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Enablis 09 Expansion In All Dimensions

Design by Identica Printed in Canada 2009

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Client : ENABLIS Nº dossier : 29-7521G Description : RAPPORT ANNUEL 2008 Publication : Livret Expansion Date parution : — Infographiste : NATALY/DANIEL Nom du fichier :7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd

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BRANDING ET Design 2100, rue Drummond, Montréal (Québec) H3G 1X1  Tél: 514 845-4040  Fax: 514 282-4745

ÉPREUVE Studio #

3:5

Date: 09/10/09_10:36


06_07 Our Mission

08_19 Dear Enablis Stakeholders

20_ 21 Financial Highlights

22 _ 27 EFC Review of Activities

28_ 29 Expansion in Kenya

30_33 West Africa Expansion

34_39 Expansion to the Americas

06_07 Our Mission

08_19 Dear Enablis Stakeholders

20_ 21 Financial Highlights

22 _ 27 EFC Review of Activities

28_ 29 Expansion in Kenya

30_33 West Africa Expansion

34_39 Expansion to the Americas

06_07 Our Mission

08_19 Dear Enablis Stakeholders

20_ 21 Financial Highlights

22 _ 27 EFC Review of Activities

28_ 29 Expansion in Kenya

30_33 West Africa Expansion

34_39 Expansion to the Americas

06_07 Our Mission

08_19 Dear Enablis Stakeholders

20_ 21 Financial Highlights

22 _ 27 EFC Review of Activities

28_ 29 Expansion in Kenya

30_33 West Africa Expansion

34_39 Expansion to the Americas

08_19 06_07 Dear Enablis Our Stakeholders Mission 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 2-3

20_ 21 Financial Highlights

22 _ 27 EFC Review of Activities

28_ 29 Expansion in Kenya

30_33 West Africa Expansion

34_39 Expansion to09/10/09 the 11:03:51 Americas


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Our Mission Enablis is a non-profit organisation created to drive measurable economic development and build thriving and self-sustaining small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the developing world. This is done through a membership-based approach aimed at empowering individual entrepreneurs and their ideas in partnership with governments, the private sector and civil society. Our Vision To nurture a dynamic entrepreneur network of men and women connected to global markets, which has become the benchmark for sustainable enterprise development initiatives. 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 6-7

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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

Dear Enablis Stakeholders, The Enablis Entrepreneurial Network grew by 61% to 743 entrepreneur members in fiscal 2009, marking six years of rapid growth. According to an annual indepen­dent survey of members, the Enablis network has created 5,029 actual jobs since 2005. Our footprint in Africa now includes chapters in South Africa, Mozambique, Tanzania and Kenya, and we are poised for exponential growth again this year. [[Optimists]] Still, while Enablis takes this opportunity to expand, the turbulent global economic climate in which entrepreneurs find themselves is worrying, as even at the best of times, SMEs face numerous obstacles and substantial challenges. [[strategies]] Despite this, Enablis continues to operate within this environ­ ment, stimulating entrepreneurs in Africa to find smarter business solutions and, where they struggle, to work with them to develop turnaround strategies that may help them [[network]]

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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

weather this storm. [[ubuntu]] In South Africa, Enablis has re-engineered its model in order to reach the 1,000 entrepreneur member target set by our local Board for fiscal 2011. Our new approach has a greater focus on facilitation and member-­­ to-member contacts. This allows more entrepreneurs to join Enablis and creates larger, more self-sufficient and ultimately stronger network nodes. Overall, this approach is perfectly consistent with the African concept of ubuntu —‘a person is a person through other persons’. [[Winners]] Twenty winners of the FNB Enablis Business LaunchPad were announced in mid-January, South Africa’s biggest such competition. Many have now been inducted as members, trained in Enablis Circles and fast-tracked for financing. Almost 2,000 ­business plans were submitted to the 2008 competition. [[Growth]] Growth and success of Enablis South Africa is directly dependent 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 10-11

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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

on the support of government and the private sector. At the start of the year, we entered into a new four-year agreement with government partner Khula Enterprise Finance (Khula). [[SUPPORT]] Partners First National Bank and Revlon also confirmed important grants over a one- or two-year period in ­addition to some other key initiatives. We also welcomed a new partnership with Pick ’n Pay through their ‘‘ShelfLife’’ initiative. We thank all our partners for their generous support. [[Funding]] During fiscal 2009, 18 transactions totalling ZAR 20.1 million in financing to Enablis members were approved in South Africa. This brings the total approved funding since inception to ZAR 79.5 million for 70 entrepreneurs. [[Success]] The return to investors on our vintage 2004 Enablis Khula Loan Fund (EKLF) for fiscal 2009 was an impressive 9.8%. The combined default rate of that fund and the vintage 2006 Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund (KESAF) stood at 3.9% for the year, up from 2.3% the ­previous one. Investors in EKLF celebrated the fourth anniversary of the fund at 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 12-13

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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

a ceremony honouring the first Enablis entrepreneurs to successfully retire their loans with FNB, guaranteed by the fund. A total of ZAR 4.1 million was repaid in full. Congratulations to Enablis members Alex Mann, James Melliar, Brian Segal, Fairoz Jaffer, Shahnaaz Scharffenorth, Nathaniel Sebolai and Wessel Schumyn who successfully retired their loans. [[Expansion]] Fiscal 2009 was a watershed year for expansion of the Enablis network across the East African region, with new chapters opened in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania and Kisumu, Kenya. We also recognised the 500th member of the Enablis network in Africa, Ms. Janine Kamau, who runs a juice and health foods business based in Yaya Centre in Nairobi. Our first Enablis business plan competition in East Africa, “The ChoraBizna Enablis LaunchPad”, was successfully launched last February in part­nership with the Kenyan Ministry of Youth Affairs and other sponsors, with the winners an­nounced in mid-2009. [[Global]] Last year, we transitioned from Phase I to Phase II of the Canadian International Development Agency’s 09/10/09 11:03:51


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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

(CIDA) funding to Enablis in East Africa. CIDA is a global Enablis partner having provided critical seed funding for both South and East Africa. An agreement was also signed with the Kenyan Youth Enterprise Development Fund for a loan facility up to KES 300 million. The new KES 600 million Enablis Loan Fund was launched in March, thanks to a matching contribution from CIDA. Finally, the Safaricom Foundation in Kenya agreed to provide funding for the business plan competition and for Enablis East Africa’s programming. Thank you to all our East Africa partners. [[stimulus]] To ensure ongoing excellence and high attendance at Enablis Circle meetings, all facilitators of the Enablis Circle groups from Africa were invited to a facilitators’ retreat at the end of the year in Johannesburg. Enablis leaders from four countries met to exchange best practices, improve their skills and suggest innovations to the program. At this retreat, we also launched the Enablis Centre of Excellence: E-Circle program. We believe that this centre will be a great stimulus to further the success of 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 14-15

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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

