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to the Cherokee County, Georgia Chamber of Commerce! left - John Barker, Owner, Delphi Global Technology 2019 Board Chair right - David Simmons, VP Facilities, Chattahoochee Technical College 2020 Board Chair

Cherokee County, Georgia boasts a significant sense of community, as does the Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce. The title of this latest Chamber publication, Destination Cherokee, reminds us that all we need is right here in Cherokee County, Georgia. The Chamber prides itself on being a member-services-driven organization whose mission is to promote business and the community while expanding the economy and enhancing the quality of life. Promote, expand, enhance: those words describe the progressive nature of not only the Chamber but also the community. Through an increasing membership base combined with countless volunteers and a supportive community, the Cherokee County Chamber will continue to achieve its mission. Having successfully led the Chamber in 2019, John Barker is confident that in 2020 David Simmons will continue to move the Chamber forward, just as the organization’s 2020 Vision Strategic Plan outlines. Both of these key volunteers feel certain that for your family and your business in 2020, you will find Cherokee County and this Chamber to be the personal and professional destination you’ve been seeking.

About the Chamber: The Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce is the county’s largest and strongest business-to-business network. Founded in 1970, the Chamber is a highly proactive and visible influence in Cherokee County. While the majority of member businesses have ten or fewer employees, the Chamber provides a forum for businesses of all sizes and types. The MISSION of the Chamber is to promote business and the community while expanding the economy and enhancing the quality of life. The Chamber’s VISION is to be the premier comprehensive resource for the Cherokee County business community. An active, viable organization serving over 1,050 members through professional and personal development opportunities, the Chamber promotes a strong, vigorous economic climate in Cherokee County. Not only does the organization create an atmosphere for new business growth in the county, it also strives to ensure existing businesses thrive and residents, newcomers and visitors alike recognize what Cherokee County has to offer.

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What’s Inside •••

Index of Advertisers Canton Tire & Wheel / 19 Cherokee County Water & Sewerage Authority / 17

1 ◗ Welcome

Chattahoochee Technical College / 29

6 Railroad

Cherokee By Choice / 43

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8 ◗ History Museum 12 ◗ Communities 20 ◗ Recreation & Parks 22 ◗ Things To Do

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Cherokee Association of Realtors / 41 Cherokee County Board of Commissioners / 10-11 City of Ball Ground / 15 City of Canton / Inside Back Cover City of Holly Springs / 9 City of Woodstock / Inside Front Cover Cobb EMC / 47 Credit Union of Georgia / 49

26 ◗ Education

Destination Cherokee / 4-5

34 ◗ Healthcare

GrassRoots Tree And Turf Care / 51

40

North Atlanta Venture Mentoring Service / 42

◗ Real

Estate

Enjoy Cherokee Magazine / 52 Little River United Methodist Church / 25

44 ◗ Economic Development

Northside Hospital Cherokee / Back Cover

50 ◗ Newcomer Information

Reinhardt University / 31

Piedmont Mountainside / 33 Renasant Bank / 3 USA Health Plans, Inc. / 37 Wellstar / 39 WLJA 101.1 FM / 29 Woodstock Funeral Home / 19 Woodstock Furniture Outlet / 25

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3605 Marietta Highway Canton, GA 30114 770.345.0400 CherokeeChamber.com

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One of the fastest growing counties in Georgia, Cherokee County is a short drive from Metro-Atlanta and the North Georgia Mountains. With its natural beauty, cultural richness, vibrant communities and southern hospitality, Cherokee County is not only a great place to live - it is a great place to visit!

EXPLORE GARDENS, ARTS & HISTORY

• Gibbs Gardens • Historic Walking Tours, Heritage Center & Visitor Centers • Art Museums, Performing Arts Centers & a Sculpture Garden • The Georgia National Cemetery

ENJOY SPORTS AND OUTDOOR ADVENTURE FOR ALL • Family Aquatic Parks, Indoor Olympic Pools • Water activities on the Etowah River & Lake Allatoona • Miles of Mountain Bike, Hiking & Equestrian Trails • Exceptional Public Golf Courses & Acres of Parks and Playgrounds • Acclaimed Dirt Speedway & Pristine Duck Hunting Preserve

SHOP UNTIL YOU DROP

• The Outlet Shoppes at Atlanta • Cabela’s, the World’s Foremost Outfitter • Specialty shops, antique stores and unique boutiques galore in Downtown Main Street Districts and surrounding communities

INDULGE IN CULINARY DELIGHTS

• Award Winning Restaurants • Famous Eateries, Delicatessens and Southern Barbecue • Breweries, Growlers, Coffee Shops and Bakeries

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History

For the first time the railroad connected the communities of Woodstock, Canton, Ball Ground, and Holly Springs with the rest of the state and beyond and allowed trade to blossom. New markets became reachable for cotton, marble, rope, and other locally produced goods. The railroad helped usher in an industrial age that by the turn of the century saw a booming mill town emerge in Canton and a brighter future take shape for businesses and residents alike. In 1870 the Georgia Legislature passed legislation to help fund a Marietta, Canton, Ellijay rail line. Other monies to fund the railroad were raised locally. Canton’s Judge James Rice Brown, brother to the former governor, Joseph Emerson Brown, was a major stockholder of the new railroad, as was William A. Teasley of Canton. In November 1879, the rail line to Canton was completed, and Little Mary chugged into the new train depot in the county seat. People came from far and wide to attend the ceremonies and view the new train, according to historian Lloyd G. Marlin, who wrote of the event in 1932.

Railroad Drives Commerce and Growth in Early Days •••

In 1879 the arrival of the railroad put Cherokee County on track for a new era of prosperity, commerce, and growth. Reminders of that pathway to success can still be seen in train depots in several cities in the county and in photographs of depots no longer standing.

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Little Mary came puffing into the new station at Canton billowing clouds of black smoke from a huge smokestack and making a noise calculated to wake the dead. The joy of the populace, which had held its breath during the uncertain stages of the road’s construction, was practically unlimited, Marlin wrote.

By 1881 four trains a day ran to Canton, and according to Marlin, “business picked up wonderfully and the entire county was greatly stimulated.” The town and the surrounding areas were billed as a resort location with a grand hotel featuring twenty-five rooms and enjoyable amenities. Canton at that time had wide, tree-lined streets and about seven hundred residents. The Canton Depot, near the Etowah River and close to cotton fields in the fertile lowlands, was a pivotal point for the growing town. Investors soon built marble-finishing companies and the new Canton Cotton Mill in the area, and the railroad depot became a bustling stop that boosted the economy even more. The depot remained in use for close to a century. It was torn down in the early 1980s. When the rail line was extended to Canton, it also ran through the smaller settlements of Woodstock and Holly Springs, which were not incorporated towns at the time. Both communities also benefited from the coming of the rail, though. It is believed that when the railroad first came through Woodstock, the original depot may have been built as early as 1879, but the first written account of it is in 1897. At that time, Woodstock had a population of three hundred. w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


The L&N Railroad built the current Woodstock Depot in 1912 to serve as a passenger and freight depot. The depot became essential for transporting local items such as rope, cotton, and other agricultural products. Woodstock had various industries, and the first grist mills in the county were located nearby. Companies in the area also provided wool carding, yarn spinning, and other related activities. Woodstock has had considerable activity in mineral developments, too. The old Kellogg gold mine and several others are within a few miles of Woodstock. Mica and kaolin were also found in and around Woodstock and needed transportation by rail. Nevertheless, Woodstock was mainly an agricultural town. By the 1890s Woodstock was said to be shipping two thousand bales of cotton yearly, more shipments than any town of comparable size in the area. An agent and full-fledged telegraph service ran the Woodstock Depot until the late 1950s. It is the only depot in the county to be listed on the National Registry of Historic Places and one of only six sites in the county. Built in the Folk Victorian architectural style, the train depot in Holly Springs dates from about the same time as the Woodstock Depot. There were about sixty-three residences in Holly Springs by 1910. Freight leaving Holly Springs included serpentine rock, granite, agricultural goods, and lumber. In later years, trains also helped farmers export poultry from the community. In 1974 L&N sold the Holly Springs depot to the city for $800. For a number of years the building housed City Hall. Today the city has preserved it as a reminder of area history. Ball Ground did not come into existence as a town until the railroad passed through it in 1882. Its development up to that year consisted mainly of two country stores and a half dozen dwellings. The community was almost purely agricultural, but in May 1882 the first train arrived and was met with great celebration. When the Marietta & North Georgia line survey ran through Ball Ground in 1882, railroad officials decided to put a depot there and start a town to go along with it. The railroad officials laid land off into town lots and held a sale of them in April 1882. With nearly all the lots sold, the town immediately began to grow. Within two years Ball Ground had an estimated population of 259. Soon Ball Ground, too, had a train depot. The main industry in Ball Ground for a number of years was marble-working. The railroad played a major part in the success of the marble industry, with trains running regularly among the nearby quarries at Tate and the finishing companies of the Consumers Monument Company, the Roberts Marble Company, and the Ball Ground Monument Company. The finished marble then left Ball Ground by rail to go to places around the country. The Ball Ground depot was on Depot Street at the railroad tracks. It was torn down in the 1980s. As the impact of the railroad was felt in Cherokee County, other plans were laid to expand the rail to areas such as Waleska, but those plans never came to fruition. •

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ne e rail li th f o s s ur e succe unty’s other fo After th o C e for the heroke system ough C r il th a r t th r s loyd no we torian L arietta n eastis a h M r l a m fo c o n o fr ades L ga two dec ialized. lans be t r s p te , la a s e m ie th cit ever during med but it n 32 that ver see 9 1 fe county, d in a o te r for a lin wro ry “Rail desire tu e n e th c G. Mar to th Sharp leading ineteen “J. A.” n h o J of the n ntire county,” l a Colone lan for ee aleska. of the p to hit th r never W te it h o t g u u m pro d, b thro a e d o v a r ti o il r c a a il r ra s an esville inhardt ska wa nd Gain llege, now Re a n , a of Wale k s Co the tow n, Wale tion to inhardt n e e R tt d a Kingsto a t h te ed. Ins d broug hed an happen is r u o fl ity, Univers e area. wth to th o r g d n a

