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Master gardener Tom Walden challenges homeowners to take more chances with landscaping. 8A

The

Monroe’s fleet-footed senior Jesus Cornejo named to all-state soccer team. 1B

Enquirer-Journal

January 26, 2010 • 50 cents

TUESDAY Sunny skies

High: 50 Low: 28 Complete report: Page 8A

Deaths

Dr. Paul James Helms Bernice Higgins Larry Eugene Medlin Sr. David Lee Pearson Beulah Whited

WHO’S NEWS Electorate sees sweeping change

Your county• Your news•Your paper

Monroe, N.C.

Edwards’ defense attacks victim BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

MONROE A man accused of killing his wife says he defended himself. Dan Warren Edwards, 59, formerly of 3204 Collaroy Road in Waxhaw, is charged with first-degree murder; his wife, Logan Drake Edwards, was smothered to death on Oct. 31, 2008, and police say Dan Edwards killed her on their bed by covering her face with a pillow. Monday, Dan Edwards took the stand and recounted for the jury much of what he gave in his written confession submitted last week. Dan Edwards’ attorney, Richard Culler, painted

E-J staff photo by Jason DeBruyn

Dan Edwards, defendant in trial for the murder of his wife, talks to members of his defense team in Union County Superior Court Monday morning. Logan Edwards as a violent woman and proposed that Dan Edwards reacted

to her instigation. “If he thought that there was a reasonable

chance that he was going to be assaulted, it could be voluntary manslaughter,”

Culler told the judge. Prosecuting attorney Steve Higdon objected to that line of reasoning. “We’re putting Logan Edwards on trial, not Dan Edwards,” he said. “We are so far removed from what happened (on Oct. 31, 2008) that I don’t even know how we got here.” Friday, prosecutors showed a video in which Dan Edwards acts out how he said he killed his wife. Judge Jack Hooks repeatedly sent the jury out of the room to hear witnesses on the record, but away from the jury in order to determine if their testimony was relevant to

See TRIAL / Page 3A

RALEIGH

A new analysis of North Carolina voter registrations shows it has been a decade of change for the state’s electorate. Numbers released Monday by elections watchdog Democracy North Carolina shows that the number of independent voters in the state has jumped by 83 percent since 2000. By comparison, the number of registered Democrats has grown by only 11 percent while the number of Republicans has grown by 16 percent. There are now more than 6 million registered voters in North Carolina, an increase of nearly 1.2 million from 10 years ago. Onslow County showed the largest increase, up 63 percent. The numbers also show a 57 percent increase among non-white voter.

BIRTHDAYS Best wishes are extended to everyone who is celebrating a birthday today, especially: Elizabeth Gaither, Amy Simpson, Minnie Harrell Clyburn, Helen Bradshaw, Deion Marsh, and Myron Baucom. Call (704) 261-2278 or e-mail birthdays@theej.com to add your names to t he list.

INSIDE Classified Comics Gardening Obituaries Opinion Sports State

6B 4B 8A 2A 4A 1B 3A

Sewer fines loom again

THE GOLDEN WEST

Eastern problem may cost county $25,000 a day BY JASON deBRUYN

Staff Writer

MONROE The county could be fined up to $25,000 a day if sewer spills persist. The N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources sent the Union Public Works department a notice of violation for wastewater spills in the eastern part of the county. “It needs to be fixed and as quick as possible,” Commissioner Parker Mills said. “You can’t have sewer running down the streets. You have to get it fixed.” The violation came as no surprise because it was based on self-reported spills, said Commissioner Lanny Openshaw. The Union County Board of Commissioners has 15 days from receipt of the violation to propose a solution in order to sidestep the fine. Public Works director Ed Goscicki recommended an $8 million project that he said would take care of the problem. The project was accepted by the board of commissioners Jan. 4, but reversed Jan. 19 on a 3-2 vote, despite Goscicki and county manager Al Greene urging the board to keep it. Goscicki received the NCDENR violation notice Jan. 20. Openshaw initiated the reversal and said the violation notice does not change his mind. “It was always a question of what we do, not if we do,” he said. “What I want to know: ‘Is that the best use of our money?’ You’ve got to do something, but that doesn’t mean you spend eight mil-

See SEWER / Page 3A

E-J staff photo by Rick Crider

Bill Howie in the center of the entrance of what is known as the ‘Callow Cut’ The brickwork, fireplace, and other fixtures are not original but have been added by the developer as a central gathering spot for visitors.

Historian remembers areas rich past BY ELISABETH ARRIERO

Staff Writer

MONROE Two industries ruled Union County at one point: one was above ground, the other below. Before the California Gold Rush created a frenzy to move West in 1949, North Carolina had an influx of 30,000 migrants following the discovery of Reed’s Gold Mine in Cabarrus County. Many settled in Union County, which had several active mines along the Western border. “In the 1850 census, there were

almost as many people working in mines in the county as in agriculture, if that tells you anything,” Virginia Bjorlin of the Union County Historical Society said. But natural cave-ins and people filling old shafts for safety reasons has buried the county’s mining history over time. The Historical Society hopes to excavate that important piece of history once more during its 2:30 p.m. meeting Sunday in the Griffin Room of the Union County Public Library. Local Historian Bill Howie will lead the presentation,

which is open to the public. Sam Howie, Bill Howie’s great uncle, acquired the land that would become Howie Gold Mine in 1829. The mine was North Carolina’s largest producer of gold in the early 1940s. In 1940, the mine brought in $10,000 to $20,000 every 14 days, according to Bill Howie’s book, “The History of Howie Gold Mine and Bonnie Bell Mine.” With 28 recognized shafts, the mine is considered one of the most highly developed in Union County.

See GOLD / Page 3A

Don’t sell the hospital, HB leaders say BY TIFFANY LANE

Staff Writer

HEMBY BRIDGE Selling Carolinas Medical Center-Union would be a big mistake, Hemby Bridge aldermen say. The town signed a resolution Thursday opposing the sale of the hospital following months of discussion among county commissioners. Some commissioners say selling it would pay off a chunk of the county’s nearly $700 million debt. No official offers have been made, but the county estimates the hospital’s worth at around $200 million, with some projections as high as $300 million. Selling CMC-Union is taking

residents’ health care to “auction it off,” Hemby Bridge mayor and former county commissioner Kevin Pressley said. Pressley said he is not opposed to minimizing the county’s debt, but jeopardiz- Pressley ing locals’ health care isn’t the way to do it. Calling CMC-Union “a political football,” Pressley said money should not come before people’s safety and well-being. “I’m tired of political motivation causing disruption in Union County,” he said.

Hemby Bridge alderman Chris Baker lives closer to Presbyterian Hospital in Matthews, but said many of his friends and some family members use CMC-Union. Baker worries that commissioners will sell the hospital before divulging how it will be used. “They don’t have any right to do that,” he said. If sold, the buyer might make the hospital “twice as nice,” Baker said, or turn it into a facility open only to certain people instead of the general public. Baker also wonders whether the county tax rate and hospital visits will cost more if selling CMC-

See HOSPITAL / Page 3A

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2A / Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Enquirer-Journal

COMING EVENTS

DEATHS

Paul James Helms

MONROE Dr. Paul James Helms, 96, of Monroe passed away Monday, January 25, 2010 at Sharon Towers in Charlotte, NC following a lengthy illness. Dr. Helms was born in Union County, NC on June 1, 1913 son of the late Kirby and Daisy Cadieu Helms. He was preceded in death by his parents, his first wife, Frielann Bullard Helms and his only daughter, Mishew “Shan” Ann Helms and four sisters, Kathryn Helms Griffin, Mildred Helms Mungo, Martha Helms Chaney and

Larry Eugene Medlin Sr.

MONROE Larry Eugene Medlin Sr., 62, passed away Monday, January, 25, 2010. He was born in Union County, N.C., on February 15, 1947 son of the late Marvin G. and Flossie Helms

Sarah Helms Kelly. He is survived by his wife of forty-five years, Jeanette Plyler Helms, also of Sharon Towers and numerous nieces and nephews. Dr. Helms graduated from Benton Heights High School, Wingate College and Northern Illinois College of Optometry in Chicago, Illinois. Dr. Helms practiced optometry in Monroe for forty-six years and during this time was joined by Dr. C. Brantley Aycock, with whom he shared a close and professional relationship. Dr. Helms was very active and involved in his community. He was a member of the Monroe Rotary Club for over 64 years, serving as past president, past district governor, a Paul Harris Fellow, a sustaining member and had received numerous awards. He was a long time trustee of Wingate University and was awarded a lifetime honorary trustee in 1993. Dr. Helms was awarded

the first Man of the Year of Monroe in 1958 and was active in the Monroe Chamber of Commerce, serving as president in 1953-54. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, January 27, 2010 at 2:00 PM at First Baptist Church in Monroe with Dr. John Hewett officiating. Immediately following the service a reception and visitation will be held. Burial will be private. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to First Baptist Church, 109 Morrow Ave., Monroe, NC 28112, Hospice and Palliative Care, Charlotte Region, 1420 East Seventh St., Charlotte, NC 28204 or The Humane Society of Union County, P O Box 101, Monroe, NC 28111. Gordon Funeral Service is caring for the Helms family. Online condolences may be made at www.gordonfuneralservice.com

Medlin. Mr. Medlin was the owner of Medlin’s Towing, Auto and Equipment Repair. Funeral services will be held Wednesday, January 27, 2010 at 11 a.m. at Secrest Grove Baptist Church. Burial will follow in Lakeland Memorial Park. Mr. Medlin was preceded in death by a brother, Johnny Ray Medlin. He is survived by his wife, Linda Helms Medlin, sons, Clint Baucom of Dallas, Larry Eugene Medlin, Jr. and Timmy Medlin, both of Monroe and Chris Medlin of Georgia, daughters, Robin Ross of Newport, N.C., Cindy Baker and Belinda Pope,

both of Monroe, brothers, Luther Wade Medlin of Marshville, Robert Lee Medlin of Greensboro, sister, Eva Louise Thompson of Monroe, 15 grandchildren and 2 great grandchildren. The family will receive friends Tuesday evening from 6:00 until 8:00 at Gordon Funeral Service, 1904 Lancaster Ave., Monroe, NC 28112. Memorials may be made to the American Heart Association, 222 S. Church St., Suite 303, Charlotte, NC 28202. Online condolences may be made at www.gordonfuneralservice.com.

PAID OBITUARY

PAID OBITUARY

Bernice Higgins

Monroe Mrs. Bernice Higgins, 92, died Monday, Jan. 25, 2010 at CMC -Union. Funeral arrangements are incomplete. Grier Funeral Services of Monroe are in charge.

Beulah L. Whited

charlotte Beulah L. Whited died Sunday (Jan. 24, 2010) at Presbyterian-Main in Charlotte. Funeral will be 11 a.m. Wednesday at Sunset Memory Gardens. Born March 2, 1917, in Shell Creek, Tenn., she was a daughter of the late Henry William and Rebecca Oaks Pilkington and married to the late Ernest W. Whited. Survivors include four sons, Stewart, Finley, Kenneth, and Jerry; 11 grandchildren and 17 greatgrandchildren. Arrangements are in care of Heritage Funeral Home, Indian Trail Chapel. Online condolences may be left at www.heritagefuneral.net.

Obituary policy

Obituaries are published daily and include name, age, address, place of death, occupation, military service, spouse, parents, childre, immediate family survivors, number of grandchildre and greatgrandchildren, funeral arrangements and memorials. Obituaries containing additional information may be purchased. Obituaries, whether free or paid, are accepted only from funeral homes.

David Lee Pearson

Indian Trail Mr. Pearson, 58, passed away Monday, January 25, 2010 after a courageous battle with cancer. Born August 20, 1951 in Monroe, David was the son of Emma Lee Pearson and the late William Pearson of Wesley Chapel. David grew up in the Wesley Chapel area playing baseball and attending dirt track races with his dad. He became a master mechanic, a skill learned from his dad. He was always a “good Samaritan”, willing to help with any emergency. David served in the U.S. Army which included a tour of duty in Germany. David’s love for his family and friends was evident in the many ways he chose to spend his time. He enjoyed golfing with the guys, the annual family beach trip, weekend trips to Twin Harbor Campground, planting and tending a garden with his wife and son-in-law, and meeting all of his friends at the dirt track races at Lancaster Motor Speedway. He always looked forward to

Sunday lunches with his Mother, eating out on Friday nights with his sisters and their families, and spending precious time with his beloved daughters and grandchildren. He will be truly missed by all who knew and loved him. In addition to his mother, survivors include his wife, Jan Stinson Pearson; daughters Heather Wilson and husband Neil of Monroe and Ara Locklear and husband Sam of Indian Trail; five grandchildren, five sisters, Diane Burrier and husband Jim of Monroe, Joyce Wolfe and husband Sanford of Monroe; Brenda Smith and husband Tommy of Wesley Chapel, Ellen Gordon and husband Jimmy of Matthews, and Vickie Wright of Waxhaw; four nephews and five nieces. A service to celebrate his life will be held at 1 PM Wednesday at Heritage Funeral Home in Indian Trail with Rev. Jim Johns officiating. Burial will follow at Lakeland Memorial Park. His family will receive friends from 7 to 9 PM Tuesday evening also at the funeral home. The family asks that memorials may be made to Hospice and Pallative Care, 1420 E. Seventh Street, Charlotte NC 28204. Arrangements for the Pearson family are in the care of Heritage Funeral Home. An online guest registry is available at www.heritagefuneral.net. PAID OBITUARY

“All My Children” actor James Mitchell dies LOS ANGELES (AP) — James Mitchell, who for nearly three decades played gruff patriarch Palmer Cortland on the ABC soap opera “All My Children,” has died, his longtime partner said Sunday night. Mitchell died Friday at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles, partner Albert Wolsky said. Mitchell had suffered from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease for years, complicated by a recent bout of pneumonia. Mitchell appeared in more than 300 episodes of the popular soap from 1979 until a 40th anniversary episode this month. He was a regular on the show until 2008. Mitchell enjoyed playing the icy, wealthy Palmer, who wielded power over his children and the show’s fictional town of Pine Valley. “He loved playing mean,” Wolsky said. “A soap gives an actor a chance to develop something because it goes on for so long.” Born in Sacramento in 1920 and trained as a dancer, Mitchell had leading roles in the Broadway musicals “Brigadoon” and “Paint Your Wagon,” and danced on stage with the American Ballet Theater. His film credits include 1953’s “The Band Wagon” with Fred Astaire, 1954’s “Deep in My Heart” and 1955’s “Oklahoma.” Mitchell also taught movement for actors at Yale University and Drake University, where he was awarded an honorary doctorate.

Woman dies at age 114 MINDEN, La. (AP) — Maggie Mae Thornton Renfro, the woman verified as the oldest living in Louisiana, has died at the age of 114. Benevolent Funeral Home director Victor Menard Carter said Renfro died Saturday. Carter said Sunday that services for Renfro were pending. The Gerontology Research Group said in 2007 that Census records showed Renfro was the oldest living resident in Louisiana, and one of the oldest in the United States. She was one of three centenarian sisters. Rosie Lee Thornton Warren died Dec. 18, just days before her 104th birthday. Carrie Lee Thornton Miller died Jan. 5 at the age of 107.

Pianist dies at 94 NEW YORK (AP) — Grammy-winning pianist Earl Wild, who became one of America’s masters of the keyboard, has died at age 94. Wild died Saturday at his home in Palm Springs, California, his publicist said. Despite his advanced age, Wild continued to teach until last week. Wild’s last public performance was at age 92 at Walt Disney Concert Hall in Los Angeles, where he was presented with the National Academy of Recording Arts & Sciences’ Presidential Merit Award. In 2005, he gave a robust recital at Carnegie Hall to celebrate his 90th birthday.