Enablis Circles going forward. [[Independent]] In the 2008 independent entrepreneur survey, researchers found that Enablis members were, on average, creating six jobs per member (including both full- and part-time). Since 2005, this translates into an estimated 58,699 direct and indirect jobs being created by the entire Enablis member network using standard multipliers and, most importantly, 307,333 Africans with an improved socioeconomic standing. [[Sustainable]] Enablis en­trepreneurs have, and continue to have, an amazing track record at building sustainable SMEs, both growing their businesses and creating employment, all of which is vital to strength­ening developing world economies! [[Implementation]] Last year, Enablis received another generous grant from Africa founding partner Microsoft, for implementation phase funding to expand the Enablis model to West Africa. [[Research]] Global founding partner Accenture continued to support our activ­ities in Africa in the second year of their three-year grant. In addition, Accenture Development ­Partnerships (ADP) carried out two 09/10/09 11:03:51


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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

fea­sibility analyses in West Africa. One covered Senegal and Côte d’Ivoire, and the other covered Nigeria and Ghana. ADP seconded consultants to work closely with Enablis to research whether the preconditions for an Enablis implementation existed in these West African countries. The output was a business plan and roadmap for deployment. These separate studies, entirely donor funded, were delivered in the second and fourth quarters last year. [[Professionals]] Based upon favourable recommendations and the support of Microsoft, Enablis opened representative offices in Dakar, Senegal and Accra, Ghana. Both offices are led by strong and experienced professionals in the SME space. We are bullish about prospects for the full launch of Enablis West Africa this year. [[Optimisation]] In this business environment, it is incumbent upon us as an non-governmental organisation (NGO) to take stock of the reality of the current global economy. As part of our 2010 fiscal budget, we have adopted a rigorous plan aimed at opti­ misation, economies of scale and cost 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 16-17

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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

cutting, though none of this will be done at the expense of our services to entre­ preneurs. Enablis will emerge from this slowdown as a stronger, more efficient organisation with all the proper processes and procedures it needs for the next phase of its global rollout. [[Contribution]] Connie Nkosi completed her two-year term as Chairperson of the Enablis South Africa Board and was succeeded in April by Bheki Sibiya. Lynette Chen was elected to the position of Vice-Chairperson of Enablis South Africa. James Gachui, Chairperson of the Enablis East Africa Board, replaced Mrs. Nkosi on the Enablis Global Board. We would like to thank Mrs. Nkosi for her strong contri­ bution over her term and particularly for agreeing to stay on the Board as a director going forward. We would also like to thank Thomas Hansen who stepped down from the Boards of both Enablis South Africa and Enablis East Africa last year. Mr. Hansen was an active member of our local Boards and a champion of Enablis’ growth across Africa. New directors joining Enablis were Bill Blair in South Africa, and Louis Otieno 09/10/09 11:03:52


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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

in East Africa. We thank depart­ing direc­ tors and welcome new ones. [[active]] After three years as Chairperson of both Enablis Investment Committees in South Africa, Marc Balkin stepped down. Mr. Balkin has agreed to remain a member of the Com­­ mittees. He was succeeded on January 1st by Richard Parker, who had served as an ­independent member for over a year. We would like to thank Mr. Balkin for his active engagement in Enablis’ financial services activities. [[THANKS]] The economic ­situation has not daunted the spirits of our staff members who are working tirelessly to support Enablis entrepreneurs. Special thanks to all our colleagues and member leaders in Cape Town, Upington, Johannesburg, Durban, Maputo, Nelspruit, Dar es Salaam, Nairobi, Kisumu, Accra, Dakar and Montreal for contributing to the success of the Enablis network. 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 18-19

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Review of Activities

Dear Enablis Stakeholders

Thank you for supporting the Enablis vision of empowering ideas and people Charles Sirois Global Founder, Chairperson,

Paul Lamontagne

President and CEO Enablis Entrepreneurial Network

Chief Executive Officer Enablis Africa Region

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Review of Activities

Financial Information Highlights

Financial Highlights

21

Consolidated Statement of Operations for Enablis Entrepreneurial Network, Enablis Foundation Canada, Enablis Entrepreneurial Network South Africa and Enablis Entrepreneurial Network East Africa.

Enablis wishes to acknowledge the contribution of KPMG in South Africa, Kenya and Canada as the organisation’s external auditors

Revenues Government of Canada

Other donors and contribution of rendered services Expenses Staffing and travel

Corporate and professional services Office and other expenses Services and marketing Contributions to the Enablis Khula Loan Fund

Review of Activities

Financial Highlights

2008 3,038,000 2,150,110 5,188,110 1,972,690 433,624 384,713 233,610 2,000,000

Contributions to Enablis East Africa Trust Excess of revenues over expenses

5,024,637 163,473 For the year ended March 31st in Canadian $

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Review of Activities

Enablis Financial Corporation

Enablis Financial Corporation’s (EFC) fourth full year of operations again featured high growth. The investment team reviewed 49 investment opportunities coming from both the pipeline of entrepreneurs regis­ tered in the Enablis network in South Africa, as well as the pipeline created by the succes­sful FNB Enablis Business LaunchPad Competition. [[entrepreneurs]] Last year, 18 trans­ actions totalling ZAR 20.1 million in financing to Enablis members were approved by our two Investment Committees in South Africa. This brings the total approved transactions since inception in late 2004 to ZAR 79.5 million for 71 entrepreneurs. [[FINANCING]] The trustees of the Enablis Khula Loan Fund approved six transactions last year, totalling ZAR 8.4 million. This has resulted in 41 financings to date. Five financings have been fully repaid. There [[GROWTH]]

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Review of Activities

Enablis Financial Corporation

were two loan defaults last year, totalling ZAR 229,000. The return to investors for fiscal 2009 after all costs was 9.8%. [[applications]] The trustees of the Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund approved 12 trans­ actions last year, totalling ZAR 11.7 million. Since inception in December 2006, 39 applications from Enablis members have been approved. Provisions were made against two investments totalling ZAR 1.9 million last year, and there were two exits totalling ZAR 630,000. The combined default rate of both funds stood at 3.9% for the year, up from 2.3% the previous one. [[MONITORING]] Monthly post-investment sessions were held with all entrepreneurs to ensure the appropriate monitoring and follow-up assistance was provided. Entrepreneurs are required to provide updated management accounts and revised revenue forecasts, 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 24-25

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Review of Activities

Enablis Financial Corporation

and be able to discuss significant changes to the business. Where significant vari­ ations are discovered, remedial plans are put in place to bring things back on course. EFC has the possibility of access­­ing the Enablis network programs to do so. EFC is licensed in South Africa by the Financial Services Board (FSB) to provide the financing requirements to the Enablis Entrepreneurial Network. [[Community-based]] EFC is committed to filling the critical financing gap for entrepreneurs who are unable to find risk capital between the micro-credit and venture capital thresholds. By applying a similar approach to community-based microfinance institutions and linking locally and globally with Enablis’ varied partner­ ships, EFC is able to better understand the unique requirements of entrepreneurs in developing countries and to successfully provide them with creative financing 7521_ENABLIS_EXPANSION_7.indd 26-27

