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IT’S OUR 5TH ANNIVERSARY AT ENABLIS AND WE COULDN’T BE MORE proud. OVER THE PAST 5 YEARS, WE’VE GONE FROM 0 TO 500 MEMBERS, STAFF AND VOLUNTEERS AND FROM SUCCESS TO SUCCESS. IT BE­GAN IN 2003 WHEN WE MADE THE LEAP FROM A UNIQUE VISION TO AN EVEN MORE UNIQUE MODEL. BY ESTABLISHING A GLOBAL NETWORK OF ENTRE‑ PRENEURS IN DEVELOPING PARTS OF THE WORLD, WE SET OUT TO ENABLE BOTH INDIVIDUALS AND COUNTRIES TO TRANSITION FROM RELI­ANCE TO SELF-SUFFICIENCY PROVIDING ENTREPRENEURS WITH EVERYTHING THEY NEED TO SUCCEED — FROM THE Enablis

Circle to NETWORKING PROGRAMS TO A CUSTOMISED INTRANET TO INNOVATIVE FINANCING SOLUTIONS —  IS HOW WE GOT FROM THERE TO HERE. THE RESULT? WE’VE EMPOWERED OUR MEMBERS TO GO FROM ONE END OF T H E S P EC T R U M TO T H E OTHER —  FROM DREA­M ING TO ACHIEVING, FROM LEARNING TO EARNING . WE’VE GROWN, DEVELOPED AND EXPANDED FROM COMMU­ NITY TO COMMUNITY, FROM COUNTRY TO COUNTRY AND FROM CONTINENT TO CONTINENT. AND AS WE MOVE FORWARD, WE CONTINUE TO GROW, ALWAYS GOING FROM STRENGTH TO STRENGTH.


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Dear Stakeholders

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18 Enablis scorecard

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Financial highlights

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Being part of it

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Pinky Duma

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Mthobeli January

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Ayoob Mota

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The revised vision

The member survey results

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Ready to share

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Getting support

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Expansion in Africa

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Shalom Munyiri

Getting funding

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Mphaga Ntlatleng

Getting connected

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74 Chronological sponsorship support

Key events

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76 Our board members

77 Our partners and sponsors

Our team


Dear Stakeholders, This year Enablis celebrates its five-year anniversary and we’re on a real high. Enablis now counts close to 500 member entrepreneurs as part of an ever-expanding network that spans from Cape Town to Nairobi. Through our unique blend of networking, capacity-building and financing programs, Enablis is established as the benchmark for sustainable enterprise development in Africa. And it’s because of you – our partners, directors, staff, volunteers and members – that Enablis is enjoying such fantastic success in such a short time. At Year 5, Enablis’ efforts at empowering a vibrant small- and medium-sized business sector to help alleviate poverty are really starting to pay off. Results of the annual independent member survey point to the tremendous impact our methodology is having on entrepreneurs. This year, 250 members in South Africa participated in the survey conducted by Research in Action in the early part of 2008. Of particular interest is that 66% of these entrepreneurs reported an increase in customers, 56% an increase in turnover, and 49% an increase in profits in the past year. In addition, respondents reported that employment had increased by over 1,000 new full- and part-time jobs, for an average of 4.8 new jobs per entrepreneur. Following the previous year’s results, which saw the creation of four new jobs per entrepreneur, this trend is extremely positive and indicative of the meaningful effect of the Enablis model. Beyond the network, these impressive results imply that 20,610 direct and indirect jobs have been created since 2005 and, on a cumulative basis, there are now over 84,000 South Africans with an improved socioeconomic standing. Fiscal 2008 was a year of rapid growth. From 287 member entrepreneurs in 2007, the Enablis network grew to 444 members, for an increase of 58%. Enablis has approved loans worth over $8 million to 58 Enablis entrepreneurs since 2005, and has delivered 7,074 hours of services and programs. Most importantly, Enablis expanded its network from Southern Africa to East Africa with the launch of a new regional hub in Nairobi, Kenya, thus successfully replicating the model. Financial results for the year were also robust. Global consolidated revenues topped $5 million to cover network expenditures and disbursements in South Africa, Kenya and Mozambique, as well as to support expansion activities into West Africa.