“Service, Staff and Prices as Comforting As Our Name” 6525 Old Monroe Road • Indian Trail, NC (at Sun Valley Commons) (704)- 821-4484 • www.goodshepherdfuneralhome.net

Tuesday

• COA UNION SENIORS PROGRAM, 9:30 a.m., Wingate Methodist Church. Bring covered dish. For details, call 704292-1797. • THE MOMS CLUB, Moms Offering Moms Support, Indian Trail and Monroe, 10 a.m., Hank’s Frozen Custard, 5250 Old Charlotte Highway. Details, Kim, 704-340-3281; or e-mail momsclubofindiantrail@yahoo.com. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., Union West Regional Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., Monroe Library, 316 E. Windsor St., for children ages 12 months to 36 months. For details, call 704-283-8184. •  TODDLER TIME, 10 a.m., 11 a.m., Waxhaw Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  BASIC SPANISH, 10 a.m. to 11 a.m., must be member of Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center and age 55 or over. Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center, 327 S. Hayne St. Details, 704-2824657. •  STORY TIME, 10:30 a.m., Monroe Library, 316 E. Windsor St., for children ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-283-8184. •  MARSHVILLE ROTARY CLUB, noon, Pier Restaurant, Marshville. For details, call Johnny Pigg, 704-624-2602. •  MONROE ROTARY CLUB, noon to 1 p.m., Rolling Hills Country Club. Details, 704-283-4645. •  AARP (AMERICAN ASSOCIATION OF RETIRED PERSONS), 2 p.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Senior Center, 327 S. Hayne St., Monroe. • HOMEWORK HELP NIGHT, 4:30 p.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monroe Library. For grades one through eight. Details, Kim, 704-283-8184, ext. 238. •  TOPS NO. 373 (Take Off Pounds Sensibly), 6 p.m. weigh-in, 6:30 p.m. meeting, 805 South Bragg Street, Monroe. For details, call 704-282-0073. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. • LAKE PARK CUB SCOUT PACK, 6:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m., Faith United Methodist Church. For details call, 704-882-7533. •  OLD HICKORY OPTIMIST CLUB, 6:30 p.m., Operation Reach-Out building, corner of Miller and Phifer streets. For details, call Daphney Henderson at 704-821-6747. •  MONROE JAYCEES, 6:30 p.m. social, 6:55 p.m. meeting, Oasis Restaurant, 116 S. Main St. New members welcome. Details, Mike McGinnis at 980-328-8702. • OVERCOMERS OUTREACH, 7 p.m., Waxhaw Bible Church. For details, call 704-764-3960. • PRENATAL CLASS, 7 p.m. to 9 p.m., CMC-Union. Come during seventh month of pregnancy. For details, call 704-283-3254. • BOY SCOUT TROOP 1, 7 p.m., First Presbyterian, 302 E. Windsor St. For details, call Gale Brown at 704-764-7589. • THE ARC OF UNION COUNTY, board meeting, 7 p.m., first-floor conference room, United Way building, 102 E. Franklin St. Details, call 704-2265110. • BINGO, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., American Legion Post 208, Highway 75 East, Waxhaw. Jackpot, $500. Smoke free. • SWEET UNION REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, 7 p.m. meeting, Waxhaw Women’s Club, 200 E. South Main St., Waxhaw. All Republicans welcome. Details, Deborah Barton, 704-839-3768. •  CANCER SUPPORT GROUP, 7:30 p.m., St. Ernest Catholic Church, Evans Mill Road, Pageland, S.C. For details, call Pat, 803-672-2037. • UNION COUNTY CHAPTER OF AARP will meet Tuesday January 26 at 2 pm. At the Ellen fitzgerald Senior Cen-

ter at 327 S. Hayne St. The Speaker for the meeting will be Susan Suarze Webster, she is a Partnership Specialist with US Census Bureau. For more information call 704-233-4308.

Wednesday • MONROE-UNION BREAKFAST ROTARY, 7:30 a.m., Golden Corral Restaurant. For details, call 704-507-3956. •  TODDLER TIME, 9:30 a.m., Marshville Library, for children ages 12 months to 36 months. •  EXERCISE CLASS, 9:30 a.m. to 10:15 a.m., Ellen Fitzgerald Center. • STORY TIME, 10 a.m., 11 a.m., Waxhaw Library, for ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-843-3131. •  STORY TIME, 10 a.m., Marshville Library, for ages 3 to 5. For details, call 704-624-2828. • SENIOR FITNESS CLASS, 10 a.m. to 10:45 a.m., Bazemore Center, Winchester Avenue, Monroe. Free to all senior citizens. Details, 704-282-4654. • TODDLER TIME, 10:30 a.m., 11 a.m., Union West Regional Library. For ages 18 to 36 months. • BABY TIME, 11 a.m., Monroe Library. Details, 704-283-8184. •  STORY TIME, 11:30 a.m., Union West Regional Library, for children ages 3 to 5. • TURNING POINT DOMESTIC VIOLENCE GROUP, 4 p.m. at the shelter. Details, 704-283-7233. • UNION WEST ANIME CLUB, 4:45 p.m. to 6:45 p.m., Union West Library. Details, 704-8217475. •  ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Low Bottom group, 6 p.m. to 7 p.m., old Belk building, 200 Stewart St., Monroe. Details, 704-332-4387; 704377-0244. • ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS, Sunset group, 6 p.m., 1010 McManus St., Monroe. Details, 704-219-6245. •  MARINE CORPS LEAGUE DETACHMENT 914, 7 p.m., Quincys restaurant. Details, call Bob Griffn, 704-7643677. • CLASSIC CRUISERS, 7 p.m., Poplin Place shopping center, West Roosevelt Boulevard, Monroe. For information, contact Jim Collura at 704-289-6208 or classiccruisers@hotmail.com.

The Enquirer-Journal copyright 2010

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The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, January 26, 2010 / 3A

Sewer Continued from Page 1A lion dollars.” The sewer spills happen because there is too much wastewater coming through pump stations in Marshville, Wingate and at Pilgrim’s Pride. Distribution pipes in the towns are operated by those towns and Openshaw said much of the problem happens from rain- and groundwater getting into their pipes before it is delivered to the county system. If that excess, known as inflow and infiltration, or I&I, can be stopped, it would put less strain on the pump stations and relieve some of the problem. Wingate started a $2.3 project Monday that would fix about 30 percent of the system; the focus of the work is on the Windgate Estates and Grove Park subdivisions, where the infiltration is worst, said town manager Dryw Blanchard. Openshaw noted that would help and that it might be appropriate for the county to work on its pipes in and around Wingate to help. The board of commissioners is scheduled to meet today at 9 a.m., but would still be within the 15-day violation window if it waited until the Feb. 1, meeting. Goscicki recommended the original project, but Openshaw said there might be a cheaper option that will solve the same problem.

Staff photo by Rick Crider

Bill Howie in one of the many horizontal corridors branching off from the vertical shaft in the Callow Cut.

Gold Continued from Page 1A Bill Howie remembers exploring the land when he was a teenager. “We’d take our bicycles to the old mine and explore the diggings and the sur-

face,” he said. “Sometimes we’d find relics and sometimes we could go so far underground that we found water.” Charlotte-based businessman John Rissanen, who now owns most of the land on which Howie Gold

Mine sits, planned on making the mine portion of the land open to the public as a historic park. But economic times halted that plan, leaving that bit of history largely inaccessible to the public. Still, Bill Howie hopes he

can provide residents with a glimpse of the county’s past at Sunday’s meeting. “The older folks know quite a bit about the gold mining here but some of the newcomers might not know just how important it used to be,” he said.

Weekend rains cause spills Two sanitary sewer overflows happened in the Union County sanitary sewer system on Monday. The overflows were not big enough to cause immediate danger to human health or the environment. All pumps and equipment were operating properly and at full capacity on Monday. The sewer overflows were the direct result of heavy rain which fell in less than 12 hours causing stormwater to enter the sanitary sewer system through defects in pipes and manholes. The first sanitary sewer overflow occurred off McIntyre Road near Wingate from about 2:30 a.m. to 8 a.m. A portion of the overflow entered Meadows Branch. A second sanitary sewer overflow happened off Sardis Church Road near Indian Trail from about 4:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. A portion of the overflow entered Crooked Creek. Union County has an ongoing program to identify and reduce stormwater entry into the sanitary sewer system. The overflows have been reported to the North Carolina Division of Water Quality. For additional information, contact the Union County Public Works Department at 704-296-4210.

Police make three arrests for car break-ins BY ELISABETH ARRIERO

Staff Writer

MONROE Monroe police arrested three men in connection with car break-ins throughout the city over the last several months. Adam Joseph Lebreton, 20, of 2013 Barbee Court, was arrested on Jan. 23 with 28 counts of breaking and entering of motor vehicles, three counts of felony larceny, 11 counts of misdemeanor larceny, and one count of larceny of a firearm. Dante Williams, 19, of 5601 Burning Ridge Drive in Indian Trail was arrested on Jan. 20 and charged with 10 counts of breaking and entering of motor vehicles. “Those two were causing a

Trial Continued from Page 1A the murder charge. Culler called Logan Edwards’ first husband, Roger Burbage, to testify and he called Logan Edwards “high strung” and “hyper.” He testified that Logan Edwards would “get in his face” when they argued and shout or scream at him.

Hospital Continued from Page 1A Union doesn’t generate as much money as estimated. “A lot of time and a lot of money has been invested in this (hospital),” Pressley said, and “to sell it at any time would be the wrong thing to do.” Marshville, Monroe and Wingate also signed a resolution opposing the hospital’s sale. There is power in group effort, Baker said, and is happy that other towns are opposed. “It may not stop (commissioners), but at least it’ll help them work with us.” IN OTHER NEWS Hemby Bridge lowered

Sasser

Lebreton

lot of havoc,” Sgt. Craig Bradshaw said, declining to speculate on a motive. Lebreton and Williams are being held at the Union County Jail under a $25,000 and $6,500 bond, respectively. Kenneth Carl Sasser, 39, of 311 East Jefferson St., was arrested on five counts of breaking and entering of motor vehicles, four counts

Higdon asked Burbage only three questions: “Did you ever assault her? ... Did you ever push her down and break four of her ribs? ... Did you ever smother her with a pillow?” To each question, Burbage quickly replied, “no.” The next witness, Tony Short, testified that he saw Logan Edwards at a bar where she said she

of misdemeanor larceny, and one count of possession of drug parapher nalia on Jan. 21. “ M r . Williams Sasser is a known drug user,” Brad- shaw said. “He probably did it mostly when he needed to get his next fix.” Sasser is being held at the Union County Jail on a $6,000 bond. Police have not been able to recover the items that Labreton and Williams stole in the Yorkshire, Wilkes Drive, Sunnybrook, Village Lake and Lake Lee Estates areas,

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that her former husband “never got physical,” “never lost control,” and “never threatened to hurt me in any way.” Dan Edwards will continue to testify Tuesday at 9:30 a.m.; he had not been cross-examined Monday.

“was going to smear (Dan Edwards’) name and break him.” He said he saw Logan Edwards hit Dan Edwards in the parking lot that same evening. Dan Edwards’ first wife, Sandy Edwards, testified

its community center rates Thursday to make it more affordable to residents. Prior to the change, a three-hour reservation at the community center cost town residents $100 and non-residents $200, plus charges to use the sound system. Rates dropped to $60 for residents and $120 for non-residents to rent out the space for half a day. A $100 refundable deposit is charged to both residents and non-residents, but no additional fees are added.

Bradshaw said. Both targeted unlocked cars with GPSs and other electronics. But police have recovered the items Sasser stole during car break-ins at Brooks Farms and Rolling Hills. “He was riding on a bicycle at 3 a.m. with the stolen items,” he said. “We were able to connect him to Rolling Hills because the bicycle was stolen the day before.” Police didn’t know where the items came from when they charged him with drug paraphernalia, Bradshaw said. But the next day, calls came in reporting the items missing. All three have a March 4 first court appearance.

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4A

V

iewpoint

Tuesday, January 26, 2010

www.enquirerjournal.com

“Love does not consist in gazing at each other but in looking together in the same direction.”

Antoine de Saint-Exupery

Editor: Stan Hojnacki / shojnacki@theej.com

The Enquirer-Journal

Since 1873, a heritage of commitment and involvement

Publisher: Marvin Enderle Managing Editor: Stan Hojnacki News Editor: Mitch McKell City Editor: Alan Jenkins

A CAROLINA VIEW

Outer Banks a memory?

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ooking for a long-term investment that might enrich your great-grandchildren? How about oceanfront real estate in Eastern Forsyth County? We’re exaggerating, of course. But, the latest projections of rising sea levels raise the very real concern that the Atlantic Ocean will wash over North Carolina’s Outer Banks by the turn of the century. A panel of scientists and engineers brought together by the N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources now says that a sea-level rise of 4.6 feet is possible by 2100. Such a rise would overwhelm the Outer Banks and open the Pamlico Sound to the Atlantic. Sea levels are rising due to global warming. A number of scientific projections have indicated that the Outer Banks will be in danger during the next century as this trend continues. The state panel said the rise will fall into one of three projected ranges: 1.3 feet, 3.3 feet and 4.6 feet - none of which is good. A widely accepted global projection calls for an average 3-foot rise. The panel based its higher projections on the theory that sea levels will not rise at a constant rate. Instead, they will accelerate as the planet further warms and sea levels rise. The panel had two good recommendations: Add more sea-level monitoring stations along our coast and revise projections every five years based on new data. Needless to say, loss of the Outer Banks would be a social and economic disaster for thousands of residents there. A big part of North Carolina history would be lost and the basic nature of our state would change forever. The implications of the sea-level increase go beyond the potential loss of Manteo, Nags Head and Hatteras Island, and a lot of seafood restaurants in the process, however. Sea-level rises large enough to overwhelm the Outer Banks would likely lead to major climatic changes that would affect everyone on the North Carolina mainland, too. Storms would hit the East more violently, and growing seasons could be seriously disrupted. It is much in vogue these days to deny that climate scientists know what they are talking about, to dismiss global-warming concerns as politically motivated and to argue that man can continue to behave as he has for the past two centuries. But that is a dangerous path to take for our children and their children. Global warming is real, and the great majority of climate scientists say man is contributing. If we don’t begin to heed their advice, the day will come when our great-grandchildren will know nothing more of the Outer Banks than what they read about them in history texts. Winston Salem Journal

Are corporations people, too? RALEIGH ast week the U.S. Supreme Court issued an opinion that radically alters the way elections can be funded both federally and in North Carolina. The case, Citizens United v. FEC, permits corporations to spend freely in order to influence elections. It doesn’t matter if the corporation is large or small, based here in the U.S. or in a foreign country. In a 5-4 decision, the court essentially ruled that when it comes to money and politics, corporations have rights no different than you and me. The decision doesn’t affect just how campaigns are funded. In a strange way, this decision redefines what it means to be human. Corporations don’t live and breathe and they cannot run or serve in office. But in giving corporations First Amendment rights, the court has bestowed an equality to them that doesn’t make much sense. Although the word “corporation” stems from the Latin for “form into a body,” they aren’t living things. They are creatures of the state. From a legal perspective, corporations are fictional stand-ins that were created to help facilitate the movement of capital. It makes sense for society to have corporations because it lets us pool resources and share dividends. The fiction, however, only goes so far. We don’t let corporations get married or adopt kids. And if a corporation breaks the law, it is the real human beings behind the corporation who go to jail. It’s not as if we stick some corporate charter behind bars. The Supreme Court likely

L

Damon Circosta Columnist

was not out to change our concept of what is human and what is not. Its decision last week had little to do with biology and a whole lot more to do with economics. Elections are a big business. Since the Watergate scandal, reformers have been trying to curb the corruption that can occur when mixing money and politics. On the other side of that fight are those who wish to benefit from the favors that come from generous contributions. The reformers were making some slow but steady progress. In 2002, Congress passed the landmark Bipartisan Campaign Reform Act, otherwise known as McCain-Feingold. In 2003, the Supreme Court blessed those reforms by holding the legislation to be constitutional. No one was claiming that our elections were free of influence, but thanks to the law, some of the most egregious excesses were gone. Progress was being made, but one should never underestimate the power of concentrated wealth. In 2007, after the departure of moderate Justice Sandra Day O’Connor, the Supreme Court began to take a much harsher view towards campaign reform. In a string of cases the court turned back the clock on the very same reforms it had

blessed just a few years earlier. Most everyone is in agreement that this latest ruling is a seismic shift to the political landscape and that corporate dollars will be playing a frontand-center role in our elections. Some have even joked that our legislators will sew sponsorship patches on their suits like NASCAR drivers, naming legislation after companies, such as: “Health-care reform brought t you by Pfizer.” As living, breathing citizens (not their corporate fictional counterparts) our only hope is to use our First Amendment rights to speak out. It might be difficult for our legislators to hear us with all those corporate dollars drowning us out, but there are still many good public servants willing to listen to their constituents. Surprisingly, some of the very corporations who were granted fictional personhood also see the folly in this Supreme Court decision. In the aftermath of the ruling several CEOs sent a letter to Congress asking it to enact public campaign financing. They see this dash for cash as a long-term problem, even if they might reap some shortterm benefit. Indeed, in its decision to craft “people” from corporations, the Supreme Court may have created a Frankenstein’s monster that will menace our democracy for years to come. • Damon Circosta is the executive director of the N.C. Center for Voter Education, a Raleighbased nonprofit and nonpartisan organization, dedicated to helping citizens more fully participate in democracy.