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Review of Activities

Enablis Financial Corporation

solutions. [[Loans]] In East Africa, the Enablis Loan Fund signed a loan agreement with the Kenyan Youth Enterprise Development Fund for up to KES 300 million at a ­ con­­cessionary rate. The KES 600 million Enablis Loan Fund was launched in March, thanks to a matching contribution from the Canadian International Development Agency. Our first loans to Enablis entre­ preneur members in Kenya are expected by mid-year. [[Catalyst]] We are in the process of structuring the Enablis SME Africa Fund. This new fund of funds will invest in new Enablis country funds. This will allow us to substantially shorten the time required to launch a fund in a new country going forward. We expect an initial closing in early 2010. This new Mauritius-based fund will be the catalyst for a third fund in South Africa, a second fund in Kenya and up to four other new country funds in Africa. 09/10/09 11:03:52


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Expansion in Kenya

In June, we opened a third East Africa chapter in Kisumu, Kenya. On hand for the launch of Enablis House Kisumu were dignitaries who included Charles Sirois, Global Founder and Chairperson, James Gachui, Enablis East Africa Chairperson, as well as Joseph Irungu, Deputy Provincial Commissioner, Nyanza, and Philip Shitohi, Nyanza Provincial Director of Youth Affairs. [[ceremony]] 28 new members from Kisumu were accredited at the ceremony. The new Enablis House is situated at Mega City Mall Shop. [[motivatION]] As commented by Mr. Shitohi, “the presence of Enablis will further drive and motivate Kenyan youth to investigate entrepreneurial quests they may not have had the support for up until now.” [[DIGNITARIES]]

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West Africa Expansion

West Africa was the main focal point for Enablis’ expansion activities in fiscal year 2009, made possible by a grant from partner Microsoft. [[potential]] A first feasibility study sponsored by Telesystem was per­­formed by Accenture Development ­Partnerships for French West Africa in the first part of 2008, which included field visits to Senegal and Côte d’Ivoire. Both countries showed a lot of entrepreneurial potential and a definite need for Enablis. [[Implementation]] Enablis appointed a country representative in Senegal, and partnered with the Agence de Développement et d’Encadrement des PME (ADEPME), the governmental agency in charge of developing and supporting SMEs in Senegal. [[Multilingual]] Our move to a multilingual organisation is an important milestone for Enablis. It started last year with the translation to French of our website and marketing materials, and will continue [[Expansion]]

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West Africa Expansion

by making our services and systems available to French-speaking entrepreneurs. [[Promising]] Later in 2008, another Accenture Development Partnerships team performed a feasibility study for English West Africa, sponsored by the Accenture Foundation. The study included Ghana and Nigeria, and both countries look promising to deploy Enablis services to entrepreneurs. [[partnership]] Enablis hired a country repre­ sentative in Ghana, and established Enablis Entrepreneurial Network Ghana. A first partnership was entered into with the Association of Ghana Industries (AGI), the oldest and largest professional organisation in Ghana, which we expect to precede many others in this exciting market. All conditions look in place to launch a new Enablis House in Accra this year. Building on this first experience in English West Africa, Enablis can look forward to take on Nigeria! 09/10/09 11:03:53


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Expansion to the Americas

Enablis has already expanded into five countries in Africa and keeps expand­ing its footprint. It has proven that its model of fostering local socio-economic development through entrepre­neurship can have a mean­ingful impact, particularly in job creation, and can be successfully replicated. [[SUSTAINABLE]] Enablis entrepreneurs (most of whom are from disadvantaged backgrounds, and a significant proportion of whom are women) have been given tailored, practical advice and mentoring, as well as easier access to financing. This has assisted them in becoming more sustainable and, in turn, enabling them to build successful businesses. With its global vision, Enablis is now prepared and ready to expand to another continent. [[DEVELOPMENT]] Various studies, including the most recent Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM) report, point to the need for the same Enablis-type developmental model in Latin America. The aim will be to assist in stimulating participation in [[IMPACT]]

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Expansion to the Americas

“high expectation” business activities where entrepreneurs can aspire to run sustainable businesses and create jobs. [[UNIQUE]] In many Latin American countries, however, entre­preneurs are faced with a skill and financing gap, which makes it difficult for small businesses to flourish. This is where Enablis can play a critical role and break down barriers with its unique formula of capacity building and access to finance. [[OBJECTIVES]] Together with the support of its founding partners, Accenture and Telesystem, Enablis will embark on its first Latin American feasibility study in 2009. Following the same expansion methodol­ ogy used in Africa, Accenture Development Partnerships is providing a team of consul­ tants to develop assessments of promising countries in the region, with the objective of establishing operations in several key Latin American markets, staged over time. This will seek to lay the foundation for Enablis’ successful rollout in the region over the coming years. 09/10/09 11:03:54


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02

Enablis 09 Expansion In All Dimensions

Design by Identica Printed in Canada 2009

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09/10/09 11:07:42

Client : ENABLIS Nº dossier : Description : RAPPORT ANNUEL 2008 Publication : Livret IN Date parution : — Infographiste : NATALY/DANIEL Nom du fichier :7521_ENABLIS_IN_7.indd C OULEU R S:

3255 U

3145 U

072

29-7521G

Format du PAP : 100 % Trim fermé : 4 1/2 po x 6 1/2 po Trim ouvert: 9 po x 6 1/2 po Bleed : 1/8 po Visible : N/A Sortie laser @ 100 %

ÉPREUVE Studio #

1:5

Date: 09/10/09_10:42

Les sorties laser ne reflètent pas fidèlement les couleurs telles qu’elles paraîtront sur le produit fini. Cette épreuve est utilisée à des fins de mise en page seulement.

BRANDING ET Design 2100, rue Drummond, Montréal (Québec) H3G 1X1  Tél: 514 845-4040  Fax: 514 282-4745


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Enablis sponsors an annual survey of its membership. This survey is done by an independent research organisation in order to ensure that the results are a fair and honest reflection of its impact. The survey provides the organisation with critical feedback concerning the value of its programs, the development of its membership and how it can better address the topical interests of its members. Donors can also be assured that the monies contrib­ uted to the organisation are used well and in the best interests of human capacity development in challenged economies. 7521_ENABLIS_IN_7.indd 6-7

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Member Survey Results

The survey also looks at the impact the organisation has on the disadvantaged sectors of the human economy. This spe­­ cifically includes the impact it has on the previously disadvantaged, or previously disenfranchised, members of the host country. One of the most important measures of Enablis’ efforts is its effect on women. In this regard, we consider the influence of the Enablis model on its membership overall, and on gender in particular. We believe this provides a compelling rationale for the expansion of the Enablis model into other key markets, such as West Africa or Latin America. [[gender]] In the two countries surveyed last year (South Africa and Kenya), researchers considered the following key measures as especially noteworthy: [[impact]]