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History

Future Museum Renderings

Cherokee County

History Museum •••

Children’s Area

New Cherokee County History Center on Horizon Continued development of the new History Center will expand the reach and impact of the Historical Society’s activities by serving as a regional tourism destination that will engage visitors and preserve local heritage with artifacts, photographs, and interactive presentations. When fully operational, the History Center anticipates 20,000+ visitors annually for museum exhibits, research resources, and highquality programming. • For more information, visit the Cherokee County Historical Society at 221 E. Marietta Street, Canton 30114. CherokeeCountyHistoryMuseum.com 770.345.3288

Life In The Mills Exhibit

Map Through Time Projection

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communities

Communities •••

Ball Ground Canton Holly Springs Waleska Woodstock 12

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City of Ball Ground Although on the northern edge of a great metropolitan area, Ball Ground retains its own character and uniqueness as a small city where people feel safe and can be involved as little or as much as they desire. An appreciation for history as Cherokee’s second oldest city, recognition of the importance of the environment as Cherokee’s first Tree City USA, and a sense of community attracts many new residents and businesses to the growing city. “Every day we do try to roll out the red carpet and not the red tape! Ball Ground surely rocks!” says Mayor Rick Roberts. The City of Ball Ground feels so strongly about its commitment to bring business, services, jobs and new residents to Ball Ground through quality development that it has trademarked its business slogan, “Where We Roll Out the Red Carpet, Not the Red Tape.” Community leaders are committed to all facets of development, from working with an existing landlord to helping locate a new tenant and with medical providers to bring a practice to the city, to working with major employers to expand. They w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


1882

When in ed to d n plann u o ad line r o r il G a r inity Baalrieltta & North Gedo,rglaiandowners in thdes voicf transfer

the M Groun he dee in the road. T gh Ball il u a o r r e th h of us c th a e run to our g d n in value to uted la on mov d ti e a c r n e a contrib id h s n d the The con is the e town an be id stated “ g of this town a s e shall t to th shin establi adjacen y by which we d n a nter, ithin untr . Carpe E h lands w nefit to the co a r a . F. dS l be on, A. M rs, include y s L r . genera to H a . P en Bye d.” Don Byers, rup, Ell benefite penter, J. W. ld a Berty W . Car rs, and , F. M e n y e B d . r a A Martha r gest Be n, Heste the second lar s, Ancil o y in L k . w A a H rgest. N. as n the la 1932 w rpenter, to a in n C a d . C n C u ith J. the Gro ounty, w idered one of ter. Ball okee C s r n e Carpen ustry o h d c C s in ears ain in y ie m y it e n c h a e T of th hed in as for m the rail line. cts finis s ound w n u o d o s r r P te Ball Gr . s ay cen busines used. In the d n siness g u b in t h s is e b w -fin and k, its o marble known l, a ban te was the d were widely o a h s a re nd ad oun ssful sto e city h e th c c , Ball Gr u e s c f n mber o romine of its p nd a nu ments. a , m te sys stablish school ercial e m m o c other

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importance of celebrated structures. The community boasts four newly renovated parks and recreation facilities. A 1,000-studentcapacity elementary school opened in 2012, providing a stateof-the-art learning environment for local youth. •

2019 Demographics

understand that, for the business owner, time is money. That progressive spirit blends perfectly with Ball Ground’s rich history. Local folklore places the community of Ball Ground near fields where Cherokee Indians played stickball against the Creeks for the prize of a thousand square miles of land. Drawn by the rolling foothills of the Blue Ridge Mountains and abundant streams, early settlers established a vital agricultural community. The community boomed with the construction of a train depot in 1882 to service the Marietta and North Georgia railroad line. Today, Ball Ground continues to thrive. Ball Ground’s population grew nearly 64% from 1990 (population 905) to 2013 (population 1,482). With convenient access to I-575, this growing community offers a positive business climate and varied residential options. Most jobs are in light industry and agriculture. Adding to the quality of life in Ball Ground is the quaint historic downtown district. The district was listed on the National Register of Historic Places for more than ten years, and numerous markers throughout the community highlight the

◗ The northernmost town to sit completely within the Cherokee County boundaries ◗P  opulation: Approximately 1,500 ◗ L ocated just north of Canton at exit 27 on Interstate 575 ◗A  Georgia Main Street Community that focuses on the revitalization of the central business district, design, promotion, and economic development ◗A  nnual special events include the Ball Ground Rocks the Park summer concert series, the Movie in the Park series, and an annual fireworks display

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communities

Canton is a vibrant community that offers a welcoming blend of charm, progressive spirit, and endless opportunities for all.

City of Canton In Canton you’ll find new and exciting possibilities for growth within an inviting community that deeply cares about the city’s future and its unrivaled quality of life. Set conveniently between Atlanta and the Blue Ridge Mountains, Canton offers scenic views of the foothills and the Etowah River, which flows through the historic city. Since 1834 Canton has been a vibrant and welcoming community with charm, a progressive spirit, exceptional parks, and endless opportunities for shopping, dining, events, and arts. Have you been to Canton lately? There is a lot going on! Between 2017 and today Canton residents and visitors have watched as more than 400,000 square feet of historic buildings in the downtown district have been rehabilitated, repurposed, and re-LOVED. The brand-new Reformation Brewery and tasting room sits where a rope factory stood. An in-fill Panera Bread restaurant pays tribute to the design characteristics of preserved buildings on both sides. The city has a 42,000-square-foot former mercantile building that has been lifeless for a decade and is now out for private proposals with a new roof and façade. City Hall has moved to the former high school building downtown to make way for a move in Public Safety space that leads to a new history museum in the planning stages. Downtown Canton’s restaurant selection has grown from three to ten and will increase by another four in the near future. Two new coworking spaces have come to Canton, too. The first of two new parking decks is

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••• in design. Public events are growing downtown. You are invited to take advantage of the new tubing and kayaking outfitters on the Etowah River and trails along more than two hundred acres of riverfront park land. On top of all of those amazing things, in 2019 downtown Canton finished fifth nationally in America’s Main Street Contest because of community commitment to the economic efforts and downtown preservation. This community is built on strong roots. Canton is moving forward and welcomes you to join the ride. Movoto Real Estate ranked Canton the Number One Best Place to Live in Georgia. OnlyInYourState.com named Canton the Number Three Safest and Most Peaceful Place to Live in Georgia. North Atlanta Business Post named Canton the Number Four Top Millennial City, and Safewise awarded it the Number Eleven Safest City in Georgia. Canton holds something for everyone. •

der Consi elf s Younvrited! I w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


◗ County Seat and Service Hub for Cherokee County ◗ Median Household Income: $54,470

2019 Demographics

◗ The median home value in Canton: $282,700 ◗ Voted one of the most charming towns in Georgia by TravelMag.com ◗ Voted Top Five Main Street in USA in 2019 by the United We Stand Contest ◗ Population: 29,306 as of 2018 ◗ Ranked the Number One Best Place to Live in Georgia by Movoto Real Estate ◗ Number Three Safest and Most Peaceful Place to Live in Georgia according to OnlyInYourState.com ◗ Named Fourth Top Millennial City by the North Atlanta Business Post

City of Canton

THE CITY OF

Ball Ground GEORGIA

Ball Ground, in the

northern part of Cherokee county, is a lively community of more than 2000 residents. Before the railroad came through in 1882, the community was almost purely agricultural consisting of two country stores and a few dwellings. After the railroad, the town grew as a result of the marbleworking industry. Today, Ball Ground is growing as businesses and homeowners are pushing into the North Georgia mountains along the I-575 corridor. City officials and staff credit our growth and development to our philosophy —

“We Roll Out the Red Carpet, Not the Red Tape.” 770-735-2123 | CityOfBallGround.com w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m

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communities

City of Holly Springs

◗ Population: 12,446

2019 Demographics

◗ Average Household Income: $80,370 ◗ Median Single-Family Home Value: $237,900 ◗ 2018 – #1 Safest City in Georgia ◗ 2019 – #11 Safest City in Georgia, National Council for Home Safety and Security ◗ 2019 – Partners in Education Award of Excellence – L. R. Tippens Education Center, Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce ◗ 2019 – Partner of the Year – Holly Springs Elementary School STEM Academy, Cherokee County School District ◗ 2015 – Present: Main Street America Accredited Program, National Main Street Center, and Georgia Main Street ◗ 2010 – 2018: Distinguished Budget Presentation Award, Government Finance Officers Association ◗ 2012 – 2017: Certificate of Achievement for Excellence in Financial Reporting, Government Finance Officers Association

