes

FDP’s teams work hard and play hard.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


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sold for $9.99. “So consumers didn’t really have a choice because the price gap was too wide. Now organic cauliflower is as cheap as the conventional because growers have balanced their production with relatively more organic than conventional cauliflower. These days the challenge is to figure out the right balance between organic and conventional produce based on constantly changing consumer preferences.”

Fresh Direct’s representatives and wholesale buyers prioritize our needs and provide the best service possible. The combination of quality, pricing and service has driven sales and customer satisfaction and resulted in a win-win relationship between Pomme and Fresh Direct. — Craig Hermanson, Operation Manager/Owner, Pomme Natural Market, Port Coquitlam and Nanaimo, BC Lower prices, improved quality and a longer shelf life also contribute to burgeoning interest and demand for organics. “Over the years, organic growers have studied how different varieties withstand the transit to market so they now know which varieties have a better shelf life,” Moi explains. Organic certification — FDP is Organics PACS certified — is critical and before purchasing from suppliers FDP ensures all regulations are in place and equivalent with Canadian organic standards. Greater supply and demand for organic produce led FDP to add organics to its house brand. Simply Fresh® “Organics” includes three or four ounce packages of turmeric, ginger, garlic and shallots. “Not everyone wants to buy in bulk,” says Moi, pointing out that smaller packages are more customer-friendly. “Some consumers want packaging to make sure the product is clean and stays 100% organic however, other consumers do not want any packaging period since packaging impacts the environment. Once again, one must carefully balance out the various differences in consumer preferences.” Going forward, Moi expects the organic segment to continue its double-digit growth every year. “This is an exciting time because there is lots of room to grow,” he says. “We live in a multicultural country where there is demand for many different varieties of produce. Since we source from all over the world we ask our customers what they’d like us to bring in for them and farmers ask us for ideas on what to grow for the organic market. We still have a long way to go,

Tim Wachter, Organic Buyer (right) with Al White from Pomme Natural Market, Nanaimo, B.C.

but over the years, with greater focus on organics and increased production, more variety will come on board and organics will become a larger part of the overall shopping basket. That’s good for everybody.”

FDP Calgary to expand market east of B.C.

As FDP continues to grow its network of vendors and retail customers, last year the company made a major investment to expand its capacity and reach by opening a brand new 53,000 sq. ft. produce facility in Calgary. “While our new facility currently has fewer items than the Vancouver location, we expect business to grow exponentially to meet changing consumer demands,” says Lum. Alberta’s multicultural mix includes strong South Asian and Middle Eastern communities, which is quite different from Vancouver’s ethnic market dominated by Asians and South Asians. Dale Tuchscherer, FDP’s Calgary Sales Manager, who joined the company four years ago after two decades working in the grocery industry, says he’s never seen such rapid sales growth. “In Alberta, we are successful because we are addressing the growth areas,” he says. “Ethnic diversity is a big one and grocers can’t ignore how society is changing. We are shifting our focus to capitalize on rising demand for ethnic products. Organics, too, are in strong demand and represent the fastest growing segment of the business. At the same time, demand continues to grow for pre-packed items that are quick and easy for busy families.” With a product mix that meets all these diverse needs, Tuchscherer says the business is “growing like crazy,” mostly through grocery chains but also food

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


Congratulations Fresh Direct Produce on 15 great years!

5310 N. Lincoln BIvd., P.O. Box 455 Livingston, CA 95334, (209) 394-2803

Congratulations Fresh Direct on 15 years! Looking forward to the next 15 and beyond! If we could figure out a better way to grow a cleaner and better tasting strawberry, why wouldn't we do it? This is our master plan.

DAVE AKAHOSHI P 714/310-2356 dave@plan-berries.com plan-berries.com

Congratulations Fresh Direct! We are a proud supplier of Fresh Figs & Radicchio

Grown by J. Marchini Farms www.jmarchinifarms.com


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Calgary Team meeting led by Dale Tuchscherer, Sales Manager (left)

service companies and independent grocers. The Calgary location is not yet filled to capacity, but has 18 truck bays, state-of-the-art ripening rooms and five new 5-ton trucks that allow the company to expand its service level as far east as Winnipeg, throughout rural Alberta and into Northern B.C.

Fresh Direct Produce’s Calgary and Vancouver teams are ALWAYS there for all my needs and the quality, selection and price are top notch. This knowledgeable and professional group will not disappoint. — Brad Bannister, Produce Supervisor, Italian Centre, Calgary, Alta. “We have fantastic reach with our ability to travel to smaller communities in Southern Alberta and north up

to Edmonton and beyond,” Tuchscherer says. “Having our own trucks gives us the flexibility to stop and service stores along the route. As business expands, we plan to add to the fleet and we have plans to establish routes into Saskatchewan and Manitoba.” With multiple trucks arriving each week from California, Mexico, and Vancouver, the Calgary branch offers a wide spectrum of produce. “The perishable produce industry is so fast-paced we are always busy,” Tuchscherer says. “No one else has the depth or breadth as Fresh Direct”. Tuchscherer enjoys working with retailers on in-store promotions. His team helps retailers set up displays, provides advice on what to carry and gather feedback on what works and what doesn’t. “We also provide ‘Look Up’ cards on Asian items that show where the product is from and how to prepare it,” he says. “It definitely helps because people are curious about new foods.”

Leadership and staff development is key

In this special anniversary year, Fresh Direct is proud to receive Platinum status for Canada’s Best Managed Companies Award, after being named one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies for seven consecutive years. “Our team works hard to live up to the expectations of being a best managed company,” says Yung. Throughout the past 15 years of steady and rapid growth, FDP’s management has striven to build a workplace culture that’s engaging, dynamic, energetic, and sincere. Today the company has about 230 employees across all three facilities and the company has numerous programs in place to help staff develop skills and a passion for the business.


Strawberries Made, Family Style Our mission at Success Valley Produce is to give our growers and customers continuous service, performing to their expectations and to the best of our ability Congratulations to Fresh Direct on your 15th anniversary

CUSTOM PRODUCE is your premier retail and food service produce consolidator.

C O N G R AT U L AT I O N S

15

FRESH DIRECT PRODUCE

On

Years

AND CHEERS TO MANY MORE!

Congratulations to Fresh Direct Produce!

In addition to our 275,000 sq. ft. state of the art facility in the Central Valley (Fresno/Parlier) we have sales offices and distribution warehouses in the major shipping areas throughout California, Arizona, Florida, and Canada to serve each and every one of your produce needs and requirements. Coupled with our experienced commodity specialists and grower relationships we are poised to keep you up to date with timely market information, trends and opportunities in assisting you to make solid and informative purchases. Our diverse abilities provide services that our customers want – volume buying power, ad pricing, a top level full audited food safety program, dedicated quality assurance team, specialty packs, product staging and consolidation and the list goes on.

P.O BOX 977 KINGSBURG, CA 93631 559-254-5800

Sanger, California (559) 787-3685 sales@sierrasunfruit.com

Congratulations to our friends and partners at Fresh Direct Produce on their 15 Year Anniversary


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What happened during a recent power outage is a good illustration of the passion for the business at FDP. “The power may be out but our guys keep working,” says Ivy Leong, FDP’s HR and Development Manager. “They pulled together, turned on the generators and headlamps and kept moving to get the orders out so our customers wouldn’t be disappointed. I like to say that our power is always on even if the power is out.” Much of the positive energy and inspiration at FDP comes straight from the president Davis Yung, whose positive attitude sets the tone throughout the company. Described as passionate, enthusiastic and humble, Yung’s staff praise his leadership skills and his ability to create excitement in a company where teamwork and self-improvement is the order of the day.

Fresh Direct truly believes in providing training for its employees to better themselves professionally and personally as well. This open-mindedness provides a wonderful environment allowing us to not be afraid to ask questions and seek the answers no matter where that takes us. — Kate Isaacson, Account Manager, Fresh Direct Produce, Calgary, Alta. “A lot of our culture and our desire for learning is fostered by Davis,” says Leong. “He creates the vision and focus for us and his attitude is very contagious. It is a blessing to work for a company where the owners and senior managers really believe in the people.” Training and education is a priority whether delivered on or off-site and includes everything from job specific training to negotiations training, customer service training, computer training, conflict resolution, and respect in the workplace. For years, FDP has also offered lean training to employees as a way to encourage efficiency, minimize waste, streamline processes and be more effective in business. Five years ago, one employee had a black belt in lean training, and now five more employees have green belts, with two more to be added this summer. “This is important for all departments because it creates a mindset around minimizing waste, increasing efficiencies, streamlining, and teamwork,” says Leong. “The staff with lean training help to support and educate the rest of the team and it allows us to run bigger projects, as well.” Yung, a big fan of Ted Talks, also holds what he calls “Why sessions” for newer staff and up and coming leaders to discuss skills and career development.

Milestones and Accolades 2003 Company founded with 11 staff, two trucks and a passion for learning and growth 2004 Launched Simply Fresh® Chinese Mandarins 2008 Won Cisco Business Incubator Challenge sponsored by The Globe and Mail 2008 Consolidated and expanded to 55,000 sq. ft. warehouse facility on Malkin Ave 2009 Received Ernst & Young’s 2008 Entrepreneur of the Year Award 2009 Received Ethno B.C. Business Award 2010 Began exporting into Asia and Australia 2010 Launched Simply Fresh®, Simply Exotics®, and Simply Hot ® lines 2011 Opened 6,000 sq. ft. Calgary Warehouse and Office 2012 Named one of Canada’s Best Managed Companies for 2011 2012 Launched Simply Fresh® Asian Veggie Kit line a Produce Marketing Association Impact Award finalist 2013 Celebrating 10th anniversary with 150 employees, two warehouse distribution facilities and over 600 products sourced from 28 countries 2014 Opened 40,000 sq. ft. South Vancouver (Kent St.) Repackaging Centre 2015 Named Gold Level Recipient of Canada’s Best Managed Companies for 2014 2015 Launched Organics Buying Department 2016 Awarded Mosaic’s Employer Recognition for Multiculturalism in the Workplace 2017 Opened 53,000 sq. ft. Calgary Warehouse and Office 2018 Named Platinum Recipient of Canada’s Best Managed Companies for 2017 2018 Celebrated 15th Anniversary with 230 employees, three warehouse facilities, and over 1,000 SKU’s sourced from over 32 countries

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


Congratulations Fresh Direct from Louvic Transport Ltd

We look forward to continuing working together in the future. Telephone 1-780-479-0725 Fax 1-780-479-0790

Congratulations to Fresh Direct Produce on your 15th Anniversary!

Foxy.com Congratulations to Fresh Direct Produce on your 15th Year Anniversary!

Grown by Our Finest Growers

Congratulations, Fresh Direct!

Thank you for 15 years of partnership and supporting locally grown produce

Congratulations to our good friends at Fresh Direct. Looking forward to another 15 years.

Grapes

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Berries Avocados www.mjosolutions.ca

Organics


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Other staff programs promote inclusiveness and recognition. Bravo, for example, is a way for employees to recognize and thank other staff members for good work or deeds. This February, FDP decided to turn February into Kindness Month to tie in with Pink Shirt Day. “We do respect and dignity in the workplace training for all who come on board and do an annual review,” says Leong. “Bullying is so prevalent these days, we want to ensure that our team understands the importance of respect and dignity and feeling safe in the workplace.”

I enjoy the opportunity to grow professionally and personally at Fresh Direct Produce. Davis’ “Why” sessions encourage me see how I can take part in projects that tie in with my career direction. — Brian Leung, Support Centre Supervisor, Fresh Direct Produce, Vancouver, B.C. The sincerity and kindness in evidence at FDP also extends to the broader community. Since 2004, the company has participated in the BC Children’s Hospital’s Child Run and donated $300,000 raised through mandarin sales and staff participation in the Run. FDP also donates produce to the Strathcona Community Centre’s breakfast, lunch, and baskets program and holds annual drives to provide hot soup, fruit, drinks, and snacks to people living in Downtown Eastside of Vancouver. And every week, FDP fills a truck from Vancouver’s Quest Food Exchange with pallets of donated produce. “While we don’t expect to solve all of the problems in one of the poorest neighbourhoods in the country, we

Buying and Sales Retreat at Whistler.

Supporting Half Your Plate produce program at Strathcona Elementary School in Vancouver, B.C.

believe we can help bring the community together,” says Yung. “Anytime there is a fundraising event, we are privileged to help. Our teams enjoy being involved in the community, particularly when we help fill the children’s knapsacks with fresh healthy produce!”

I would like to thank Fresh Direct Produce for their generous donation of produce which in turn helped us feed 8,312 kids in our 2017 Summer program. —Sundae Nordin, CEO, Community Kitchen Program, Calgary, Alta.

Celebrating Pink Shirt Day at our Kent facility.

SPECIAL PROMOTIONAL FEATURE IN CANADIAN GROCER–MARCH/APRIL 2018


Grower • Packer • Shipper of Conventional & Organic Yams & Sweet Potatoes Sales: 209-394-7514 • 800-433-7997 Fax: 209-394-7500 avthomas@avthomasproduce.com 3900 Sultana Dr. PO Box 286 • Livingston, CA 95334

Five Crowns Marketing would like to congratulate Fresh Direct Produce Ltd on your 15th Year Anniversary!

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Future strategies

FDP staff and families volunteering in the community.