ENABLIS SOUTH AFRICA Enablis South Africa (SA) launched its year with results-based management training for senior staff in Johannesburg courtesy of our global partner, the Canadian International Development Agency. This allowed us to refine our performance management framework to improve monitoring, evaluation and reporting for donors and sponsors going forward. What’s more, in the early part of the year, the revenue service granted us Public Benefit Organisation status in South Africa, thereby confirming our status as a non-taxable NGO. For the third consecutive year, the FNB Enablis Business Plan Challenge was launched with great fanfare. Over 1,400 entrepreneurs attended the Challenge’s workshops on how to prepare a business plan, 1,500 calls were made to the Challenge’s help desk, 22,000 unique visits to the Challenge’s website were recorded and over 1,800 business plans were received. These results established this Enablis competition as the biggest of its kind in South Africa. In the end, 19 winners were selected across 10 business categories and recognised at a gala luncheon held in October. The Challenge has become an important driver of new partnerships and a permanent revenue stream for our networking and capacity-building activities. A special word of thanks to all the Challenge sponsors and congratulations to the winners. In the second quarter, Enablis SA introduced an innovative new financial instrument through our partner, First National Bank. Designed to improve access to shortterm working capital requirements, the FNB Enablis Fast Track Loan allows Enablis entrepreneur members to borrow up to ZAR 200,000 for a two-year term upon the recommendation of another network member. Once the bank’s minimum criteria have been met, Enablis extends a 90% loan guarantee at a concessionary rate, with a rapid turnaround time. In our third quarter, the Enablis Khula Loan Fund – established in December 2004 – received its first full loan repayment. Thanks to the success of his IT business, Enablis Gauteng member Fairoz Jaffer repaid the balance of his ZAR 350,000 business loan midway through a five-year term. This was an important milestone for the network because these funds could then be redistributed to another member requiring financing assistance. Over the past four years, over ZAR 37 million in total financing has been approved for 35 entrepreneurs through this initiative. Substantial income from this Fund will flow back to Enablis SA next year as part of our sustainability model. Launched in 2006, our second Fund – the Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund – finished the year with ZAR 18 million in approved financings to 23 entrepreneurs. This


is of particular interest because this Fund’s risk profile is generally much greater than that of the Enablis Khula Loan Fund.

Enablis House, which would serve as both an operating base for network activities and offices for local and visiting support In our fourth quarter, we received confirma- personnel. On October 23rd the network tion of new multi-year grants from partners achieved another critical milestone when Khula Enterprise Finance and First National Enablis House was inaugurated with great Bank. Totaling over ZAR 10 million, these fanfare at an official ceremony that also saw grants are critical to ensuring the continued the accreditation of 34 founding members. growth of Enablis in South Africa. At this After the launch, we immediately started point, we are pleased to report that thanks delivering the full range of Enablis programs to a combination of donor funding, the to our new Kenyan members. vision and leadership of Khula and FNB, and Through Enablis Financial Corporation (EFC), internally generated revenues, Enablis SA Enablis’ banking arm, Enablis concluded a has reached the point of sustainability. preliminary loan agreement with the Youth Enterprise Development Fund (YEDF) at ENABLIS EAST AFRICA year end. YEDF agreed to provide EFC with Following on the heels of the Accenture up to KES 300 million for on-lending to Development Partnerships’ (ADP) team entrepreneurs at a concessionary rate. These that led our pre-implementation phase in funds will be matched by CIDA, leveraging East Africa, we established a presence in each partner’s commitment. Africa Region Nairobi in the first quarter. Global founding partner Microsoft also agreed to provide partner Accenture and Africa Region Enablis EA with a matching grant to fund a partner Microsoft allocated grants to portion of our capacity-building programs. establish our East Africa hub, and the These funds, along with global partner team’s mandate was to carry out the legal CIDA’s contributions, ensure that we will be incorporation in Kenya, identify potential able to provide a high level of entrepreneur staff and board members, locate office networking and development activities in space and generally assume ownership of fiscal 2009. the key relationships that were established by ADP. Initial partnerships were quickly Following violent clashes arising from the put in place with the Ministry of State for presidential election, our final quarter of the year got off to a rocky start, making it Youth Affairs and EABS Bank. difficult to maintain business as usual for a Enablis started the second quarter by number of weeks. For the most part, our signing a contribution agreement with the staff was safe during this crisis, but some Canadian International Development members and stakeholders were either Agency (CIDA). CIDA conditionally agreed personally displaced or their businesses to provide up to $10 million in two phases affected. During and following the crisis, over five years. This seed funding for our our programming was adapted to facilitate expansion into East Africa is similar to that meetings that would help entrepreneur awarded for the South Africa pilot in 2003. members with the healing process. By It will allow Enablis to establish a presence, March, our Nairobi chapter was ready to build a membership base, deliver program- hold its inaugural Enablis Exposé event ming, start on-lending activities and build and seven dynamic presentations from new partnerships and revenue sources over member entrepreneurs closed out the year time to ensure the sustainability of the on a high note. network in East Africa. Enablis East Africa (EA) took the first steps to establishing a permanent presence in the region with the appointments of James Gachui to Chairman of the Board of Directors and Moses Mwaura as the Regional Director. Office space was secured in Nairobi for the establishment of the first 13