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Member Survey Results

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Member Survey Results

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82% 14

Member Survey Results

82% South Africa

hat Enablis had enhanced their capacity g new business skills

82%

82%

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Member Survey Results

82%

South Africa

82%

82%

82%

71% still felt that Enablis was in some way helping them to grow their businesses

71%

hat Enablis had helped them usiness people 

81%

15

82%

82% felt that Enablis had enhanced their capacity in applying new business skills

elt that Enablis was in some way em to grow their businesses

71%

82%

71%

71%

71%

81% felt that Enablis had helped them grow as business people 

81%

81%

81%

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Member Survey Results

Annual Surveys, East Africa and South Africa

In South Africa, this was the fifth such study, while in Kenya, this was the first since launching the chapter just over a year ago. 352 entrepreneurs took part in the South African study while in Kenya, there were 82 respondents. The two latest studies took place in March 2009. [[FULL-TIME]] In South Africa, the number of new, fulltime positions created by the surveyed members was 634, and the number of new, part-time jobs created was 1,304. In total, the members surveyed created 1,938 jobs in the past year, which is, on average, 5.5 jobs per member. [[PROFITS]] According to Enablis’ Jobs and Socio-economic Impact study done in 2008 (South Africa), an increase in company turnover was experienced by 55% of the respondents, with 36% having had an increase in the last three months (which is significant given that, normally, this is a difficult trading period for business, e.g. January to March). [[RESULTS]]

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Member Survey Results

Annual Surveys, East Africa and South Africa

An increase in profits was experienced by 46% of the respondents in the past year. [[IMPROVED]] 41% of the respondents have improved their products, with another 30% having introduced new ones and 19% extending their product range. An increase in the number of customers was experi­ enced by 57% of the respondents, which may be a reflection of the increased value of networking opportunities. 43% of the respondents had created a new business in the past year. [[skills]] Most importantly, 71% still felt that Enablis was in some way helping them to grow their businesses, with another 61% believing that Enablis had improved their business skills. 81% felt that Enablis had helped them grow as business people and 82% felt that Enablis had enhanced their capacity in applying new business skills. 77% rated their overall satisfaction with Enablis as good, very good or excellent. 09/10/09 11:07:44


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Member Survey Results

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Member Survey Results

5.5 jobs per member

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6

59,530

(a factor of 5 )

Number of indirect jobs created

Socio-economic improvement

of jobs created Estimated number

20

Member Survey Results

11,506

of jobs created Actual number

4,349

283,047 (average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created)

South Africa

59,530

(a factor of 5 )

4,349

Enablis’ Jobs and 11,506 Socio-economic Impact Study 2008 (South Africa)59,530 Actual number of jobs created

Estimated number of jobs created

Number of indirect jobs created

(average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created )

of jobs created Actual number

(average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created )

Socio-economic improvement

30

047 047

r of jobs created)

r of jobs created)

59,530

Number of indirect jobs created

11,506

of jobs created Actual number

Actual number of jobs created

11,506

Estimated number of jobs created

59,530

Number of indirect jobs created

283,047 283,047 (a factor of 5 )

Socio-economic improvement

(average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created ) (average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created )

Socio-economic improvement

59,530

(a factor of 5 )

Number of indirect jobs created

of jobs created Estimated number

11,506

of jobs created Actual number

30

11,506

Estimated number of jobs created

59,530

Number of indirect jobs created

283,047 283,047 (a factor of 5 )

Socio-economic improvement

(average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created) (average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created)

Socio-economic improvement

59,530

(a factor of 5 )

4,349 4,349

Actual number of jobs created

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4,349

Actual number of jobs created

4,349 4,349

11,506

Estimated number of jobs created

59,530

Number of indirect jobs created

283,047 (a factor of 5 )

Socio-economic improvement

(average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created )

of jobs created Actual number

Number of indirect jobs created

of jobs created Estimated number

11,506

of jobs created Actual number

4,349

South Africa

4,349

Actual numbe of jobs create

1

4,349 Actual number of jobs created

11,506

4,349

(a factor of 5 )

of jobs created Estimated number

Member Survey Results

11,506

(a factor of 5 )

Socio-economic improvement

21

11,506

of jobs created Estimated number

Number of indirect jobs created

283,047 283,047

of jobs created Estimated number

Estimated number of jobs created

59,530

Estimated num of jobs create

59

Number of ind

283,047 28 283,047 28 (a factor of 5)

Number of indirect jobs created (a factor of 5)

Socio-economic improvement

Socio-econom

(average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created)

(average SA househ

(average SA household: 4.1 2001 x total number of jobs created)

Socio-economic improvement

59,530

(a factor of 5)

Number of indirect jobs created

of jobs created Estimated number

11,506

(average SA househ

Socio-econom

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59

(a factor of 5)

Number of ind


17,760

(a factor of 10 as industry standard )

22

Member Survey Results

of jobs created Actual number

680

East Africa

17,760

( a factor of 10 as industry standard )

680

Enablis’ Jobs and 1,776 Socio-economic Impact Study 2008 , (East Africa) 17 760 Actual number of jobs created

6

Estimated number of jobs created

Number of indirect job creation

156,288 156,288 (a factor of 10 as industry standard )

Socio-economic improvement

(average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created: 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey )

60

88 88 jobs created:

17,760

of jobs created Actual number

1,776 680 680

Actual number of jobs created

1,776

Estimated number of jobs created

17,760

Number of indirect job creation

156,288 156,288 (a factor of 10 as industry standard )

Socio-economic improvement

(average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created: 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey ) 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey ) (average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created:

Socio-economic improvement

17,760

(a factor of 10 as industry standard )

Number of indirect job creation

of jobs created Estimated number

1,776

Member Survey Results

Actual number

Actual number of jobs created

1,776

Estimated number of jobs created

East Africa

680

Actual numbe of jobs create

680 Actual number of jobs created

1,776

Estimated number of jobs created

17,760

Estimated nu of jobs create

1

Number of ind

156,288 15 156,288 156 288 , 15 17,760 17,760

(a factor of 10 as in

Number of indirect job creation (a factor of 10 as industry standard)

Number of indirect job creation

156,288 ( a factor of 10 as industry standard )

Socio-economic improvement

( average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created: 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey) 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey) ( average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created:

Socio-economic improvement

Socio-economic improvement

(average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created: 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey) 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey) (average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created:

Socio-economic improvement

Socio-econom

(average Kenya ho 98/99 Kenya Labor

98/99 Kenya Labor (average Kenya ho

Socio-econom

( a factor of 10 as industry standard )

680 680

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680 680

Number of indirect job creation

of jobs created Estimated number

23of jobs created

1,776

(a factor of 10 as industry standard )

of jobs created Actual number

1,776

of jobs created Estimated number

Socio-economic improvement

jobs created:

60

Number of indirect job creation

98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey ) (average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created:

of jobs created Actual number

of jobs created Estimated number

Socio-economic improvement

of jobs created Estimated number

1,776

156,288 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey) ( average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created:

Number of indirect job creation

Number of indirect job creation

Actual number of jobs created

1,776

Estimated number of jobs created

17,760

Number of indirect job creation

156,288 (a factor of 10 as industry standard )

Socio-economic improvement

(average Kenya household: 8 x total number of jobs created: 98/99 Kenya Labor Force Survey )

of jobs created Estimated number

1,776

of jobs created Actual number

680

17,760

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(a factor of 10 as industry standard)

Number of indirect job creation

of jobs created Estimated number

1,776

1

(a factor of 10 as in

Number of ind


Member Survey Results

South Africa

25

Member Survey Results

East Africa

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Enablis employees

Enablis Circle

Advantage workshops

Networking

Overall satisfaction

Enablis employees

Enablis Circle

Satisfaction with Enablis Programs (East Africa)

Advantage workshops

Networking

Satisfaction with Enablis Programs (South Africa)

Overall satisfaction

24

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East Africa

Increase in customers

Member Survey Results

Increase in profits

27

Increase in turnover

Increase in turnover

Improvement in Member Business Performance (South Africa)

South Africa

Increase in profits

Member Survey Results

Increase in customers

26

Improvement in Member Business Performance (East Africa)

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30

Member Survey Results

East Africa

31

Member Survey Results

East Africa

East Africa (Kenya) members surveyed created 109 full-time jobs and 571 part-time jobs in the last year (a total of 680 jobs for the year). [[increased]] According to Enablis’ Jobs and Socio-economic Impact study done in 2008 (East Africa), 54% of the respondents experienced an increase in their turnover during the past year and 56% reported an increase in their profits. In addition, 21% indicated that they had improved their products or services, while 27% introduced new products or services. 56% indicated an increase in the number of customers over the last year. [[business persons]] An impressive 82% of our members felt that Enablis had helped them grow their businesses, and 85% felt that Enablis had helped them grow as a business person. An even more impressive 97% of the members felt that Enablis had in some way improved their business skills. [[good value]] Overall, 85% of the members surveyed regard their membership as good value for money. [[jobs]]

of the respondents experienced an increase in their turnover

reported an increase in their profits

introduced new products or services

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09/10/09 11:07:51


82% 32

Member Survey Results

82% East Africa

ur members felt that Enablis d them grow their businesses

82%

82%

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Member Survey Results

82%

East Africa

82%

82%

82%

85% felt that Enablis had helped them grow as a business person

85%

e members felt that Enablis had way improved their business skills

97%

33

82%

82% of our members felt that Enablis had helped them grow their businesses

hat Enablis had helped them business person

85%

82%

85%

85%

85%

97% of the members felt that Enablis had in some way improved their business skills

97%

97%

97%

97% 09/10/09 11:07:52


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03

Enablis 09 Expansion In All Dimensions

Design by Identica Printed in Canada 2009

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Client : ENABLIS Nº dossier : Description : RAPPORT ANNUEL 2008 Publication : Livret ALL Date parution : — Infographiste : NATALY/DANIEL Nom du fichier :7521_ENABLIS_ALL_7.indd C OU L EU R S:

876U

cool gray 6U 072

09/10/09 11:19:59

29-7521G

Format du PAP : 100 % Trim fermé : 4 1/2 po x 6 1/2 po Trim ouvert: 9 po x 6 1/2 po Bleed : 1/8 po Visible : N/A Sortie laser @ 100 %

ÉPREUVE Studio #

1:5

Date: 09/10/09_11:19

Les sorties laser ne reflètent pas fidèlement les couleurs telles qu’elles paraîtront sur le produit fini. Cette épreuve est utilisée à des fins de mise en page seulement.

BRANDING ET Design 2100, rue Drummond, Montréal (Québec) H3G 1X1  Tél: 514 845-4040  Fax: 514 282-4745


7521_ENABLIS_ALL_7.indd 2-3

26_ 27

Expansion in Business LaunchPad Competition

22_ 25

Chronological Sponsorship Support

18 _ 21

Expansion of Services to Members

14_17

The Africa Scorecard

Mulweli Rebelo

Biubwa Ibrahim and Tausi Kaijage

Cynthia Tshililo Mkhombo

Karyna Okwaro 10_13 30_31

28_ 29 32 _39

09/10/09 11:19:59


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In the following pages you will read the stories of four of our members. They are success stories, stories we hope will inspire more young entrepreneurs to set up their own businesses. And they are rewarding stories, stories we’re proud to share as they confirm that a little encouragement and advice go a long way towards empow­ erment. These four entrepreneurs brought courage, determination and initiative to the table and now they are reaping the fruits of their labour. It’s a very exciting process to watch. 7521_ENABLIS_ALL_7.indd 6-7

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12

Member Story

Karyna Okwaro

Kenya

Ms. Karyna Okwaro, owner and General Manager of Lakeside Meeting Point Fast Food restaurants in Kisumu, is glad that her idea of setting up a fast food chicken chain is bearing fruit. With close to KES 10 million invested in the venture, Karyna has succeeded with a new style of restaurants in the lakeside town. [[SUCCESS]] “At first my parents were hesitant about the idea, but after a while they accepted to try it,” says Karyna, who has a degree in hotel management from the UK, and worked at McDonald’s while a student. She says her family took loans, and in November last year the first outlet opened, Lakeside One, at Sansora Building, Oginga Odinga Road. “It records about 500 customers daily. It is the largest of the three,” says Karyna, a first born in a family of three. Impressed by the success of the first facility, they opened Lakeside Two, two months later. Next came the Lakeside Three, in February of this year. [[OWNER]]

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13

Member Story

Karyna Okwaro

Kenya

Lakeside Two is situated in the Kamasi area, while Lakeside Three is located along Oginga Odinga Street, about 200 metres from Lakeside One. [[motivation]] Karyna is among the new members who were accred­ited in June 2009. She has been able to meet, host and interact with people within the Enablis pool including Charles Sirois and Enablis East Africa Board members James Gachui and Louis Otieno. She has expressed the sentiment that interacting with these person­­­ alities has been motivating and a real eye opener on where she sees her business growing. [[knowledge]] Enablis is currently working with her on her assessment and roadmap, noting her areas of weaknesses and strength. She has since been able to increase her financial knowledge while enhancing staff motivation based on her interactions with Enablis. Karyna plans to work on her business plan as she prepares to put forward her application for funding. 09/10/09 11:20:00


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16

Member Story

Mulweli Rebelo

Mozambique

In 1999, Mulweli Rebelo and his partner David Jarvis identified a gap in the market due to Telkom’s high pricing and poor service levels. After gaining con­­ siderable experience in the establishment of two Wireless Internet Service Providers (WISP) in Mozambique in late 2002, the two partners decided to establish a wireless internet company in Cape Town. The deci­ sion was based on the city’s tremendous untapped potential for wireless connectivity services and the expectation that the unclear legislative/regulatory environment that operated in favour of the fixed-line operator would be resolved. [[INITIATIVE]] One of Uninet’s current projects is the Unifi [[POTENTIAL]]