With the support and insight of the people at Fresh Direct Produce, we are working on an extraordinary pilot project that has the potential to revolutionize how we look at surplus food. — Aart Schuurman Hess, CEO, Greater Vancouver Food Bank, Vancouver, BC

Over the past five years, Fresh Direct Produce has nearly tripled its footprint from 55,000 sq. ft. to 150,000 sq. ft., expanded its workforce from 150 to 230 employees and vastly increased produce offerings to 1,000 globally sourced items. Where to next? “After adding the Kent Avenue location and opening a brand new facility in Calgary, we expect growth to continue over the next three to five years,” says Yung, adding that the company is considering going into the U.S. and Eastern Canada. Increased automation and greater adoption of digital technology is also in the cards. “We don’t want to be Blockbuster at the launch of Netflix,” Yung says. “If we are doing the same thing in the same way in 10 to 15 years, it won’t be fun –– we have to do something different in the next five years to give us room to navigate in the future. Our target in five years is to double our size. We have put a lot of thought into what will drive the growth, whether it will be a new region, product or way of doing things. For sure we expect to upgrade our infrastructure, use more data analytics and build up our human capital. At Fresh Direct we always want to do things better and we continue to evolve.”


R IN G D E L IV ENESS

FRESH OU TO Y


2018 SHOW GUIDE

EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. CONFERENCE + EXHIBITION

APRIL 23-24, 2018 CONFERENCE HOURS: April 23 | 7:30am - 10:30am April 24 | 7:15am - 10:30am

TRADE SHOW HOURS: April 23 | 11:00am - 4:30pm April 24 | 11:00am - 4:00pm

VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE, WEST BUILDING 1055 CANADA PL, VANCOUVER BC, CANADA GSFSHOW.COM

NEW

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Covering British Columbia www.adnrefrigeration.com

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EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. 2018 SHOW GUIDE | APRIL 23-24 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2018

DOWNLOAD GSF 2018 APP:

PASSWORD: gsfshow

WIFI SPONSORED BY:

WELCOME FROM THE CHAIR Welcome to the 29th edition of Grocery & Specialty Food West! With the many challenges facing the grocery industry, this year’s show is about making sure you and your businesses are prepared. From the networking opportunities to business learning sessions, there’s a host of opportunities to gain insights and discover innovations over two days. The morning conferences will kick-start your day with topical insights from experts in ecommerce, technology and the economy. Workshops on Tuesday will focus on key areas of your business looking at best practices. On the exhibition floor, the Live Well Pavilion features the latest trends in health and wellness. At the First Timer’s Pavilion, you’ll be able to treasure hunt for new services and products hitting the market. And with consumers still favouring Made in Canada goods, be sure to stop by the Canada Connect Pavilion, where you’ll find companies from across the country showcasing their wares. Networking and making important business connections is what this show is all about, so be sure to attend the Sunday market store tour, wherein you’ll learn from some of the city’s best retailers. There’s also the Sunday kick-off party at Steamworks, the Monday trade floor Mix ‘N Mingle and Retailer Connect meetings, all of which are focused on this year’s theme: Excite. Exceed. Exchange.

CONTENTS GENERAL INFORMATION 3 .......... Welcome Message 5 .......... General Information 7 .......... 2018 CFIG Board of Directors 9 .......... CFIG Associate Members’ Council 11......... CFIG Staff 15 ........ Sponsors Acknowledgement

CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW 12 ........ Program 14 ........ Workshops 20 ....... Speakers’ Spotlight

EXHIBITOR LISTINGS 18 ........ Trade Show Floor Plan 19 ........ Exhibitors by Booth Number 22 ....... Exhibitors by Company Name 29 ....... Exhibitors by Product Category

This is your one-stop grocery exhibition – from front end to back end. Be sure to stop by the Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers’ booth in the main lobby entrance and find out how the association can assist your business goals. See you at the show!

GSF ANNUAL CONFERENCE & TRADE SHOW PRESENTED BY:

Sincerely, JIM BEXIS, Owner, Sun Valley Supermarket, Toronto

Chair, Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers | Fédération Canadienne des Epiciers Indépendants www.CFIG.ca

#GSFShow18

THE CANADIAN FEDERATION OF INDEPENDENT GROCERS / FÉDÉRATION CANADIENNE DES ÉPICIERS INDÉPENDANTS 401-105 Gordon Baker Road North York, ON M2H 3P8 Tel: 1-800-661-2344 | Fax: 416-492-2347 Email: info@cfig.ca | www.cfig.ca

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

3


Meet our brand new look. Now featuring the beekeepers behind our 100% Pure Canadian Honey.

Booth Number 712

HELPING CANADIANS

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We are more than just a distributor, we are part of your team. As Specialty & Gourmet leaders, we share category and consumers insights and work with you to develop plan-o-grams and support programs that meet your specialty retail needs. Join us at Booth #514 at Grocery & Specialty Food West where we will be showcasing and sampling our growing selection of new and innovative products. Visit us online at treeoflife.ca to learn more.

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EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. 2018 SHOW GUIDE | APRIL 23-24 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2018

DOWNLOAD GSF 2018 APP:

PASSWORD: gsfshow

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GENERAL INFO CONFERENCE HOURS April 23 ................................. 7:30am - 10:30am April 24 ................................. 7:15am - 10:30am Business Casual Attire

TRADE SHOW HOURS April 23 .................................11:00am - 4:30pm April 24 .................................11:00am - 4:00pm Business Casual Attire

BADGE COLOURS Red ...................................... Retailers Green...........................................Manufacturers/Suppliers/ Visitors/Wholesalers Blue ...................................... Exhibitors Grey .................................... Media

REGISTRATION HOURS Registration Desk | Vancouver Convention Centre WEST Building, 1055 Canada PL, Vancouver BC

Saturday, April 21 ............... 4:00pm - 8:00pm Sunday, April 22 ................. 8:00am - 8:00pm Monday, April 23 ............... 7:00am - 6:30pm Tuesday, April 24 ................ 7:00am - 3:30pm

SELF CHECK-IN Self Check-in Kiosk Onsite | Vancouver Convention Centre WEST Building, 1055 Canada PL, Vancouver BC

Saturday, April 21 ............... 4:00pm - 8:00pm Sunday, April 22 ................. 8:00am - 8:00pm Monday, April 23 ............... 7:00am - 6:30pm Tuesday, April 24 ................ 7:00am - 3:30pm

SAVE THE DATE Grocery Innovations Canada 2018 Tuesday, October 23 & Wednesday, October 24, 2018 Toronto Congress Centre North Building – Toronto www.GroceryInnovations.com

#GSFShow18

Grocery & Specialty Food West 2019 Monday, April 1 & Tuesday, April 2, 2019 Vancouver Convention Centre East www.GSFShow.com

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Tap into Canada’s $120 billion grocery business now!

WHO’S WHO 2018 2017

! 8 1 r 20

o f W NE

ANNUAL DIRECTORY OF CHAINS AND GROUPS IN CANADA

WhosWho_cover_front_2018.indd 1

Revised and completely updated for 2018, the Who’s Who Directory of chains and groups in Canada contains key information and contacts for grocery retailers, distributors, convenience stores, mass merchants, drugstores and franchised groups stores. Get access to: • Top executive, buyer and category manager names • Key industry data and statistics • Historical sales data on the grocery channel in Canada

2017-11-06 10:06 AM

Limited Quantity Available ORDER NOW! To order your copy, please contact Customer Care toll-free at 1-844-694-4422 or email contactus@canadiangrocer.com


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2018 CFIG BOARD OF DIRECTORS The Canadian Federation of Independent Grocers (CFIG) is governed by a Board of Directors elected from the membership and reflecting a regional distribution. A national office consisting of the President and staff implement the federation's operations in a manner consistent with the policies established by the Board. The Board and the President also receive ongoing input from advisory committees consisting of members and established across Canada.

*THOMAS A. BARLOW President & CEO CFIG Toronto, ON

*JIM BEXIS Chair, Sun Valley Supermarket Inc., Scarborough, ON

*DAN BREGG Secretary, Buy-Low Foods, Surrey, BC

*PETER CAVIN Honorary Past Chair, Country Grocer, Victoria, BC

BILL COLEMAN Colemans, Corner Brook, NL

SHANNON FORNER Valu-Plus Foods, Keremeos, BC

LAURIE JENNINGS Masstown Market, Masstown, NS

MIKE LONGO Longo Bros. Fruit Markets, Vaughan, ON

*CHRISTY MCMULLEN Vice Chair, Summerhill Market, Toronto, ON

JEFFREY MIN Galleria Supermarket, Vaughan, ON

JAMIE NELSON Save-On-Foods, Langley, BC

VICTOR RABBA Rabba Fine Foods, Mississauga, ON

GARY SORENSON Georgia Main Food Group, Burnaby, BC

ISABELLE TASSÉ Marché Tassé (Provigo), Gatineau, QC

*GIANCARLO TRIMARCHI Member at Large, Vince’s Market, Sharon, ON

TOM VESELY Sobeys Westlock, Westlock, AB

CRAIG SOLLITT The Bownesian Grocer, Calgary, AB

*RON WELKE Treasurer, Federated Co-operatives Ltd., Saskatoon, SK

*Executive Committee

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DO YOU KNOW A STAR WOMAN?

2018 NOMINATIONS now

OPEN.

Deadline to enter:

APRIL 12, 2018

FOR FULL DETAILS, VISIT: StarWomen.ca


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ASSOCIATE MEMBERS’ COUNCIL Co-operation and communication between supplier and retailer have become increasingly important in grocery retail. CFIG’s Associate Members’ Council (AMC) has in turn become more integral to the direction of the federation as a whole. The Associate Members’ Council is a group of senior executives representing a variety of Canadian grocery product companies. The AMC meets quarterly, and provides professional guidance to the Board of Directors on industry news and trends.

PHIL ANGEMI VP, Sales, General Mills Canada

LAURIE COOPER VP Customer Development, Unilever Canada

STEVE FOX Sr. VP, Customer Development, Nestlé Canada Inc.

CURTIS FRANK Sr. VP, Retail Sales, Maple Leaf Foods

PETER HALL VP of Retail Sales, Kraft Heinz Company

CARA KEATING VP Customer Development, PepsiCo Foods Canada

STEPHEN KOURI VP, Sales & Trade Marketing, Smucker Foods of Canada Corp.

JIM LEISH VP, Sales, Procter & Gamble Inc.

SCOTT LINDSAY Sr. VP, National Sales & Marketing, Coca-Cola Refreshments

GARY LOCKE Head of Acceptance, Client Management, Interac/Acxsys

MICHEL MANSEAU Past Chair, Corporate VP Consumer Sales Canada, Kruger Products LP

CHRIS POWELL VP, Business Development, Tree of Life Canada

SEAN MATEER Sr. VP, Sales, Parmalat

TOM SZOSTOK Chair, VP Sales, Campbell Company of Canada

BRENT SCOWEN President, Acosta

JOE WEBER Sr. VP, Retail Dairy Sales, Saputo Dairy Products Canada

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Supporting Independent Grocers for over 130 Years A LOOK AT LONGO’S Inside the new Ajax store P. 20 MEAT MATTERS What consumers want from this key department P. 39

MAKING MAKINGA MAKING AAMOVE MOVE ON MOVEON MEAL KITS ON MEAL Grocers, KITS Grocers, slowly, getting slowly, inSlowly, the game getting in grocers P. 11are the game getting P. 11 in the game P.11

MEAL KITS

Exclusive interview with Sun Valley Supermarket’s

JIM BEXiS

The new chair of CFIG

89,000+ AUDITED* audience/mo.

6 STEPS

TO MAKING YOUR STORE THE GO-TO FOR HEALTH-MINDED SHOPPERS

CANADA’S #1 GROCERY INFORMATION BRAND • Largest national readership • Award-winning content • Most print issues – 8 times a year

275,000+

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total impressiomns/mo.

AUDITED* unique visitors/mo.

For more information and advertising inquiries, please contact: Associate Brand Director Vanessa Peters vpeters@ensembleiq.com 437.889.0446 *AAM, ALLIANCE FOR AUDITED MEDIA


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CFIG STAFF THOMAS A. BARLOW President & CEO

FRAN NIELSEN Vice President, Finance & Administration

DIANA STEVENSON Director, Conference & Events

ANDREA ALMARZA Executive Assistant to the President & CEO and to the VP of Finance and Administration

NANCY KWON Vice President, Marketing & Communications

ROLSTER TAYLOR Director, Sales

GARY SANDS Senior Vice President, Public Policy and Advocacy TOM SHURRIE Senior Vice President & Chief Operating Officer

SHOW

LAURA KNETSCH Director, Member Services & Operations IRMELI KOSKINEN Coordinator, Member Services

JASON AN Account Representative JESSICA HERDSMAN Membership Coordinator & Registration Administrator

JOE SAWAGED Director, National Accounts & Business Development

MASTER MERCHANDISER AWARDS

AND

TELL AND

SELL

2017 Themed Event Category Large Surface Winner – Sobeys Birdshill, Winnipeg

Do you want to grow your sales up to 15%? Participate in the Master Merchandiser Program!

Master Merchandiser Awards Program enables retailers and supporting manufacturers the opportunity to stimulate purchase by building effective displays, promotions and events.

Merchandising displays, promotions and events held between August 14, 2017 and August 17, 2018 are eligible. Entries can be submitted any time during this period.