City of Holly Springs

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Holly Springs was incorporated in 1906 around the busy Louisville & Nashville Railroad train depot. Holly Springs was at that time known for its green marble quarry on the west side of the city and as a destination for local farmers who wanted to ship their goods on the railroad. As metropolitan Atlanta has grown over the past several decades, Holly Springs has become more suburban in character, with light industry, commercial establishments, and residential developments. Recently much of the work from the mayor, City Council, and city staff has centered on the redevelopment of the downtown area. The Town Center Project (TCP), which will be constructed on about twenty acres near the intersection of Hickory Road and Palm Street, will include retail units, multifamily housing, senior living, and single-family detached residential units as well as City Hall with a town green and amphitheater. Although it would be more exciting to see shovels digging the ground, the city has focused on making sure the TCP succeeds by first completing necessary infrastructure improvements before vertical construction begins. The city has added travel and turn lanes near the TCP, and most recently, widened the southside of Holly Springs Parkway to four lanes and added sidewalks and lampposts to complement the construction of Sixes Ridge and The Darby, both market-driven apartment complexes with upscale amenities. Construction of the Town Center Road Network Project began in 2019. It includes the construction of a roundabout on Hickory Road east of Fire Station Number Eight, the addition of a westbound travel lane from the roundabout to Holly Springs Parkway, the construction of a new roadway from Palm Street to Hickory Road, and the conversion of the end of Palm Street to a right-in/right-out intersection. Construction is expected to be complete in the fall of 2020. The city has furthered its commitment to going green by completing the requirements to become a Tree City USA, recognized by the Arbor Day Foundation. The Holly Springs Tree Commission hosted the city’s first Arbor Day celebration by giving away free dogwood, live oak, and crepe myrtle seedlings as well as thornless blackberry bushes. It also participated in the Great American Cleanup event and picked up more than a thousand pounds of trash and debris from city streets. The city continues its Holly Springs 101 class, which it launched in 2016. In the class, residents and local business owners meet and interact with city staff members on a personal level while learning how city departments function daily. They are encouraged to ask questions of city staff and engage in open dialogue about topics such as the duties of the city clerk as well as those of employees involved in finance, administration, police, fire, and Community Development. Each class meets for four weeknight sessions in the spring, and participation is free. • w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


City of Waleska

•••

Waleska is also home to the historic Cline’s Store, which was constructed in the 1920s as a general store. Once a place where local residents could purchase all types of goods ranging from shoes and school supplies to potatoes and horse collars, the nearly 100-year-old building reopened in 2014 as an antique store. The historic feel of Cline’s makes it a must-see for all visitors to Waleska. •

2019

Demographics

Located in the northern portion of Cherokee County along State Routes 140 and 108 is the quaint community of Waleska. Home to 700 residents — the population increases to 1,250 when residential students from Reinhardt University are counted — the town has a rich history. Settled in the early 1800s primarily by the Reinhardt, Sharp, Rhyne, and Heard families, the community was thriving by 1856 when the crossroads was home to a store, cotton gin, and tobacco factory. A post office was soon to follow, and the town was incorporated in 1889. The name Waleska dates to the mid-1800s when area farmers Lewis Reinhardt and his wife named it in honor of Warluskee, the daughter of a nearby Cherokee chief, to show their sympathy for the Cherokees as they were forced to move west. Today, the city is home to Reinhard University, a four-year, coeducational, liberal arts institution. Since its founding by A. M. Reinhardt, the school has anchored the town’s economy and added to its culture, most notably through the Funk Heritage Center, which is dedicated to the art and history of Southeastern Indians and European settlers. Perhaps Waleska’s best asset is the people. The residents of the small, close-knit community pride themselves on caring for and protecting one another. Waleska’s city leaders are working to enhance the inviting feel of the community and to capitalize on the wonderful sense of place a visitor experiences in town.

◗ Incorporated in 1889 ◗ Accessible via State Routes 140 and 108 ◗ Home to the 134-year-old Reinhardt University ◗ Population: 700 residents; population increases to 1,250 counting residential students at Reinhardt University

CityofWaleska.com

Hollis Q. Lathem Reservoir

Cherokee’s Safe and Sustainable Water Begins Here.

This beautiful reservoir encompasses 334 acres with about fifteen miles of shoreline and is surrounded by a 150 foot buffer. The lake is located in Cherokee and Dawson Counties with the only entrance located at 5436 Cowart Road in Dawsonville. The fishing is fantastic! In 2000, the reservoir was stocked with Blue Gill, Shell Cracker, Largemouth Bass, and Channel Catfish. Other species of fish are present, which include, Spotted Bass, Redeye, Speckled Catfish, and Crappie which were not part of the initial stocking program.

140 West Main Street, Canton, GA 30114 770.479.1813 | www.ccwsa.com w w wCHER19-CCWaterSewer-HPAD.indd . c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r . c o m1

Summer Lake Hours: Winter Lake Hours:

8:00 a.m. - 8:00 p.m. 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Day Auto Pass: $5 at the gate | Annual Pass: $50

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communities

City of Woodstock

Thirty miles north of Atlanta, the city of Woodstock covers more than twelve square miles and contains more than 32,500 residents. The first settlers arrived in the early 1800s with hopes of finding gold from the veins in the area. Investors later constructed mills to serve the burgeoning cotton farms. The railroad constructed a depot in 1879, and storefronts followed. Woodstock officially became a city in 1897.

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Once a sleepy town, today Woodstock boasts awardwinning theater performances, an energetic music scene, independent retailers, name-brand outlet shopping, chefdriven restaurants in a vibrant downtown entertainment district, and a world-class trail system, including some of Georgia’s best mountain bike trails. The Woodstock Visitors Center, Explore Georgia’s 2019 Regional Visitors Center of the Year, is located in the historic Dean’s Store, which opened on Main Street in 1906. Woodstock is home to about 1,750 businesses. The leading industries in Woodstock are retail, health care and social services, accommodation and food services, and professional, scientific, and technical services. Woodstock is home to the historic Dixie Speedway, The Outlet Shoppes at Atlanta, and Georgia Small Business Rockstar Reformation Brewery. Entertainment abounds in Woodstock. The Woodstock Summer Concert Series is held annually at the Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater in the Park at City Center. Musicians such as local Grand Ole Opry inductee Mark Wills, The Charlie Daniels Band, and 38 Special have taken the stage at the venue that accommodates more than 7,500 people on its multiple grass terraces and large main lawn. Madlife Stage & Studios also welcomes audiences of up to three hundred music lovers for performances nightly Wednesday through Sunday. All ages enjoy enriching experiences such as live plays, concerts, and improv comedy at Elm Street Cultural Arts Village. Woodstock is one of North Georgia’s great outdoor destinations. You can picnic with loved ones at centrally located Dupree Park, take a walk or play fetch with a four-legged friend at

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••• Woofstock Park, or kayak to Lake Allatoona from Olde Rope Mill Park. Plans are underway for a new one-hundred-acre park on the east side of town, as well. Woodstock Parks and Recreation hosts festivals, ceremonies, and parades year-round, too. The department has been awarded accreditation by the Commission for Accreditation of Park and Recreation Agencies and the National Recreation and Park Association. City of Woodstock municipal government provides first-class service to citizens, visitors, and stakeholders, and its awards and accreditations confirm that fact.

Woodstock is a Georgia PlanFirst Community and a recipient of Georgia Municipal Association’s Live Work Play City Award. Woodstock is a recipient of Georgia Tech’s 2019 Georgia Smart Community Challenge.

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The Woodstock Police Department is a state-certified law enforcement agency and is accredited through the Commission on Accreditation of Law Enforcement Agencies. The Woodstock Fire Department maintains an Insurance Services Office rating of one, the best rating possible. •

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Serving Cherokee County for 30+ years.

Quality Tires and Professional Service. Today and Down the Road.

◗ The population of Woodstock is approximately 32,580.

2019 Demographics

◗ The median age of residents is thirty-six. ◗ T he labor force includes about 18,500 workers; 41.9% of workers have a bachelor’s degree. ◗ The median household income is approximately $77,300. ◗ T he median single family home value is approximately $250,000. ◗R  esidents of Woodstock spend an average of only thirty-three minutes commuting to work. ◗A  ccording to Niche.com, Woodstock is the Number One Place to Live in Cherokee County, Number One Place to Raise a Family in Cherokee County, Number One Place for Young Professionals in Cherokee County, and the Suburb with the Best Public Schools in Cherokee County. Source: http://www.cherokeegaprospector.com/default.aspx? DID=COMMUNITIES_1384176&SST=CHEROKEE

SHOP FOR TIRES

ALIGNMENTS

BRAKE SERVICES

MONDAY - FRIDAY 8:00 AM - 6:00 PM

115 Ridgewood Road CANTON, GEORGIA

770-479-6556

CANTONTIREANDWHEEL.COM

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Recreation & Parks

Recreation & Parks... More than a Game! •••

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When asked about the importance of public parks and recreation programs, most people agree that they improve the quality of life for residents in a community, but a precise definition of recreation can be elusive. Recreation means different things to different people; it’s personal. For a young adult it might mean multi-purpose trails and a walkable community. For a family with young children, it might mean parks with athletic fields and youth sports programs, along with summer camps and a swimming pool. For a retired person it might mean fitness programs or travel clubs for active seniors. In other words, we each have our own perception of what recreation means. A challenge for the Cherokee Recreation & Parks Agency (CRPA) is to meet the needs of our increasingly diverse and growing community to keep Cherokee a great place to visit, live, work, and play. CRPA operates twenty-three parks throughout the county that encompass more than 2,443 acres and include athletic fields, playgrounds, swimming pools, tennis courts, trails, and much more. As well as upkeep and

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maintenance of its parks, CRPA provides a variety of recreation opportunities for children and adults in the areas of athletics, aquatics, education, special events, and therapeutic recreation. The Cherokee County Aquatic Center provides a multitude of recreation opportunities, including swim lessons, competitive teams, fitness and therapeutic programs, as well as the outdoor leisure pool, The Oasis, for family fun. Is fishing or boating your thing? Access Lake Allatoona at the boat ramps at either Cherokee Mills or Fields Landing Parks. Into horseback riding or looking for a long walk in the woods? Visit the Garland Mountain Horse and Hiking Trails north of Waleska. Pick up a paddle and join some friends for a game of pickleball at Cherokee Veterans Park, or grab your skateboard and try out the skate park. Looking for a place to exercise your furry friend? Try the dog park at Patriots Park. Dreaming of the U.S. Open or Wimbledon? Visit the Cherokee Tennis Center at JJ Biello Park to tune up your backhand.