William Friday and the Class of 1948 study group About 65 years ago in the winter of 1946, a group of World War II veterans enrolled in the class of 1948 at UNC Law School and formed a study group that, some of us believe, had a important and positive influence on North Carolina’s history. One of the members of that group, former state senator John Jordan, explained some of that history the other day at a luncheon hosted by the North Carolina Bar Association. The Bar Association invited its Board of Governors and other leaders to honor former UNC President William Friday. These days most North Carolinians know President Friday not as the university president, but as host, since 1971, of UNCTV’s interview program, “North Carolina People.” Every week Friday introduces us to prominent and interesting fellow citizens, most of whom we would otherwise never get to know. Even more important, Friday’s interviews and the way he conducts them makes his guests into our neighbors. His program builds on and maintains a

D.G

Martin Columnist

sense of community that is one of North Carolina’s important strengths. It is a precious asset that is increasingly threatened by modern pressures that tend to drive us inward and away from connections to a statewide community. If there were nothing else on Friday’s list of contributions, this weekly gift would be enough. But there is so much more— too much to try to summarize here, including 30 years as a university president and another post retirement career as the leader of the Kenan Trust and William Rand Kenan Fund. What does all this have to do

with the law school Class of 1948 Study Group? And what does it have to do with the Bar Association’s honor for Friday? Something very few North Carolinians know is that William Friday was a lawyer and that he was a member of that Class of 1948 Study Group. John Jordan explained that, although Friday had passed by a career in law, he used the skills of advocate and mediator over and over again to meet the challenges that faced the university. There were many, including several that could have ruined the University like the Speaker Ban Law, a season of scandal in collegiate athletics, and a battle with the Federal Government about the management of the desegregation of the University’s multiple campuses. Another thing that many North Carolinians do not know is that Friday could always call on members of the Study Group for help. Jordan and the late William Deese were long serving members of the University’s Board of Governors,

“These days most North Carolinians know President Friday not as the university president, but as host, since 1971, of UNC-TV’s interview program, “North Carolina People.” and each served as Chair, standing by Friday in the toughest of times. Another member of the Study Group, William Aycock, taught law and, at Friday’s request, served as Chancellor of UNC-Chapel Hill during the tumultuous 1960s. Another member, Dickson Phillips, was dean of the UNC Law School before becoming a judge on the U.S. Court of Appeals. Acknowledging the Bar Association’s honor, Friday explained how the members of

the Study Group were part of the World War II generation that Tom Brokaw described as “The Greatest Generation.” “We grew up in the depression and after four years in the military, we knew we were the lucky ones that got to come home…and we just decided to contribute.” Then, Friday looked out over the group of lawyers and said that North Carolina lawyers, like the ones in his Study Group, were part of a profession with a long tradition. “There is an added ingredient. We must do something extra to leave this place a little better.” If more of us followed Friday’s admonition and the example of the Class of 1948 Study Group, North Carolina could look forward to another long season of progress. D.G. Martin is hosting his final season of UNC-TV’s North Carolina Bookwatch, which airs Sundays at 5 p.m. For more information or to view prior programs visit the webpage at www.unctv.org/ncbookwatch/


The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, January 26, 2010 / 5A

Obama plans to help a middle class ‘under assault’ President’s message tries to lift spirits WASHINGTON (AP) — Declaring America’s middle class is “under assault,” President Barack Obama unveiled plans Monday to help hurting families pay their bills, save for retirement and care for their kids and aging parents. His comments previewed Wednesday’s State of the Union Address. Obama’s proposals won’t create jobs, but he said they could “re-establish some of the security that’s slipped away.” His remarks aimed to lift the nation’s dour mood and show he is in touch with the daily struggles of millions of people as resentment runs high about lost jobs and the economy. The initiatives amount to a package of tax credits, spending expansions and new mandates on employers to encourage retirement savings by workers. Most of them will be included in Obama’s budget for the fiscal year starting Oct. 1, and they will require approval from Con-

gress. Obama will release that budget Feb. 1. The president’s latest rollout of ideas served as a preview of his primetime State of the Union address. The economic elements of that speech will also cover Obama’s plans to boost job creation and reduce swelling budget deficits — areas of concern to the public. Obama’s address will outline his second-year agenda across a spectrum of issues, including tighter rules on Wall Street behavior and a push for financial discipline in Washington. He also is expected to touch on the issue of gays in the military. In an interview Monday, Obama defended his agenda and said he would not support only smaller issues that avoid controversy. “I will not slow down in terms going after the big problems,” he told ABC News. Among the president’s economic ideas: — Nearly doubling the tax credit that families making under $85,000 can receive for child care costs, with some help for families earning up to $115,000, too. — Capping the size

“We’re talking about knowing your pension is safe, your health insurance is reliable, your elderly parents and your children are going to be cared for, your neighborhood is safe.”

— Vice president Joe Biden

in double digits, and the economy is the public’s top concern. Yet Obama said that squeezed families need help in other ways, too: paying for child care, helping out aging parents, saving for retirement, paying off college debt. What matters ultimately to people, Obama said, is “whether they see some progress in their own lives. So we’re going to keep fighting to rebuild our economy so that hard work is once again rewarded, wages and incomes are once again rising, the middle class is once again growing.” Less clear was how much the programs would cost or where the money would come from. Officials deferred comment until the release of the budget.

of periodic federal college loan repayments at 10 percent of borrowers’ discretionary income to make payments more affordable. — Increasing by $1.6 billion the money pumped into a federal fund to help working parents pay for child care, covering an estimated 235,000 additional children. — Requiring employers who don’t offer 401(k) retirement plans to offer direct-deposit IRAs for their employees, with exemptions for the smallest firms. — Spending more than $100 million to help people care for their elderly parents and get support for themselves as well. The White House maintained that its imperative still is to create jobs. Unemployment remains

Obama, whose poll numbers are off, is trying to sharpen his economic message in a way that shows people he is on their side. White House officials say they know people have been turned off by the long, messy fight for health insurance reform. Plus, there’s a perception that families have gotten far less help than big banks. The economy is growing, but not fast enough to bring down widespread joblessness. The unemployment rate is at 10 percent and most economists say it could take until at least 2015 for it to return to more normal levels. The plans Obama set forth came from the yearlong work of a task force, led by Vice President Joe Biden, that was charged with helping the middle class. “We’re talking about dignity. We’re talking about security,” Biden said. “We’re talking about knowing your pension is safe, your health insurance is reliable, your elderly parents and your children are going to be cared for, your neighborhood is safe.” Obama’s initiatives also include expanding and simplifying a tax credit

that matches retirement savings, and making 401(k) rules easier to understand. On the matter of gays in the military, Obama has vowed to lift the ban on gays serving openly, and several lawmakers support a repeal of the law. But some senior military advisers and members of Congress have urged the president not to shake up the status quo at a time of two wars. Sen. Carl Levin, chairman of the Armed Services Committee, said he had planned to convene a hearing on the issue in January, but that the Obama administration asked him to hold off until the president’s national address. “We were told by the Pentagon that they expected the president to say something in the State of the Union on it,” Levin said. Levin, who favors repealing the law, said he does not know what Obama will say. He said he plans to hold hearings in February and would like to hear testimony from Defense Secretary Robert Gates and Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Gen. Mike Mullen.

Wilmington developer leaves NC toll road board RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A Wilmington businessman politically connected to former Gov. Mike Easley resigned Monday from the state toll road authority, days after a former Easley aide was indicted on charges of unlawfully profiting from a development involving the businessman. Lanny Wilson sent his letter resigning from the North Carolina Turnpike Authority board of directors to Senate leader Marc Basnight, D-Dare, who had picked him for the panel. Wilson, who was the authority’s vice chairman, didn’t give a reason for his departure in the three-sentence letter. Last Thursday, Wilson resigned from the state Board of Transportation because he wanted to “avoid further unnecessary distractions” that would impede Gov. Beverly Perdue’s transportation reforms, according to his resignation letter.

The Board of Transportation letter was released hours before a federal grand jury indicted former Easley aide Ruffin Poole on 51 federal corruption charges, including extortion, bribery and money laundering. Poole was Easley’s former special counsel and aide during the governor’s two terms. Government prosecutors allege Poole accepted gifts from a “Wilmington financier” unidentified in the indictment. The indictment said Easley appointed the financier to the transportation board in 2001, just as Wilson was. Wilson was the only board member from Wilmington. Poole also used his position to help expedite coastal developments while making returns of at least 25 percent on investments in two of the same properties the financier had invested in as well, according to pros-

Charged contractors had checkered military pasts RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) — A pair of former Blackwater contractors charged with murdering two people in Afghanistan had checkered pasts with the military before getting hired to work overseas, according to service records disclosed in recent U.S. court hearings. The troubled backgrounds of the two men — including instances of violence, drug use and disregard for authority — are a first sign that Xe, the company formerly known as Blackwater, was staffing its war-zone work force with contractors who might not be suited for the job. Drotleff ’s three-year service in the Marines ended with an other-than-honorable discharge in 2001 Cannon, 27, was discharged from the Army after going AWOL and testing positive for cocaine. Both men were indicted by a federal grand jury in Virginia this month on two counts of second-degree murder, attempted murder and weapons charges in a 2008 shooting along a Kabul road. They had been in Afghanistan working for Xe subsidiary Paravant under a Department of Defense contract to provide weapons training to the Afghan National Army.

“This resignation is long overdue, and should have been demanded by Governor Perdue long ago” — state GOP chairman Tom Fetzer

ecutors. Wilson had been identified years ago as helping finance the sale of Cannonsgate in Carteret County, one of the developments named in the indictment. Wilson’s lawyer didn’t return a phone call seeking comment. Poole hadn’t turned himself to federal authorities as of Monday. Senate Minority Leader Phil Berger, R-Rockingham, had released a statement Monday before Wilson’s resignation calling on him to step down from the turnpike authority or Perdue to force him out. “This resignation is

long overdue, and should have been demanded by Governor Perdue long ago,” state GOP chairman Tom Fetzer said in a news release. Wilson had raised money for Easley and Perdue’s campaigns. At a news conference, Fetzer called on Perdue to look further at Wilson’s campaign fundraising activities and asked why Perdue hadn’t called on Wilson’s resignation from the Board of Transportation months ago. Wilson was reappointed to the Board of Transportation during the Easley administration but Per-

due had never acted on whether to appoint him again, so he remained on the board in the meantime. During a State Board of Elections hearing in October investigating Easley’s campaign committee, Wilson testified he wrote a check for the state Democratic Party believing it would go to help Easley’s campaign. Donations can’t be earmarked or funneled to another campaign. Wilson hasn’t been charged with any crimes. The elections board didn’t

accuse the state party of wrongdoing but the party had to forfeit a Wilson donation. Fetzer’s comments “are nothing more than an attempt to score cheap political points,” state Democratic Party Chairman Young said. Perdue spokeswoman Chrissy Pearson said that Perdue has made it clear she would force the governor’s appointees to boards and commissions to resign if they are indicted or refuse to cooperate in an investigation.

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6A / Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Enquirer-Journal

Teen embarrassments turn into fond memories DEAR ABBY: I had to respond to “Blushing in San Francisco” (Nov. 21), the 11-year-old girl who’s embarrassed because her mother sings and dances in the mall. I was that mother a few years ago. My daughter and I shopped in trendy stores where the music was really loud, and when she saw me bob my head and move to the music, she would shake her head “no.” I’d do it again -- just to torture her. As she tried on clothes, she would pop out and say, “Have you been dancing again? This is a no-dancing zone!” We laugh about it now. When I teach, I tell my students what I did. They tell me unanimously that they would die if I were their mom -- to which I respond that it’s my job to make them miserable. As the Bee Gees sang, “You should be daaaancin’, yeah!”

Dear Abby Columnist

-- STILL DANCING IN GRANITE CITY, ILL. DEAR STILL DANCING: Your letter was among hundreds I received pointing out that “Blushing in San Francisco’s” dilemma is universal. Read on: DEAR ABBY: My husband is a contractor, and his office is in our home. He enjoys playing music while he works, and we often hear him singing happily along. One evening when my daughter was 11, she had some friends over and was

trying her best to ignore the fact that her dad was singing while he worked, and hoping her friends wouldn’t notice. All went well until Shania Twain came on and he started singing along to “Man! I Feel Like a Woman!” We all laughed hysterically, and it’s still one of our favorite memories. My daughter saw that her dad could laugh at himself, and that her friends enjoyed the humor without losing respect for him. Not to take oneself too seriously was the lesson learned. It’s one we all need reminding about occasionally. -- STILL LAUGHING IN SAN JOSE DEAR ABBY: When my daughter was about 8, I was walking her to the door of her school and thought I’d have some fun with her, so I started acting like a cross between the Hunchback of Notre Dame, Dracula and

Horoscopes Jan. 26, 2010

Dennis the Menace take kindly to it at all. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -Be smart, and don’t talk critically about someone in front of others who know and like this person, even if what you say is true. Listeners are likely to resent you. SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) -When put in charge of a group involvement, creating pointless rules will only make you look foolish in the eyes of others. Let each person volunteer what he or she is capable of doing. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec. 21) -- If you pretend to be knowledgeable about something that you’re not, prepare for a rude awakening. It will not make you look good in the eyes of another; you will be found out and embarrassed. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) -- If you are enthusiastic about some exciting plans you’ve made, avoid telling a negative friend. Chances are your pal will do nothing but put doubt and misgivings in your mind.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19) -- When doing business with a new and unfamiliar firm, get everything in writing and study it beforehand. Conduct business only after you are completely satisfied. PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) -Usually, you’re thoughtful about not telling a down-and-out friend about the good things happening in your life. But in your excitement, you might blurt it all out at this time. ARIES (March 21-April 19) -- Chances are you’ll have little patience for handling small details. If you’re smart, you’ll temporarily put aside any assign-

ment that requires an aptitude for dealing with them. TAURUS (April 20-May 20) -- You’ll have little patience for details so be extra careful when dealing with business involvements. If you forget important little things, it could mean a big loss. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- Don’t put on affectations because it could blemish your image. True friends appreciate you for who you are, so there’s no need to act superior. CANCER (June 21-July 22) -You might withhold something important from another out of spite. Sadly, the one you hurt the most will be yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- If in your mind you are not properly acknowledged for a past action, resentment might cause more bitterness than you bargained for. Others won’t be anxious to be your friend. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) -- Your mobility and independence might be more important than usual. Steer clear of those who can place restrictions on your time, because you won’t

Blondie

by Dean Young & Mike Gersher

ASTRO-GRAPH By Bernice Bede Osol Improving your knowledge in your chosen field of endeavor will pay large dividends in the year ahead. Many opportunities loom on the horizon, but until you know about them, you won’t be able to take advantage.

Garfield

Frank and Ernest

Hagar the Horrible

Dilbert

the Mummy. When I asked if I was embarrassing her, she responded: “Why would I be embarrassed? You’re the one acting silly!” I immediately stopped because she was right. What she understood at her tender age was that you can only be responsible for your own actions. -- MOM IN HAMILTON, ONTARIO, CANADA DEAR ABBY: My advice to “Blushing” is to enjoy her mother while she has her. When I was in my teens, my dad mortified me with his dancing whenever we went to the grocery store. While pushing his shopping cart, Dad would bebop up and down the aisles. As an adolescent, it embarrassed me to no end. I look back now and regard my father’s dancing fondly -- mainly because I have two delightful small children who inherited their grandfather’s

by Bob Thaves

by Chris Browne

DEAR ABBY: I was embarrassed every time I went to the mall with my mom because she’d usually burst into show tunes before we got out of the parking lot. I am now 40, and I sing in parking lots, too. I finally understand that the most valuable lesson my mother ever taught me was to let that song in my heart out and not care what anybody else thinks. It’s empowering, and “Blushing” should give it a try. -- SECONDGENERATION SINGER DEAR SINGER: One of these days, try it in a parking structure. The acoustics are as good as any you’ll find in a recording studio. -- LA-LA IN L.A. aka DEAR ABBY

Family Circus

Encourage your children to read the newspaper.

Copyright 2010 Newspaper Enterprise Assn.

by Jim Davis

love of dancing. When I see them “perform,” I know my dad is looking down from heaven and chuckling, too. -PROUD MOM IN GEORGIA

B.C.