Deadline for Entries: Friday, August 17, 2018

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2018 SCHEDULE

CONFERENCE HOURS: April 23 7:30am – 10:30am & April 24 7:15am – 10:30am TRADE SHOW HOURS: April 23 11:00am – 4:30pm & April 24 11:00am – 4:00pm

SUNDAY, APRIL 22, 2018 9:30am – 1:00pm | SUNDAY MARKET STORE TOUR

*(Pre-registered CFIG Members Only) Meet at Fairmont Waterfront Hotel Lobby – 900 Canada Pl, Vancouver Sponsored by:

5:30pm – 7:30pm | OPENING RECEPTION The Steamworks Brew Pub – 375 Water Street (Across from Waterfront Station at the foot of Gastown) Sponsored by:

MONDAY, APRIL 23, 2018 7:30am – 10:30am | CONFERENCE Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 1055 Canada Pl, Vancouver, BC

7:30am – 8:15am | BREAKFAST Vancouver Convention Centre West Building– 2nd Floor – Room 211 Sponsored by:

8:15am – 8:30am | CFIG PRESIDENT & CEO MESSAGE Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 2nd Floor – Room 211

8:30am – 9:30am | KEYNOTE | RORY CAPERN, MEDIA/TECH EXPERT Join Rory Capern (formerly of Twitter and Google Canada) for a look into the future of retailing and insights on key ways your business can compete in the digital frontier. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 2nd Floor – Room 211 Sponsored by:

9:30am – 9:45am | COFFEE BREAK Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Burrard Foyer – 2nd Floor Sponsored by:

9:45am – 10:30am | THE TOUGH GET GOING | MARK PETRIE, CIBC CAPITAL MARKETS An overview of the Canadian grocery market and its challenges and opportunities. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 2nd Floor – Room 211 Sponsored by:

11:00am – 4:30pm | TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 1055 Canada Pl, Vancouver, BC – Halls A & B1

12:00pm – 1:00pm | TOP 10 IN GROCERY JUDGING Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Halls A & B1 entrance – New Product Showcases

12

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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1:00pm – 1:30pm | EDUCATION SESSION The Unshopper Dilemma: Matthew Diamond and James Fraser of Mosaic will look at how, as a manufacturer, retailer or marketer you can move beyond the stale solutions that are plaguing our shopper environment. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Halls A & B1 entrance – Insights & Innovations Stage Sponsored by:

2:30pm – 3:00pm | EDUCATION SESSION Freshen up your Sales! CPMA President Ron Lemaire provides tips on merchandising ideas and programs to grow your fresh basket. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Halls A & B1 entrance – Insights & Innovations Stage Sponsored by:

3:15pm – 3:45pm | BEST BOOTH AWARDS Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Halls A & B1 – Insights & Innovations Stage Sponsored by:

4:15pm – 5:00pm | TRADE FLOOR MIX ‘N MINGLE Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Halls A & B1 entrance – Insights & Innovations Stage Sponsored by:

EVENING EVENT 6:30pm – 7:00pm | RECEPTION Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 3rd Floor – The Summit Room

7:15pm – 9:00pm | DINNER & ENTERTAINMENT Enjoy an evening of canapés and comedy with special guest, comedian Erica Sigurdson. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 3rd Floor – The Summit Room Dinner and Entertainment Sponsors:

ATTENTION:

FULL DELEGATE RETAILERS!!!

Wine & Beer Sponsor:

A TRIP TO GROCERY INNOVATIONS CANADA 2018 IN TORONTO WILL BE DRAWN! Includes: return airfare for one; accommodations during the show and a chance to win the Grand Prize at the event! Prize sponsored by:

TUESDAY, APRIL 24, 2018 7:15am – 10:30am | CONFERENCE Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 1055 Canada Pl, Vancouver, BC

7:15am – 8:00am | BREAKFAST Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 2nd Floor – Room 211 Sponsored by:

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GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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8:00am – 8:45am | KEYNOTE | ROBERT CARTER, THE NPD GROUP Eating Patterns in Canada: A 360-Degree View of Consumption. The NPD Group and Nielsen present an unparalleled view of Canadians’ “share of stomach” to provide a unique look at the motivations behind what they eat and drink. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 2nd Floor – Room 211 Sponsored by:

COFFEE BREAK Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Burrard Foyer – 2nd Floor Sponsored by:

9:00am – 9:45am | CONCURRENT WORKSHOPS WORKSHOP 1 | SOCIAL MEDIA 101

Giancarlo Trimarchi of Vince’s Market shares best practices for your business. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Room 212 Sponsored by:

WORKSHOP 2 | HOW TECHNOLOGY IS IMPACTING GROCERY RETAILING IGD’s Stewart Samuel looks at the new technologies being used in store, with a view to improving productivity and reducing costs. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Room 213 Sponsored by:

WORKSHOP 3 | MEAL KIT MANIA!

The meal-kit industry is estimated to grow to $1 billion in the next five years in Canada. Katie Martin of The Gourmet Retailer/ Progressive Grocer will look at how grocers can get a piece of the bourgeoning meal-kit market. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Room 214 Sponsored by:

~ 9:45am – 10:30am

| WORKSHOPS REPEATED ~

11:00am – 4:00pm | TRADE SHOW EXHIBITION Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – 1055 Canada Pl, Vancouver, BC – Halls A & B1

1:00pm – 1:30pm | EDUCATION SESSION AI-Driven Analytics: Hear from Daisy Intelligence’s CEO Gary Saarenvirta on how AI is revolutionizing the competitive grocery industry and how retailers can capitalize on it. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Halls A & B1 entrance – Insights & Innovations Stage Sponsored by:

Feder ated Insurance

Knowing your business matters.

2:30pm – 3:00pm | EDUCATION SESSION Bring it on Amazon! Chris Emergui of Sale Whale will go through a simple checklist where a grocer can assess where they are in different aspects of digital marketing. Vancouver Convention Centre West Building – Halls A & B1 entrance – Insights & Innovations Stage Sponsored by:

SEE YOU NEXT YEAR AT GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – APRIL 1 & 2, 2019 14

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS* Grocery & Specialty Food West 2018 thanks the following sponsors for their support: *As of March 13, 2018

Feder ated Insurance

Knowing your business matters.

LUMSDEN BROTHERS

“Committed to your Success”

MEDIA SPONSOR

#GSFShow18

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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2018 Innovation TM/MD

Crave-able, Mouthwatering Meals Growing the frozen category Source of volume showcases ability to trade consumers up and grow the category.*

NO artificial colours, flavours or sweeteners Filling portion sizes with 2030g of protein * Source: Nielsen BASES Concept/ Volumetric Test, Crave, March 2017

The Coffee that gives * 1.5X more Caffeine

Crafted with 1.5X the caffeine Made with no artificial ingredients All caffeine used is naturally occurring

Available in two formats t3PBTU(SPVOE HUJO

t4JOHMF4FSWF1PET DPVOUDPVOU

*Roast & Ground contains an average of 99 mg caffeine compared to an average of 60 mg caffeine per 1 Tbsp ground coffee of the leading brands of 100% Arabica Coffee. Pods contain an average of 205 mg caffeine compared to an average of 134 mg caffeine per 1 pod serving of the leading brands of 100% Arabica Coffee.


from ™

A seriously rich, creamy & smooth mayonnaise made using only the best quality ingredients

Delicious, rich and creamy taste that could only come from Heinz Made with high quality ingredients like 100% Canadian free-run eggs No artificial flavours, colours or preservatives* Breakthrough packaging: egg shaped glass jar *As per mayonnaise standards in Canada

800mL Regular Glass Jar

Heinz Pitmasters Regional BBQ Sauces Varieties inspired by the regions that know barbecue best t Memphis style sweet and spicy t Kansas City style sweet and smoky t Carolina vinegar style tangy t Texas style bold and spicy

Heinz partnered with the top pitmasters to create authentic premiumsauces


IG OTH

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WIFI SPONSORED BY:

SHOW OFFICE

THE LIVE WELL PAVILION

INSIGHTS & INNOVATIONS STAGE

CANADA CONNECT

FIRST TIMER’S PAVILION

W

W

W

W

W W

W

W

NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE NEW PRODUCT SHOWCASE

CFIG Booth

18

RETAILER CONNECT

PAVILIONS: CANADA CONNECT

FIRST TIMER’S PAVILION

THE LIVE WELL PAVILION

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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EXHIBITORS BY BOOTH *As of March 13, 2018

4 ..............Advantage Solutions 102 ...........Golden Home Ultra Thin Pizza Crusts 104 ...........Custom Food Packaging 106 ...........CasusGrill Canada 108 ...........Gindara Sablefish 108 ...........West Creek Land Raised Coho Salmon 110 ...........Drader Manufacturing Ind. Ltd. 114 ...........Imperial Brown Manufacturing 116 ...........Kick Stick 117 ...........KeepRite Refrigeration 118 ...........Spain Gourmet Canada 120 ...........Sugar & Spice Body Care Ltd. 122 ...........Lang Bros. Hot Pepper Company 124 ...........Medrar Holding Company 125 ...........UNFI Canada 126 ...........A-Line Greetings 130 ...........Naraz Import/Export Corp. 132 ...........Manna International Trading Ltd. 209 ..........Hobart Canada 215 ...........Dynamic Productions Inc. 216 ...........Rational Canada 217 ...........Kysor Warren 224 ..........Parmalat Canada Inc. 225 ..........Kraft Heinz Canada 228 ..........Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry 230 ..........SeaChange Seafoods 233 ..........Epicurean Food & Beverages 234 ..........Jakeman’s Maple Products 235A .......Samrock Canada Inc. 241 ...........Care Bakery 302 ..........Gridrax Group 303 ..........ShopHero 307 ..........Bizerba Canada Inc. 308 ..........Ideon Packaging 313 ...........Action Retail Outfitters, Western Canada’s Best Store Fixtures Inc. 317 ...........Cavendish Farms 325 ..........Nestlé Canada Inc. 329 ..........Halo Metrics Inc. 331 ...........Great Little Box Company 332 ..........Skedaddle Maple 334 ..........Kappa Foods 335 ..........Boreal Wildcraft Tea Co. 335 ..........Canadian Gold Beverages (2012) 335 ..........Common Sense Natural Products Inc. 335 ..........Rawnata 335 ..........The Canadian Birch Company Ltd. 335 ..........Smak Dab 336A .......Little Miss Chief Gourmet Products Inc.

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340 ..........Arctic Chiller Ltd. 341 ...........Daisy Intelligence 402 ..........Imprint Plus 403 ..........A. Lassonde Inc. 404 ..........Burnbrae Farms Ltd. 407 ..........Covered Bridge Potato Chip Company Inc. 409 ..........CoChef Food Inc. 412 ...........Welco Expediting Ltd. 413 ...........ID Foods 414 ...........Danone Wave 416 ...........Howell Data Systems 417 ...........JD Farms Specialty Turkey 419 ...........The Grocery People (TGP) 425 ..........Weston Foods 428 ..........Unitex Sales Ltd. 433 ..........Dairy Farmers of Canada 434 ..........Schär 436 ..........SaleWhale.ca / WebSaver.ca 438 ..........Canadian Grocer 440 ..........CHEP Canada Inc. 502 ..........The Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd. 503 ..........Hussmann Canada Inc. 503 ..........Jones Food Store Equipment Ltd. 503 ..........Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd. 504 ..........Cardinal Meat Specialists Ltd. 506 ..........Procter & Gamble Inc. 507 ..........CMR Distribution 509 ..........The Reusable Paper Towels 512 ...........Etalex 513 ...........Novolex, DeLuxe Packaging 514 ...........Tree of Life Canada 515 ...........Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP 525 ..........Kruger Products LP 529 ..........MIWE Canada Inc. 531 ...........PBF The Pita Bread Factory 535 ..........Kidd Bros Honey 537 ..........Boulangerie Lanthier Bakery 539 ..........Federated Insurance 541 ...........Dion Herbs & Spices 603 ..........Coca-Cola Refreshments Canada 606 ..........Ishida Canada Inc. 607 ..........RJT Blueberry Park Inc. 612 ...........Grainworks, Inc. 615 ...........Boxmaster 616 ...........Bosa Foods 617 ...........Associated Grocers 624 ..........Prairie Naturals 625 ..........Macdonalds Consolidated 628 ..........Amerlux, LLC 629 ..........Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd.

630 ..........Brencar 631 ...........Trumps Food Interests Ltd. 633 ..........ImagineXSolutions for Metrowire 634 ..........Canadian Prairie Bison 634 ..........Gravelbourg Mustard 634 ..........Farmer Direct Co-op 634 ..........Wendell Estate Honey 640 ..........Nimbus Water Systems Inc. 703 ..........Loblaws Inc. 706 ..........Unilever Canada 707 ..........Old Dutch Foods Ltd. 712 ...........Bee Maid Honey Limited 713 ...........Sellers Publishing 714 ...........QuickLabel 715 ...........Grown Here Farms 717 ...........DIGI Canada 724 ..........Acosta 739 ..........Canature Processing– A Global Leader in Freeze-dried Pet Food & Treats 741 ...........Delicacies Valley Foods Inc. 802 ..........Arneg Canada Inc. 808 ..........FMS Financial Management Systems Ltd. 811 ...........Indonesia Trade Promotion Center 816 ...........Campbell Company of Canada 817 ...........General Mills Canada 824 ..........GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. 825 ..........Maple Leaf Foods 829 ..........Keurig Canada Inc. 830 ..........Western Grocer Magazine 832 ..........Dart Canada Inc. 837 ..........Global Reach Confections and more 838 ..........Icy Blue 839 ..........Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI) 840 ..........On Green Go Solutions 909 ..........Able Cresting Ltd 911 ...........Canadian Food & Grocery Industry Directory 917 ...........Inform Brokerage Inc. 925 ..........Canada Bread Company Limited 929 ..........Bulldog Bag Ltd. 932 ..........The Ice Cream Depot 933 ..........Grocery Business Magazine 936 ..........Dyna-Pro Environmental 1000.........Sunshine Pickles 1003A......Nature’s Choice Foods 1004.........Salish Sea Foods LP 1006.........BCLC (British Columbia Lottery Corporation) 1018 .........JillyV’s Food Products Ltd. 1019 .........Fatso Peanut Butter

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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APPEARING AT GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST 2018 Rory Capern, Media & Tech Expert Rory Capern has spent more than 20 years at the intersection of Canada’s technology, media and communications industries, working with some of the fastest companies in the world. Most recently as Managing Director of Twitter Canada, Rory was responsible for all aspects of Twitter’s business in Canada and a member of Twitter’s Global Leadership team. He led Google Canada’s large partnerships function for five years before that. He has served in Business Development and Strategy functions at a number of Canadian tech and media companies including Microsoft Canada, Torstar and Bell Canada.