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Like to bike? The Blankets Creek Bike Trails on Sixes Road are among the most popular mountain biking trails in the United States. The trails represent a partnership between Cherokee County, the Army Corps of Engineers, and the Southern Off-Road Bicycle Association. More than fifteen miles of trails present a variety of options to riders with various skill levels. Grab your bike and join them! As you can see, there are many great things to do in Cherokee County parks. Cherokee Recreation & Parks Agency makes life better in Cherokee County by providing diverse parks and recreation programs that promote healthy lifestyles and inspire an active community. Whatever your passion, you are encourage, to visit your local parks in search of something fun to do. • For more information about the many parks and recreation opportunities available in Cherokee County, visit CRPA.net 770.924.7768.

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THINGS TO DO

Things To Do •••

Ball Ground Downtown & City Park: Adjacent to the railway in downtown, this wooded park features an entertainment venue for concerts and special events. Also available for lease for outdoor weddings and private events. CityofBallGround.com 250 Civic Drive, Ball Ground 770.735.2123 Big Door Vineyards: Conveniently located off I-75 in northwest Cherokee County near Canton, Big Door Vineyards is a beautiful farm winery that offers wine tastings, classes, special events, live music, and more. With an upscale tasting room, spacious verandah, covered pavilion, plus outdoor oasis and waterfall, it is the perfect setting for weddings, corporate outings, and special celebrations. BigDoorVineyards.com 125 Clearwater Trail, White 844.692.4436

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Blankets Creek Mountain Bike Trails: This mountain bike trail system has more than fourteen miles of the most popular single-track trails in the Southeast. Enthusiasts can choose from six unique trails that vary in degree of difficulty and required skill level. Includes parking, restrooms, and picnic area. SorbaWoodstock.org 2261 Sixes Road, Canton 678.568.1508 DE S TINATION CHEROKEE

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Cherokee County Aquatic Center: State-of-the-art aquatic facility featuring an indoor fifty-meter competition pool and twenty-five-yard pool with warmer water plus The Oasis, an outdoor family-fun leisure pool. Competitive and recreational programs and seasonal special events are also available for all ages. CRPA.net/Parks/AquaticsCenter 1200 Wellstar Way, Holly Springs 678.880.4760 Cherokee County History Museum: The museum features movies, interactive iPad presentations, exhibits, and artifacts from the collections of the Cherokee County Historical Society. Learn more about Canton’s rich history on the Historic Canton Downtown Walking Tour, a self-guided tour of historical sites. CherokeeCountyHistoryMuseum.com 221 East Marietta Street, Canton 770.345.3288 Cherokee Veterans Park: This 149-acre-park has athletic fields, tennis and pickleball courts, a playground, skate park, walking trails, an open multiuse meadow, and restrooms. CRPA.net/Parks/Cherokee-Veterans-Park 7345 Cumming Highway, Canton 770.924.7768 Chukkar Farm Polo Club: This beautiful 100-plus acre farm at the southernmost tip of Cherokee County operates as an event facility and Polo Club, hosting weddings, special events, concerts, summer camp, and polo matches in a gorgeous closein location. Limited horse boarding available. ChukkarFarmPoloClub.com 1140 Liberty Grove Road, Alpharetta 770.314.3735 w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


Cline Park: This twelve-acre park includes tennis courts, a walking trail, a playground, and a seasonal splash pad. CRPA.net 704 Bartow Street, Waleska 770.924.7768 Dixie Speedway: One of the premiere dirt tracks in the nation, this raceway provides thrilling high-speed entertainment every Saturday night from April through October. Check out weekly and special shows like the Monster Truck Nationals, Demolition Derbies, Outlaw Sprint Cars, and Late Model touring series. DixieSpeedway.com 150 Dixie Drive, Woodstock 770.926.5315

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Etowah River Park: Enjoy concerts, community events and more in this waterfront park with an amphitheater, a walking trail, a playground, and access to the Etowah River. CantonGA.gov 600 Brown Industrial Parkway, Canton 770.720.7674 Feathers Edge Vineyards: Enjoy locally sourced wines in the tasting room and live entertainment on Saturday and Sunday. Visitors can also shop for fine crafts at the Wildcat on a Wing art gallery. FeathersEdgeVineyard.com 10061 Ball Ground Highway, Ball Ground 770.735.6923

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THINGS TO DO Garland Mountain Sporting Clays: A golf-cart-driven shotgun experience features two courses each with fourteen varying target stations. No experience necessary, and shotguns are available to rent. Enjoy the Lodge for a bite to eat or relax on the deck with views of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Perfect for groups, corporate outings, and special events. Open year-round. GarlandMountain.com 2618 Garland Mountain Trail, Waleska 770.345.0303 Georgia National Cemetery: Located off Georgia Highway 20, Exit 16 in Canton, the Department of Veteran Affairs 123rd National Cemetery is proud to serve veterans’ needs for generations to come. CEM.VA.gov 1080 Scott Hudgens Drive, Canton 770.479.9300 Gibbs Gardens: These world-class gardens feature the nation’s largest Japanese garden, over twenty million daffodils in the spring, 140 varieties of water lilies from spring to fall, special events, a café, and gift store. Located in a pristine setting with twenty-four ponds, thirty-two bridge crossings, nineteen waterfalls, natural springs, and artistically designed gardens. Open March through December. GibbsGardens.com 1987 Gibbs Drive, Ball Ground 770.893.1881 J. B. Owens Park: This thirty-three-acre park features a playground, two pavilions, walking trails, and a multipurpose field. HollySpringsGA.us 2699 Hickory Road, Holly Springs 770.345.5536 Olde Rope Mill Park/Taylor Randahl Memorial Bike Trails: The park features a .5-mile paved walking path plus fishing, canoeing, and picnic areas, along with six bike trail loops that are directional by day for beginner or experienced cyclists. Hikers are welcome but must yield the trail to bikes and travel in the opposite direction. SorbaWoodstock.org 690 Rope Mill Road, Woodstock 678.568.1508 Reformation Brewery, Canton: Situated on the river in The Mill On Etowah, this second location for Reformation Brewery features a tap room, private event space, brewery tours, weekly special events and entertainment, and is family and dog-friendly. ReformationBrewery.com 141 Railroad Street, #500, Canton 678.341.0828

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Reinhardt University–Falany Performing Arts Center: On the campus of Reinhardt University, the Falany Performing Arts Center is known as one of the best concert halls in the Southeast, offering exceptional performances in an intimate setting. Reinhardt.edu/Falany 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska 770.720.9167 Reinhardt University–Funk Heritage Center: This is Georgia’s official frontier and southeastern Indian interpretive center and a certified National Park Service Trail of Tears interpretive site. Visitors will see a film about the Southeastern Indians, exhibits including dioramas, plus artifacts and contemporary American Indian art. The Sellers Gallery of Historic Hand Tools features an amazing collection of hand tools from more than one hundred crafts. Walking trails and a great gift shop are also available. Reinhardt.edu/FunkHeritage 7300 Reinhardt Circle, Waleska 770.720.5970 The Outlet Shoppes at Atlanta: This premier outlet shopping center features more than one hundred nationally known brand-name designer stores plus a wide variety of restaurants. TheOutletShoppesatAtlanta.com 915 Ridgewalk Parkway, Woodstock 678.540.7040 Wiley Creek Duck Preserve: A pristine 350-acre hunting preserve, Wiley Creek Duck Preserve specializes in mallards. Drive-in or overnight packages are available for groups, corporate outings, or day trippers. Hunts are scheduled on Wednesday and Saturday, October through March. Additional activities on the property include skeet, trap, hiking, fishing, a game room, and more. Hunting or preserve license required. WileyCreek.com 205 Sawyer Farm Road, Waleska 770.597.0026 Woodstock’s Northside Hospital Cherokee Amphitheater: Located in downtown Woodstock’s Park at City Center, the amphitheater features multiple grass terraces and a large “lawn” to accommodate an audience of more than 7,500. WoodstockGA.gov 101 Arnold Mill Road, Woodstock 770.517.6788

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Downtown Ball Ground Ball Ground is an official Georgia Main Street Community. Downtown is dotted with inviting eateries, alluring gift shops, and striking parks and gardens. The Ball Ground Botanical Garden is located on the grounds of City Hall and draws visitors from around the state for lectures, tours, tea parties, and even an annual day lily sale. Downtown Ball Ground is also home to community celebrations throughout the year and a bimonthly farmer’s market. Downtown Canton History comes alive in downtown Canton. Visitors are enamored by the unusual white marble courthouse that overlooks beautiful Cannon Park and the iconic gazebo. A regular farmers market is found at this location on Saturdays most of the year. The quaint streets of downtown are lined with boutiques, shared work environments, and a variety of local restaurants. Don’t miss the new Cotton Mill Exchange for an afternoon filled with exploring a collection of shops under one roof. Downtown Holly Springs Holly Springs is growing, and the new downtown will soon be a true “Live, Work, and Play” project. Housing options will include lofts, townhomes, and cottage homes. An abundance of space for retail and office space will surround the new city hall. An event green and amphitheater are also a part of things to come. Construction is slated to begin or start in 2020.