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17

Member Story

Mulweli Rebelo

Mozambique

Smart Townships project. The project is a private initiative that provides services to sub-economic communities. This will allow unlimited t­ oll-free local calls for  ZAR 39 (US$4) per month, and calls for 10c (US$0.01) per minute nationally from a Uninet mobile phone. The mobile handset also allows internet browsing and access to free content such as educational sites, e-government sites and selected commer­cial sites. [[EMPLOYMENT]] The partners joined Enablis in 2005 after hearing about it through the Bandwidth Barn and CITI. They later applied for funding to boost their growth. Since that time, they have created employ­ment opportunities for 30 people. 09/10/09 11:20:01


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20

Member Story

Cynthia Tshililo Mkhombo

South Africa

Masana Hygiene Services (MHS) is  a cleaning and hygiene services compa­­ny established in 2004 by Cynthia Tshililo Mkhombo, a qualified health inspector and safety practitioner. Cynthia was one of the top 300 Business LaunchPad 2008/2009 entrants who was offered free Enablis membership. [[PASSION]] MHS has a staff comple­ ment of over 430 employees. They target previously disadvantaged women. Cynthia’s passion is to create employment for these women while also providing opportunities for them to study further and pursue careers they are really passionate about. [[SPECIALIsED]] The company provides a highly specialised range of cleaning solutions [[QUALIFIED]]

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21

Member Story

Cynthia Tshililo Mkhombo

South Africa

covering virtually everything, including contract cleaning, sanitation, hygiene, supply and maintenance, pest control, carpet cleaning, reoccupation cleaning, supply of cleaning chemicals, equipment, and consumables. [[CLIENTS]] MHS’ clients include: UN offices, the Father Smangaliso Place of Safety, the Department of Educa­ tion, and the SA War College. [[EXPERIENCE]] Cynthia attended one of the networking events, which gave her the opportunity to network with potential clients. She also attended an Enablis Circle training session that gave her a platform to communicate and share views and experiences with other like-minded member entrepreneurs. 09/10/09 11:20:01


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24

Member Story

Biubwa Ibrahim and Tausi Kaijage

Tanzania

It started as a small shop with a capital of TZS 50,000 (US$38), selling homemade juice and ice cream. As business began to grow, Biubwa Ibrahim joined forces with Tausi Kaijage to run a larger business. They became agents of two major ice cream companies and were supplying ice cream wholesale to more than 50 retail outlets in Dar es Salaam. One year ago, they diversi­ fied their business and decided to construct a shopping centre with a hotel, bar, restau­ rant and shops to let. [[BREAKTHROUGH]] Biubwa and Tausi’s major breakthrough actually came after a massive set back. Following the Chinese milk scare in 2008, the business [[start-up]]

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25

Member Story

Biubwa Ibrahim and Tausi Kaijage

Tanzania

of one of the ice cream companies for which they were agents collapsed (it was importing raw materials from China) and this affected their business to a great extent. However, through quick thinking and good advice, they were able to diversify and start a new project, the NAMAINGO Complex. [[strategy]] Since joining Enablis in March 2009, they have greatly benefited from business advice, networking with members and Advantage Workshops (especially business strategy and financial management). This has enabled them to review their business in terms of processes, products, services provided and long-term goals. 09/10/09 11:20:02


26

27

The Africa Scorecard

The Africa Scorecard

The Africa Scorecard *Applicable to South Africa only

Number of chapters Number of members % who are female Number of support hours provided throughout the year Number of members with approved funding* % of funds allocated to female members*

Total value of financings approved* Number of jobs created by member entrepreneurs Loan default rate*

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March

2009

2008

743

382

14,681

7,074

30% ZAR

33% ZAR

5,029

1,750

09 05 35% 28% 70 55 79.5M 59.5M 3.9% 2.3% 09/10/09 11:20:02


28

Expansion of Services to Members

Last year, Enablis expanded the reach of its programs by offering more dedicated capacity building activities relating to the Enterprise Development Programs of its partners, Pick ’n Pay and Revlon, in South Africa. These programs seek to provide entrepreneurs with better insight into the FMCG retail environment and to enable them to become suppliers to such prestigious retail groups. [[mentorship]] Enablis’ programs are therefore aligned to enhance the participating members’ business skills and marketing and sales strategies to enable them to build the capacity to deliver at this level. This goes side by side with closer mentorship provided in collaboration with the local [[dedicated]]

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29

Expansion of Services to Members

chapters of the Young Presidents’ Organi­ zation and support from the partnering companies, and gives entrepreneurs more practical first-hand knowledge of the dynamics of such sophisticated business environments. [[innovative]] One of these inno­ vative programs is under the banner of Pick ’n Pay’s Small Business Initiative, or “ShelfLife”, which aims to build the capacity of small businesses to supply products and services to Pick ’n Pay’s regional network of stores. This support includes a series of workshops and networking sessions where entrepreneurs can learn how to deal with “big business” issues, as well as how to ensure that they are audit compliant. 09/10/09 11:20:02


30

31

Chronological Sponsorship Support

Chronological Sponsorship Support

Includes Business LaunchPad 2009 Partners and Sponsors

Chronological Sponsorship Support 2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

Accenture / Telesystem Ltd Canada Fund for Africa Hewlett Packard / Khula Enterprise Finance / First National Bank / KPMG / Identica Quebecor World Inc Microsoft Mpumalanga Economic Growth Agency Canadian International Development Agency / Youth Enterprise Development Fund (Kenya) / Young Presidents’ Organisation Johannesburg & Golden City chapters / Revlon / Business Times / Small Enterprise Development Agency Agency for Development and Training of SMEs Transcontinental Lithoacme Safaricom Foundation / Pick ’n Pay / Kenya Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports / Trafford Trading / Business Daily / Venture Capital Trust Fund / Association of Ghana Industries / Agence de Développement et d’Encadrement des Petites et Moyennes Entreprises / Youth Enterprise Development Fund / Postbank / Insead Alumni Association of South Africa / Department of Economic Development, Environment and Tourism (South Africa) / Gauteng Enterprise Propeller / Free State Development Corporation / Limpopo Economic Development Enterprise / Eastern Cape Development Corporation

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32

Expansion in Business LaunchPad Competition

ChoraBizna Enablis LaunchPad

Enablis East Africa, in partnership with the Ministry of Youth Affairs and Sports, ran the national business plan competition in Kenya, dubbed ChoraBizna Enablis LaunchPad. This was the country’s second national business plan competition, which was designed to stimulate and celebrate entrepreneurship, provide inspiration, and support young individual entrepreneurs in setting up businesses across Kenya. [[sustainable]] The competition aimed to turn great ideas into thriving sustainable busi­ nesses. It targeted 11 million youth across the country. It was made possible by the support of the following partners and sponsors: Enablis East Africa, the Ministry [[inspiration]]