Robert Carter, Foodservice Industry Analyst, The NPD Group Robert Carter is a highly respected consumer behaviour industry expert and a dynamic speaker with a passion for tracking trends and consumer activity. Robert is a sought-after and energetic presenter who is regularly recruited to deliver subject matter expertise on consumer behaviour trends, market activity, and operator and retailer performance. Robert is a frequent keynote speaker at numerous industry events and is quoted in various media outlets.

Matthew Diamond, EVP, Mosaic Matthew Diamond has a wealth of knowledge garnered on the client and agency side in his two decades of experience in the marketing world. Currently as EVP, he leads the Mosaic Toronto office, overseeing all integrated marketing services, including Hunter Straker, the shopper agency that Mosaic acquired five years ago. Prior to joining Hunter Straker, Matthew was a Partner at Capital C for nearly a decade.

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Chris Emergui, Founder, SaleWhale.ca Chris Emergui has over 20 years of digital marketing experience, having founded award winning BAM Strategy in 1996. Chris also co-founded WebSaver.ca, one of Canada’s largest grocery coupon distributors. Most recently, he founded SaleWhale.ca, a provider of digital grocer solutions and a place where over 500,000 Canadians find the best deals on their groceries weekly.

James Fraser, President, Fraser Shopper Consulting Group With more than 22 years’ experience, James Fraser is a pioneer in the retail and shopper marketing industry. He is a sought-after speaker throughout North America on a variety of shopper-related topics ranging from sales strategy to retail communication. James recently returned to Canada after a two-year engagement as the Head of North American shopper operations for Mosaic Sales Solutions. Now, James has once again ventured out on his own to create Fraser Shopper Consulting Group.

Ron Lemaire, President, Canadian Produce Marketing Association Ron Lemaire brings over 23 years of extensive experience from a not-for-profit association perspective with a focus on vertically integrated supply chains and systems philosophy. Ron is actively engaged in the public and private sector focusing on partnership and stakeholder development strategies. For over 16 years and in his role as CPMA President, Ron has worked to represent the needs and interests of over 850 international and Canadian members who are responsible for 90% of the fresh fruit and vegetable sales in Canada.

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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Katie Martin, Managing Editor/Sr. Editor, The Gourmet Retailer/ Progressive Grocer Katie Martin, a 20-year business media veteran, has covered the supermarket industry, specializing in independent and specialty grocers, for the last four years.

Mark Petrie, Executive Director, CIBC Capital Markets Mark Petrie joined CIBC Capital Markets in 2005 and currently holds the position of Research Analyst, Merchandising and Consumer Products. Prior to 2005, Mark worked at one of Canada’s largest retailers in a number of departments including New Business Development, Corporate Strategy and Retail Finance. Mark holds an Honours B. Comm from McMaster University and is a CFA charterholder.

Gary Saarenvirta, Founder & CEO, Daisy Intelligence Gary is the founder and CEO of Daisy Intelligence, which has a proven record-of-success applying A.I.-powered technology to automated core business decisions. Daisy’s softwareas-a-service (SaaS) platform analyzes 100% of input data, simulates the possible alternatives and tradeoffs inherent in any complex business question, considers any boundary conditions and constraints, and recommends the optimal course of action to best meet a client’s goals. Gary is the former head of IBM Canada’s analytics and data warehousing practices and previous head of Loyalty Consulting Group.

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Stewart Samuel, Program Director IGD Services Canada Stewart joined IGD in the U.K. in 2005 and transferred to Vancouver, Canada in 2009. He is an expert on Canadian and U.S. food retailer strategies and market trends. He also works on developing IGD’s customer base in those markets, meeting regularly with retailers and manufacturers. Stewart is a regular presenter at international conferences, a media commentator and works on our customized services, focusing particularly on the North American market. He has led several international study tours in the U.S. and Canada.

Erica Sigurdson, Comedian Best known for her rapier wit on CBC Radio’s smash hit The Debaters, Erica Sigurdson is in high demand for radio, television and live appearances. In addition to her 27 appearances on The Debaters, this hilarious comic is a headline performer at Comedy Festivals and club dates.

Giancarlo Trimarchi, Partner, Vince’s Market Giancarlo Trimarchi is a Partner of Vince’s Market, a regional independent grocer with four locations and a central commissary surrounding the Greater Toronto Area. He is also a current member of the Board of Directors for CFIG. Giancarlo is a second-generation grocer and his primary responsibilities are as the organization’s Chief Financial Officer and Director of Marketing. Having grown up in the business, Giancarlo learned that their business was only as strong as the team that supported it.

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. 2018 SHOW GUIDE | APRIL 23-24 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2018

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EXHIBITORS BY COMPANY NAME CFIG MEMBER

✪ SHOW SPECIAL

A. LASSONDE INC. 170 5th Ave. Rougemont, QC J0L 1M0 T: (800) 477-6663 E: info@lassonde.com www.oasis.ca, www.lassonde.com Proud Canadian company celebrating its 100th anniversary in 2018; actively pursuing the development, production and marketing of high-quality products that consumers will enjoy. BOOTH #403

✪ ABLE CRESTING LTD. 102 - 31281 Wheel Ave. Abbotsford, BC V2T 6H1 T: (604) 864-9728 E: ablecresting@shaw.ca www.ablecresting.com Able Cresting is a full ad specialty company, specializing in uniform sales, special event products and marketing products. BOOTH #909 ACOSTA #100 - 9440 202 St. Langley, BC V1M 4A6 T: (604) 881-1414 F: (604) 881-1092 E: info@acosta.com www.acosta.com Major grocery brands from baking, dry goods, household products, personal care, oral care, condiments, beverages and frozen food. BOOTH #724

✪ ACTION RETAIL OUTFITTERS, WESTERN CANADA’S BEST STORE FIXTURES INC. 9115 Stadium Rd. Edmonton, AB T5H 3W7 T: (780) 420-0345 F: (780) 426-7072 E: sales@actionretailoutfitters.com www.actionretailoutfitters.com ARO provides infinite number of store display solutions ranging from shelving, showcases, merchandising solutions, signage, installation and merchandising services for all sizes of needs. BOOTH #313 ADVANTAGE SOLUTIONS #115, 7455 132nd St. Surrey, BC V3W 1J8 T: (604) 572-8686 F: (604) 572-6006 E: jennifer.hutchinson@ advantagesolutions.net www.advantagesolutions.net

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Advantage Solutions represents brands from dry goods, frozen, condiments, beverages, personal care, household, baking, confectionary, seafood and breakfast. BOOTH #4 A-LINE GREETINGS 30 Sinclair Blvd. Brantford, ON N3S 7Y1 T: (800) 790-1280 F: (800) 771-7633 E: customerservice@ alinegreetings.com www.alinegreetings.com Premium greetings cards, wrapping paper, gift gags, Christmas accessories, Christmas boxed cards and other social expression products. BOOTH #126 AMERLUX, LLC 178 Bauer Dr. Oakland, NJ, USA 07436 T: (973) 882-5010 F: (973) 882-8970 E: info@amerlux.com www.amerlux.com Manufacturer of innovative lighting solutions that captivates, inspires and commands attention. Enhancing retail, commercial, hospitality and supermarket environments while focusing on quality and service excellence. BOOTH #628

✪ ARCTIC CHILLER LTD. 100 Cree Rd. Sherwood Park, AB T8A 3X8 T: (780) 449-0459 F: (780) 449-0404 E: sales@arcticchiller.com www.arcticchiller.com Arctic Chiller is about more than delivering quality water to our clientele – we’ve created a personalized promotional product designed to expand your brand. BOOTH #340 ARNEG CANADA INC. 18 rue Richelieu Lacolle, QC J0J 1J0 T: (450) 246-3837 F: (450) 246-4428 E: hfriedmann@arnegdml.com www.arneg.ca Refrigerated display cases for deli, meats, produce, dairy and bakery. Proudly manufactured In Canada. BOOTH #802

✪ ASSOCIATED GROCERS 7100 44th St. SE. Calgary, AB T2C 2V7 T: (403) 236-6300 F: (403) 236-3766 E: info@associatedgrocers.ca www.associatedgrocers.ca Associated Grocers is a full-service wholesaler that services over 650 locations in British Columbia, Alberta and Saskatchewan. Truly, “The Home of the Independent.” BOOTH #617 ATLANTIC STAINLESS FABRICATORS LTD. 62 Howdden Rd. Scarborough, ON L1V 3J8 T: (416) 285-5535 F: (416) 285-6649 E: mrafik@bellnet.ca www.atlanticstainless.ca Manufacturer of stainless steel sinks, tables, cabinets, carts, olive/ antipasto displays. Specializes in refrigerated and non-refrigerated seafood cases and tables, custom designs and fabrication. BOOTH #629

✪ BCLC (BRITISH COLUMBIA LOTTERY CORPORATION) 74 West Seymour St. Kamloops, BC V2C 1E2 T: (250) 828-5500 E: ADiLiello@bclc.com www.bclc.com BCLC delivers great entertainment for our players and revenue for the province of B.C. that goes towards supporting communities, health care and education. BOOTH #1006 BEE MAID HONEY LIMITED 625 Roseberry St. Winnipeg, MB R3H 0T4 T: (204) 786-8977 F: (204) 783-8468 E: honey@beemaid.com www.beemaid.com Beekeeper-owned, proud supplier of 100% pure Canadian honey for over 60 years. True source, SQF and HAACP certified, we are the preferred honey of Canadians. BOOTH #712

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

✪ BIZERBA CANADA INC. 6411 Edwards Blvd. Mississauga, ON L5T 2P7 T: (905) 816-0498 E: ca.info@bizerba.com www.bizerba.ca Bizerba is a leading solution provider whose portfolio includes unique products and solutions relating to slicing, processing, weighing and labelling technologies. BOOTH #307 ✪ BOREAL WILDCRAFT TEA CO. 7 - 1050 Logan Ave. Winnipeg, MB R3E 1P7 T: (204) 774-3655 E: hello@borealwildcraft.com www.borealwildcraft.com Canadian and blended teas with infuser teaware for the best healthy beverage possible. BOOTH #335 BOSA FOODS 1465 Kootenay St. Vancouver, BC V5K 4Y3 T: (604) 253-5578 F: (604) 253-5656 E: anna.r@bosafoods.com www.bosafoods.com Bosa Foods is a leading importer and distributor of Italian and Mediterranean specialty food products. Offering over 7,500 products to retail and foodservice markets. BOOTH #616 BOULANGERIE LANTHIER BAKERY 58 Dominion St. Alexandria, ON K0C 1A0 T: (613) 525-2435 E: info@lanthierbakery.com www.BettyBread.ca Bakery production of high-quality breads, rolls and authentic brioche burger buns, hot dog buns and mini buns as well as assorted other brioche products. BOOTH #537 BOXMASTER #100-880 Belgrave Way Delta, BC V3M 5Y8 T: (604) 521-4715 E: info@boxmaster.com www.boxmaster.com Boxmaster is proud to be the leader of the box manufacturing industry in the lower mainland, having a complete food-safe manufacturing process. BOOTH #615

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EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. 2018 SHOW GUIDE | APRIL 23-24 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2018

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BRENCAR 207 - 15272 Croydon Dr. Surrey, BC V3Z 0Z5 T: (604) 531-5122 F: (604) 531-5106 E: Info@Brencar.com www.Brencar.com Brencar is Canada’s leader in supplying the finest user-friendly, bulk food dispensing systems available in North America. Bulk: The Ultimate Green Packaging. Bulk Up! BOOTH #630

CANADIAN FOOD & GROCERY INDUSTRY GUIDE 4917 Prospect Ave. Victoria, BC V9E 1J5 T: (250) 708-0427 F: (250) 708-0429 E: products@contactcanada.com www.contactcanada.com Canada’s leading directory on the food and grocery industry in print and online. Sister directories include Natural Health Products, Seafood Buyers Guide etc. BOOTH #911

BULLDOG BAG LTD. 13631 Vulcan Way Richmond, BC V6V 1K4 T: (604) 273-8021 F: (604) 273-9927 E: customerservice@ bulldogbag.com www.bulldogbag.com Paper grocery and plastic or pouch bags for retail front-end use as well as in-store or product packaging for bakery, produce and deli. BOOTH #929

✪ CANADIAN GOLD BEVERAGES (2012) Box 150 45137 Hwy. 10 Marchand, MB R0A 0Z0 T: (204) 424-5479 F: (204) 424-5012 E: info@canadiangold beverages.com www.cdngb.org Winning gold medal in 2017 and silver medal in 2018 for best tasting Sparkling Mineral Water in the World. BOOTH #335

✪ BURNBRAE FARMS LTD. 3356 County Rd. No.27 RR#1 Lyn, ON K0E 1M0 T: (613) 345-5651 F: (613) 345-6946 E: ckemp@burnbraefarms.com www.burnbraefarms.com A fifth-generation Canadian familyowned and operated company. Our egg products can be found in your local grocery, restaurants, foodservice operations and homes across Canada. BOOTH #404

CANADIAN GROCER 20 Eglinton Ave. West, Ste. 1800 Toronto, ON M4R 1K8 T: (877) 687-7321 F: (888) 889-9522 E: contactus@canadiangrocer.com www.canadiangrocer.com Canadian Grocer is the #1 trade publication serving the grocery industry in Canada. With an audited audience of over 89,000 (print & digital), we are your most efficient and effective way to reach Canadian retailers. BOOTH #438

✪ CAMPBELL COMPANY OF CANADA 60 Birmingham St. Toronto, ON M8V 2B8 T: (416) 251-1131 E: canada_custeam@ campbellsoup.com www.campbellsoup.ca Come visit Campbell’s to try a taste of the new Chunky soup lines and our new Tim Tam cookies! BOOTH #816 CANADA BREAD COMPANY LIMITED 10 Four Seasons Pl. Etobicoke, ON M9B 6H7 T: (800) 465-5515 E: CBConsumerEngagement@ grupobimbo.com www.canadabread.com Vachon & Hostess Snack Cakes, Takis Tortilla Chips, Sanissimo Oven Baked Corn Crackers. BOOTH #925