Little River United Methodist Church Serving the Woodstock Community since 1830

Sing in a Choir • Feed the Hungry Experience Community • Grow with God 12455 Highway 92, Woodstock GA 30188 Reverend Dr. Gale Seibert | GaleSeibert@gmail.com

LittleRiverUMC.info | (770) 926-2495 Sunday School 9:45 am All Ages Welcome

Sunday Worship 8:30 am & 10:55 am Everyone Welcome

CHER19-LittleRiverMethodist-QPAD.indd 1

10/22/19 4:06 AM

Downtown Waleska Waleska is proud to be the home of Reinhardt University, one of North Georgia’s most prestigious institutions of higher education. The school is located in the heart of downtown Waleska and brings with it two captivating destinations—the Falany Performing Arts Center and the Funk Heritage Center. Visitors also enjoy browsing Cline’s Store, an old-fashioned general store where local residents gather to discuss current events, tell stories of yesteryear, and share news of the hottest fishing spots. Downtown Woodstock Visitors flock to downtown Woodstock for boutique shopping, chef-driven restaurants, arts, music, concerts, and a variety of festivals throughout the year. With more than twenty restaurants, thirty-five independent retailers, and entrances to the community Greenprints trails, there’s always something to keep visitors happy. Enjoying a drink while in downtown Woodstock is easy, since it’s an open-container district. Participating restaurants can pour your favorite beverage in an approved open container to take with you as you explore downtown. w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m

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education

Education

Students prepare to be productive members of society and are primed to advance our community. •••

Our community believes in the value of a wellbalanced education, and our leaders strive to instill excellence in every aspect. Education is a constant focus—from early childhood through higher education. We foster lifelong learning, make it easily accessible, and bring home awards for outstanding accomplishments.

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Cherokee County School District The Cherokee County School District, already nationally recognized for its dedication to STEM—science, technology, engineering and mathematics—education, is launching new initiatives to further enhance these learning opportunities for all students. STEM careers are on the rise locally and internationally, with high demand for job-ready workers. In 2012 the school district joined a national effort to invest in STEM education, which included the opening of CCSD’s elementary school STEM academies and examining middle- and high-school programs to ensure students were being well prepared for careers in those disciplines. CCSD’s STEM investments have since grown, with even more programs slated for the 2019-2020 school year, in partnership with major players in the field. “No matter their career aspirations, STEM learning is important to every student we serve. Through STEM they gain invaluable critical-thinking, problem-solving, and technology skills,” Superintendent of Schools Dr. Brian V. Hightower says...

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We want to inspire a love of learning in students, and through STEM education, we also can inspire very successful future careers.

CCSD today operates five STEM academies, specifically at Ball Ground, Holly Springs, Knox, and R. M. Moore Elementary Schools plus Clark Creek Elementary, which is both state STEM certified and, after evaluation this spring, internationally STEM certified by AdvancED. The Knox and R. M. Moore academies are new for CCSD, following the consolidation of Canton Elementary, one of the original STEM academies. STEM academies offer core academics and electives but blend STEM into those lessons and complement that learning with standalone STEM lab classes and activities. School-level partnerships create unique opportunities for students, including field trips to neighboring businesses in the STEM fields. The academies improve not only their students, but also students districtwide, as the lessons their teachers create are shared in a database accessible for all CCSD educators. At the district level several major partnerships are upping the game for STEM learning, including the Atlanta Braves Science of Baseball lessons, a strong relationship with Microsoft and its products, including Minecraft Education, and a new collaboration with Discovery Education, part of the Discovery Network family. Discovery Ed will begin working this school year throughout CCSD to help teachers craft more meaningful STEM lessons and increase involvement from the business community to add realworld connections and experiences for students. A new district partnership with the Georgia Tech Research Institute is incorporating problem-based learning lessons in eighth-grade Connections classes such as fire forensics investigation, green architectural design, and wearable technologies. CCSD high schools offer multiple routes to STEM careers, varying from industry certifications in occupations such as welder or certified nursing assistant to advanced academic programs that incorporate Advanced Placement science, math, and research courses that prepare graduates for research universities. •

ts

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d th ts w attend ents train an residen e k c th to g ny stud s a in s m u f o d Wood ck e te commu hnston was on 1935. Woodsto l, o o h c S . Jo h in rade, Smith L m Canton Hig tenth g e t. o th p h e a D d fro throug diplom aduate es only school s h s ig la o who gr c h h t a w y taugh receive tudents Academ ho wanted to here. S w at the e ls e ew the train ool. hool c ff s o h t so thos o ig h ah Depot g high sc attend odstock the hill to the had to o W fo e on r p d at th afterno alked u h w c boarde d a n e a e was ain Depot rd the tr ssenger servic 1949. a o Canton b n e a ould th tock. P arch 1, They w Woods ot on M p to e D ip k tr rn hen the oodstoc the retu 1956 w at the W in d d te e a s termin hool clo ed. High Sc h School open n to n a C Hig erokee new Ch

Get to Know Cherokee County School District

◗ Eighth-largest school district in Georgia

◗ One Internationally AdvancED ◗ Cherokee Academies: four STEM Certified STEM School (Clark Creek academies, two fine arts academies (school choice program open to all Cherokee County ES STEM Academy) families) ◗ Two State-Certified STEM Schools (Clark Creek ES STEM Academy and ◗ 1,122 average SAT score—second Woodstock HS) highest in Metro

◗ 42,000 students

◗ 23 average ACT score—third highest in Metro

◗ Two-time National MAGNA Award Program honoree for innovation in education

◗C  herokee County’s largest employer: 5,000 full-time, 1,000 part-time and at-will employees

◗ National AP Honor Roll—four consecutive years

◗ U.S. Department of Education Green Ribbon School District Sustainability Award winner

◗ Quality School System Accreditation from SACS-CASI (AdvancED)

◗ All CCSD high schools named AP Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) or AP STEM Achievement Schools

◗ Forty-one schools and centers (twenty-three elementary, seven middle, six high, four centers)

◗A  ll CCSD high schools named to the Washington Post list of America’s Most Challenging High Schools

For more information, visit CherokeeK12.edu.

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education Chattahoochee Technical College Chattahoochee Technical College has what it takes to help students soar to success. A unit of the Technical College System of Georgia, Chattahoochee Tech awards associate degrees, diplomas, and certificates in more than fifty programs of study for students to gain the skills and experience they need for the next step in their professional or academic careers. Programs of study at Chattahoochee Tech range from health sciences and engineering technology to business, computer information systems, and public/personal services. During the past academic year, students from Cherokee County accounted for almost twenty percent of Chattahoochee Tech’s total enrollment of nearly 15,000 students. Two of the eight Chattahoochee Tech campuses are located in Cherokee County, with one of these campuses in the heart of downtown Woodstock and the other in Canton in the 700-acre mixed-use development known as The Bluffs at Technology Park. Premier programs of study at the Woodstock campus include the popular cybersecurity program and online programs, as well as an interiors program, which includes the Kitchen and Bath Designer Certificate. At the Canton campus, the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) program was added during the past academic year. The OTA program is equipped with state-of-theart technology that includes the HoverCam Pilot wireless digital teaching station. The Canton campus also features programs in

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early childhood care and education, air conditioning technology, and business management. Chattahoochee Tech partners with the Cherokee County School District (CCSD) Summer Bridge program by offering rising ninth graders in-depth tours of the North Metro Campus in Acworth. CCSD students have the opportunity to preview programs the college offers and meet the college’s outstanding faculty. Through this initiative high school students learn about the post-secondary, skilled workforce training opportunities available at Chattahoochee Tech, to start them planning for successful careers in high-demand fields. Chattahoochee Technical College also serves Cherokee County through the college’s Economic Development Division, which provides dynamic career and workforce development opportunities for people and industries of Cherokee County. The program offers customized training services to local businesses and industries to ensure that employees upgrade their skills to keep pace in a rapidly changing environment. Popular training topics include safety and leadership training and Lean Six Sigma, a method that relies on a collaborative team effort

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••• to improve performance by systematically removing waste and reducing variation. The college also offers training in programmable logic controllers, industrial maintenance, forklift operating, and quality assurance. Non-credit professional development courses also help citizens gain the skills necessary to further their careers. •

Chattahoochee Tech students gain a highquality and affordable education that prepares them for skilled jobs in a vast array of in-demand careers.

Southern Gospel • Bluegrass • Classic Country

Get to Know Chattahoochee Technical College ◗C  TC is Georgia’s largest technical college serving nearly 15,000 students in the past academic year. ◗W  ith eight campus locations serving six counties – Bartow, Cherokee, Cobb, Gilmer, Paulding and Pickens counties, there are more than 1.3 million people in CTC’s six-county service delivery area. ◗C  TC awards certificates, diplomas, and associate degrees in over fifty programs of study in the areas of Arts and Sciences, Business and Technical Studies and Health Sciences. ◗ T he Chattahoochee Tech Foundation awarded more than $96,000 in scholarships and grants to 100 students during the previous academic year. ◗ T he Canton campus enrolled a total of 1,324 students, while the Woodstock campus had a total of 1,359 students from July 1, 2018, through June 30, 2019.

For more information, visit ChattahoocheeTech.edu.

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Liveing Stream and

Cherokee County News • Weather • Sports www.WLJAradio.com

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education

Reinhardt University Nestled on 525 acres in Cherokee County, Reinhardt University rests in the shadow of Pine Log Mountain in Waleska. Only a ten-minute drive from Canton, the university offers a beautiful place to learn with a strong support system of dedicated faculty and staff. Reinhardt University served more than 1,700 students in the 2017–2018 academic year with more than forty undergraduate and graduate programs. It has also been recognized as a College of Distinction as the Number Seven Best College in Georgia by College Consensus among the likes of Emory University, Georgia Tech, and the University of Georgia; and by U.S. News & World Report as the twentyfifth Best Regional College South for 2019. Soft Skills: Preparing students to be successful employees is a main focus of Reinhardt, University’s faculty and staff. While staying true to the university’s vision to create a unique Reinhardt Experience where each student thrives and while maintaining the values of faith, learning and leading, Reinhardt University has implemented a Quality Enhancement Plan (QEP) that opens more doors for students. The QEP – “Where in the World RU Going?” – was developed in 2018 as part of the university’s Strategic plan and focuses on student participation in high impact practices. From study abroad and internships to service learning and undergraduate research, learning at Reinhardt expands outside the classroom. “Employers are looking for employees who know the hard skills of the job but who also can communicate effectively, work in a team atmosphere, and think critically,” said Dr. Mark Roberts, Executive Vice President and Provost. “Our QEP expands student opportunities that challenge them in a way that helps develop these skills.” From enrollment to employment, every step of the way is centered on student success. Reinhardt’s Office of Student Affairs launched RU Leads last year, bringing in industry professionals in an interactive atmosphere. RU Leads gives students the opportunity to strengthen networking, leadership and communication skills.