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33

Expansion in Business LaunchPad Competition

ChoraBizna Enablis LaunchPad

of Youth Affairs and Sports, Business Daily, Hewlett Packard, Microsoft, Post Bank, Safaricom Foundation, Trafford Trading Company and the Youth Enterprise Devel­ opment Fund. [[EXPERTS]] The gala awards ceremony took place on June 26, 2009, after a rigourous judging process that had taken place the previous day. The panel of experts who judged the competition were drawn from universities and other training institutions, and also included local and international entrepreneurs. [[ASPIRINg]] The winners were chosen out of 887 entries that were received from aspiring and established Kenyan entrepreneurs. The gender split of the winners was 72% male and 28% female. 09/10/09 11:20:02


34

Expansion in Business LaunchPad Competition

The competition winners per sector were: Business and Professional Services: Njinju James Ng’a ng’a Agri-business and Agri-processing: Kwamboka Hilda Gisemba ICT Ndu’ngu Grishon Ng’ang’a Manufacturing and Construction: Odongo Lemy Shem Tourism and Ecotourism: Mwakio Edward Mvoi Sport, Leisure and Recreation: Nkari Martin Kagendo 7521_ENABLIS_ALL_7.indd 34-35

ChoraBizna Enablis LaunchPad

72% male winners

28% female winners

Fine Arts and Performing Arts: Kinori Teresia Njoki Media, Marketing and Communication: Ouma Kevin Omondi Transport and Logistics: Njuguna Njoroge Green / Ecological Business: Kalama Charles Wamukoya Youth Employment Creation: Kimanga Isabel Wambui Breaking New Ground: Koech Chepngetich Mercy Overall Best Business Plan: Jura Ernest Odege

Chosen out of 887

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36

Expansion in Business LaunchPad Competition

2008 FNB Enablis Business LaunchPad Competition

The 2008 FNB Enablis Business LaunchPad Competition saw a record 6,000 registrations. From this, more than 1,800 business plans were considered ­suitable for judging in ten categories ranging from ICT to manufacturing to tourism. [[prizes]] Twenty winners received a package of  con­­sumer electronic prizes and became part of the Enablis network of entrepreneurs, with access to networking oppor­tunities, training, online resources, mentorship and funding. [[WINNERS]] Two winners, one for a start-up business and one for an expansion business, were chosen in each of the follow­ ing categories: Agriculture, Business and Professional Services, Construction, Green Business, Information and Communication Tech­nology, Manufacturing, Media and Marketing, Personal Services, Tourism, and Transport and Logistics. [[diversification]] The winners’ business plans included ideas such as a new concrete pump designed [[BUSINESS PLANS]]

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37

Expansion in Business LaunchPad Competition

2008 FNB Enablis Business LaunchPad Competition

for places with difficult access, a training academy for emergency workers, a motor­ cycle dealership for residents of Soweto, a container-based digital gaming outlet, and an electronic database management, marketing and communication services tool for the South African wine industry, among other ideas. [[GREEN]] The winners of a new category, Green Businesses, included a green cab (taxi) service, and the pro­­duction of organic compost from the water invasive wattle plant. [[sponsorship]] The 2008 FNB Enablis Business LaunchPad Competition was made possible by the generous sponsor­ship provided by: FNB, SEDA, Microsoft, Khula Enterprise Finance, Postnet, KPMG, Business Place, Revlon, Free State Development Corporation, Gauteng Enterprise Propeller, Business Times and Spier Earth Capital — all of whom are focused on building the small business sector. 09/10/09 11:20:03


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04

Enablis 09 Expansion In All Dimensions

Design by Identica Printed in Canada 2009

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09/10/09 11:01:11

Client : ENABLIS Nº dossier : 29-7521G Description : RAPPORT ANNUEL 2008 Publication : Livret DIMENSION Date parution : — Infographiste : NATALY/DANIEL Nom du fichier :7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd

Format du PAP : 100 % Trim fermé : 4 1/2 po x 6 1/2 po Trim ouvert: 9 po x 6 1/2 po Bleed : 1/8 po Visible : N/A Sortie laser @ 100 %

C OU L EU R S :

Les sorties laser ne reflètent pas fidèlement les couleurs telles qu’elles paraîtront sur le produit fini. Cette épreuve est utilisée à des fins de mise en page seulement.

347 U

398 U

072

BRANDING ET Design 2100, rue Drummond, Montréal (Québec) H3G 1X1  Tél: 514 845-4040  Fax: 514 282-4745

ÉPREUVE Studio #

1:5

Date: 09/10/09_11:01


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16_ 23 Our Board Members

10_15 Our Team

30 Our Partners

26_ 27 Enablis House

16_ 23 Our Board Members

10_15 Our Team

16_ 23 Our Board

10_15 Our Team

30 Our Partners

26_ 27 Enablis House

16_ 23 Our Board Members

10_15 Our Team


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It’s time, once again, to recognise and ­ cel­­ebrate the incredible people behind this year’s many accomplishments. You will find them all listed on the following pages, but that hardly suffices to show our appreciation for the efforts, the creativity and, most of all, the heart they all put into sustaining and expanding our presence in Africa. To those who are moving on, we say happy trails. To those who are staying, we say may the coming year bring new growth. And finally, to our wonderful team of volunteers, we say your generosity touches us all. 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 6-7

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10

11

Our Team

Global Team Charles Sirois / Global Founder, Chairperson, President and Chief Executive Officer Michel Cordeau / Corporate Secretary Daniel Cyr / Chief Financial Officer 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 10-11

Paul Lamontagne / President, Enablis Financial Corporation Francine Lefebvre / Communications Director Liz Padmore / UK Director, Multilateral Relations Gina Piccolo / Financial Controller

Our Team

Africa Operations Team Paul Lamontagne / Chief Executive Officer Ebenise Bester / Chief Financial Officer Miana Naude / Chief Operating Officer Jaco Kuhn / Financial Manager Nadine Sheffield / Financial Administrator Emelia Lemmetjies / Financial Administrator Grant Glanvill / Head of Technology Avesh Mahabeer / IT Manager

Gavin Seymour / Communications Manager Annie Oliver / Executive Assistant Shaheema Ryklief / HR Manager Charlotte Marais / Legal and Corporate Affairs Manager Rose Vervenne / Head of Development Valerie Flanagan / Head of Partnerships Sally Moodley / Head of Enablis Centre of Excellence Don Reddy / Assistant, Enablis Centre of Excellence 09/10/09 11:01:11


12

13

Our Team

South Africa Member Support Team Denvor Phokaners / Country Manager Designate Brenda Twala / Chapter Coordinator, Gauteng Busisiwe Mahuza / Office Assistant, Cape Town Faghmieda King / Chapter Coordinator, Cape Town 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 12-13