The Born Loser

Andy Capp

The Wizard of Id

by Scott Adams Peanuts

by Johnny Hart

by Art Sansom

by Reggie Smythe

by Bryant Parker & Johnny Hart

by Charles M. Schultz


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8A / Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Enquirer-Journal

Break the mold and plant something new in your garden I like to observe people. I have for a number of years. You can learn quite a bit about people, if you pay attention. I believe most people have a group mentality. As examples, for years most families purchased minivans. Then, it is as if someone flipped a switch and most purchased SUVs. I am not saying that is wrong or right; I am just saying it is what people do. Likewise, most people plant what is safe. They plant what they have seen many others use in their landscape. It works. It is usually plain. It is ordinary. It is repetitive. That is why you see so many Bradford pears, Leyland cypress, Nellie Stevens hollies and Japanese hollies. There are many of those examples, but you get the point. Historians say that hindsight is only useful to learn from your mistakes. In other words, you do not want to repeat mistakes. If there were a way to go back and start over in planting our landscape, you would not readily recognize the plants around our home. They would be different. They would be unique. They would not have that safe “herd” look.

Tom Walden Columnist

To a degree, I have always been like that. Thirteen years ago, I purchased a Dodge RAM pickup because no one else owned one. They drove almost all Ford and Chevy pick-ups. Since then, the Dodge RAM seems to be on every corner. That is why I have a Hardy Sugar Cane plant. This giant grass can reach 12 feet tall and wide. It is still a great plant, but few gardeners use it, even though it has no pests or diseases. Some years ago, I noticed some native plants that the FBI could not find in most gardeners’ landscape. We purchased one of these that we love at first sight, even though the grower did not even know its name. We found it at a flea market that

was at the foothills of the NC Mountains. An older man had this interesting plant for sale. After we brought it home and researched it, I found it was a ‘Texas Star’ hibiscus. I have scores of this big flowered native I am growing for the Master Gardener’s Spring Plant Sale. After every one of them finds a new home, it will still be vastly underused. I can say the same thing about native honeysuckle vines. I cannot grow enough Alabama Crimson honeysuckles. One reason is that they are difficult to propagate. I have another native honeysuckle that is named ‘John Clayton’. It is identical to ‘Alabama Crimson’, except its flowers are a medium yellow instead of red. It is another example of a great plant that I seldom see. If gardeners choose a vine, they will usually select large flowered hybrid clematis, wisteria or a Carolina jessamine. Those are good vines in their place. However, don’t you want something different, unique and unusual? The point I am making is, if I had not decided to grow something that wasn’t the norm, I would have missed a number of

talked about 126 plants. That seemed like a lot until he said they carry now, 18,600 different plants. That is not total plants. Those plants are different in some way. They specialize in perennials, woody plants and some in-between the two. Plant Delights funds expeditions all over the world searching for new or different plants. One thing I really like is that they do not collect wild plants or deal with endangered species. Their breeding program is probably up there with many leading universities. If you desire something different, unusual or unique, Plant Delights may be worth checking out. Just remember, plants are more expensive when you order by mail. In addition, they are always smaller, due to shipping concerns. Tony Avent gave a statement I have pondered a number of times. It’s true for me and for you. It is “You don’t learn from what you already know”. In other words, if you plant the usual items, year after year, you will never learn anything new. To that thought, I add, “Plant something different!”

great plants. Something new and different was the subject of an informative seminar held at Daniel Stowe Botanical Gardens. It was all about new or under used perennials. The guest speaker was Tony Avent, owner of Plant Delights Nursery in Raleigh. Nadine, Becky Walters and I made a night of it and we were in plant heaven. You know I am a proponent of local nurseries. These places should get the majority of our business. I have also mentioned that there are definite times when you want to order different, unusual or specialty plants. Plant Delights Nursery is a great mail order source if you need a special plant, not available locally. They are not open to the public year round like local nurseries. Everything is done by phone, internet or mail. I have to say though; they do an excellent job with their niche of the gardening business. The main problem usually with ordering plants by mail is that they can arrive in very poor shape or dead. That has never been my experience with Plant Delights. Tony Avent showed and

The hardiest of house plants By David Bare

Media General News Service

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The Enquirer-Journal Weather Today

Tonight

Wednesday

Thursday

Friday

Saturday

Sunny

Clear

Sunny

Mostly Sunny

Rain Likely

Snow Possible

50º

28º

51º 29º

60º 36º

41º 32º

40º 22º

North Carolina State Forecast

In-Depth Forecast Today we will see sunny skies with a high temperature of 50º, humidity of 42% and an overnight low of 28º. The record high temperature for today is 77º set in 1950. The record low temperature is 1º set in 1940. Wednesday, skies will remain sunny with a high temperature of 51º.

Almanac Yesterday’s Temperatures High . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .65 Low . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .50 Yesterday’s Precipitation Precipitation . . . . . . . . . . . . . .0.18"

Tarboro 51/28 Washington Asheville 54/30 Greensboro Raleigh 40/24 47/26 50/27 Charlotte Cape 50/26 New Bern Hatteras Monroe Fayetteville 54/29 50/35 Shown is today’s weather. 50/28 52/29 Wilmington Temperatures are today’s 56/33 highs and tonight’s lows.

Sun and Moon

110s 100s 90s 80s 70s 60s 50s 40s 30s 20s 10s 0s

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Last 2/5

New 2/13

First 2/21

Local UV Index

H H This map shows high temperatures, type of precipitation expected and location of frontal systems at noon.

0 - 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11+ Cold Front

UV Index

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Albemarle . . . . . .49/27 Brevard . . . . . . . .41/26 Burlington . . . . . .47/26 Cape Fear . . . . . .51/28 Emerald Isle . . . .54/34 Fort Bragg . . . . . . . .52/28 Gastonia . . . . . . .50/29 Grandfather Mtn. .25/21 Greenville . . . . . .53/30 Hendersonville . .42/25 Hickory . . . . . . . .46/26 Jacksonville . . . .54/27 Kinston . . . . . . . .53/28 Kitty Hawk . . . . . .50/34 Mount Mitchell . .49/27 Roanoke Rapids .49/27 Southern Pines . .51/28 Swanquarter . . . .52/32 Wilkesboro . . . . .46/26 Williamston . . . . .53/30 Yanceyville . . . . .48/27 Zebulon . . . . . . . .50/27

s . .49/29 s s . .50/26 s s . .47/29 s s . .49/30 s s . .50/39 s s . .52/28 s s . .53/29 s sn .41/22 s s . .50/32 s s . .48/26 s s . .50/28 s s . .51/36 s s . .50/32 s s . .49/38 s s . .51/28 s s . .47/29 s s . .50/30 s s . .48/34 s s . .43/27 s s . .49/32 s s . .45/28 s s . .48/30 s

Low Pressure High Pressure

High: 85° in Fort Myers, Fla. Low: -9° in Mammoth Lakes, Calif.

Across The Nation

Around The World

Today Wednesday

Today Wednesday

City

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Atlanta . . . . . . . . .53/28 Baltimore . . . . . . .44/29 Chicago . . . . . . . .27/20 Denver . . . . . . . . .45/20 Detroit . . . . . . . . .35/22 Houston . . . . . . . . . .70/54 Indianapolis . . . .27/19 Los Angeles . . . .59/51 Miami . . . . . . . . . .73/56 Minneapolis . . . . .14/1 New York . . . . . . .46/34 Orlando . . . . . . . .66/42 Philadelphia . . . .47/30 Reno . . . . . . . . . .42/27 Sacramento . . . . .51/38 Salem, OR . . . . . .50/35 Salt Lake City . . .38/25 San Francisco . . .58/45 Seattle . . . . . . . . .47/37 Syracuse . . . . . . .37/24 Tampa . . . . . . . . .67/45 Washington, DC .44/28

s . .57/33 s s . .39/30 s mc . .26/9 sn pc .37/15 pc mc .30/21 mc s . .71/62 mc cl . .34/22 mc t . .60/49 pc s . .72/61 s s . .12/-1 s pc .45/34 pc s . .68/45 s pc .43/31 pc sh .39/23 s sh .54/41 s mc .49/37 s sn .38/22 mc sh .57/44 pc mc .46/38 pc sn .33/24 sn s . .70/48 s s . .40/30 s

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dim light, good or poor soil. Just don’t keep it constantly moist. Zamioculcas will get about 2- to 3-feet high if happy, and it puts out regular new fernlike growth. Like any plant, give it everything it desires and it will thrive. But unlike many, if you ignore the ZZ it keeps on chugging. But the thing about Zamioculcas is that not only can it act like a plastic plant, it looks like one, too. If you want something a little more “life like,” check out a Chinese evergreen. Aglaonema is its botanical name, but if you go into the nursery asking for that they might send you to the pharmacy. Masses of lance-shaped, foot-long leaves are produced on slender canes that are usually obscured by the leaves.

4<G@IODI@±*JQ@±*DI@N

Kyla, Happy Valentine’s Day. We love you so much little girl! Love, Nana & Papaw

Today’s National Map

Sunrise today . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7:25 a.m. Sunset tonight . . . . . . . . . . . . .5:45 p.m. Moonrise today . . . . . . . . . . . .1:48 p.m. Moonset today . . . . . . . . . . . . .4:01 a.m.

Full 1/30

Durham 49/27

Winston-Salem 46/25

Helping folks to understand plant care is a big part of what I do every day. Usually a thorough understanding of the conditions that make a plant thrive translates into better plant care. But not always. Try as we may, there are those out there who refuse to think of house plants as living things with specific needs -- like water and sunlight. Fear not, though, for there are plants with a will to live that outstrips owner disregard. Consider the semisucculent Zamioculcas zamifolia -- or ZZ plant for short. A native of East Africa, including Zanzibar and Zimbabwe, it is an atypical member of

the aroid family, having leaves arranged bipinnately, like a fern, and thick succulent growth. Very glossy, almost shellacked-looking leaves are symmetrically arranged along the swollen petiole or leaf stem. In its natural habitat, the ZZ experiences periods of both wet and dry conditions and part shade. But the plant seems tolerant of dim light and occasional watering in the house. It seems to put up with everything short of overwatering. The plant will thrive if it’s potted in a well-drained mix, such as potting soil amended with sand and perlite or gravel, and given regular moisture. But the rules are negotiable. It seems to put up with about anything you throw at it: bright light,

Hi/Lo Wx Hi/Lo Wx

Acapulco . . . . . . .84/70 Athens . . . . . . . . .46/40 Baghdad . . . . . . .57/36 Beijing . . . . . . . . .35/22 Berlin . . . . . . . . . . .15/3 Cairo . . . . . . . . . . . .66/51 Hong Kong . . . . .63/61 London . . . . . . . .37/28 Madrid . . . . . . . . .45/27 Mexico City . . . . .75/45 Moscow . . . . . . . . .0/-6 Nassau . . . . . . . .76/64 Paris . . . . . . . . . .31/21 Rio de Janeiro . . .82/74 Rome . . . . . . . . . .52/43 San Juan . . . . . . .82/72 Stockholm . . . . . .20/16 Tokyo . . . . . . . . . .49/37 Toronto . . . . . . . .32/23

s . .87/72 s pc .52/41 ra s . .59/36 s s . .40/20 s pc . .24/4 mc pc .68/53 pc mc .70/55 sh pc .42/29 sh rs .40/24 s s . .78/47 s cl . . .4/-7 mc sh .74/64 pc pc .34/23 pc t . .85/74 t ra .49/36 ra sh .83/73 sh pc .26/17 sn s . .55/37 s sn .29/24 sn

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S ports

Editor: Jerry Snow (261-2225) jsnow@theej.com

WORTH A LOOK Men’s college basketball Clemson at Boston College 7 p.m., ESPN2

In a slump Nuggets hand Bobcats third straight loss 3B Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Section B

One of the state’s best Monroe High’s Cornejo named to honorary team

North Carolina at N.C. State 9 p.m., RAYCOM

BY JUSTIN MURDOCK

WHO’S NEWS Brady says he won’t need surgery

BOSTON (AP) — Tom Brady said Monday he won’t need surgery for rib and finger injuries that bothered him for much of the season. The New England Patriots quarterback described his ailments as “just bumps and bruises” that all players deal BRADY with. “I’m feeling good. I really am,” Brady said at a commercial appearance. “I’m excited I don’t have to have surgery this offseason. A year ago at this time, there were all these concerns about whether I was going to play this year. It’s nice to be in an offseason where I really feel I can get started right away.” Brady missed all but the first quarter of the 2008 season with a left knee injury that required surgery during that season. He played all 17 games this season, ending with the Patriots’ 33-14 loss to the Baltimore Ravens in the first round of the playoffs. Brady was selected as an AFC backup quarterback for the Pro Bowl scheduled for Sunday in Miami but withdrew because of the injury to his finger, the Patriots said.

Crittenton pleads guilty to gun charge

WASHINGTON (AP) — Washington Wizards guard Javaris Crittenton pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor gun charge Monday, explaining he had a pistol because he feared teammate Gilbert Arenas would shoot him or blow up his car after the two argued over a card game. Crittenton The hearing marked the first time authorities confirmed Crittenton was the other player involved in the confrontation with Arenas, who pleaded guilty Jan. 15 to a felony gun charge. D.C. Superior Court Senior Judge Bruce Beaudin sentenced Crittenton, 22, to a year of unsupervised probation after Crittenton pleaded guilty to misdemeanor possession of an unregistered firearm. Beaudin ordered Crittenton to mentor young people in Washington and to help with relief efforts for Haiti. Beaudin didn’t order a specific amount of community service but said his lawyer must report regularly on the work. Crittenton must also pay a $1,000 fine and $250 into a victims’ fund.

Paraguay soccer star shot in head

MEXICO CITY (AP) — Salvador Cabanas, the top player on Paraguay’s World Cup team, was shot in the head before dawn Monday in the bathroom of a bar in a well-off neighborhood in Mexico City. The 29-year-old striker underwent surgery in which doctors failed to remove a bullet lodged in his skull. Dr. Ernesto Martinez, who was part of the surgical team, said “we cannot guarantee that his life is out of danger.” He called the player’s condition stable. Mexico City Attorney General Miguel Angel Mancera visited the bar and said from the crime scene robbery did not appear a motive “because nothing was taken.” Cabanes plays for the Mexico City team America. Club president Michel Bauer said Cabanas was conscious when he arrived at the hospital and was speaking as he awaited surgery.

+

Monroe coach Rick Kukor. “Despite missing five games with a twistMONROE ed knee, he still manThe boys soccer team aged to lead the team in at Monroe High is com- goals and finish second ing off its best season in assists. He’s very in recent history, and athletic, fast and he led Jesus Cornejo was vi- by example.” tal to the Redhawks’ Cornejo, a four-year success. starter and three-year Cornejo, a senior, captain for the Redscored a team-high 21 hawks, was also named goals to help Monroe all-region and all-Rocky finish with an River Confer18-5 record and ence this past advance to the season. 1A state semi“We’re proud finals. He was of (Jesus),” said also second on Kukor. “He’s the team in asjust an excepsists with nine. tional young For his stelman that led our lar season, program this Cornejo was past season.” voted to the 1A Cornejo Monroe finall-state team ished tied for by the North Carolina second with Piedmont Soccer Coaches Asso- in the Rocky River Conciation. ference standings beOnly three other play- hind Cuthbertson, but ers in Union County was the top 1A seed for were voted all-state, in- the playoffs since the cluding Marvin Ridge’s Panthers and Cavaliers Matt Risher (3A) and are part of the 2A clasGarrett Condon (3A) sification. and Cuthbertson’s The Redhawks finTrent Johnson (2A). ished third in the final “Jesus had a great 1A state poll by eurosseason for us,” said portscoreboard.com. E-J Sports Writer

Pro tennis Australian Open, quarterfinals 9 p.m., ESPN2

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Monroe’s Jesus Cornejo (front) was named all-state after scoring 21 goals last season.