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✪ CANADIAN PRAIRIE BISON PO Box 74 - 660 Main St. Canwood, SK S0J 0K0 T: (306) 468-2316 F: (306) 468-2327 E: roger@cdnbison.com www.cdnbison.com Our locally made bison pemmican and jerky comes in four delicious flavours: Original, Saskatoon Berry, Cranberry & Sunflower Seeds, and Cracked Pepper & Blueberry. BOOTH #634 ✪ CANATURE PROCESSING A GLOBAL LEADER IN FREEZEDRIED PET FOOD & TREATS 5292 272nd St. Langley, BC V4W 1S3 T: (778) 899-0779 E: jordan@canature.ca www.canature.ca One-stop shop for the finest freeze-dry dog and cat foods, treats and toppers. Branded and private label. BOOTH #739

CARE BAKERY 3833 29 St. NE Calgary, AB T1Y 6B5 T: (403) 724-1920 E: info@carebakery.com www.carebakery.com Care Bakery is a specialty bakery that provides high quality, gluten free, frozen baked goods using ingredients you can pronounce. BOOTH #241 CARDINAL MEAT SPECIALISTS LIMITED 155 Hedgedale Rd. Brampton, ON L6T 5P3 T: (905) 459-4436 F: (905) 459-8099 E: info@cardinalmeats.com www.cardinalmeats.com Visit the Cardinal booth to sample Canada’s most innovative and delicious veggie, chicken and beef burgers. BOOTH #504 CASUSGRILL CANADA 117-15272 Croydon Dr. Surrey, BC V3Z 0Z5 T: (604) 531-1228 E: alexis@casusgrillcanada.ca www.casusgrillcanada.ca CasusGrill is the world’s only 100% biodegradable and environmentally friendly portable single-use barbecue. Made from bamboo, cardboard and lava rocks. MSRP $10. BOOTH #106 CAVENDISH FARMS 100 Midland Dr. Dieppe, NB E1A 6X4 T: (506) 858-7777 E: frey.fred@cavendishfarms.com www.cavendishfarms.com We’re a family food company that brings the goodness of the farm to homes. We will be showcasing new product launches at our exhibit. BOOTH #317 CHEP CANADA INC. 7400 East Danbro Cres. Mississauga, ON L5N 8C6 T: (905) 790-2437 E: customercare.ca@chep.com www.chep.com CHEP manages, maintains, transports and supplies more than 300 million platforms for our customers. Our higher-quality pallets, containers, RPCs, bins, trays and store displays support the construction, handling and transport of more efficient and sustainable product loads. CHEP platforms and services play a critical role within every leg and across every trading partner in the supply chain. BOOTH #440

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

CMR DISTRIBUTION 6800 Trans-Canada Hwy. Pointe Claire, QC H9R 5L4 T: (514) 459-1021 E: cmrsales@inetvideo.com www.inetvideo.com Distributor of multimedia, movies, electronics and toys great value and low-end prices to end users. BOOTH #507 COCA-COLA REFRESHMENTS CANADA 335 King Street Toronto, ON M5A 1L1 T: (800) 438-2653 E: ecoke@coca-cola.com www.coca-cola.ca Come see our 2018 innovation beverages. 2018 will be our biggest innovation expansion in our history in Canada. Come see us and try a sample. BOOTH #603

✪ COCHEF FOOD INC. #22 - 7228 Winston St. Burnaby, BC V5A 2G9 T: (604) 374-7045 F: (604) 439-2021 E: jaeykwak11@gmail.com www.mcnulty.co.kr Mcnulty infuses you with the rich aroma of coffee and tea. We acquired HACCP certificate, use 196°C C.M.G.T that preserve intrinsic nutrients, flavour and taste. BOOTH #409 ✪ COMMON SENSE NATURAL PRODUCTS INC. 1 -490 Des Meurons Winnipeg, MB R2H 2P5 T: (204) 237-7909 E: admin@csnp.ca www.commonsenseroducts.ca Organic Yerba Mate Herbal Tea: a key part to whole body nutrition, reduces stress and anxiety. Six blends in four packaging formats. Made in Canada. BOOTH #335 COVERED BRIDGE POTATO CHIP COMPANY INC. 35 Alwright Ct. Waterville, NB E7P 0A5 T: (506) 375-2447 F: (506) 375-2448 E: info@coveredbridgechips.com www.coveredbridgechips.com Covered Bridge Potato Chips and Pop It Kettlecorn are made with all-natural ingredients and are certified gluten free, making the perfect snack! BOOTH #407

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EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. 2018 SHOW GUIDE | APRIL 23-24 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2018

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✪ CUSTOM FOOD PACKAGING 855 Matheson Blvd., E. Mississauga, ON L4W 4L6 T: (647) 926-2653 E: david@customfoodpackaging.ca www.customfoodpackaging.ca Thirty+ years of experience in private label development, packaging manufacturing, organic and conventional product supply and sourcing, biodegradable bags and fulfillment. BOOTH #104 DAIRY FARMERS OF CANADA 1801 McGill College Ave. Ste. 700 Montreal, QC H3A 2N4 T: (514) 284-1092 E: gianna.ciancio@dfc-plc.ca www.dairyfarmers.ca Canadian dairy products made from 100% Canadian milk. BOOTH #433 DAISY INTELLIGENCE 2300 Steeles Ave. West, Ste. 250 Concord, ON L4K 5X6 T: (905) 642-2629 F: (289) 780-4579 E: contact@daisyintel.com www.daisyintelligence.com Daisy Intelligence represents the latest generation of promotion and price optimization solutions, using A.I. to help businesses solve complex questions that increase revenue. BOOTH #341 DANONE WAVE 18945 68th Ave. Surrey, BC V4N 0B3 T: (778) 558-5318 E: alan.bates@whitewave.com www.danone.ca We will be featuring dairy yogurts as well as non-dairy beverages, yogurts and frozen desserts. BOOTH #414 DART CANADA INC. 2121 Markham Rd. Toronto, ON M1B 2W3 T: (416) 293-2877 F: (416) 332-3489 E: canadainfo@dartcanada.ca www.solocup.ca Dart Canada Inc. is the leading supplier of single-use plates, bowls, cups and cutlery under the well-known Solo and Dart brands. BOOTH #832 DELICACIES VALLEY FOODS INC. 328 69 Springborough Court SW Calgary, AB T3H 5V5 T: (587) 968-2052 E: info@kakow.ca www.kakow.ca Kakow represents Venezuelan Cacao Derivatives, crafted from Fine Aroma Cacaos Criollos

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and Trinitarios; a combination of scents, textures, and flavours from different regions of Venezuela. BOOTH #741 DIGI CANADA INC. 87 Moyal Court Concord, ON L4K 4R8 T: (905) 879-0833 F: (905) 879-4008 E: sales@ca.digi-group.com www.digisystem.com DIGI, a global leader in food retail equipment, offers solutions for linerless auto-cutter printing, weighing and wrapping, advanced printer scales, POS, ESL and consumables. BOOTH #717 DION HERBS & SPICES 801, Saint-Nicolas St. Saint-Jérôme, QC J7Y 4C7 T: (877) 569-8001 F: (450) 569-0062 E: info@dionspices.com www.dionspices.com Dion Herbs & Spices offers a variety of approximately 600 herbs and spices, all certified gluten-free, including organic products. BOOTH #541

✪ DISTRIBUTION CANADA INC. (DCI) 3425 Harvester Rd. Ste. 102 Burlington, ON L7N 3N1 T: (905) 681-3933 F: (905) 681-0314 E: info@distributioncanada.ca www.distributioncanada.ca DCI is a national organization of retailers/wholesalers that foster collaborative selling relationships between its shareholders, manufacturers, and key stakeholders selling food in the Canadian market. BOOTH #839 ✪ DRADER MANUFACTURING INDUSTRIES LTD. 5750-50 St. NW Edmonton, AB T6B 2Z8 T: (780) 440-2231 F: (780) 440-2244 E: jbredo@drader.com www.drader.com We are a manufacturer for plastic products for the bakery/grocery industry. We produce baskets, carriers, dairy cases, service trays, wheelers, dollies, hand trucks and warehouse bins. BOOTH #110 ✪ DYNAMIC PRODUCTIONS INC. #5 - 62 Fawcett Rd. Coquitlam, BC V3K 6V5 T: (604) 529-1181 F: (604) 529-1154 E: info@dynamicproductions.ca www.dynamicproductions.ca

Audio marketing specialists providing customized background music, in-store announcement and on-hold message programs for businesses since 1994. BOOTH #215

✪ DYNA-PRO ENVIRONMENTAL 575 Roseberry St. Winnipeg, MN R3H 0T3 T: (204) 774-5370 F: (204) 774-5397 E: dynapro@dyna-pro.com www.dyna-pro.com Ultra-Pure and Ultra-Plus reverse osmosis purified water dispensing systems, bottle-less water coolers and refillable-bottle washer/sanitization stations for selfserve purified water consumers. BOOTH #936 EPICUREAN FOOD & BEVERAGES 2299 Perimeter Park Dr. Atlanta, GA USA 30341 T: (770) 457-0300 E: info@epicureanbeverages.com www.epicureanbeverages.com Upscale French beverages at affordable prices to make a difference in your portfolio: organic sparkling juices, lemonades and hard ciders. BOOTH #233 ETALEX 8501 Jarry E. Montreal, QC H1J 1H7 T: (514) 351-2000 F: (514) 351-2100 E: info@etalex.ca www.etalex.ca Founded in 1966, Etalex is the Canadian leader in store fixtures, specializing in metal shelving, millwork, glass display showcases and industrial racking systems. BOOTH #512

✪ FARMER DIRECT CO-OP 1024 Winnipeg St. Regina, SK S4R 8P8 T: (305) 352-2444 E: ccampbell@farmerdirect.coop www.farmerdirect.coop 100% organic grains and pulses sold in retail-ready packaging and in bulk. Under their fairDeal brand, they are redefining what fair and sustainable farming means. BOOTH #634 ✪ FATSO PEANUT BUTTER 4264 Blenkinsop Rd. Victoria, BC V8X 2C4 T: (250) 885-1366 E: jill@eatfatso.com www.eatfatso.com Fatso is an all-natural peanut butter fortified with plant-based super fats and fiber. It’s peanut butter...but way better. BOOTH #1019

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

FEDERATED INSURANCE 660-3100 Boul. Le Carrefour Laval, QC H7T 2K7 T: (800) 361-0790 F: (450) 687-6663 E: mauro.ditullio@federated.ca www.federated.ca Federated Insurance offers customized insurance solutions designed for the grocery store industry, featuring industry-leading coverage such as product recall, transit, computerized equipment and infestation. BOOTH #539

✪ FMS FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS LTD. 55011 Tomken Rd., Ste. 204 Mississauga, ON L4W 4B8 T: (877) 435-9400 F: (855) 388-4433 E: Mikes@fmsolutions.com www.Fmssolutions.ca FMS provides accounting, payroll, best practices, benchmarking, time and attendance solutions, and more to over 4,000 independent grocers in North America. Timely financial knowledge aligned from weekly reports linked to industry benchmarks, enable grocers to make the best decisions, at the right time. The result is they make three times the profits of the average grocery store. BOOTH #808 ✪ FRASER VALLEY SPECIALTY POULTRY 4540 Simmons Rd. Chilliwack, BC V2R 4R7 T: (604) 823-4435 F: (604) 823-4306 E: office@fvsp.ca www.fvsp.ca A fourth-generation family farm based in the beautiful Fraser Valley specializing in duck, geese, specialty chicken, squab and Yarrow Meadow organic chicken. BOOTH #228 GBS FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT INC. 2871 Brighton Rd. Oakville, ON L6H 6C9 T: (905) 829-5534 F: (905) 829-9914 E: pdouglas@gbscooks.com www.gbscooks.com GBS offers a full line of combi-ovens, blast chiller/freezers, heated and refrigerated display cases, fryers, rotisseries, juice and ice machines, training and service + support. BOOTH #824

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EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. 2018 SHOW GUIDE | APRIL 23-24 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING FREE WIFI NETWORK: GSF 2018

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✪ GENERAL MILLS CANADA 5825 Explorer Dr. Mississauga, ON L4W 5P6 T: (905) 212-4000 E: tobias.bourdeau@genmills.com www.generalmills.ca General Mills is serving the world by making foods people love! Enjoy exciting offerings from our traditional grocery as well as natural and organics categories. BOOTH #817 GINDARA SABLEFISH 117-15272 Croydon Dr. Surrey, BC V3Z 0Z5 T: (604) 531-1228 E: info@willowfield.net www.gindarasablefish.com Gindara Sablefish is native fish growing in native waters, in harmony with its environment. Ocean Wise approved, we can supply fresh Gindara Sablefish all year. BOOTH #108 GLOBAL REACH CONFECTIONS & MORE #202 4848 275 St. Langley, BC V4W 0A3 T: (604) 533-8822 F: (604) 857-3388 E: adminglobalreach confections.com www.globalreachconfections.com We are the bridge that connects the Canadian marketplace with Dutch and Indonesian food, as well as unique brand name confections from around the world. BOOTH #837

✪ GOLDEN HOME ULTRA

THIN PIZZA CRUSTS 1207 North Mason St. Appleton, WI USA 54912 T: (604) 536-3960 F: (604) 536-3916 E: gfc1@telus.net www.ultrathinpizzacrust.com Canada’s only Ultra Thin Shelf stable pizza crusts. Three options available. Clean label. New to the market Super Sprouted Grain Crust. Come by to taste! BOOTH #102 GRAINWORKS, INC. Box 30 Vulcan, AB T0L 2B0 T: (800) 563-3751 F: (403) 485-6459 E: sales@grainworks.com www.grainworks.com We grow organic grains and oilseeds on the prairies. We supply organic grains, beans, flours, flakes and mixes in shelfready packaging and bulk sizes. BOOTH #612