At Reinhardt, we believe that soft skills training has a positive impact on workplace outcomes for our graduates, such as recruitment, retention, productivity and job satisfaction. Developing our student’s soft skills build their leadership capacity in a sustainable way, says Dr. Walter P. May, dean of students.

Hard Sciences: Building on the launch of the cybersecurity and nursing programs, Reinhardt continues to focus on hard sciences. The National Science Foundation awarded Reinhardt the Robert Noyce Teacher Scholarship Program grant to create the STEM Teacher Education and Development Program. Over five years Reinhardt is expected to receive $930,000 for the STEM Teacher Education and Development Program to fund student scholarships, teacher stipends, research, and STEM Summer Camp. The program serves Reinhardt students as well as Cherokee and Pickens school district teachers. It also provides scholarships for Chattahoochee Technical College graduates who earn their associate degree in a related field and enroll at Reinhardt to finish their bachelor’s degree. Scholarship funds will be distributed to eligible Reinhardt juniors and seniors majoring in biology or math. Reinhardt graduates will then take their knowledge to a Title I public school in Cherokee or Pickens counties and teach for at least two years. •

Get to Know Reinhardt University

◗ 1,700+ students served in 2017–2018 ◗ More than forty undergraduate and graduate programs

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◗ Recent Degree Offerings: • 100% Online MBA • 1 00% Online Master of Science in Sport Administration & Leadership • MFA in Creative Writing • Cybersecurity • Nursing ◗A  thletics: Twenty-three sports (men’s volleyball added for 2019) ◗ Three-time NAIA Men’s Lacrosse National Champions

Designations: ◗ College of Distinction (2019–2020, Georgia, Christian, Education, Business) ◗ College Consensus (#7 Best College in Georgia) ◗ U.S. News & World Report 2019 (#25 Best Regional Colleges South)

For more information, visit Reinhardt.edu.

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You Will Be

Successful

40+

5

PROGRAMS OF STUDY

GRADUATE PROGRAMS

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40+

INTERCOLLEGIATE SPORTS

CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

Apply Now ADDITIONAL SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE FOR CHEROKEE COUNTY STUDENTS.

Reinhardt.edu | 770-720-5526

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education

at a glance

Kennesaw State University

Enrollment: 37,807 (based on Fall 2019) ◗ Undergraduate: 34,499 ◗ Graduate: 3,308 Student Profile: Gender ◗ Female: 49% ◗ Male: 51% Race/Ethnicity ◗ 55% White ◗ 21% Black/African-American ◗ 10% Hispanic/Latino ◗ 5% Asian ◗ Full-time: 71% ◗ Part-time: 29% ◗ Average High School GPA: 3.38 ◗ Average ACT: 23 ◗ Average SAT: 1,175 ◗ Eight residential facilities with approximately 5,200 beds ◗ More than 100,000 alumni ◗A  n economic impact of $1.46 billion ◗ An NCAA Division I school with eighteen athletic teams

For more information, visit Kennesaw.edu.

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A leader in innovative teaching and learning, Kennesaw State University offers more than 150 undergraduate, graduate, and doctoral degrees to its more than 35,000 students. Kennesaw State is a member of the University System of Georgia. With thirteen colleges on two metro Atlanta campuses, KSU is the third-largest university in the state and one of the fifty largest public institutions in the country. The university’s vibrant campus culture, diverse population, strong global ties, and entrepreneurial spirit draw students from throughout the region and from ninety-two countries across the globe. Kennesaw State is a Carnegiedesignated doctoral research institution (R2), placing it among an elite group of only six percent of U.S. colleges and universities with an R1 or R2 status. As a child Chris Roper was drawn to anything that flew—planes, rockets, and satellites. He knew his future would involve aerospace engineering studies. His fascination with aviation led him to Kennesaw State University, where he earned a degree in mechanical engineering with a minor in aerospace engineering. After graduation he completed a threemonth fellowship at Los Alamos National Laboratory before joining the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory for a six-month co-op, ultimately gaining admission into a highly competitive Ph.D. program. Like Roper, more than 36,000 students at Kennesaw State today, are discovering their own potential and transitioning into exciting careers, and the university stands ready to deliver. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, more than 4,200 degree-granting postsecondary institutions operate in the U.S. For that reason, cutting through the fiercely competitive higher education marketplace can be challenging without first identifying who and what makes a university tick. KSU has gained tremendous momentum with the new appointment of President Pamela Whitten and elevation to R2 doctoral university status, the second-highest classification for research institutions in the country. Following the reclassification by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Learning, the university set an ambitious goal of becoming a top-tier R2 institution. It created a roadmap to advance undergraduate and graduate education, along with bolstering research and scholarship. More recently the university launched an effort to clearly define its purpose in the landscape of higher education and identify what it means to be an Owl, the school mascot and exemplification of wisdom. That effort confirmed what many across the Southeast already knew: Kennesaw State is built on a promise that all students can set their own life’s trajectory to transform lives, find new purpose, and dare to climb higher. The university holds true to its promise by ensuring students are the focal point of all institutional efforts.

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When students enroll at KSU, they enter an educational environment that caters to their every need, offering outstanding academic support, world-class facilities, and a vibrant and welcoming campus community within the thriving Atlanta metropolitan area.

Much like Roper, who conducted extensive research alongside faculty experts, KSU students make an immediate impact on their areas of study by coalescing thought-provoking coursework with practical applications. Whether nursing students learning hands-on in clinics, computer science students engaging the industry, or education students using state-of-the-art mixedreality technology to simulate classroom experiences, they leave with a multitude of real-world experiences that make them highly sought after by employers across the Southeast. KSU students respond to their educational environment with vigor. They are a diverse group from all backgrounds who are fearlessly determined, uniquely prepared for the road ahead, and passionately engaged with their studies. They exceed expectations every day. •

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Get to Know Kennesaw State University Nationally recognized high-quality degree programs, dedicated faculty, and an emphasis on basic and applied research have helped Kennesaw State garner national attention. U.S. News and World Report ◗ Ranked the top public university and tenth nationally for Schools Students Most Eager to Enroll (admissions yield rate) ◗ Ranked among National Universities in 2019 Best Colleges ◗ Among the Best Undergraduate Engineering Programs in the nation ◗ Best Online MBA program in Georgia and top twenty-five nationally ◗ Best Online Graduate Information Technology program in Georgia and top forty nationally ◗ Best Online Graduate Engineering program in Georgia and top sixty nationally Princeton Review ◗ Top fifty Game Design Programs for Undergraduates Billboard ◗ Among Top Twenty Music Business Programs in the Nation Military Times ◗ Among Top Seventy-five Colleges Ranked Best for Vets

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healthcare

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation ranks Cherokee County as the Fifth Healthiest County in Georgia. •••

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“Our patients are the center of everything we do, and that never changes,” says Billy Hayes, CEO, Northside Hospital Cherokee. In just over two years since it opened, the new Northside Hospital Cherokee has seen tremendous growth and record volumes across multiple specialties.

Northside Hospital Cherokee According to an Atlanta Regional Commission report, Cherokee County was the fastest growing county (at nineteen percent) in the ten-county region between 2010 and 2018. Northside Hospital Cherokee certainly reflects that growth. “As more people move into this area, more and more patients are choosing Northside Hospital Cherokee for their healthcare,” says Hayes. “We’re always proud to demonstrate the truly remarkable caliber of Northside’s doctors and nurses.” The hospital is expanding its services and facilities to provide the region and the community with greater access to healthcare. Two floors have been added to the hospital’s main patient tower. Construction is underway on two new floors in the Women’s w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


anged road ch il a r e ing of th 879 a The com ny ways. In 1 om his a ry in m heard fr rth n’s histo iddle Georgia to n a t in No C f in m rse o ing buil ty u e n o b lish u c s o e a C th to estab road w s ewton il N ie a r it m n o w e ortu man fr ok the that a n eat opp elative , Sr., to as s n up gr e e n p o o J wife’s r ld w u yre r., who and wo obert T ddox, S the trip to the man, R Georgia a t a M h . T F t . e ber ses nd mad cording busines is relative, Ro pany, a ere, ac m h h o T f c o r. d e e a Riv for his ilro advic Etowah f the ra needed o e e t th h n e n g o id wife, ythin pres nton nd ever with his Jones, n of Ca u e w r fo e to s e th ll ed sma ts, Jon rmedus he mov y repor bert Pe a year o R in , h golfer to famil n it o and w fant s famous , in f s o s d r e n e a in fath es, bus made a lker Jon to become the rs, Jones Sr. a le W ie Sus up ercanti yea ones M twenty ld grow J t u x e o e e w th n g o d e wh ene For th exchan and op Jones. rmers to il line made fa siness u h Bobby b it n w o he ra rked pact nded rops. T . He wo c n n major im to o n tt comma a o c C it r ir in e e v y n r th ere ar Compa store fo the cotton wh Mill ne Cotton om his fr ip n h s to s d e n o h a to go im loth ed C le for h e found om there the c d it possib ice. In 1899 h r ntry an F o r. c e the u e riv t pr in . s th e e in d r b a n e e g a h th na cks nyw ft Canto road tra could reach a le il r a r e v e e th ls es n 37. his mil nd. Jon is death in 19 made in t dema h a l e r ti g n u on in ls there was so the mil d te a r e He op

on t n a C

Center. Expected to open in spring 2020, the expanded Women’s Center will support Northside Hospital Cherokee’s Special Care Nursery with new level-three NICU services, an expanded wellbaby nursery, more observation and extended recovery beds, and education space. More physicians are opening offices on or near the Northside Hospital Cherokee campus to better and more conveniently serve patients. A second medical office building opened on the campus in July 2019. In addition to the multiple physician practices that have already opened, the building includes a larger outpatient infusion center, orthopedics and rehabilitation services, an expanded cardiac and pulmonary rehabilitation clinic, an outpatient imaging center, and a dedicated breast-care center for women.