New tests allowing for better detection of concussions Editor’s Note: Piedmont High began taking part in this concussion testing program in the summer of 2009: By Richard Gould

Media General News Service

HICKORY South Caldwell High football players spent their summer memorizing and repeating strings of unrelated words like candle, paper, sugar, sandwich and wagon. The players laughed self-consciously as they did sets of five jumping jacks, sit-ups, push-ups and knee bends to test their balance. Then they recited jumbled numbers and the months of the year in reverse order. When each finished the 5-minute test, athletic trainer Mark Davis sent him back

to the weight room to summon another player to be put through the drill. Davis spent two months administering the tests and making detailed notes of the players’ performances. Why was every one of the school’s football players given what some have described as an elaborate field sobriety test? Peyton Manning, Troy Polamalu and the head of the NFL Players Association Kevin Mawae know the answer. So does Hall of Famer Troy Aikman, who suffered as many as 10 concussions in his 11-year pro football career. Six South Caldwell players suffered concussions this season. Multiple concussions in a short period can cause Second Impact Syndrome - a potentially lethal condition especially preva-

lent among high school-aged and younger athletes, said South Caldwell team doctor Edward Bujold. Bujold’s been the team doctor for nearly 20 years and knows the danger and prevalence of concussions in football. That’s why he worked with Davis to administer the Standardized Assessment of Concussion to every football player on the team.

The test

The SAC is a diagnostic tool. “It’s seven tests to gauge mental function,” Davis said. “In the preseason you give all the kids a baseline. Then, during the football season we can re-test them if they suffer a concussion.”

Pirates on 7-game win streak

Conference basketball standings Involving Union County schools:

Southern Carolina Boys

By JERRY SNOW

Team Conf. Overall Weddington 3-1 9-8 Marvin Ridge 3-1 6-7 Parkwood 2-2 7-7 Sun Valley 2-2 11-5 Anson Co. 2-2 10-8 Porter Ridge 0-4 4-13

E-J Sports Editor

INDIAN TRAIL Porter Ridge High’s girls carry a seven-game winning streak into tonight’s road game against cross-town rival Sun Valley. The Pirates, now 16-2 overall and 4-0 in the Southern Carolina Conference, are 7-0 since the turn of the decade. Junior forward Kelley Godbout leads the Pirates in scoring (15.6 ppg), rebounding (9.0 rpg), assists (3.0 apg) and steals (3.9 spg); she ranks among the top five in Union County in all four categories. The Pirates have some impressive wins during their current win streak. They beat Piedmont — which stands atop the Rocky River Conference standings — 66-36 on Jan. 13 a day after winning by nine at 13-2 Parkwood (51-42). Sun Valley’s girls enter tonight’s matchup 2-2 and 10-5 overall. The Spartans have two of the area’s top inside players in 6-2 junior forward Stephanie Taylor (12.7 ppg, 8.2 rpg) and 6-1 junior center Jordynn Gaymon (11.3 ppg, 11.2 rpg).

Southern Carolina Girls Team Conf. Overall Porter Ridge 4-0 16-2 Marvin Ridge 3-1 9-5 Parkwood 2-2 13-2 Sun Valley 2-2 10-5 Weddington 1-3 9-9 Anson Co. 0-4 4-13

Rocky River Boys Team Conf. Overall Monroe 9-0 16-1 Berry Academy 7-2 12-5 Forest Hills 7-3 9-8 Piedmont 6-4 8-9 West Stanly 5-5 8-8 Cuthbertson 4-5 8-9 Central Academy 3-5 5-9 North Stanly 1-8 6-10 Union Academy 0-10 0-16

Panthers in first

Piedmont’s girls are on the road tonight against Berry Academy with first place on the line.

See PANTHERS / Page 3B

Rocky River Girls Team Conf. Overall Piedmont 8-2 10-7 North Stanly 7-2 14-2 Berry Academy 7-2 13-4 West Stanly 6-4 11-5 Monroe 5-4 8-8 Forest Hills 4-6 5-11 Union Academy 3-7 4-12 Central Academy 3-5 5-9 Cuthbertson 0-9 0-17

See CONCUSSIONS / Page 2B

Today’s basketball doubleheaders involving Union County schools:

Photo by Jamie Belk

PR junior Kelley Godbout is averaging 15.6 points per game.

Porter Ridge at Sun Valley, 6:15 p.m. Weddington at Marvin Ridge, 6:15 p.m. Parkwood at Anson County, 6:15 p.m. Forest Hills at Central Academy, 6 p.m. Piedmont at Berry Academy, 6:15 p.m. Cuthbertson at West Stanly, 6 p.m. Monroe at North Stanly, 6:15 p.m.


2B / Tuesday, January 26, 2010

Concussions Continued from Page 1B “We don’t send them back to play until they score their baseline,” he said. “It quantifies something we were not able to quantify before.” When a player takes a hard hit and the trainer or coaches think he may have a concussion, he’s taken to the sideline and given the test again. If he scores lower than his baseline, the trainer tells the player and his parents he’s done for the night. “A concrete score eliminates a lot of arguments,” said South Caldwell head football coach Butch Carter. Some doctors say if an athlete gets three concussions in his lifetime, he should never play contact sports again, said Hickory High School team doctor Peter Hurley. Carter said the team’s medical staff decides when a player can return, but as a general rule, two concussions will end an athlete’s season. Referring to South Caldwell’s six players with concussions this season, Bujold said, “I’d say we were pretty lucky this year - they were pretty mild.” It generally takes a player three to 10 days to get a normal score on the test following a concussion. They’re allowed to play again after achieving a normal score and having no symptoms for 10 days, Davis said.

The NFL

Today’s NFL guidelines state, “A player who suffers a concussion should not return to play or practice on the same day if he shows any signs or symptoms of a concussion.” To be allowed to return to play, the player must be medically cleared by the team doctor and an independent neurologist. Until this year, the league al-

lowed players to get back in the game after a concussion, provided they hadn’t lost consciousness. The change came in December after an October congressional probe focused the nation’s attention on concussions and the long-term damage associated with the injury. In the past, the focus was on the short-term symptoms. Now it has shifted to the long-term effects of concussions - depression, dementia and memory loss. Brain scans of people who have suffered multiple concussions over the span of their careers are reminiscent of those who have Alzheimer’s disease, said neurologist Robert Yapundich. Researchers are working to determine whether multiple concussions create dementia or speed its onset in those who are already susceptible to the disease.

Parents and players

Before SAC testing was implemented, parents and athletes often wanted to get the player back in the game as quickly as possible. “One of the frustrations we had was parents not appreciating the seriousness of the injury,” Bujold said. The team doctor would tell the player he couldn’t play and the family would shop around with different doctors until they found one who would give a second opinion allowing the child to return to the game. “It happens quite a bit,” Hurley said. Athletes can underestimate the severity of their injury. While a broken leg makes playing sports impossible for weeks, athletes who go back in the game immediately after “getting their bell rung” may be able to make contributions to the team. “There are some gross motor skills the athlete can probably do after a concussion - it’s the fine motor skills that we worry about,” Yapundich

The Enquirer-Journal

said. “I look at this assessment as the canary in the coal mine.” Bujold and Hurley approached Yapundich to seek his help monitoring players with concussions and ensuring that they’re healthy before they return to the team. The goal is to prevent the onset of serious problems later in life. “Brain loss is brain lost. Period,” Yapundich said. “You’re not going to recover that.” The doctors and athletic trainers needed a low-cost way to evaluate and monitor recovery following concussions. “At the high school level we’re dealing with no budgets and no money,” Bujold said. The SAC fit the bill. The results are concrete and tough to argue with. The test is fast, easy and inexpensive. The software and license cost $500. “We paid out of our pocket for this system,” Bujold said. Since the test has been implemented, it’s taken the heat off athletic trainers, doctors and coaches. Parents and athletes can look at the score and know whether the player can get back in the game.

The future

Now Bujold and Davis are working with Hickory Orthopaedic Center to get the word out and get more schools to use the SAC test next season. Hickory High is already onboard. “The No. 1 thing for all our athletes not just football players - is safety,” said Hickory High School athletic director and head football coach John Worley. “We educate our kids on what to look for and how severe concussions can be.” Both South Caldwell and Hickory High plan to expand SAC testing beyond their football programs to include other sports where head injuries are common. The next sport to be included: Soccer.

Local Events Today High School Basketball Weddington at Marvin Ridge, 6 p.m. Porter Ridge at Sun Valley, 6 p.m. Parkwood at Anson County, 6 p.m. Central Academy at Forest Hills, 6 p.m. Piedmont at Berry Academy, 6 p.m. Cuthbertson at West Stanly, 6 p.m. Monroe at North Stanly, 6 p.m. High School Wrestling Marvin Ridge at Weddington, 7 p.m. Anson at Parkwood, 7 p.m. Sun Valley at Porter Ridge, 7 p.m.

What’s

on

TV?

Today MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL 7 p.m. ESPN — Michigan St. at Michigan ESPN2 — Clemson at Boston College 9 p.m. RAYCOM — North Carolina at N.C. State ESPN — Kentucky at South Carolina NBA BASKETBALL 9 p.m. FSCR — Charlotte at Phoenix NHL HOCKEY 7 p.m. VERSUS — Phoenix at Detroit TENNIS 3 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia (same-day tape) 9 p.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia 3:30 a.m. ESPN2 — Australian Open, men’s and women’s quarterfinals, at Melbourne, Australia

Scoreboard Call scores in at (704) 261-2253 National Basketball Association EASTERN CONFERENCE Atlantic Division

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str Home Away Conf

Boston

29

13 .690

5-5

W-2

Toronto

23

22 .511 7 1/2

6-4

New York

17

26 .395 12 1/2

4-6

Philadelphia

15

29 .341

New Jersey

3

13-7

16-6

19-8

W-2

15-6

8-16

15-15

L-2

10-13

7-13

12-16

5-5

L-1

7-15

8-14

8-16

40 .070 26 1/2 0-10

L-11

2-17

1-23

3-21

15

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str Home Away Conf

Atlanta

29

14 .674

8-2

W-3

Orlando

29

16 .644

1

5-5

Miami

23

21 .523 6 1/2

5-5

Charlotte

21

22 .488

8

Washington

14

29 .326

15

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str Home Away Conf

Cleveland

35

11 .761

8-2

W-5

17-3

18-8

19-6

Chicago

21

22 .488 12 1/2

7-3

W-3

14-7

7-15

13-12

Milwaukee

18

24 .429

4-6

W-1

13-7

5-17

10-12

Indiana

16

29 .356 18 1/2

5-5

W-1

10-11

6-18

12-16

18-5

11-9

16-10

L-1

16-4

13-12

19-9

L-1

13-11

10-10

14-9

6-4

L-3

18-5

3-17

15-16

3-7

L-3

8-14

6-15

10-16

Central Division

Detroit

15

28 .349 18 1/2

4-6

L-2

11-11

4-17

11-14

WESTERN CONFERENCE Southwest Division

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str Home Away Conf

Dallas

29

15 .659

6-4

W-1

13-7

16-8

16-10

San Antonio

25

18 .581 3 1/2

4-6

L-3

17-9

8-9

13-13

Memphis

24

19 .558 4 1/2

7-3

W-2

17-5

7-14

16-14

Houston

24

20 .545

4-6

L-2

13-7

11-13

18-12

New Orleans

23

20 .535 5 1/2

6-4

L-1

16-4

7-16

16-10

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str Home Away Conf

Denver

30

14 .682

9-1

W-7

21-3

9-11

Portland

27

18 .600 3 1/2

5-5

W-1

16-7

11-11

17-7

Utah

26

18 .591

4

8-2

W-3

18-6

8-12

12-13

Oklahoma City 24

20 .545

6

5-5

L-2

12-9

12-11

9-15

Minnesota

36 .200 21 1/2

2-8

L-3

6-17

3-19

4-26

5

Northwest Division

9

17-8

Pacific Division

W

L

Pct

GB

L10

Str Home Away Conf

L.A. Lakers

33

11 .750

5-5

L-1

23-3

10-8

20-8

Phoenix

26

20 .565

8

3-7

L-1

17-5

9-15

14-11

L.A. Clippers

20

24 .455

13

4-6

L-1

14-9

6-15

10-18

Sacramento

15

28 .349 17 1/2

1-9

L-7

12-9

3-19

9-16

Golden State

13

29 .310

4-6

L-1

9-11

4-18

7-17

19

Sunday’s Games L.A. Clippers 92, Washington 78 Dallas 128, New York 78 Toronto 106, L.A. Lakers 105 Monday’s Games Indiana 109, Philadelphia 98 Boston 95, L.A. Clippers 89 Cleveland 92, Miami 91 Memphis 99, Orlando 94 Atlanta 102, Houston 95 Chicago 98, San Antonio 93 Denver 104, Charlotte 93 Utah 124, Phoenix 115 New Orleans at Portland, late Today’s Games L.A. Lakers at Washington, 7 p.m. Minnesota at New York, 7:30 p.m. Milwaukee at Dallas, 8:30 p.m. Charlotte at Phoenix, 9 p.m. Golden State at Sacramento, 10 p.m. Wednesday’s Games L.A. Lakers at Indiana, 7 p.m. Minnesota at Cleveland, 7 p.m. Miami at Toronto, 7 p.m. Memphis at Detroit, 7:30 p.m. L.A. Clippers at New Jersey, 7:30 p.m. Philadelphia at Milwaukee, 8 p.m. Chicago at Oklahoma City, 8 p.m. Denver at Houston, 8:30 p.m. Atlanta at San Antonio, 8:30 p.m. Utah at Portland, 10 p.m. New Orleans at Golden State, 10:30 p.m.

16-4 635 15-4 599 15-4 411 13-6 286 14-6 270 15-3 264 14-5 194 18-3 180 15-3 157 17-2 125

18 9 22 — 21 — 19 — 25 —

Others receiving votes: Florida St. 111, N. Iowa 106, Clemson 103, Wake Forest 98, Butler 69, Mississippi St. 42, Texas A&M 29, Oklahoma St. 25, Missouri 24, Maryland 22, Cornell 16, Old Dominion 11, Xavier 11, UNLV 6, Northwestern 5, Siena 3, Virginia 3, California 2, Louisiana Tech 2, Saint Mary’s, Calif. 2, Coastal Carolina 1, Harvard 1.

USA Today/ESPN Top 25

Southeast Division

15

16. Wisconsin 17. Pittsburgh 18. Mississippi 19. Connecticut 20. Ohio St. 21. Vanderbilt 22. Georgia Tech 23. New Mexico 24. Baylor 25. UAB

College basketball The AP Top 25

The top 25 teams in The Associated Press’ college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 24, total points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25thplace vote and previous ranking:

1. Kentucky (65) 2. Kansas 3. Villanova 4. Syracuse 5. Michigan St. 6. Texas 7. Georgetown 8. Duke 9. West Virginia 10. Purdue 11. Kansas St. 12. BYU 13. Gonzaga 14. Tennessee 15. Temple

Rec Pts Pvs 19-0 1,625 2 18-1 1,519 3 18-1 1,503 4 19-1 1,455 5 17-3 1,324 6 17-2 1,307 1 15-3 1,124 12 16-3 1,120 7 15-3 1,113 11 16-3 977 13 16-3 960 10 20-1 894 14 16-3 847 15 15-3 837 8 17-3 707 16

The top 25 teams in the USA TodayESPN men’s college basketball poll, with first-place votes in parentheses, records through Jan. 24, points based on 25 points for a first-place vote through one point for a 25th-place vote and previous ranking:

1. Kentucky (31) 2. Kansas 3. Villanova 4. Syracuse 5. Michigan State 6. Texas 7. Duke 8. Gonzaga 9. West Virginia 10. Brigham Young 11. Georgetown 12. Purdue 13. Kansas State 14. Tennessee 15. Temple 16. Wisconsin 17. Pittsburgh 18. Butler 19. Connecticut 20. Mississippi 21. Clemson 22. Georgia Tech 23. Vanderbilt 24. Ohio State 25. Northern Iowa

Rec Pts Pvs 19-0 775 2 18-1 739 3 18-1 714 4 19-1 680 5 17-3 627 7 17-2 613 1 16-3 555 6 16-3 533 10 15-3 506 12 20-1 485 13 15-3 483 14 16-3 420 15 16-3 409 9 15-3 385 8 17-3 339 17 16-4 282 19 15-4 267 11 16-4 213 20 13-6 199 21 15-4 151 24 15-5 112 16 14-5 105 18 15-3 71 NR 14-6 62 25 17-2 60 22

Others receiving votes: Florida State 50; Cornell 38; New Mexico 38; Baylor 37; Wake Forest 23; UAB 18; Missouri 16; Oklahoma State 16; Saint Mary’s 11; Mississippi State 9; Maryland 6; UNLV 6; Siena 4; Texas A&M 4; Louisiana Tech 3; Old Dominion 3; Xavier 3; California 2; Notre Dame 2; North Carolina 1.