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✪ GRAVELBOURG MUSTARD PO Box 125 Gravelbourg, SK S0H 1X0 T: (306) 648-7247 E: val@gravelbourgmustard.ca www.gravelbourgmustard.ca Gravelbourg Mustard has nine flavours of gourmet mustards, dry mustard & rub, and mustard seed. Recently featured on CBC’s Dragon’s Den, the company is recognized nationwide. BOOTH #634

HOWELL DATA SYSTEMS 103 - 3011 Underhill Ave. Burnaby, BC V5A 3C2 T: (800) 410-6871 E: sales@howelldatasystems.com www.howelldatasystems.com HDS has been developing and implementing point of sale solutions, enterprise management solutions, POS integrated deli scales, DVR and digital menu boards for 25 years. BOOTH #416

✪ GREAT LITTLE BOX COMPANY 11300 Twigg Pl. Richmond, BC V6V 3C1 T: (604) 301-3700 F: (604) 301-3745 E: info@glbc.com www.glbc.com Western Canada’s largest manufacturer of labels and flexible packaging, paperboard and rigid boxes, corrugated boxes, POP displays and protective packaging. BOOTH #331

HUSSMANN CANADA INC. 5 Cherry Blossom Rd. Cambridge, ON N3H 4R7 T: (519) 653-9980 F: (519) 653-1805 E: rob.arabski@hussmann.com www.hussmann.com Hussmann enables excellence in food retailing with merchandising and food display equipment, refrigeration systems, service, maintenance, energy solutions, food quality expertise and store planning services. BOOTH #503

GRIDRAX GROUP 1200 Aerowood Dr. Mississauga, ON M4W 2S7 BOOTH #302 GROCERY BUSINESS MAGAZINE PO Box 23103 Longworth PO Bowmanville, ON L1C 0H0 T: (905) 697-0467 E: admin@grocerybusiness.ca www.grocerybusiness.ca Grocery Business Magazine is Canada’s leading grocery publication and eNews provider. BOOTH #933 GROWN HERE FARMS 7591 Satchell St. Abbotsford, BC V4X 2E6 BOOTH #715 HALO METRICS INC. 183 - 21300 Gordon Way Richmond, BC V6W 1M2 T: (604) 273-4456 E: rsangha@halometrics.com www.halometrics.com Halo Metrics is a leading solution provider for theft prevention and in-store visitor analytics systems. We can deliver actionable insights about the customer journey. BOOTH #329

✪ HOBART CANADA 105 Gordon Baker Rd. Ste. 801 Toronto, ON M2H 3P8 T: (866) 334-2371 E: marketing@hobart.ca www.hobart.ca Hobart, Baxter, Traulsen, Vulcan, Berkel, Stero and Hobart Service. Brands you know and trust, service you depend on. Visit the Hobart Canada booth 209. BOOTH #209

ICY BLUE 57-59 Airport Rd. Winnipeg, MB R3H 0V5 T: (204) 771-6711 E: rene@eautopiabiotech.com www.eautopiabiotech.com Eautopia is a manufacturer of spring water, purified water, sparkling water and flavours in glass and PET plastic. We offer both branded and private label. BOOTH #838 IDEON PACKAGING 11251 Dyke Rd. Richmond, BC V7A 0A1 T: (604) 524-0524 F: (604) 524-0523 E: sales@ideonpackaging.com www.ideonpackaging.com 100% B.C. owned and operated. Designer and manufacturer of corrugated packaging and folding carton boxes. Digitally printed POP displays. Delivering WOW. BOOTH #308 ID FOODS 1800 Autoroute Laval Laval, QC H7S 2E7 T: (450) 687-2680 E: info@idfoods.com www.idfoods.com Largest Canadian full-service distributor and importer of specialty food servicing retailers in all channels. Brands include Tabasco, Maille, Blue Dragon, Twinings, Patak’s and more. BOOTH #413

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

IMAGINEXSOLUTIONS FOR METROWIRE 39 Royalavon Cres. Etobicoke, ON M9A 2E7 T: (416) 821-2323 E: info@imaginexsolutions.com www.imaginexsolutions.com Premium wire shelving. POP and storage solutions for the boutique grocer. BOOTH #633

✪ IMPERIAL BROWN MANUFACTURING 2271 NE 194th Ave. Portland, OR USA 97230 T: (503) 665-5539 F: (503) 665-2929 E: sales@imperial-brown.com www.imperialbrown.com We are an employee-owned company that manufactures walk-in coolers, freezers and cold storage doors. We have three locations: Oregon, Oklahoma and North Carolina. BOOTH #114 IMPRINT PLUS 21320 Gordon Way, Unit 260 Richmond, BC V6W 1J8 T: (604) 278-7174 E: sales@imprintplus.com www.imprintplus.com Imprint Plus is a leading supplier of premium high-quality reusable name badges and signage systems with over 37,000 customers worldwide in 102 countries. BOOTH #402

✪ INDONESIA TRADE PROMOTION CENTER 567 Seymour St. Vancouver, BC V3J 7Y7 T: (604) 696-6322 F: (604) 559-5022 E: itpc@indonesiavancouver.org www.itpcvancouver.com ITPC can assist you with list of suppliers from Indonesia. Variety of rice, sugar, spices, snacks, processed food, healthy food & beverages (organic/non-organic products). BOOTH #811 INFORM BROKERAGE INC. 2286 Holdom Ave. Burnaby, BC V5B 4Y5 T: (604) 324-0565 F: (604) 324-1215 E: marketing@informbrokerage.com www.informbrokerage.com At Inform, we know food: prepare, present, market, sell. Whether foodservice, retail, or c-store, Inform is your informed source. BOOTH #917

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✪ ISHIDA CANADA INC. 2220 Argentia Road, Unit 7 L5N 2K7 T: (647) 428-0279 F: (778) 518-2928 E: sales@ishidacanada.ca www.ishidacanada.ca World leader in manufacturing of weighing and packaging solutions. Food wrapping, scales, high-speed weigh-price labelling, meat slicers, food preparation equipment, labels and film. BOOTH #606 ✪ JAKEMAN’S MAPLE PRODUCTS

454414 Trillium Line Beachville, ON N0J 1A0 T: (226) 339-9022 F: (519) 421-2469 E: chad@themaplestore.com www.themaplestore.com Jakeman’s Maple Products is a family-owned maple syrup and confectionery company from Ontario, Canada. BOOTH #234

JD FARMS SPECIALTY TURKEY 24726 52 Ave. Langley, BC V2Z 1E2 T: (604) 856-2431 F: (604) 856-2437 E: turkey@jdfarms.ca www.jdfarms.ca Our specialty turkeys are certified free of antibiotics, are not fed any animal by-products and are certified by the Global Animal Partnership animal welfare program. BOOTH #417 JILLYV’S FOOD PRODUCTS LTD. 45739 Kerr Ave. Chilliwack, BC V2R 0N2 T: (604) 230-1050 E: sales@jillyvs.com www.jillyvs.com JillyV’s Food Products makes allnatural ready-to-eat meals. BOOTH #1018 JONES FOOD STORE EQUIPMENT LTD. 2896 Norland Ave. Burnaby, BC V5B 3A7 T: (604) 294-6321 F: (604) 294-4087 E: info@jonesfood.com www.jonesfood.com Jones Food Store Equipment provides equipment, refrigeration system designs, installation, service and energy solutions for small to large footprint supermarkets, warehouses, liquor stores and more. BOOTH #503

✪ KAPPA FOODS

185 Pony Dr. Newmarket, ON L3Y 7B5 T: (905) 853-8828 F: (905) 853-8886

26

E: info@kappafoods.com www.kappafoods.com Kappa Foods is a purveyor of flavoursome and impactful sauces inspired from cuisines all over the globe, made with only the most distinct ingredients. BOOTH #334 KEEPRITE REFRIGERATION 159 Roy Blvd. Brantford, ON N3T 5P4 T: (800) 463-9517 E: marketing.support@k-rp.com www.k-rp.com KeepRite Refrigeration is a leading North American manufacturer of commercial refrigeration products, specialized applications in food storage and processing, and industrial process cooling. BOOTH #117 KEURIG CANADA INC. 3700 Jean Rivard Montreal, QC H1Z 4K3 T: (800) 361-5628 F: (514) 593-8211 E: ca.b2b@gmcr.com www.keurig.ca Keurig Canada offers a wide range of premium coffees in a variety of formats, as well as Keurig Single Cup Coffee Makers. BOOTH #829 KICK STICK 800-1401 West Broadway Vancouver, BC V6H 1H6 T: (604) 331-7888 F: (604) 331-7801 E: contact@mykickstick.com www.mykickstick.com Kick Stick is a compact aromatherapy stick with ingredients designed to help you Refresh, Recharge, Relax. Kick Stick can be enjoyed in two ways: twist off the top and breathe in the aroma or twist off the bottom and apply the oil directly to your skin. BOOTH #116

✪ KIDD BROS HONEY #15 - 5684 Landmark Way Cloverdale, BC V3S 7H1 T: (604) 532-9757 F: (604) 533-3595 E: kiddbros@telus.net www.kbhoney.com Naturally flavoured honeys and raw bee products under three brand names. Each as unique as the next without compromising quality. Family owned/operated since 1884. BOOTH #535

KRAFT HEINZ CANADA 95 Moatfield Dr. Toronto, ON M3B 3L6 T: (416) 441-5000 E: kim.allison@kraftheinz.com www.kraftcanada.com Kraft Heinz is the fifth-largest food and beverage company in the world with iconic brands including Kraft, Heinz, Classico, KD, Jell-O, Philadelphia and Maxwell House. BOOTH #225 KRUGER PRODUCTS LP 200-1900 Minnesota Ct. Mississauga, ON L5N 5R5 T: (905) 812-6900 F: (905) 812-6905 E: reception@krugerproducts.ca www.krugerproducts.ca Kruger Products L.P. is a leading Canadian manufacturer and distributor of tissue and paper towels for consumer in-home use and commercial awayfrom-home use. BOOTH #525 KYSOR WARREN 5201 Transport Blvd. Columbus, GA USA 31907 T: (800) 866-5596 E: Marketing@Kysorwarren.com www.kysorwarren.com Kysor Warren is a leading manufacturer of refrigerated display cases and refrigeration systems, partnering with customers to bring commercial refrigeration solutions to supermarkets across North America. BOOTH #217

✪ LANG BROS. HOT PEPPER COMPANY 2282 232 St. Langley, BC V2Z 2Z9 T: (604) 790-2305 E: sales@langbros.com www.langbros.com Coarse ground pepper with heat. Shake it on anything you would put pepper on for an extra kick. Oh yah! BOOTH #122 LITTLE MISS CHIEF GOURMET PRODUCTS INC. 128-2440 Old Okanagan Hwy. Westbank, BC V4T 1X6 T: (250) 768-6977 F: (250) 768-9946 E: lmchief@telus.net www.littlemisschief.com Wild Pacific smoked salmon (sockeye and keta) in retort pouch. Marinated in Okanagan wine, shelf stable, no refrigeration required until opened (ambient). Ocean Wise certified. BOOTH #336A

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

✪ LOBLAWS INC. 1 President’s Choice Circle Brampton, ON L6Y 5S5 T: (905) 459-2500 E: business.development@ loblaw.ca www.loblaw.ca The Affiliated Independent Group services over 300 independently owned grocery stores across Canada with our Freshmart and Intermarché banner programs. BOOTH #703 ✪ MACDONALDS CONSOLIDATED 1020 64th Ave. NE Calgary, AB T2E 7V8 T: (800) 933-7515 www.macdonaldsconsolidated.ca Macdonalds Consolidated is a full-service food wholesaler. Being the wholesales arm for Sobeys in Western Canada, we service Thunder Bay to Vancouver Island. BOOTH #625 MAPLE LEAF FOODS 6897 Financial Dr. Mississauga, ON L5N 0A2 T: (800) 268-3708 E: drew.reghenas@mapleleaf.com www.mapleleaf.com Maple Leaf is Canada’s leading consumer packaged meats company. We make high quality, great tasting, nutritious and innovative food products under Maple Leaf, Schneiders and Swift. BOOTH #825 MANNA INTERNATIONAL TRADING LTD. #150 1658 Industrial Ave. Port Coquitlam, BC V3C 6N3 T: (604) 944-2200 F: (604) 944-2201 E: manna_ltd@hotmail.com www.mannaitl.com No. 1 top-selling soybean milk drink from Korea. Experience the new taste of Vegemil Drink. BOOTH #132 MEDRAR HOLDING COMPANY 2233 Argentia Rd., East Tower Mississauga, ON L5N 2X7 T: (587) 598-7777 E: husam@medrart.ca We have organic dates, and we are selling organic fried food such as apricots, cherries and figs, producing concentrated drinks and homemade cookies sugar free. BOOTH #124 MIWE CANADA INC. 3055 Lenworth Dr. Unit # 10 Mississauga, ON L4X 2G3 T: (905) 614-0505 F: (905) 614-0505 E: officecanada@miwe.com