Khanita Thomas / Office Assistant, Gauteng Sibongile Mltoshwa / Office Assistant, Gauteng Moeketsi Motsepe / Banker Noelle Ngobeni / Project Manager: Member Events, Gauteng Rodney Douglas / Chapter Manager, Cape Town

Our Team

West Africa Member Support Team Victor Mzimela / Shika Acolatse / Banker Country Director, Nishol Partab / Ghana Chapter Administrator, Durban Matilda Serwodo / Office Coordinator, Karen McKee / Ghana Project Manager, Business Launchpad Marc-AndrĂŠ Ledoux / Ntshembo Ngobeni / Country Representative Assistant Member Senegal Support, Gauteng 09/10/09 11:01:12


14

Our Team

East Africa Member Support Team Moses Mwaura / Regional Director Edna Chepngeno / Office Coordinator Lillian Marenya / Entrepreneur Development Associate Joan Wekesa / Network Coordinator Betty Kariuki / Entrepreneur Development Associate 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 14-15

Terrence Adembesa / Chapter Manager, Kisumu Dorothy Mutisya / Office Assistant, Nairobi Palmer Thambu / Banker Tabu Kiteti / Chapter Coordinator, Tanzania Linda Lifiga / Chapter Manager, Tanzania 09/10/09 11:01:12


16

Our Board Members

Global Charles Sirois / (Chair), Chairperson, President and Chief Executive Officer, Telesystem Ltd. Bill Morris / Managing Director, Accenture Canada James Gachui / Chairperson, Transcentury Ltd, Jimana Ltd. 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 16-17

17

Our Board Members

South Africa Bheki Sibiya / (Chair) Non-Executive Chairperson, Brait Lynette Chen* / (Vice Chair), Chief Executive Officer, NEPAD Business Foundation Connie Nkosi / Executive Chairperson, Lidonga Group Holdings Martin Feinstein / Chief Executive Officer, Traction Enterprise Development Consultants William Blair / Chief Executive Officer, Dumela Diamond Fire

Paul Lamontagne / Chief Executive Officer, Enablis Africa Donovan Muller* / Director, Accenture South Africa Hugh Myres* / Business Unit Executive, Unified Communications, GijimaAst Holdings (Pty) Ltd. David Milligan / Head of Strategy, FNB Commercial Xola Sithole* / Chief Executive Officer, Oteo Capital *Denotes chair of a board sub-committee

09/10/09 11:01:12


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20

Our Board Members

Miana Naude / Chief Operating Officer, Enablis Africa East Africa Moses Mwaura / James Gachui / (Chair), Chairperson, Regional Director, Transcentury, Jimana Enablis East Africa Carol Musyoka* / Rina Karina-Hicks / Financial Analyst, Director, Bungani Faida Securities Limited Rozette Phillips / Paul Lamontagne / Chief Executive Senior Executive: Officer, Enablis Products Operating Africa Group South Africa, Louis Otieno / Accenture Rosemary Mutunkei / General Manager, Microsoft East and Director, Works Central Africa of Faith Ltd. and Maheboob Alibhai* / Member, Seri Yetu Ltd. Chairperson, Phoenix Assurance *Denotes chair of a board sub-committee 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 20-21

21

Our Board Members

Investment Committees Enablis Khula Loan Fund (South Africa) Richard Parker / (Chairperson), Managing Director, Pleiad Capital Marc Balkin / Managing Partner, Hasso Plattner Ventures Africa

Bheki Sibiya / Non-Executive Chairperson, Brait Bettina Mokete / Account Executive: Corporate Channel, Khula Enterprise Finance Heather Lowe / Commercial Banking, First National Bank 09/10/09 11:01:12


22

23

Our Board Members

Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund (South Africa) Richard Parker / (Chairperson), Managing Director, Pleiad Capital Mkhululi Maxibuko / Channel Manager, Khula Enterprise Finance Denvor Phokaner / Country Manager Designate, Enablis South Africa Marc Balkin / Managing Partner, Hasso Plattner Ventures Africa 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 22-23

Enablis Loan Fund (East Africa) James Gachui / (Interim Chairperson), Transcentury Jimana Paul Lamontagne / Chief Executive Officer, Enablis Africa Moses Mwaura / Regional Director, Enablis East Africa Henry Mwenda Rithaa / Youth Enterprise Development Fund Anju Paunrana /  Independent

Our Board Members

Enablis Khula Loan Fund Trustees (South Africa) Martin Feinstein / Chief Executive Officer, Traction Enterprise Development Consultants Paul Lamontagne / Chief Executive Officer, Enablis Africa Xola Sithole / Chief Executive Officer, Oteo Capital Heather Lowe / Commercial Banking, First National Bank

Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund Trustees (South Africa) Xola Sithole / Chief Executive Officer, Oteo Capital Paul Lamontagne / Chief Executive Officer, Enablis Africa Marc Balkin / Managing Partner, Hasso Plattner Ventures Africa 09/10/09 11:01:12


Members

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26

Enablis House

South Africa Enablis House Cape Town 302 Manhattan Place 130 Bree Street Cape Town 8001 Global South Africa Head Office 1250 Rene-Levesque Enablis House Johannesburg Boulevard West 7 Mellis Road Suite 3800 2nd Floor Montreal, Quebec Canada H3B 4W8 North Tower Bradenham Hall Africa Region Rivonia 2192 Head Office South Africa 7 Mellis Road Enablis House 2nd Floor Durban 116 Florida Road North Tower Suite 4 Bradenham Hall Morningside Rivonia 2191 Durban 4001 Johannesburg South Africa South Africa 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 26-27

27

Enablis House

East Africa Enablis House Nairobi 1st Floor Cedar Suite Riverside Green Nairobi, Kenya Enablis House Dar es Salaam Mayfair Plaza Centre Court Shop CC103 Mikocheni Dar es Salaam Tanzania Enablis House Kisumu Shop No. 87 (Ground Floor) Kisumu Mega City Nairobi Road Kisumu, Kenya

West Africa Enablis House Accra Orphan Crescent North Labone Estates Accra, Ghana 09/10/09 11:01:12


7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 28-29

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DESIGN: IDENTICA

Founding Partners

South African Partners

West African Partners

AGI Association of G h a n a Industires

DESIGN: IDENTICA

Global Partners

DESIGN: IDENTICA

DESIGN: IDENTICA

African Partners

Founding Partners

African Partners

African Partners

Global Partners

Global Partners

South African Partners

South African Partne

West African Partners

West African Partner

AGI

AG

Association of G h a n a Industires

Assoc of G h Indus

East African Partners

East African Partner

Founding Partners

Founding Partners

DESIGN: IDENTICA

East African Partners

Founding Partners

Founding Partners 7521_ENABLIS_DIMENSION_7.indd 30-31

09/10/09 11:01:14


Expansion in all directions - Enablis Annual Report 2009