Pro football NFL Playoff Glance All Times EST

Wild-card Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 9 N.Y. Jets 24, Cincinnati 14 Dallas 34, Philadelphia 14 Sunday, Jan. 10 Baltimore 33, New England 14 Arizona 51, Green Bay 45, OT Divisional Playoffs Saturday, Jan. 16 New Orleans 45, Arizona 14 Indianapolis 20, Baltimore 3 Sunday, Jan. 17 Minnesota 34, Dallas 3 N.Y. Jets 17, San Diego 14 Conference Championships Sunday, Jan. 24 Indianapolis 30, N.Y. Jets 17 New Orleans 31, Minnesota 28, OT Pro Bowl Sunday, Jan. 31 At Miami AFC vs. NFC, 7:20 p.m. (ESPN) Super Bowl Sunday, Feb. 7 At Miami N. Orleans vs. Indianapolis, 6:25 p.m. (CBS)

Pro Bowl Rosters

(i-injured, will not play; r-replacement; s-Super Bowl participant; x-starter) AFC Offense Quarterbacks — i-Tom Brady, New England; s-Peyton Manning, Indianapolis; i-Philip Rivers, San Diego; r, x-Matt Schaub, Houston; r-Vince Young, Tennessee; r-David Garrard, Jacksonville Running Backs — x-Chris Johnson, Tennessee; Maurice Jones-Drew, Jacksonville; Ray Rice, Baltimore Wide Receivers — x-Andre Johnson, Houston; x-Brandon Marshall,

Denver; s-Reggie Wayne, Indianapolis; i-Wes Welker, New England; r-Chad Ochocinco, Cincinnati; r-Vincent Jackson, San Diego Tight Ends — s, x-Dallas Clark, Indianapolis; x-Antonio Gates, San Diego; r-Heath Miller, Pittsburgh Fullback — x-Le’Ron McClain, Baltimore Centers — x-Nick Mangold, N.Y. Jets; s-Jeff Saturday, Indianapolis; r-Kevin Mawae, Tennessee Guards — x-Logan Mankins, New England; x-Kris Dielman, San Diego; Kris Dielman, San Diego Tackles — x-Ryan Clady, Denver; r-D’Brickashaw Ferguson, N.Y. Jets; i-Jake Long, Miami; x-Joe Thomas, Cleveland Defense Ends — s, x-Dwight Freeney, Indianapolis; s, x-Robert Mathis, Indianapolis; x-Mario Williams, Houston; r, x-Kyly Vander Bosch, Tennessee, r-Shaun Ellis, N.Y. Jets Interior Linemen — x-Haloti Ngata, Baltimore; x-Vince Wilfork, New England; Casey Hampton, Pittsburgh; Inside-Middle Linebackers — x-Ray Lewis, Baltimore; DeMeco Ryans, Houston Outside Linebackers — i-Brian Cushing, Houston; x-Elvis Dumervil, Denver; x-James Harrison, Pittsburgh; r-LaMarr Woodley, Pittsburgh Cornerbacks — x-Nnamdi Asomugha, Oakland; Champ Bailey, Denver; x-Darrelle Revis, N.Y. Jets Strong Safety — x-Brian Dawkins, Denver; r-Yeremiah Bell, Miami Free Safeties — i-Jairus Byrd, Buffalo; x-Ed Reed, Baltimore; r, x-Brandon Mariweather, New England; s-Antoine Bethea, Indianapolis Specialists Punter — Shane Lechler, Oakland Kick Return Specialist — Joshua Cribbs, Cleveland Placekicker — Nate Kaeding, San Diego Special Teamer — Kassim Osgood, San Diego Long Snapper — Jon Condo, Oakland NFC Offense Quarterbacks — s, x-Drew Brees, New Orleans; i-Brett Favre, Minnesota; x-Aaron Rodgers, Green Bay; r-Donovan McNabb, Philadelphia; r-Tony Romo, Dallas Running Backs — i-Steven Jackson, St. Louis; x-Adrian Peterson, Minnesota; DeAngelo Williams, Carolina; r-Frank Gore, San Francisco Wide Receivers — x-Miles Austin, Dallas; i, x-Larry Fitzgerald, Arizona; x-DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia; Sidney Rice, Minnesota; r-Steve Smith, New York Giants Tight Ends — x-Vernon Davis, San Francisco; Jason Witten, Dallas Fullback — x-Leonard Weaver, Philadelphia Centers — i, x-Andre Gurode, Dallas; x-Shaun O’Hara, New York Giants; r, s-Jonathan Goodwin, New Orleans; r-Ryan Kalil, Carolina Guards — x-Leonard Davis, Dallas; s, x-Jahri Evans, New Orleans; x-Steve Hutchinson, Minnesota; r-Chris Snee, N.Y. Giants Tackles — Bryant McKinnie, Minnesota; x-Jason Peters, Philadelphia; Jon Stinchcomb, New Orleans; s, x-Jahri Evans, New Orleans Defense Ends — x-Jared Allen, Minnesota; Trent Cole, Philadelphia; x-Julius Peppers, Carolina Interior Linemen — x-Darnell Dockett, Arizona; Jay Ratliff, Dallas; x-Kevin Williams, Minnesota Inside-Middle Linebackers — s-Jonathan Vilma, New Orleans; x-Patrick Willis, San Francisco; London Fletcher, Washington Outside Linebackers — i, x-Lance Briggs, Chicago; r-Clay Matthews, Green Bay; x-Brian Orakpo, Washington; x-DeMarcus Ware, Dallas Cornerbacks — i-Dominique RodgersCromartie, Arizona; x-Asante Samuel, Philadelphia; i, x-Charles Woodson, Green Bay; r, x-Terence Newman, Dallas; r-Mike Jenkins, Dallas Strong Safety — x-Adrian Wilson, Arizona; s, x-Roman Harper, New Orleans; s-Wuintin Mikell, Philadelphia Free Safeties — x-Nick Collins, Green Bay; s, x-Darren Sharper, New Orleans; r Antrel Rolle, Arizona Specialists Punter — Andy Lee, San Francisco Kick Return Specialist — DeSean Jackson, Philadelphia; r-Percy

Harvin, Minnesota. Placekicker — David Akers, Philadelphia Special Teamer — Heath Farwell, Minnesota Long Snapper — Jon Dorenbos, Philadelphia

Pro tennis Australian Open Results Monday At Melbourne Park Melbourne, Australia Purse: $22.14 million (Grand Slam) Surface: Hard-Outdoor

Singles Men Fourth Round Nikolay Davydenko (6), Russia, def. Fernando Verdasco (9), Spain, 6-2, 7-5, 4-6, 6-7 (5), 6-3. Novak Djokovic (3), Serbia, def. Lukasz Kubot, Poland, 6-1, 6-2, 7-5. Jo-Wilfried Tsonga (10), France, def. Nicolas Almagro (26), Spain, 6-3, 6-4, 4-6, 6-7 (6), 9-7. Roger Federer (1), Switzerland, def. Lleyton Hewitt (22), Australia, 6-2, 6-3, 6-4. Women Fourth Round Venus Williams (6), United States, def. Francesca Schiavone (17), Italy, 3-6, 6-2, 6-1. Li Na (16), China, def. Caroline Wozniacki (4), Denmark, 6-4, 6-3. Serena Williams (1), United States, def. Sam Stosur (13), Australia, 6-4, 6-2. Victoria Azarenka (7), Belarus, def. Vera Zvonareva (9), Russia, 4-6, 6-4, 6-0. Doubles Men Third Round Michael Kohlmann, Germany, and Jarkko Nieminen, Finland, def. Simone Bolelli and Andreas Seppi, Italy, 4-6, 7-6 (3), 7-6 (6). Lukas Dlouhy, Czech Republic, and Leander Paes (3), India, def. John Isner and Sam Querrey, United States, 6-3, 7-5. Fernando Gonzalez, Chile, and Ivan Ljubicic, Croatia, def. Simon Aspelin, Sweden, and Paul Hanley (11), Australia, 6-4, 6-3. Women Third Round Bethanie Mattek-Sands, United States, and Yan Zi (8), China, def. Elena Vesnina, Russia, and Zheng Jie (9), China, 6-4, 6-4. Lisa Raymond, United States, and Rennae Stubbs (6), Australia, def. Chan Yung-jan, Taiwan, and Monica Niculescu, Romania, 7-5, 6-3. Maria Kirilenko, Russia, and Agnieszka Radwanska (15), Poland, def. Nuria Llagostera Vives and Maria Jose Martinez Sanchez (3), Spain, 6-1, 6-2.

Pro baseball Remaining Free Agents

NEW YORK (AP) — The 92 remaining free agents: AMERICAN LEAGUE BALTIMORE (3) — Mark Hendrickson, lhp; Chad Moeller; c; Melvin Mora, 3b. BOSTON (2) — Rocco Baldelli, of; Paul Byrd, rhp. CHICAGO (1) — Jermaine Dye, of. CLEVELAND (1) — Tomo Ohka, rhp. DETROIT (1) — Jarrod Washburn, lhp. KANSAS CITY (2) — Bruce Chen, lhp; Jamey Wright, rhp. LOS ANGELES (1) — Robb Quinlan, of. MINNESOTA (3) — Orlando Cabrera, ss; Joe Crede, 3b; Ron Mahay, lhp. NEW YORK (3) — Johnny Damon, of; Jose Molina, c; Xavier Nady, of. OAKLAND (3) — Nomar Garciaparra, dh; Adam Kennedy, 3b; Brett Tomko, rhp. SEATTLE (5) — Miguel Batista, rhp; Erik Bedard, lhp; Russell Branyan, 1b; Endy Chavez, of; Mike Sweeney, dh. TAMPA BAY (5) — Chad Bradford, rhp; Jason Isringhausen, rhp; Troy Percival, rhp; Brian Shouse, lhp; Russ Springer, rhp. TEXAS (2) — Joaquin Benoit, rhp; Hank Blalock, 1b. TORONTO (2) — Rod Barajas, c; Kevin Millar, 1b. NATIONAL LEAGUE ARIZONA (2) — Scott Schoeneweis, lhp; Chad Tracy, 1b. ATLANTA (2) — Garret Anderson, of; Greg Norton, 1b. CHICAGO (3) — Chad Fox, rhp; Kevin Gregg, rhp; Reed Johnson, of. CINCINNATI (1) — Kip Wells, rhp.

COLORADO (8) — Joe Beimel, lhp; Jose Contreras, rhp; Alan Embree, lhp; Josh Fogg, rhp; Jason Giambi, 1b; Matt Herges, rhp; Juan Rincon, rhp; Yorvit Torrealba, c. FLORIDA (1) — Kiko Calero, rhp. HOUSTON (5) — Aaron Boone, 1b; Doug Brocail, rhp; Darin Erstad, of; Mike Hampton, lhp; Miguel Tejada, ss. LOS ANGELES (11) — Brad Ausmus, c; Ronnie Belliard, 2b; Jon Garland, rhp; Orlando Hudson, 2b; Mark Loretta, 3b; Guillermo Mota, rhp; Eric Milton, lhp; Will Ohman, lhp; Jason Schmidt, rhp; Jim Thome, 1b; Jeff Weaver, rhp. MILWAUKEE (5) — Frank Catalanotto, of; Braden Looper, rhp; Felipe Lopez, 2b; Corey Patterson, of; David Weathers, rhp. NEW YORK (4) — Carlos Delgado, 1b; Ramon Martinez, ss; Gary Sheffield, of; Fernando Tatis, 1b. PHILADELPHIA (5) — Paul Bako, c; Miguel Cairo, 2b; Scott Eyre, lhp; Pedro Martinez, rhp; Chan Ho Park, rhp. ST. LOUIS (2) — John Smoltz, rhp; Todd Wellemeyer, rhp. SAN DIEGO (1) — Brian Giles, of. SAN FRANCISCO (3) — Rich Aurilia, 1b; Randy Johnson, lhp; Randy Winn, of. WASHINGTON (5) — Josh Bard, c; Livan Hernandez, rhp; Austin Kearns, of; Ron Villone, lhp; Dmitri Young, 1b.

Transactions Monday’s Sports Transactions BASEBALL American League DETROIT TIGERS—Sent INF Jeff Larish outright to Toledo (IL). KANSAS CITY ROYALS—Agreed to terms with OF Rick Ankiel on a oneyear contract. Designated INF Mario Lisson for assignment. LOS ANGELES ANGELS—Agreed to terms with INF Maicer Izturis on a three-year contract. TEXAS RANGERS—Designated INF Joe Inglett for assignment. National League MILWAUKEE BREWERS—Agreed to terms with RHP Dave Bush on a oneyear contract. SAN DIEGO PADRES—Named Mark Loretta special assistant to baseball operations. BASKETBALL National Basketball Association CHICAGO BULLS—Acquired G Devin Brown from New Orleans for C Aaron Gray. UTAH JAZZ—Signed G Sundiata Gaines for the rest of the season. FOOTBALL National Football League NEW YORK JETS—Announced the contracts of assistant quarterbacks coach John DeFilippo, assistant defensive backs coach Doug Plank, special teams assistant Kevin O’Dea, pass rush specialist Chuck Smith and defensive quality control coach Brian Smith had expired and would not be extended. TENNESSEE TITANS—Named Kennedy Pola running backs coach. HOCKEY National Hockey League CAROLINA HURRICANES— Reassigned G Justin Peters to Albany (AHL). DALLAS STARS—Assigned RW Raymond Sawada to Texas (AHL). NASHVILLE PREDATORS—Recalled C Cal O’Reilly from Milwaukee (AHL). PITTSBURGH PENGUINS—Recalled RW Chris Conner from WilkesBarre/Scranton (AHL). COLLEGE CREIGHTON—Suspended junior G P’Allen Stinnett indefinitely for conduct not acceptable to the basketball team. DUKE—Named Jarred Martin associate head field hockey coach. DUQUESNE—Announced it’s eliminating baseball, wrestling, men’s swimming and men’s golf as varsity sports. EAST CAROLINA—Named John Wiley associate head football coach and Brian Mitchell defensive coordinator. FLORIDA STATE—Agreed to terms with defensive coordinator Mark Stoops, running backs coach Eddie Gran and offensive coordinator James Coley on three-year contracts, and linebackers coach Greg Hudson, quarterbacks coach Dameyune Craig and strength coach Vic Viloria on two-year contracts. JAMES MADISON—Named Lauren Sauer volleyball coach. MICHIGAN—Reinstated G Manny Harris after a weekend suspension. PRINCETON—Named Dennis Goldman wide receivers coach. TEXAS A&M-KINGSVILLE—Named Noel Allen women’s golf coach.


The Enquirer-Journal

Premier matchup

Afflalo’s triples too much for Charlotte DENVER (AP) — Chauncey Billups scored 27 points, Aaron Afflalo matched his career high with 24 points and the depleted Denver Nuggets beat the Charlotte Bobcats 104-93 for their season-high seventh straight win. Stephen Jackson had 22 points and Gerald Wallace added 20 for the Bobcats, who lost their third in a row since a franchise-tying six-game winning streak. The Nuggets were playing without leading scorer Carmelo Anthony, who sprained his left ankle in overtime Saturday against New Orleans. They lost forward Kenyon Martin to an ejection late in the second quarter when he argued with officials over a foul call against teammate J.R. Smith.

Early in the fourth quarter, Denver’s Chris Anderson got his feet tangled underneath the basket going for a rebound and crashed to the floor. He limped off the floor with 11:02 remaining with a left ankle sprain. He returned to the bench a couple minutes later but did not go back into the game. The Bobcats kept the game close most the way, trailing 29-26 after the first quarter and 56-52 at halftime. But the Nuggets began pulling away midway through the third quarter. After a Nazr Mohammed’s dunk pulled the Bobcats to 64-61, Billups, who also had 11 assists, converted a three-point play to start a 13-4 run that carried the Nuggets to a 77-65 lead with 3:58 remaining in the third quarter.

Tuesday, January 26, 2010 / 3B

E-J staff photo by Ed Cottingham

Marvin Ridge junior guard TJ Tolbert (21) leads his team into today’s home game against Weddington. Both teams are currently tied for first place at 3-1 in the Southern Carolina Conference.

New Orleans still trying to soak in landmark victory METAIRIE, La. (AP) — Sean Payton still hadn’t gone home yet when the New Orleans Saints returned to work the day after the biggest win in franchise history. Drained after an emotional overtime triumph that set off celebrations all across the city, Payton joined family and friends for dinner downtown and then relaxed in a hotel. “There was just so much emotion,” Payton said Monday at the team’s suburban training cen-

ter. “You know, when you finish with the locker room ... you just try to find your family. My son’s concern is the confetti’s going to keep us from being able to play catch on the field. That was his concern. It was just good to hug them and be around the family and enjoy the time. There never seems to be enough of it.” “For them to have a chance to be part of it I think it makes it really special,” Payton continued. “Obviously, the same goes for this upcoming game.”