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www.miwe.com With high-performance ovens, comprehensive expertise in baking processes, high competent consulting and firstclass service, MIWE is a world leader in the baking industry. BOOTH #529 NARAZ IMPORT/EXPORT CORP. 11538 236B St. Maple Ridge, BC V4R 2C5 T: (604) 401-6151 E: naraz.importexport@gmail.com The unique taste of Azerbaijan. BOOTH #130 NATURE’S CHOICE FOODS PO Box 93 Maple Ridge, BC V2X 7E9 T: (604) 465-2100 F: (604) 465-4372 E: info@natureschoice.ca www.natureschoice.ca Nature’s Choice specializes in importing premium culinary spices, herbs and blends. Our distinctive packaging has been a staple in British Columbia for over 20 years. BOOTH #1003A NESTLÉ CANADA INC. 25 Sheppard Ave. W. North York, ON M2N 6S8 T: (416) 218-3030 F: (416) 218-2700 E: info@ca.nestle.com www.madewithnestle.ca We make meals and snacks that complement busy days, and warm sips to savour with slow moments. We also make nutrition solutions to help you through different life stages. We make it all with a drive to constantly improve our products and our company. BOOTH #325 NIMBUS WATER SYSTEMS INC. 112 Oakdale Rd. Toronto, ON M3N 1V9 T: (416) 398-2028 E: steve@nimbuswatersystems.com www.nimbuswatersystems.com Full service to all makes and models of water equipment. Best range of equipment and options for vended and storeuse. Purchase and revenue share. BOOTH #640 NORTHWEST REFRIGERATION & AIR CONDITIONING LTD. 363 Kaska Rd. Sherwood Park, AB T8A 4E9 T: (877) 464-0313 F: (780) 449-1324 E: office@northwest-refrig.com www.northwestrefrig.com For the past 39 years, Northwest Refrigeration has been serving grocery retailers by providing refrigeration equipment, store design and engineering,

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installations and quality refrigeration service. BOOTH #503

Coconut Chips, SuperFoods and ReCleanse - 7 Day Cleanse. BOOTH #624

NOVOLEX, DELUXE PACKAGING 35 Dynamic Dr. Scarborough, ON M1V 2W2 T: (800) 845-6051 E: Sales@novolex.com www.novolex.com Novolex is an industry leader in paper and plastic packaging choice, service, sustainability, design, innovation and quality. BOOTH #513

PROCTER & GAMBLE INC. 4711 Yonge St. Toronto, ON M2N 6K8 T: (416) 730-4714 E: nazarec.tl@pg.com www.pg.com P&G has been doing business in Canada for more than 100 years. We are strongly committed to providing branded products and services of superior quality. BOOTH #506

ON GREEN GO SOLUTIONS 5800 Ambler Dr. Mississauga, ON L4W 4J4 BOOTH #840

✪ OLD DUTCH FOODS LTD. 100 Bentall St. Winnipeg, MB R2X 2Y5 T: (800) 351-2447 E: Belinda.Simms@ olddutchfoods.com www.olddutchfoods.com At Old Dutch Foods, we believe your snacking should be about the basics. Simple, quality ingredients. Let’s get Snack to Basics. Because at Old Dutch... Quality Lives Here. BOOTH #707 PARMALAT CANADA INC. 1939 Centre Avenue SE Calgary, AB T2E 0A8 T: (403) 221-8453 F: (403) 221-9583 E: angela_cove@parmalat.ca www.parmalat.ca Parmalat Canada is a leading producer of milk and dairy products. Our brands include Beatrice, Lactantia, Astro, Black Diamond, Balderson, Galbani and President. BOOTH #224 PBF THE PITA BREAD FACTORY 8000 Winston St. Burnaby, BC V5A 2H5 T: (604) 528-6111 F: (604) 528-6000 E: sales@pbf.bc.ca www.bakestonebrothers.ca Look no further than the Bakestone Brothers family of authentic baked goods. Made by brothers, bound by bread. BOOTH #531

✪ PRAIRIE NATURALS 56 Fawcett Rd. Coquitlam, BC V3K 6V5 T: (604) 525-4950 E: customercare@prairienaturals.ca www.prairienaturals.ca Prairie Naturals makes products designed to help you “Live the Healthy Life.” Featuring Organic

QUICKLABEL 3505 rue Isabelle, Ste. O Brossard, QC J4Y 2R2 T: (800) 565-2216 E: rbolanos@astronovainc.com www.QuickLabel.com QuickLabel is the leading manufacturer of productioncapacity, full-colour digital label printers, barcode printers, and media that allow businesses to print their own labels on-demand. BOOTH #714 RATIONAL CANADA 2410 Meadowpine Blvd. Ste. 107 Mississauga, ON L5N 6S2 T: (647) 808-1469 E: info@rational-online.ca www.rational-online.ca See how the Rational SelfCookingCenter can grill, roast, bake, steam and more with a simple click of a button and within a space of about 1 m2. BOOTH #216

✪ RAWNATA Box 181 New Bothwell, MB R0A 1C0 T: (204) 479-6287 F: (204) 388-6758 E: info@rawnata.com www.rawnata.com Award-winning raw, vegan, seedbased snacks free from most common allergens. Suitable for low-carb and keto diets. Made in Manitoba. BOOTH #335 RJT BLUEBERRY PARK INC. 25990 48th Ave. Aldergrove, BC V4W 1J2 T: (604) 381-4562 F: (603) 381-4563 E: sales@rjtblueberry.com www.rjtblueberry.com RJT Blueberry Park insists on capturing the freshness of B.C.’s blueberries in every pack, providing you with 100% natural, nutritious and tasty blueberries. BOOTH #607

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

SALEWHALE.CA/WEBSAVER.CA 4810 Rue Jean-Talon Ouest Montreal, QC H4P 2N5 T: (514) 576-7007 E: sales@salewhale.ca www.SaleWhale.ca, www.WebSaver.ca We help grocers maximize their online marketing budgets and reach millions of Canadian grocery shoppers. Contact us to see how we can drive traffic in-store. BOOTH #436 SALISH SEA FOODS LP 820 Shamrock Pl. Comox, BC V9M 4G4 T: (250) 339-6412 F: (250) 339-4951 E: cat@salishseafoods.net www.salishseafoods.net Owned by the K’omoks First Nation, Salish Sea Foods offers a wide variety of shellfish, and handmade smoked and marinated salmon. BOOTH #1004 SAMROK CANADA INC. #5 Skyline Cr. NE Calgary, AB T2K 5X2 BOOTH #235A

✪ SAPUTO DAIRY PRODUCTS CANADA GP 6800 Lougheed Hwy. Burnaby, BC V5A 1W2 T: (604) 420-6611 E: dustin.strong@saputo.com www.saputo.com Manufacturer and distributor of a vast array of fluid and cultured dairy products, and cheeses. Our brands include Dairyland, Milk2Go, Armstrong and Alexis de Portneuf. BOOTH #515 SCHÄR 125 Chubb Ave. Lyndhurst, NJ USA 7071 T: (201) 355-8470 E: info@schar.com www.schar.com Founded 35 years ago, Schär has provided a safe, flavourful, and quality line of gluten-free products ranging across multiple categories. BOOTH #434

✪ SEACHANGE SEAFOODS Box 429 Heriot Bay, BC V0P 1H0 T: (250) 537-5641 E: mail@seachangeseafoods.ca www.seachangeseafoods.ca Authentic Canadian shelf-stable smoked salmon and seafood pate gifts crafted from wild caught salmon from the West Coast. BOOTH #230 27


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✪ SELLERS PUBLISHING 161 John Roberts Rd. South Portland, ME USA 4106 T: (207) 772-6833 F: (207) 772-6814 E: rsp@rsvp.com www.rsvp.com Founded in 1993, Sellers Publishing is a contemporary publisher of calendars, books and greeting cards including RSVP, High Note premium and Wicked Funny humor line. BOOTH #713 ✪ SHOPHERO

673 N 1890 W Provo, UT USA 84601 T: (855) 361-9525 E: info@shophero.com www.shophero.com ShopHero provides an easy and affordable, white-label online grocery solution that works with your POS. Call us for a free consultation and demo. BOOTH #303 SKEDADDLE MAPLE 9110 Main St. Florenceville-Bristol, NB E7L 2A5 T: (506) 392-5202 E: info@skedaddle-maple.com www.skedaddle-maple.com Oak Aged Organic Maple Syrup: No other syrup tastes like Skedaddle 100% pure, 100% organic, 100% kosher and oak aged in the barrel. BOOTH #332 SMAK DAB 3210 - 658C Kenaston Blvd. Winnipeg, MB R3N 2A1 T: (204) 232-2569 E: eat@smakdab.ca www.smakdab.ca Specialty mustards and gift sets. BOOTH #335

✪ SPAIN GOURMET CANADA

107-3011 Underhill Ave. Burnaby, BC V5A 3C2 T: (604) 283-7216 E: sandy@spaingourmet canada.com www.spaingourmetcanada.com Organic and unique imported food from Spain, including organic olive oil, vinegars, gazpacho, Catanies (gourmet chocolate covered almonds) and paella kits. BOOTH #118

✪ SUGAR & SPICE BODY CARE LTD. 22360 Dewdney Trunk Rd. Maple Ridge, BC V2X 3J2 T: (778) 317-3270 F: (604) 477-2471 E: sales@sugarandspicebbc.ca www.sugarandspicebbc.ca Natural deodorants, shower gels and lotions. Free of parabens, 28

aluminum and animal byproducts. Locally made with pride in Maple Ridge. BOOTH #120 SUNSHINE PICKLES 30043 Jane Rd. Thamesville, ON N0P 2K0 T: (519) 692-4416 F: (519) 692-5590 E: info@picklesplease.ca www.picklesplease.ca Canadian grown and processed pickled products. Conventional and certified organic products available. Co-packing and private label opportunities. BOOTH #1000

✪ THE CANADIAN BIRCH COMPANY LTD. Box 283 Grand Marais, MB R0E 0T0 T: (204) 930-7908 E: info@canadianbirchcompany.com www.canadianbirchcompany.com Award-winning Amber and Amber Gold Pure Birch Syrups, Birch Bacon Jam, Birch Whiskey Toffee Sauce and Birch Q Sauce. The gold standard of Birch Syrup. BOOTH #335 THE GROCERY PEOPLE (TGP) 14505 Yellowhead Trail Edmonton, AB T5L 3C4 T: (780) 447-5700 F: (780) 447-5714 E: info@tgp.ca www.tgp.ca Full-service wholesaler backed by Federated Co-operatives Limited that’s solely committed to family-owned and operated retailers and their communities across Western Canada. BOOTH #419 THE ICE CREAM DEPOT 3508 56 Ave. Edmonton, AB T6B 3S7 T: (780) 463-2423 E: orderdesk@theicecream depot.ca www.theicecreamdepot.ca We distribute Chapman’s Ice Cream in Alberta as well as Blue Bunny ice cream novelties and the latest ice cream innovations all over Western Canada. BOOTH #932 THE METROPOLITAN TEA COMPANY LTD. 41 Butterick Rd. Toronto, ON M8W 4W4 T: (416) 588-0089 F: (416) 588-7040 E: sales@metrotea.com www.metrotea.com Luxury whole leaf tea, biodegradable pyramid tea bags, custom blends, DIY

pouches, custom foodservice solutions, Canadian manufacturer. BOOTH #502

✪ THE REUSABLE PAPER TOWELS 33 Jutland Rd. Toronto, ON M8Z 2G6 T: (416) 259-6044 E: canadaspongeltd@aol.com www.reuse.bio The Reusable Paper Towels, 100% biodegradable, machine washable up to 300 times, dishwasher safe top drawer, one towel = 15 rolls of paper towels. BOOTH #509 ✪ TREE OF LIFE CANADA 19488 Telegraph Trail Surrey, BC V4N 4H1 T: (800) 661-9655 E: Canada.Sales@treeoflife.com www.treeoflife.ca Tree of Life Canada is one of the largest distributors of specialty and natural foods in Canada. BOOTH #514 ✪ TRUMPS FOOD INTERESTS LTD. 646 Powell St. Vancouver, BC V6A 1H4 T: (604) 732-8473 F: (604) 732-8433 E: info@trumpsfood.com www.Trumpsfood.com Desserts; gluten free and some vegan, shelf-stable snacks, also with retail-ready packaging. Bars, cookies, loaves and Slims dessert crackers. Come and sample. BOOTH #631 UNFI CANADA 153-12757 Vulcan Way Richmond, BC V6V 3C8 (604) 276-2411 E: eventscanada@unfi.com www.unfi.ca UNFI Canada is a full service DSD distributor of third-party packaged goods, specializing in natural/organic as well as UNFI’s Field Day and Savor. BOOTH #125 UNILEVER CANADA 160 Bloor St. E. Toronto, ON M4W 3R2 T: (416) 415-3000 E: privacy.canada@unilever.com www.unilever.ca Unilever meets every day needs for nutrition, hygiene, personal care with brands that help people feel good, look good and get more out of life. BOOTH #706

✪ UNITEX SALES LTD. 102 - 30720 Simpson Rd. Abbotsford, BC V2T 6C7 T: (604) 855-1850 E: kevinf@unitexsales.com www.unitex.ca

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

We offer quality merchandise and exceptional service. We specialize in grocery uniforms, corporate apparel and promotional goods. When your image counts, count on Unitex! BOOTH #428 WELCO EXPEDITING LTD. 5475 - 61 Ave. SE Calgary, AB T2C 5N7 T: (403) 279-8636 E: insidesales@welco.ca www.welco.ca Welco Expediting Ltd. is a Calgary-based distributor that specializes in supplying plant process equipment throughout Western Canada. BOOTH #412 WENDELL ESTATE HONEY PO Box 25 Main St. A1 MacNutt, SK S0A 2K0 T: (204) 796-0017 E: martin@wendellestate.ca www.wendellestate.ca Unadulterated, unheated, raw prairie blossom honey direct from the producer. Elegantly presented. BOOTH #634 WEST CREEK LAND RAISED COHO SALMON 117-15272 Croydon Dr. Surrey, BC V3Z 0Z5 T: (604) 531-1228 E: info@willowfield.net www.westcreekbc.ca We grow Coho salmon on land in closed containment. We are Ocean Wise and Seafood Watch approved. We have fresh salmon through the year. BOOTH #108 WESTERN GROCER MAGAZINE 1313 Border St. Unit 16 Winnipeg, MB R3H 0X4 T: (204) 954-2085 F: (204) 954-2057 E: rbradley@mercurypublications.ca www.westerngrocer.com Since 1916, Western Grocer Magazine has been the voice of the grocery industry in the western Canada. Stop by our booth. BOOTH #830 WESTON FOODS 1425 The Queensway Toronto, ON M8Z 1T3 T: (416) 252-7323 E: WestonFoodsCCC@ WestonFoods.ca www.westonfoods.ca Weston Foods is a leading North American bakery company with specialized focus in key bakery categories: breads, rolls, donuts, pies, cakes, alternative breads and others. BOOTH #425

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EXHIBITORS BY PRODUCT CATEGORY ADVERTISING/MEDIA/ MARKETING PROGRAMS Able Cresting Ltd. Arctic Chiller Ltd. Associated Grocers Canadian Food & Grocery Industry Guide Canadian Grocer Dynamic Productions Inc. Grocery Business Magazine Old Dutch Foods Ltd. SaleWhale.ca/WebSaver.ca ShopHero The Grocery People (TGP) Western Grocer Magazine AROMATHERAPY Kick Stick ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE & OPTIMIZATION SOLUTIONS Daisy Intelligence

BEVERAGES A. Lassonde Inc. Arctic Chiller Ltd. Boreal Wildcraft Tea Co. Canadian Gold Beverages (2012) Coca-Cola Refreshments Canada Danone Wave Dyna-Pro Environmental Epicurean Food & Beverages Icy Blue Indonesia Trade Promotion Center Inform Brokerage Inc. Kraft Heinz Canada Manna International Trading Ltd. Medrar Holding Company Nimbus Water Systems Inc.