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We’re constantly thinking about what’s next and what services or facilities we need to support our patients and the community,” says Hayes. “Our goal is to provide the highest quality healthcare for Cherokee and Northwest Georgia. That’s where all our planning starts.

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healthcare

The commitment to support healthier patients and create a stronger, healthier community extends beyond the hospital’s physical walls. “We continue to invest in programs that promote healthy lifestyles, such as partnering with local schools and EMS providers,” says Hayes. “Our Sports Medicine Network partners with Cherokee County high schools, Reinhardt University athletics programs, and the Cherokee Recreation and Parks Agency to help athletes prevent injury and reach peak performance.” The dedication of Northside Hospital employees and their families and friends doesn’t end at the end of the workday. Last year they donated more than thirty thousand hours to more than one hundred local service projects, including March for Babies, MUST Ministries, the Malon D. Mimms Boys & Girls Club, The Children’s Haven, and many others. •

Recent Accomplishments ◗ Recognized for providing an Outstanding Patient Experience in 2018 and 2019 by Healthgrades ◗ Earned Advanced Certification for Primary Stroke Centers from The Joint Commission, as well as multiple Disease-Specific Care Certifications for joint replacement, pneumonia, and heart attacks ◗ Received multiple awards from American Heart Association Lifeline and Get With The Guidelines programs for treatment of heart attack and stroke ◗ Named one of the nation’s Best Places to Work by job sites Glassdoor.com and Comparably.com.

Follow @NorthsideHosp on social media, and for more information, including free community health screenings, visit Northside.com. Northside Hospital Cherokee, 450 Northside Cherokee Blvd. Canton, 30115 770.224.1000.

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New Health Insurance Plans Available Exclusively for Chamber Members.

Lower your health insurance cost through new plans available ONLY to Chamber Members!

770-475-7562

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The USA Health team is local in Woodstock and is ready to help you, your family, or your business find the highest quality healthcare plan at an affordable rate. Call today. DE S TINATION CHEROKEE

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healthcare

Wellstar Cherokee Health Park Wellstar Cherokee Health Park at Holly Springs is conveniently located just off I-575 and Sixes Road and offers many services and benefits for you and your family. ◗ 21 Primary Care Physicians & Specialists ◗ 100 New Staff Positions ◗ Imaging Center with MRI and Digital Mammography Technology ◗ Convenient Urgent Care open 7 days/week, 365 days/year ◗ Sleep Center ◗ Lab Outreach Services ◗ Physical Therapy and Sports Medicine ◗ Free Parking

Cherokee Health Park at Holly Springs is located at 1120 Wellstar Way, Holly Springs, 30114. Wellstar operates health parks in Acworth, East Cobb, and Vinings along with the newest location at Avalon.

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Wellstar Cherokee Health Park at Holly Springs provides Cherokee County residents with high-quality outpatient services close to home. As of its September 2019 opening of phase one of a two-phase project, the new health park hosts access to primary care including family medicine, OB/GYN and pediatrics, urgent care, imaging, a sleep center, cardiac diagnostics, lab outreach services, and OrthoSport physical therapy. Other medical specialties include cardiology, endocrinology, pulmonary medicine, ENT, general surgery, hand surgery, and urology. “Wellstar has always been committed to providing patients in the communities we serve with better access to world-class healthcare,” says Executive Vice President Kem Mullins of the ambulatory division and business development for Wellstar. “The reaction to our health parks concept has been overwhelmingly positive, and we are excited that Cherokee County, home to more than 1,300 Wellstar team members, is our first health park outside of Cobb County.” •

We are thrilled to meet the growing demand for essential healthcare services in the Cherokee community by building a health park that’s convenient for residents.

– Joe Brywczynski, Senior Vice President Wellstar Health Parks Administration & Development

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real estate

What makes Cherokee the best place to live?

Great Choices

•••

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WHY CHEROKEE

“One of Cherokee’s best assets in attracting people to our county is the diversity of places to live. Newcomers can choose from new or resale houses, condos, townhomes, developments for folks over fifty-five, farms, and even places with pastoral acreage and room for horses. Many subdivisions offer amenities such as tennis and swimming pools, and some locations even offer nearby lakes or rivers. Cherokee County offers something for everyone.” Wanda Roach, ERA Sunrise Realty 404.861.4381 WandaRoach@Comcast.net

Five Reasons to Hang Your Hat

The fastest growing county in the metro Atlanta area for the last two years, Cherokee County draws new homeowners because it is such a highly desirable place to live. New residents are drawn by the county’s easy access to the metro area, abundance of natural resources, and hometown environment. Cherokee County has built a steady reputation of being an ideal community to raise a family, retire as empty nesters, or spend the golden years. Knowledgeable local real estate professionals share the top five reasons why Cherokee attracts so many new residents and what makes the community such an attractive place to call home.

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Good Value “One of the biggest reasons so many people find Cherokee County an attractive place to live is the value of their home relative to the community it is located in. With all the awesome amenities Cherokee County has to offer, not to mention excellent schools, it is a safe, affordable, and fun place to live.” Michael Bradford, Keller Williams Realty Partners 770.862.8002 Michael.Bradford@KW.com

Great Schools “Great weather and southern hospitality attract a lot of people to Georgia, and Cherokee County is abundant in those departments, but the top thing that continues to bring young families as well as new senior residents into our county is our excellent school system. Most people assume that seniors don’t care about the schools if they don’t have school-age children, but there is a direct correlation between property values and the quality of a school system. Seniors appreciate that the high-quality schools in Cherokee have a positive effect on their property values. Seniors and others also appreciate the county’s low tax rates. Cherokee County has many wonderful things to w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


offer, including our small-town feel, diverse shops, Lake Allatoona, the Etowah River, golf courses, a modern hospital, bike trails, parks and recreational activities, restaurants, mountain views, easy access to highways, arts and theater, and much more. Cherokee County is truly a great place to live, work, and play.” Jenn Goddard, RE/MAX Town & Country 770.262.7218 GoddardRealty.com

Quality of Life “Buyers flock to Cherokee County because of our overall quality of life, including our parks, restaurants, shopping, medical care, and top schools. Newcomers appreciate the ability to find a great selection of homes and lifestyles, whether it’s an estate with acreage, a horse farm, a community for those over the age of fifty-five, a single-family home, or a townhome within walking distance to restaurants. It can be a new or resale home, and it can be on a lake or golf course or in a subdivision with swim and tennis amenities. We truly have something for everyone, while still being within a reasonable commute to Atlanta’s concert, sporting, and event venues or within easy driving distance for a weekend in the mountains or at the beach.” Becky Babcock, Path & Post Real Estate 770.851.5595 Becky@PathPost.com

Sense of Community “Our family moved to Cherokee County in 1984 from metro Atlanta, and from the beginning we felt a sense of family, belonging, and community. Everyone we met was friendly, and we immediately felt connected. Our first home in Cherokee County was in the Union Hill area. The little corner grocery store at Sugar Pike and Lower Union Hill added charm to the area. I was having trouble finding my way around, and the woman there gave me a map on my second visit. The sense of community was strong right from the start and continues today. Cherokee is about family and community.” Camille Gard Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices Georgia Properties 770.547.6659 PMCommunities.com Everyone who already makes Cherokee their home agrees there can be no better community in which to live. Its cities filled with shopping, restaurants, cultural events, and bustling farmers markets give way to vistas of rural countryside, one of the most beautiful lakes in Georgia, rivers and streams. Parks and recreation, some of the best schools in Georgia, skilled healthcare, as well as excellent police and fire services all contribute to Cherokee County being a great place to live. In the shadow of metro Atlanta and at the foothills of north Georgia, Cherokee County is truly where the metro meets the mountains. •

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MIT principled and trained… A first of it’s kind opportunity for Georgia startups, led by the Cherokee Office of Economic Development, principled and trained by MIT’s Venture Mentoring Service (VMS). The MIT VMS Model is tried and true with 20 years of operation in 23 different countries. NAV is proud to be the 90th chapter of the MIT VMS program. All Atlanta-based entrepreneurs who are looking for guidance are welcome.

NorthAtlantaVMS.com

HQ: Cherokee County Serving: The Atlanta Region


Economic Development

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se ing hou A room g to accordin k: t, o p e d oodstoc k train gia’s W mmers oodstoc r o W e e G , th r book or dru d near smen, re in he operate o le a d m s it g h n y arrive veli S. W Felicia ute. Tra there after the y rented ib r T l nnia ed ds. The A Cente re called, stay eir goo th ll e e w s rding to to as they n. Acco by train w arren k to c d to n s d r was W in arou e d m le in Woo m e u v r a d g house s and tr e such buggie unt, on boardin goods o r c c le a w o re’s n dry at the F Whitmo called o e he met stayed d o n h a w ts , hir her Sewell e sold s round 1900, w H . d been k c to She ha ler a . e w here Woods e o L F . a r, Av orgia, w t N. A e te n h a G g h , c u r th a y me gest d rried in in Fors ’s youn ally ma d, ollege tu C n t e if v T Fowler e e g Bessie usic. The two fore they mov m e attendin B g ck . in to y ta s d n d oo Atla s stu W a to e w d th e e h v to s fter it d r mo ebuilt a edicate r d nd late s a e a 2 m w 1 a 9 it 1 ll bec ee that , Sewe elped s h d though n a 3. Church fire 191 Baptist y b d e y stro was de

ock t s d Woo

Live, Work, Play:

No Longer a Unique Selling Point – It’s an Expectation

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Economic Development Cherokee is a place where cutting-edge industry and new startups combine with the comfortable pace of greenspace and outdoors, giving residents room to breathe. It doesn’t take long to discover what makes this place so special and why so many people are making a life in Cherokee.