The upcoming game happens to be the first Super Bowl involving the Saints in the franchise’s 43 years of existence. This is only the ninth winning season the club has had. The 31-28 overtime victory over Minnesota on Sunday night marked the first time the Saints had hosted an NFC championship game. So when it was over, fans in the Louisiana Superdome and residents of a city that already acts on any excuse for a party spilled

into the streets and toasted the Saints’ success. Bourbon Street was mobbed with revelers in Saints jerseys letting out high-pitched howls of delight and stirring up impromptu chants of “Who dat say dey gonna’ beat dem Saints!” Some exchanged wateryeyed embraces after watching their team pull out a highstakes thriller that appeared to be going the Vikings’ way before Tracy Porter intercepted Brett Favre’s pass in Saints

territory in the last minute of regulation. “It was crazy. It was almost like Mardi Gras,” said Porter, who would know because he grew up in south Louisiana. A number of players, including Porter and fellow defensive back Darren Sharper, said they wanted to go out on the town and join in the celebration, but were so tired they ended up just staying home and watching footage of the citywide party on the local news.

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E-J file photo

Parkwood senior guard Michelle Brown was honored before last Friday’s game for reaching 1,000 career points. Brown and the Rebels play at Anson County tonight.

Panthers Continued from Page 1B The Panthers (8-2, 10-7) have a half-game lead on North Stanly and Berry Academy. Piedmont and North Stanly are the only girls teams with wins over Berry this season. The Panthers won the first meeting with Berry, 55-48, in Unionville on

Dec. 11, and split their two games with North Stanly. If Piedmont wins at Berry tonight, the Panthers are likely to win at least a share of the Rocky River Conference title. Piedmont junior guard Jade Montgomery ranks second in the county in scoring (16.3 ppg) and third in assists (4.3 apg).

Brown honored

Senior shooting guard

Michelle Brown was honored with a pre-game ceremony last Friday, when Parkwood hosted Marvin Ridge, for eclipsing 1,000 career points in a road game at Sun Valley earlier in the week. Brown, an all-Union County selection last season, is averaging 13.8 points and 2.4 steals per game. The Rebels travel to Wadesboro to face Anson County tonight.


4B / Tuesday, January 26, 2010

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ANNOUNCEMENTS 004 Legals STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF UNION IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION BEFORE THE CLERK 10E0026 NOTICE TO CREDITORS The undersigned having qualified as Executors of the Estate of Julian Paul Boling, late of Franklin County, Georgia, this is to notify all persons, firms, and corporations having claims against the estate to present such claims to the undersigned Martha Dickerson on or before the 27th of day March, 2010 or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to the estate will please make immediate payment. This the 26th day of January, 2010 Name: Martha Dickerson Address: PO Box 150 Martin, Georgia, 30557 John T. Burns Attorney for Estate P.O. Box 904 Monroe, NC 28211-0904 Telephone: (704)289-5594 January 26, 2010 February 2, 9, 16, 2010

CROSSWORD PUZZLE

Notice of Public Hearing Amending Section 10-101 AN ORDINANCE REGULATING DOMESTIC ANIMALS The public will take notice a public hearing has been scheduled for the Town of Waxhaw, NC has been scheduled for February 9, 2010 beginning at 6:30 p.m. in the meeting of the Museum of the Waxhaws, 8215 Waxhaw Highway on the question of amending Section 10-101 of the following town Ordinance as follows: AN ORDINANCE REGULATING DOMESTIC ANIMALS • Deleting Item E of Section 10-101 eliminating the yearly dog license tag requirement and the $3.00 yearly fee and amending any other portions of said Ordinance as the Waxhaw Board of Commissioners deems just and proper. A copy of the proposed amendment for Section 10101 is on file at the Town Clerk’s Office is available for review during normal working hours and posted on town website The general public is invited to attend to make oral or written comments. As a result of testimony received at the public hearing, the Town Commissioners reserves the right to approve or disapprove AN ORDINANCE REGULATING DOMESTIC ANIMALS deleting Item E of Section 10-101 eliminating the yearly dog license tag requirement and the $3.00 yearly fee and amending any other portions of said Ordinance as the Waxhaw Board of Commissioners deems just and proper. The Mayor reserves the right to adjourn the public hearing to another place and time. For more information please contact Town Manager McLaurin at 704/843-2195 during normal business hours. The Town of Waxhaw does not discriminate on the basis of disability. If you need an auxiliary aid or service or other accommodations in order to attend or fully participate at this hearing, please contact the Town Clerk at 704/843-2195 as far in advance of the hearing as possible so that your request can be considered. Bonnie B. McManus Town Clerk Town of Waxhaw, NC January 26, 2010 February 2, 2010 AMENDED NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE Pursuant to the power of sale contained in that Deed of Trust executed by Cannon Property Group, LLC, dated the 14th day of October, 2005, and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Union County, North Carolina, in Book 3949, at Page 471, and because of default in the payment of the indebtedness thereby secured, and pursuant to demand of the owner and holder of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will sell at public auction to the highest bidder at the usual place of sale in the Union County Courthouse, Monroe, North Carolina, at

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11:00 o'clock a.m. on the 4th day of February, 2010 the following described real property, including all improvements thereon: ADDRESS OF PROPERTY: 3842 West Roosevelt Blvd., Monroe, NC 28562. LEGAL DESCRIPTION: See Exhibit A attached. EXHIBIT A PROPERTY DESCRIPTION Being all of that certain property situated in Union County, North Carolina and more particularly described as follows: Parcel 1: Located in the City of Monroe, Union County, North Carolina, and more particularly described as follows: Being all of Lot Number 4A, containing 1.89 acres, more or less, of the Donald W. Wilburn property, as shown on that plat recorded in Plat Cabinet G, at File Number 755, Union County Register of Deeds, to which plat reference is hereby made for a more complete description. Parcel 2: Located in the City of Monroe, Union County, North Carolina, and more particularly described as follows: Being all of Lot Number 5A, containing 1.64 acres, together with that certain .26 acres of land located within the right-of-way of U.S. Highway 74 adjacent to said Lot 5A, for a total acreage of 1.90 acres, more or less, of the Helms Associates, LLC, property, as shown on that plat recorded in Plat Cabinet G, at File Number 707, Union County Register of Deeds, to which plat reference is hereby made for a more complete description. PRESENT OWNER(S): Cannon Property Group, LLC The terms of the sale are that the property will be sold for cash to the highest bidder and a cash deposit not to exceed the greater of five percent (5%) of the amount of the bid, or Seven Hundred and Fifty Dollars ($750) may be required at the time of the sale. The property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance "As Is, Where Is". Neither the Substitute Trustee nor the holder of the Note secured by the Deed of Trust being foreclosed, nor the officers, directors, attorneys, employees, agents or authorized representatives of either the Substitute Trustee or the holder of the Note make any representation or warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at or relating to the property being offered for sale, and any and all responsibilities or liabilities arising out of or in any way relating to any such conditions are expressly disclaimed. The property will be sold subject to restrictions and easements of record, any unpaid taxes, prior liens and special assessments, any transfer tax associated with the foreclosure, and the tax of forty-five cents (454) per Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) required by N.C.G.S. ' 7A-308(a)(1). The sale will be held open for ten days for upset bids as required by law. An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to N.C.G.S. § 4521.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. This the 7th day of January, 2010. G. Robert Turner, III Substitute Trustee January 26, 2010 February 2, 2010

Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse Door in Union County, North Carolina, at 10:30AM on February 09, 2010, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property, to wit: Being all of Lot 57, Phase 2, Map 3 of Stratford On Providence as shown on map thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet G at File 805, Union County Public Registry, reference to which is hereby made for a more particular metes and bounds description. Said property is commonly known as 6049 Oxfordshire Road, Waxhaw, NC 28173. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 105-228.30, in the amount of One Dollar ($1.00) per each Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) or fractional part thereof, and the Clerk of Courts fee, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 7A308, in the amount of Forty-five Cents (45) per each One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) or fractional part thereof or Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), whichever is greater. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the bid, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale and must be tendered in the form of certified funds. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts will be immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, land transfer taxes, if any, and encumbrances of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Albert C Antonino and Lena A Cunningham. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, that tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. Substitute Trustee 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 Our File No.: 221.0929210NC /R January 26,2010 February 2, 2010

undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse Door in Union County, North Carolina, at 10:30AM on February 09, 2010, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property, to wit: Being all of Lot Number 1 of Chatelaine Subdivision, as shown on plat thereof recorded in Plat Cabinet H at File 869 through 873, Union County public registry, reference is to which plat is hereby made for a more particular metes and bounds description. Said property is commonly known as 426 Gladelynn Way, Weddington, NC 28173. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 105-228.30, in the amount of One Dollar ($1.00) per each Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) or fractional part thereof, and the Clerk of Courts fee, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 7A308, in the amount of Forty-five Cents (45) per each One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) or fractional part thereof or Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), whichever is greater. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the bid, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale and must be tendered in the form of certified funds. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts will be immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, land transfer taxes, if any, and encumbrances of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Clara D. Haynes Wesley. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, that tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. Substitute Trustee 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 Our File No.: 221.0934665NC January 26, 2010 February 2, 2010

NAIL FOUND IN THE CENTERLINE OF RIDGE ROAD, THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF G.B. EUBANKS PROPERTY (NOW OR FORMERLY) AS DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 294, PAGE 391, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY; AND RUNNING THENCE ALONG AND WITH THE CENTER LINE OF RIDGE ROAD SOUTH 34-27-54 EAST 285.89 FEET TO A P.K. NAIL FOUND, A CORNER OF LANA B. DAVIS PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 978, PAGE 605, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY; THENCE WITH TWO (2) LINES OF SAID PROPERTY AS FOLLOWS: (1) SOUTH 5036-44 WEST 419.07 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND CROSSING AN IRON FOUND ON LINE IN THE WESTERN RIGHT OF WAY OF RIDGE ROAD AT 30 FEET; (2) SOUTH 3449-28 EAST 417.46 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND IN THE BRUCE FOWLER ESTATE PROPERTY AS SHOWN ON PLAT RECORDED IN PLAT CABINET D, FILE 869, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY; THENCE WITH SAID LINE FOUR (4) CALLS AS FOLLOWS: (1) SOUTH 50-3442 WEST 802.12 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND; (2) NORTH 53-47-43 WEST 143.63 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND; (3) NORTH 6333-12 WEST 175.88 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND, AND (4) SOUTH 82-56-40 WEST 87.55 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND, A COMMON CORNER OF THE BRUCE FOWLER ESTATE AND EDWARD L. FOWLER PROPERTY (NOW OR FORMERLY) AS DESCRIBED IN DEED BOOK 260, PAGE 21, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY; THENCE WITH SAID LINE TWO (2) CALLS AS FOLLOWS: (1) NORTH 08-2140 WEST 394.1 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND; (2) NORTH 70-45-07 WEST A TOTAL DISTANCE OF 903.98 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND, A COMMON WITH G.S. EUBANKS PROPERTY (NOW OR FORMERLY) CROSSING IRONS ON LINE AT 218.36 FEET, 221.53 FEET AND 261.52 FEET RESPECTIVELY; THENCE WITH THE G.S. EUBANKS LINE SOUTH 77-27-55 EAST A TOTAL DISTANCE OF 910.57 FEET TO AN IRON FOUND, CROSSING IRONS ON LINE AT 201.11 FEET, 172.85 FEET AND 266.25 FEET RESPECTIVELY; THENCE CONTINUING WITH EUBANKS LINE NORTH 59-42-54 EAST 224.62 FEET TO THE POINT AND PLACE OF BEGINNING, CROSSING AN IRON STAKE ON LINE IN THE WESTERN RIGHT OF WAY OF RIDGE ROAD AT 195.92 FEET, CONTAINING 26.37 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, PER PLAT AND SURVEY BY WILLIAM J. ALEXANDER, R.L.S. DATED NOVEMBER 6, 1997, AND BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO ANTHONY R. TIMMS AND WIFE TERESA R. TIMMS BY DEED RECORDED IN DEED BOOK 1029, PAGE 240, UNION COUNTY REGISTRY. Said property is commonly known as 219 Ridge Road, Monroe, NC 28110. Third party purchasers must pay the excise tax, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 105-228.30, in the amount of One Dollar ($1.00) per each Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00) or fractional part thereof, and the Clerk of Courts fee, pursuant to N.C.G.S. 7A308, in the amount of Forty-five Cents (45) per each One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) or fractional part thereof or Five Hundred Dollars ($500.00), whichever is greater. A deposit of five percent (5%) of the bid, or Seven Hundred Fifty Dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, will be required at the time of the sale and must be tendered in the form of certified funds. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all the remaining amounts will be immediately due and owing. Said property to be offered pursuant to this Notice of Sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance AS IS WHERE IS. There are no representations of warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in,

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY 09 SP 1319 Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Albert C. Antonino and Lena A. Cunningham to Jackie Miller, Trustee(s), dated December 21, 2006, and recorded in Book 04410, Page 0062, and modified in Deed Book 4977 and Page 130, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY 09 SP 2142 Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Clara D. Haynes Wesley and Leonard Wesley to Jackie Miller, Trustee(s), dated December 22, 2006, and recorded in Book 04413, Page 0488, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the

NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE NORTH CAROLINA, UNION COUNTY 09 SP 1814 Under and by virtue of a Power of Sale contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed by Dennis W. Cantile to Charles F. Barone, Atty, Trustee(s), dated February 25, 2005, and recorded in Book 3700, Page 884, Union County Registry, North Carolina. Default having been made in the payment of the note thereby secured by the said Deed of Trust and the undersigned, having been substituted as Trustee in said Deed of Trust by an instrument duly recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds of Union County, North Carolina, and the holder of the note evidencing said indebtedness having directed that the Deed of Trust be foreclosed, the undersigned Substitute Trustees will offer for sale at the Courthouse Door in Union County, North Carolina, at 10:30AM on February 09, 2010, and will sell to the highest bidder for cash the following described property, to wit: BEGINNING AT A P.K.