CONDIMENTS & RELISHES Bosa Foods Gravelbourg Mustard Kappa Foods Lang Bros. Hot Pepper Company Naraz Import/Export Corp. Skedaddle Maple Smak Dab Spain Gourmet Canada Sunshine Pickles

BLAST/CHILLER FREEZERS GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc.

CONSULTING SERVICES Canadian Food & Grocery Industry Guide FMS Hussmann Canada Inc.

BUYING GROUP Distribution Canada Inc. (DCI)

AUTOMATION SYSTEMS Ideon Packaging Ishida Canada Inc.

CALENDARS Sellers Publishing

BAGS Able Cresting Ltd. A-Line Greetings Bulldog Bag Ltd. Novolex, DeLuxe Packaging Unitex Sales Ltd.

CARDS A-Line Greetings Sellers Publishing

BAKED GOODS: FRESH/FROZEN/REFRIGERATED Boulangerie Lanthier Bakery Canada Bread Company Limited Golden Home Ultra Thin Pizza Crusts MIWE Canada Inc. PBF The Pita Bread Factory Trumps Food Interests Ltd. Weston Foods

CEREAL Farmer Direct Co-op General Mills Canada Grainworks, Inc.

CARTS Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd.

BAKING OVENS MIWE Canada Inc. BARCODING EQUIPMENT/SYSTEMS Howell Data Systems Ishida Canada Inc. BEAUTY & PERSONAL CARE Acosta Advantage Solutions Sugar & Spice Body Care Ltd. Unilever Canada BEER/WINE/CIDER Epicurean Food & Beverages

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CLEANERS & SUPPLIES CasusGrill Canada Dart Canada Inc. Procter & Gamble Inc. The Reusable Paper Towels

CONFECTIONARY Advantage Solutions Global Reach Confections & More Jakeman’s Maple Products Nestlé Canada Inc.

CHRISTMAS SEASONAL A-Line Greetings DAIRY & EGGS Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Dairy Farmers of Canada Danone Wave Kraft Heinz Canada Parmalat Canada Inc. Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP DESSERT Kraft Heinz Canada DISPLAY CASES Arneg Canada Inc. Drader Manufacturing Industries Ltd. GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. KeepRite Refrigeration Kysor Warren Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd.

COFFEE & TEA Advantage Solutions Coca-Cola Refreshments Canada CoChef Food Inc. Common Sense Natural Products Inc. Keurig Canada Inc. Kraft Heinz Canada Nature’s Choice Foods Nestlé Canada Inc. The Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd. Wendell Estate Honey

EQUIPMENT - FOOD WEIGHING, WRAPPING & LINERLESS LABELLING WITH AUTO-CUTTER DIGI Canada

COLD STORAGE DOORS & WALK-IN COOLERS Imperial Brown Manufacturing

FOOD PREPARATION EQUIPMENT Bizerba Canada Inc. Hobart Canada Ishida Canada Inc. Keurig Canada Inc.

FIXTURES: STORE Action Retail Outfitters Atlantic Stainless Fabricators Ltd. Brencar Etalex ImagineXSolutions for Metrowire

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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EXCITE. EXCEED. EXCHANGE. 2018 SHOW GUIDE | APRIL 23-24 | VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE WEST BUILDING DOWNLOAD GSF 2018 APP:

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MIWE Canada Inc. Rational Canada Welco Expediting Ltd.

FOODS: KOSHER Jakeman’s Maple Products RJT Blueberry Park Inc. Skedaddle Maple Trumps Food Interests Ltd.

FOOD SAFETY & SANITATION Novolex, DeLuxe Packaging FOODS: BABY Nestlé Canada Inc. FOODS: CANNED Little Miss Chief Gourmet Products Inc. FOODS: DELI Bosa Foods Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Golden Home Ultra Thin Pizza Crusts Gravelbourg Mustard Inform Brokerage Inc. Saputo Dairy Products Canada GP FOODS: DRY Farmer Direct Co-op General Mills Canada Golden Home Ultra Thin Pizza Crusts Indonesia Trade Promotion Center Medrar Holding Company RJT Blueberry Park Inc. Unilever Canada FOODS: ETHNIC ID Foods Lang Bros. Hot Pepper Company PBF The Pita Bread Factory FOODS: FROZEN Acosta Burnbrae Farms Ltd. Cardinal Meat Specialists Limited Care Bakery Cavendish Farms Danone Wave JD Farms Specialty Turkey JillyV’s Food Products Ltd MIWE Canada Inc. Salish Sea Foods LP Schär The Ice Cream Depot Tree of Life Canada Unilever Canada FOODS: GRAINS & PULSES Farmer Direct Co-op FOODS: GLUTEN FREE Care Bakery Schär FOODS: HEALTH Care Bakery Delicacies Valley Foods Inc. Grainworks, Inc. Kidd Bros Honey Prairie Naturals

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FOODS: NATURAL/ORGANIC Delicacies Valley Foods Inc. Dion Herbs & Spices Farmer Direct Co-op Fatso Peanut Butter Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry General Mills Canada Grainworks, Inc. Indonesia Trade Promotion Center Jakeman’s Maple Products Kidd Bros Honey Maple Leaf Foods Medrar Holding Company PBF The Pita Bread Factory Prairie Naturals Rawnata Schär Skedaddle Maple Spain Gourmet Canada Sunshine Pickles The Canadian Birch Company Ltd. Tree of Life Canada UNFI Canada FOODS: PREPARED Boulangerie Lanthier Bakery Campbell Company of Canada Canadian Prairie Bison Kraft Heinz Canada Maple Leaf Foods Spain Gourmet Canada The Canadian Birch Company Ltd. FOODS: SNACK Campbell Company of Canada Canada Bread Company Limited Canadian Prairie Bison Covered Bridge Potato Chip Company Inc. ID Foods Old Dutch Foods Ltd. Rawnata RJT Blueberry Park Inc. Trumps Food Interests Ltd. Weston Foods FOODS: SPECIALTY Acosta Bosa Foods Care Bakery Fatso Peanut Butter Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry Global Reach Confections & More Gindara Sablefish ID Foods Inform Brokerage Inc. JD Farms Specialty Turkey Kappa Foods Kidd Bros Honey Little Miss Chief Gourmet Products Inc. Naraz Import/Export Corp.

Rawnata Salish Sea Foods LP Schär SeaChange Seafoods The Canadian Birch Company Ltd. Tree of Life Canada Wendell Estate Honey West Creek Land Raised Coho Salmon FOODS: SPREADS Bee Maid Honey Limited Fatso Peanut Butter Gravelbourg Mustard Wendell Estate Honey FOODSERVICE EQUIPMENT Bizerba Canada Inc. Canadian Food & Grocery Industry Guide GBS Foodservice Equipment Inc. Hobart Canada Hussmann Canada Inc. Jones Food Store Equipment Ltd. Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd. Welco Expediting Ltd. GARDEN/FLORAL/SEASONAL CasusGrill Canada HERBAL TEAS Boreal Wildcraft Tea Co. Common Sense Natural Products Inc. The Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd. HOME DELIVERY SERVICE ShopHero INSURANCE PRODUCTS Federated Insurance JUICES A. Lassonde Inc. Coca-Cola Refreshments Canada Naraz Import/Export Corp. LABELLING & PRICING EQUIPMENT Bizerba Canada Inc. DIGI Canada Inc. Ishida Canada Inc. QuickLabel LIGHTING Amerlux, LLC LOTTERY BCLC (British Columbia Lottery Corporation) MATERIAL HANDLING & BACKROOM EQUIPMENT Canadian Food & Grocery Industry Guide Drader Manufacturing Industries Ltd. ImagineXSolutions for Metrowire KeepRite Refrigeration MIWE Canada Inc

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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Nimbus Water Systems Inc. Welco Expediting Ltd.

PALLETS & CONTAINERS CHEP Canada Inc.

MEAL SOLUTIONS JillyV’s Food Products Ltd.

PAPER PRODUCTS Dart Canada Inc. Kruger Products LP The Reusable Paper Towels

MEAT: PORK Maple Leaf Foods

PET FOOD & SUPPLIES Canature Processing - A Global Leader in Freeze-dried Pet Food & Treats

MEAT: POULTRY Fraser Valley Specialty Poultry JD Farms Specialty Turkey Maple Leaf Foods MEAT PROCESSING Cardinal Meat Specialists Limited MEATS: OTHER Canadian Prairie Bison MULTIMEDIA, TOYS & ELECTRONICS CMR Distribution MUSIC/ENTERTAINMENT SERVICES CMR Distribution Dynamic Productions Inc. NAME BADGES/TAGS Imprint Plus NATURAL PRODUCTS A. Lassonde Inc. Bee Maid Honey Limited Boreal Wildcraft Tea Co. Canature Processing - A Global Leader in Freeze-dried Pet Food & Treats Custom Food Packaging Delicacies Valley Foods Inc. JillyV’s Food Products Ltd. Kick Stick Prairie Naturals Sugar & Spice Body Care Ltd. The Reusable Paper Towels UNFI Canada ONLINE GROCERY ShopHero OUTDOOR CasusGrill Canada

PRIVATE LABEL Able Cresting Ltd. Arctic Chiller Ltd. Bee Maid Honey Limited Boulangerie Lanthier Bakery Canadian Food & Grocery Industry Guide Canadian Gold Beverages (2012) Canature Processing - A Global Leader in Freeze-dried Pet Food & Treats Custom Food Packaging Global Reach Confections & More Icy Blue SeaChange Seafoods Sunshine Pickles The Metropolitan Tea Company Ltd. UNFI Canada

STATIONARY SUPPLIES Imprint Plus Sellers Publishing STORE FURNISHINGS & DESIGN Action Retail Outfitters, Western Canada’s Best Store Fixtures Inc. Brencar Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd. TISSUE PRODUCTS Kruger Products LP TRADE PUBLICATIONS Canadian Grocer Grocery Business Magazine Western Grocer Magazine TRANSPORTATION Associated Grocers The Grocery People (TGP) UNIFORMS Able Cresting Ltd. Unitex Sales Ltd.

PRODUCT FACING DEVICE Brencar

WAREHOUSING Associated Grocers

PROMOTIONAL MERCHANDISE Unitex Sales Ltd.

WATER Canadian Gold Beverages (2012) Dyna-Pro Environmental Epicurean Food & Beverages Icy Blue Nimbus Water Systems Inc.

REFRIGERATION, HVAC & FREEZERS Hussmann Canada Inc. Imperial Brown Manufacturing Jones Food Store Equipment Ltd. KeepRite Refrigeration Kysor Warren MIWE Canada Inc Northwest Refrigeration & Air Conditioning Ltd. RETAIL TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS Halo Metrics Inc.

PACKAGING Able Cresting Ltd. Boxmaster Bulldog Bag Ltd. CHEP Canada Inc. Custom Food Packaging Dart Canada Inc. Drader Manufacturing Industries Ltd. Great Little Box Company Ideon Packaging Ishida Canada Inc. Novolex, DeLuxe Packaging QuickLabel

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POINT OF SALE SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT DIGI Canada Inc. Howell Data Systems

SPICES & FLAVOURINGS Dion Herbs & Spices Kappa Foods Lang Bros. Hot Pepper Company Nature’s Choice Foods

SEAFOOD Gindara Sablefish Little Miss Chief Gourmet Products Inc. Salish Sea Foods LP SeaChange Seafoods West Creek Land Raised Coho Salmon

WATER CONDITIONING Dyna-Pro Environmental WHOLESALE Associated Grocers Loblaws Inc. Macdonalds Consolidated The Grocery People (TGP) WIRE SHELVING ImagineXSolutions for Metrowire

SECURITY SYSTEMS & EQUIPMENT Howell Data Systems SIGNAGE & GRAPHICS Action Retail Outfitters, Western Canada’s Best Store Fixtures Inc. Imprint Plus

GROCERY & SPECIALTY FOOD WEST – OFFICIAL SHOW GUIDE 2018 | GSFSHOW.COM

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Canadian Grocer - March/April 2018  

Canadian Grocer - March/April 2018