Cherokee is the fastest growing county in metro Atlanta, and refreshing energy comes with the territory. Whether its collaboration with local businesses or industries providing opportunities for new hires, Cherokee understands the power of community. To capitalize on this momentum, the Cherokee Office of Economic Development (COED) continues to pioneer a new path forward through initiatives that foster economic growth and attract future investment. Enter Cherokee By Choice, a strategic public/private partnership launched in 2018 to foster economic growth and raise awareness of the world of opportunities within the county borders. The time spent traveling to work means less time with family and doing the things you love. That’s why COED’s newly redesigned website, CherokeeGA.org, features an interactive career center designed specifically to help residents forget the long commute and find local jobs. To grow Cherokee’s talent base, in 2019 COED partnered with area businesses and the Cherokee County School District to launch the county’s first high school internship program and the inaugural Cherokee Student Film Summit. In the coming months a mobile workforce workshop—the first of its kind in Georgia—will also roll out in high schools across the county. This interactive workshop revolutionizes the way people think about skilled professions, engaging students with hands-on modules that spark curiosity and outline the training necessary to fulfill today’s in-demand careers. Combining real-world training and early exposure to a wide range of opportunities, these experiences take career readiness to the next level.

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No Longer a Unique Selling Point – It’s an Expectation

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COED is also focused on cultivating Cherokee’s thriving entrepreneurial ecosystem. In July 2019, COED launched the North Atlanta Venture Mentoring Service (NAV), the first team-based entrepreneur mentorship program in Georgia trained and principled by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology Venture Mentoring Service. With a focus on serving Cherokee and beyond, NAV harnesses the expertise of diverse mentors with proven skills and experience to guide startups toward success. Initiatives such as NAV, forget the commute, and the mobile workforce training workshop are strong catalysts for bringing future investment and business expansion to the county. With master-planned parks with available acreage, along with existing buildings with a wide range of configurations, Cherokee has quickly become the preferred location to start and grow a business in metro Atlanta. Cherokee’s growing marketplace also makes it the ideal location for mixed-use destinations. With access to premier amenities such as restaurant, retail, and office space, these properties are changing the landscape of development and attracting growth. The latest mixed-use developments include The Mill On Etowah, Academy & Main, the Holly Springs Town Center, and the revitalization of the Jones Mercantile Building. •

As you can see, “live, work, play” is no longer a unique selling point in Cherokee; it’s an expectation. The talent is here. The businesses are here. The community is here. And they are all in Cherokee by choice.

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Newcomer Information •••

Should you decide to make Cherokee County your home, these phone numbers and websites will be helpful to you as you get settled. Of course, don’t hesitate to call the Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce for any additional newcomer information at 770.345.0400 or visit them online at cherokeechamber.com

Registration & License Driver Information ◗D  river’s License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.413.8400 dds.georgia.gov/locations/canton ◗ T ag Office/Tax Commissioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6400 cherokeega.com Out-of-state drivers have 30 days to obtain a Georgia’s driver’s license.

Voter Information ◗V  oter Registration   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.0407

voter.cherokeega.com

School Registration Children must be five years old on or before September 1 to enter kindergarten and six or older on or before September 1 to enter the first grade in Cherokee County. To register your child for school, you will need a certified birth certificate; a vision, hearing and dental screen from a physician or health clinic; and immunization records on Georgia State Form 3032. For more information, or to register your child, please call the Cherokee County School District at 770.479.1871 or visit them online at onlinereg.registration.cherokeek12.net

Library System

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Electricity ◗A  micalola EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 706.253.5200 amicalolaemc.com ◗C  obb EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.429.2100 cobbemc.com ◗G  eorgia Power . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888.660.5890 georgiapower.com ◗S  awnee EMC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.887.2363 sawnee.com

Natural Gas ◗A  tlanta Gas Light . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800.427.5463

atlantagaslight.com

◗G  as South . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 877.332.5442

gas-south.com

◗ T rue Natural Gas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.502.0226

truenaturalgas.com

Water ◗P  lease contact your local city hall or the

Cherokee County Water Authority at . . . . . . . . . 770.479.1813 ccwsa.com

Television/Internet/Phone ◗ AT  &T/U-verse/DirecTV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 888.757.6500

att.com

◗C  omcast/Xfinity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800.934.6489

xfinity.com

◗ ETC  Communications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800.660.6826

etcnow.com

or Ball Ground 678.454.2271

◗ TD  S Telecom-Nelson Ball Ground . . . . . . . . . . 888.233.0001

Sequoyah Regional Library System Locations: ◗ RT  Jones Memorial Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.3090 ◗B  all Ground Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.735.2025 ◗H  ickory Flat Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.345.7565 ◗R  ose Creek Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.591.1491 ◗W  oodstock Public Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.926.5859 ◗C  herokee County Law Library . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6175

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tdstelecom.com ◗W  indstream . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844.757.4718 windstream.com

Services

Health Services ◗C  herokee County Health Dept. (Canton) . . . . . 770.345.7371 (Woodstock) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.928.0133 nghd.org w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


◗ E nvironmental Health . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.0444

nghd.org/locations/envhealth/cherokeeenv ◗N  orthside Hospital Cherokee   . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.224.1000 northside.com/cherokee ◗P  iedmont Mountainside Hospital . . . . . . . . . . . 706-692-2441 piedmont.org ◗W  ellstar Health System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.956.7827 Wellstar.org

Police & Fire ◗ F ire Marshal’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6290

cherokeecountyfire.org/fire-marshal ◗G  A State Patrol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 706.387.3702 dps.georgia.gov/troop-map ◗M  arshal’s Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6200 cherokeegamarshal.org ◗O  ffice of Emergency Management . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.4001 cherokeega-ema.org ◗S  heriff’s Department . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.4200 cherokeega-sheriff.org

Government City Halls ◗B  all Ground . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.735.2123 cityofballground.com ◗C  anton . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.704.1500 cantonga.gov ◗H  olly Springs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.345.5536 hollyspringsga.us

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◗N  elson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.735.2211

nelsongeorgia.com ◗W  aleska . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.2912 cityofwaleska.com ◗W  oodstock  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.592.6000 woodstockga.gov County ◗A  nimal Control . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.4080 cherokeegamarshal.org/animal-control ◗A  nimal Shelter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.345.7270 cherokeega-animals.org ◗B  usiness License & Building Permits . . . . . . . 770.721.7810 cherokeega.com/dsc ◗C  ommissioner Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6000 cherokeega.com/boc ◗C  ounty Attorney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6000 cherokeega.com/county-attorney ◗C  ounty Extension Office . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.721.7803 extension.uga.edu ◗D  istrict Attorney . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.1488 cherokeega.com/district-attorneys-office ◗ E ngineering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6077 cherokeega.com/engineering ◗ F amily Violence Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.1804 cfvc.org ◗ F ire and Emergency Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.4000 cherokeecountyfire.org ◗G  eneral Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6000 cherokeega.com

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newcomer information

◗G  IS & Mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6050

cherokeega.com/gis ◗H  umane Society . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.592.8072 cchumanesociety.org ◗M  arriage License . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6160 cherokeega.com/probate-court/marriage-licenses ◗P  lanning and Zoning . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6101 cherokeega.com/planning-and-zoning ◗P  robate Court (24 hrs) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6160 cherokeega.com/probate-court ◗P  ublic Transportation (CATS) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.345.6238 cherokeega.com/transportation ◗R  ecycling Center . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.516.4195 cherokeega.com/recycling-center ◗R  oads and Bridges . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.345.5842 cherokeega.com/public-works ◗S  enior Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.345.2675 cherokeega.com/senior-services ◗S  eptic Tank Inspections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.0444 nghd.org ◗S  heriff’s Investigation Division . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.928.0239 ◗ T ax Commissioner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6400 cherokeega.com/tax-commissioners-office ◗ T ax Assessor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.493.6120 cherokeega.com/tax-assessors-office ◗V  ital Records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.928.0133 nghd.org

State

◗ F orestry Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800.428.7337

gfc.state.ga.us

◗G  A Department of Labor . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.528.6100

dol.georgia.gov/location/cobb-cherokee

◗G  A Public Service Commission . . . . . . . . . . . . 404.656.4501

psc.ga.gov

◗G  A Department of Transportation . . . . . . . . . . . 404.631.1990

dot.ga.gov

◗ Immigration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800.375.5283

uscis.gov

◗S  ecretary of State . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844.753.7825

sos.ga.gov ◗S  ocial Security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800.772.1213 ssa.gov/atlanta ◗S  tate Government Directory Assistance . . . . . . 404.656.2000 georgia.gov ◗V  eteran Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 770.720.3538 veterans.georgia.gov/locations/canton

Media Newspapers ◗A  tlanta Journal-Constitution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 404.522.4141 ajc.com ◗C  herokee Tribune & Ledger News  . . . . . . . . . . 770.479.1441 tribuneledgernews.com Radio Stations ◗W  LJA Radio, 101.1 FM  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 678.454.9552 WLJAradio.com

◗C  hild Support Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 844.694.2347

childsupport.georgia.gov

◗ F amily & Children’s Services . . . . . . . . . . . . . 855.422.4453

dfcs.georgia.gov

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DE S TINATION CHEROKEE

2020

w w w. c h e r o k e e c h a m b e r. c o m


Profile for Enjoy Cherokee Magazine

Destination Cherokee, 2020  

Georgia's Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce is proud to present their 2020 Community Magazine. Please support the advertisers of this publ...

Destination Cherokee, 2020  

Georgia's Cherokee County Chamber of Commerce is proud to present their 2020 Community Magazine. Please support the advertisers of this publ...