The Enquirer-Journal

Tuesday, January 26, 2010 / 5B

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on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, land transfer taxes, if any, and encumbrances of record. To the best of the knowledge and belief of the undersigned, the current owner(s) of the property is/are Mohamad H. Kodaimati and Ghesoun Chawa. PLEASE TAKE NOTICE: An order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to G.S. 4521.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the clerk of superior court of the county in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days' written notice to the landlord. The notice shall also state that upon termination of a rental agreement, that tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. Nationwide Trustee Services, Inc. Substitute Trustee 1587 Northeast Expressway Atlanta, GA 30329 (770) 234-9181 Our File No.: 348.0601493NC January 26, 2010 February 2, 2010

at public auction to the highest bidder for cash at the usual place of sale in the County Courthouse of Union County, in the city of Monroe, North Carolina, at 10:00 a.m. on the 9th day of February, 2010, all that certain parcel of land, more particularly described as follows: IMPROVEMENTS: House and lot/Condominium/or Lot LEGAL DESCRIPTION: BEING ALL OF Lot 8 of Manetta Mills, Inc. Property, said property being known as Knitting Mill Village, as shown on a map thereof recorded in Plat Book 4, Page 97, in the Union County Public Registry, North Carolina. ADDITIONAL POSSIBLE STREET ADDRESS FOR REFERENCE PURPOSES ONLY: 1507 Gold Mine Road, Monroe, NC 28110 Notice & Disclaimer: The listed street address may be incorrect and is stated hereby for informational and reference purposes only. The Substitute Trustee makes no certifications or warranties that said street address is accurate or correct. It is each potential bidder's duty to determine with his/her own title examination that said street address is correct and matches the above legal description. The above legal description describes the property being sold and shall be controlling. PRESENT RECORD OWNERS as reflected on the records of the Register of Deeds not more than 10 days prior to posting the notice are Brenda Clark and Bobby Clark, Trustee may, in the Trustee's sole discretion, delay the sale for up to one hour as provided in NCGS §45-21.23. In the event that this sale is one of residential real property with less than 15 rental units, an order for possession of the property may be issued pursuant to NCGS §45-21.29 in favor of the purchaser and against the party or parties in possession by the Clerk of Superior Court of the County in which the property is sold. Any person who occupies the property pursuant to a rental agreement entered into or renewed on or after October 1, 2007, may, after receiving the notice of sale, terminate the rental agreement upon 10 days written notice to the landlord. That upon termination of a rental agreement, the tenant is liable for rent due under the rental agreement prorated to the effective date of the termination. Should the property be purchased by a third party, that person must pay the tax of forty-five (45) cents per One Hundred Dollars ($100.00) required by NCGS §7A-308 (a)(1). This sale is also subject to any applicable county and/or state land transfer and/or revenue tax, and the successful third party bidder shall be required to make payment for such tax. The property to be offered pursuant to this notice of sale is being offered for sale, transfer and conveyance "AS IS, WHERE IS". Neither the Trustee nor the holder of the note secured by the Deed of Trust/Security Instrument, or both, being foreclosed, nor the officers, directors, attorneys, employees, agents or authorized representative of either Trustee of the holder of the note make any representation or warranty relating to the title or any physical, environmental, health or safety conditions existing in, on, at, or relating to the property being offered for sale, and any and all responsibilities or liabilities arising out of or in any way relating to any such condition expressly are disclaimed. This sale is made subject to all prior liens, unpaid taxes, special assessments, land transfer taxes, if any, encumbrances of record, including prior Deeds of Trust. The Substitute Trustee reserves the right to require a cash deposit or certified check made payable to the Substitute Trustee (no personal checks) for five percent (5%) of the purchase price or seven hundred fifty dollars ($750.00), whichever is greater, at the time of the sale. The sale will be held open for ten (10) days for upset bids as by law required. Following the expiration of the statutory upset bid period, all remaining amounts are due immediately. If the Trustee is unable to convey title to this property for any reason, the sole remedy of the purchaser is the return of the deposit. Reasons of such inability to convey include, but are not limited to, the filing of a bankruptcy petition prior to the sale and reinstatement of the loan without the knowledge of the Trustee. If the validity of the sale is challenged by any party, the Trustee, in their sole discretion, if they believe the challenge to have merit, may declare the sale to be void and return the deposit. The purchaser will have no further remedy. THIS IS A COMMUNICATION FROM A DEBT COLLECTOR. THE PURPOSE OF THIS COMMUNICATION IS TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE, EXCEPT AS STATED BELOW IN THE INSTANCE OF BANKRUPTCY PROTECTION. IF YOU ARE UNDER THE PROTECTION OF THE BANKRUPTCY COURT OR HAVE BEEN DISCHARGED AS A RESULT OF A BANKRUPTCY PROCEEDING, THIS NOTICE IS GIVEN TO YOU PURSUANT TO STATUTORY REQUIREMENT AND FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES AND IS NOT INTENDED AS AN ATTEMPT TO COLLECT A

DEBT OR AS AN ACT TO COLLECT, ASSESS, OR RECOVER ALL OR ANY PORTION OF THE DEBT FROM YOU PERSONALLY. This the 19th day of January, 2010. The Caudle Law Firm P.A. Substitute Trustee David R. Caudle President &Attorney at Law State Bar Number 6075 2101 Rexford Road, Suite 165W Charlotte, North Carolina 28211 http:// www.caudlelawfirm.com 09-SP-2186 January 26, 2010 February 2, 2010

Wanted job driving truck FT or PT, local or short hal Class A- X endorsement (704)309-0239

PUBLIC NOTICE NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Union County Board of Commissioners will on Monday, February 1, 2010, at 7:00 p.m. in the Commissioners’ Board Room, Room 118, First Floor, Union County Government Center, 500 North Main Street, Monroe, North Carolina, conduct a public hearing to receive comments from the public on the amendments and petitions set forth below. 1. Petition #001095 - Allison's Custom Construction: Petition #001095, ALLISON’S CUSTOM CONSTRUCTION, requesting rezoning classification from B-4 (General Commercial) to RA-40 (Residential-Agricultural) containing 3.02 acres, being on Tax Map #04-198-004B, located on Griffith Road (S.R. #2139) and being within Buford Township. 2. Amend Article XXIV Flood Damage Prevention Section 384 Amend Article XXIV Flood Damage Prevention Section 384 of the Union County Land Use Ordinance entitled Definitions “Essential Services” by deleting stormwater facilities from the current wording. The effect of this amendment will be to prevent construction of stormwater facilities in the floodplain. Current Wording: “Essential Services” means an activity or structure that is required to provide safe movement of traffic and the provision of utilities. Specifically, these services are: street, road, highway, and railroad crossings, overhead and underground utility crossings where crossings are made perpendicular to the stream, municipal and county owned sanitary sewers, stormwater facilities, and stream restoration activities. Proposed Amendment: “Essential Services” means an activity or structure that is required to provide safe movement of traffic and the provision of utilities. Specifically, these services are: street, road, highway, and railroad crossings, overhead and underground utility crossings where crossings are made perpendicular to the stream, municipal and county owned sanitary sewers, and stream restoration activities. The proposed amendments may later undergo, without further notice, substantial changes resulting from objections, debate, and discussions at the hearing. The full text and/or supporting documents relative to the proposed amendments are available for inspection and study at the Union County Planning Department located at 407 North Main Street, Room #149, Monroe, NC from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday. Anyone having any questions on the above petition or amendments may contact the Planning Department at 704-283-3565. Any person requesting a sign language interpreter, please call (704) 225-8554 and make a request at least 96 hours in advance. Any other special assistance needed by an individual due to a disability under the Americans with Disabilities Act should call (704) 283-3810 and make a request at least 96 hours in advance. Lynn G. West Clerk to the Board January 19, 26, 2010 NOTICE OF SUBSTITUTE TRUSTEE'S SALE OF REAL ESTATE UNDER AND BY VIRTUE OF the power and authority contained in that certain Deed of Trust executed and delivered by Brenda Clark and Bobby Clark, wife and husband, dated the 30th day of November, 2006, and recorded in the Office of the Register of Deeds for Union County, North Carolina, in Book 4387 at Page 154 and because of default in the payment of the indebtedness thereby secured and failure to carry out and perform the stipulations and agreements therein contained and, pursuant to demand of the owner and holder of the indebtedness secured by said Deed of Trust, the undersigned Substitute Trustee will expose for sale

005 Special Notices ★★★★★★★★★★★★

GENERAL INFORMATION

HOURS 8:00am-4:30pm DEADLINES In Column Call before 1:30pm the day prior to publication. For Saturday call before 3:30pm on Thursday and for Sunday call before 1:30 pm on Friday. Display Sunday Tuesday Wed. Thursday Friday Saturday

12 Noon Thurs 4PM Friday 4PM Monday 4PM Tuesday 4PM Wed. 10AM Thurs

POLICIES The Enquirer-Journal reserves the right to edit or reject and correctly classify an ad at any time. The Enquirer-Journal will assume no liability for omission of advertising material in whole or in part. ERRORS Please check your ad the first day it runs. If you find an error, call the first day so your ad can be corrected. The Enquirer-Journal will give credit for only the first incorrect publication.

PETS & LIVESTOCK 062 Homes for Pets Free 1 yr Cat, and kitten 6-8 wks, both female call (980)328-5686 Free Female Beagle mix 1yr. old good home needed (704)282-7978

MERCHANDISE 069 Appliances Refrigerator & Stoves $99.99 Washers & Dryers $99.99 704-649-3821

090 Miscellaneous Metal Roofing 3ft wide $1.40 LF 1-803-789-5500

108 Money To Loan Advance Fee Loans or Credit Offers Companies that do business by phone can’t ask you to pay for credit before you get it. For more information, call toll-free 1-877-FTC-HELP. A public service message from The Enquirer-Journal and The Federal Trade Commission.

109 REAL ESTATE REAL ESTATE - RENT

113 Duplexes

Warehouse/office with 4’ dock door. 2400 sf. Old 1br 1ba duplex gas heat cent air private deck, year Charlotte Hwy. $600/Mo. lease +dep. req’d no pets, (704)283-4697 704-201-9534 leave msg

104 Bus. Opportunities

$550mo incls: 1 mo rent & sec. 1br Apt Cotton St. Monroe Unionville Realty 704-753-1000

BEFORE YOU INVEST! Always a good policy, especially for business opportunities and franchises. Call NC Attorney General at (919)-716-6000 or the Federal Trade Commission at (877)-FTCHELP for free information; or visit our Web site at www.ftc.gov/bizop. N.C. law requires sellers of certain business opportunities to register with NC Attorney General before selling. Call to verify lawful registration before you buy.

★★★★★★★★★★★ 1/2 off 1st mo. rent !! Ask about other specials Completely Remodeled 2br, 1.5ba Townhouse Small pets allowed Shown by appt only 704-283-1912 ★★★★★★★★★★★

Weekly rents avail. 1 & 2 BR’s no pet, no inside smoking, lease dep. 704Warehouse 2500sf with 846-6019 dock door, $1000mo. 1630-C Concord Ave. call (704)283-4697

112 Apartments

Newly Remodeled Townhouse 2bd/1.5 ba $600mo. 704-283-3097

114 Houses For Rent

MOBILE HOMES

★ Monroe Apt. ★ 3br 1ba, stove, fridge, 138 Mobile Homes - Rent cent H/A large yard, Special 2br 2ba (704)225-1691 $625mo Neat clean 3br 2ba MH Move in by Jan 31st. Unionville/Piedmont dist Get Feb & Mar. FREE 3br 2ba Parkwood Sch. dist $600mo. 704-289-1460 Beautiful & quiet country living, hardwood paid water flooring, $850mo. ref’s & Wingate: 2mo. rent free dep req’d (704)776-4664 704-289-5949 2BR 2BA $525; 3BR 2BA

111 Commercial - Rent

FINANCIAL

INVESTIGATE

112 Apartments

Oak trees surround small brick ranch near Cane Creek Park $700mo+dep 704-843-1676

REAL ESTATE - SALE 126 Houses For Sale

$600. Cent H/A. No pets. 704-451-8408

140 Mobile Homes - Sale $500.00 DN moves you in. Call and ask me how. 704-225-8850

Houses For Sale By Owner owner financing avail. Monroe, Wingate & Marshville 704-320-5423

First Time Home Buyers

Find The Car Of Your Dreams! Check the Classifieds!

TRANSPORTATION

$8000 Tax Credit $500 down (704)225-8850

166 Recreational 73 Camper good condition, sleep 6-8, $600 call (704)695-4772 or (704)272-0905

1br 1ba duplex spacious, cent H/A, $437mo. 903 A Guild, ref’s & dep req’d (704)225-1543

3br 1.5ba 1050sf $695mo both, great location in Wingate cul de sac dep & ref’s req’d (704)283-6490

PAYMENT Pre-payment is required for all individual ads and all business ads. Business accounts may apply for pre-approved credit. For your convenience, we accept Visa, Master Card, cash, or checks

FAX: 704-289-2929

★★★★★★★★★★★★

014 Lost & Found

FREE FOUND ADS If you find an item, call us and place your FREE ad.

3 LINES, 5 DAYS, FREE There is a charge for Lost Ads The Enquirer-Journal CLASSIFIED DEPARTMENT

704-261-2214 020 Cemeteries & Plots Cemetery plot single plot in Field of Honors in Lakeland Mem. Park valued at $1500 sell for $575 call (704)296-9014

BUSINESS SERVICES EMPLOYMENT 040 Help Wanted Avon- Do you need an extra $200-500? Act now! Ft/Pt. Free gift. Medical Ins. avail. 704/821-7398 Cell Tower Help Wanted Looking for a self motivated person with cell phone tower experience. Experience to include both installation & test of telecommunications equipment inside both hut & cabinet type installations. Call (843) 675-2626 or Fax Resume to (843) 675-2632. Dukes Grill now hiring PT Cashier Apply in person only! 1114 Concord Ave. Earn Extra Money Deliver the new AT&T Real Yellow Pages in the Union Co. area. FT/PT, daily work, quick pay, must be 18 yrs+, have drivers license & insured vehicle (800)422-1955 Ext. 4 8:00A-4:30P Mon-Fri Fast growing maid service needs PT person to clean houses & offices. Must be drug free with no criminal history, own transportation a must 704-243-4435 Mobile Heavy Equipment Mechanic 5 Years Minimum Mechanic Experience Required References Required Mining experience a plus Fax Resumes to 843-6723579 or apply in person at Buckhorn Materials 3410 Hwy 601 South, Jefferson, SC 29718 843-675-7625

READER NOTICE! While many work-athome opportunities listed provide real income, many seek only to sell booklets or catalogs on how to get such work.

Please use caution when responding to all such ads.

Round up scores, stats and highlights from your favorite games at www.enquirerjournal.com.

TheEnquirer-Journal 704-289-1541 • In print and online!


6B / Tuesday, January 26, 2010

The Enquirer-Journal

REAL ESTATE LISTINGS

Let us help your dreams come true ...... Check out these fantastic homes and land deals in our area!

For Sale by Owner, 50 acres Piedmont schools, well installed perk permitted. Mostly wooded, some grass.

For Sale 4 bedroom, 3 bath, 2 car garage. Over 2000 square feet. Near Waxhaw. 704-621-7799

$500,000 Call day 704-291-1061 or night 704-289-1734

$169,000

Hamilton Place • 2808 Arrowhead Ct. $172,500 3 Bed/2 1/2 Bath/+Bonus Room, 1760 sq. ft. / .39 acre premium lot, 2 Car Garage, Gas FP, New Paint, Carpet, ceramic tile, counter tops & gutters. Master suite w/trey ceiling. Contact Perkins Properties, 704-579-1364 MLS 717444

3 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath. Gourmet kitchen with granite countertops/ hardwoods and ceramic tile/jacuzzi jet master bath. Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Attention Golfers FOR SALE BY OWNER 2731 Rolling Hills Drive 704-283-6519 or 704-242-1303 Brick home w/approx. 3200 sq. ft. w/4 large BDs, 3 Full BAs, 2 half BAs, GR room w/rock fireplace w/gas logs. Formal dining room, Bkfst room & kitchen w/pantry. Rear deck overlooking large yard w/garden spot. Oversized garage. Porter Ridge School District.

3 Bedroom, 2 Bath, Ranch home with all new tile flooring/all new neutral carpet thru out/Master bath has dual sinks/garden tubshower. Kitchen has new installed oven.

Lot $30,000

SKYECROFT

5930 Timbertop Lane Charlotte, NC 28215

.87 ac cul-de-sac lot. Gated Community with full amenities; Swim,Tennis, Club House. $189,000. MLS#850338.

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Jeff Hall - Realtor/Broker 980-722-6702-cell jeffhall@kw.com

Call Remax Executive: 704.602.8295, Lara Taylor

Need To Sell Your Home Quickly?

3BR 2B home on 1.23 acres Pageland SC. home has sheetrock walls, new laminate floors, berber carpet, front and rear decks, septic tank, Pela storm doors, counter tops, whirlpool tub with jets. heat pump is 2 yrs old. Refri, stove and dishwasher and gas logs to remain. This home is top of the line. Home can be seen on my web site : terripurser.remax-carolina.com list price $79,500.

Call 704-488-5869 Terri Purser Re/Max Steeplechase Monroe

881 Clonmel Drive • Desired Shannamara Golf Community Breathtaking brick home w/open floor plan. Master on main. Gourmet kitchen w/extras. Oversize bedrooms & Loft. Beautiful landscape w/deck, & in-ground pool. Fenced yard w/ mature trees behind for privacy. For more information and virtual tour visit http://www.MyRealtorMichael.com/ Offered at $399,900

Michael Calabrese 704-231-7750

Place Your Ad Here! REDU LEASE TO OWN!! 2322 Lexington Ave. (Near New Walter Bickett Elem.) 2224 heated sq. ft. Built in 2004. Like new inside and out 3-4 bedroom, 2 1/2 bath, stone and vinyl exterior, new appliances.

$169,900 to buy or lease to purchase. Call 704-488-7722

CED!

Call 704-261-2213 or email: sharon@theej.com

FOR SALE BY OWNER, NORTH MYRTLE BEACH HOUSE $725,000 5 BD, 4 BTH, ON CHANNEL, TWO BLOCKS FROM BEACH WWW.NORTHMYRTLEBEACHTRAVEL.COM, RENTAL HOUSE NAME, AQUAVIEW, 704-975-5996,WCMMCLEOD@CS.COM

BUSINESS AND SERVICE DIRECTORY To advertise your business & services for as little as $2.72 per day in this section call 704-261-2213

We accept cash, checks or Mastercard, VISA and American Express. Cancellable but non-refundable.

Concrete Work

To Subscribe Call 704-261-2219

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Check the classifieds daily! There’s always something new!

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