THANK YOU FOR SUPPORTING THE ENABLIS VISION OF EMPOWERING IDEAS AND PEOPLE

Thanks to a grant and software from Microsoft, we were able to start revamping the Global Enablis Network and Information Exchange (GENIE), our member portal. With virtual networking and the capacity to bring thousands of African entrepreneurs together, GENIE’s functionalities are now world-class and will play an ever-important role in our future. Global founding partner Telesystem is also committed to driving Enablis’ expansion efforts in Africa. At year end, Telesystem gave us a grant to cover the costs of an ADP feasibility analysis of West Africa. We then selected a team of two Accenture consultants from Belgium to carry out the study in Dakar, Senegal and in Abidjan, Ivory Coast starting in April. Clearly, the next few years will be characterised by the continued growth of the Enablis network. In South Africa, the network is poised to grow to 1,000 entrepreneurs by December 2010. In East Africa, we are expected to reach that same milestone by 2013, spanning up to five countries in the region. In West Africa, we have already begun the process of establishing a presence and hope to have accredited our first founding members by year end. Currently, we are evaluating other expansion opportunities, which could see Enablis chapters being established in 10 African countries by 2011. At this time, we would like to acknowledge the people behind all of this year’s hard work. Firstly, we would like to recognise Tebogo Khaas and Judy Dlamini, departing Directors in South Africa. We would like to welcome new Director David Milligan who joined our other Directors Connie Nkosi (Chair), Bheki Sibeya (Deputy Chair), Donovan Muller, Hugh Myres, Lynette Chen, Thomas Hansen, Martin Feinstein and Xola Sithole in South Africa. In East Africa, we welcome our first board comprised of James Gachui, Maheboob Alibhai, Rina Karina, Rosemary Mutunkei, Carol Musyoka and Thomas Hansen. We acknowledge Enablis Global Directors Connie Nkosi and Bill Morris for their strategic contributions. We would particularly like to thank all our volunteer Directors for their passion and dedication to the cause. A special thanks also to Bill Blair and the Young Presidents’ Organization’s (YPO) Johannesburg Chapter for providing membership to some of our members. Since our inception, so many YPO members have provided us with assistance.

CHARLES SIROIS Global Founder, Chairman, President and CEO — ENABLIS ENTREPRENEURIAL NETWORK

PAUL LAMONTAGNE Chief Executive Officer ­— Enablis Africa Region

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We would like to recognise the tireless devotion of the Enablis professionals in Cape Town, Durban, Nelspruit, Upington, Johannesburg and Nairobi for keeping our network animated. Finally, thank you again to Accenture, Telesystem, the Government of Canada, Microsoft, KPMG, Khula Enterprise Finance, First National Bank, HP, Revlon, Youth Enterprise Development Fund and EABS Bank for supporting the Enablis vision over the past year.


Number of members

Number of jobs created by member entrepreneurs in South Africa

1,750

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151

287

444

2005

2006

2007

2008

539 Number of support hours provided throughout the year 7,074 151

1,453

0 268 2005

480

2006

2007

2008

Total value of financings approved (in zar) 59.5 M

25.4 M

8.3 M 540 K

2005

2006

2007

2008

2005

2006

2007

2008


enablis score— card

FINANCIAL HIGHLIGHTS Financial Information Highlights

March

2008

2007

2006

2005

Consolidated Statement of Operations for Enablis Entrepreneurial Network, Enablis Foundation Canada, Enablis Entrepreneurial Network South Africa and Enablis Entrepreneurial Network East Africa. Enablis wishes to acknowledge the contribution of KPMG in South Africa, Kenya and Canada as the organisation’s external auditors.

THE south AFRICA scorecard Number of chapters

5

4

4

2

Number of members

382

287

151

54

% who are women

28%

32%

27%

22%

% who are previously disadvantaged individuals (PDIs)

63%

64%

68%

71%

Number of support hours provided throughout the year

5,559

1,453

480

268

Number of members with approved funding

55

30

12

2

% of funds allocated to women members

33%

35%

35%

% of funds allocated to PDI members

78%

85%

94%

Total value of financings approved

ZAR 59.5M

ZAR ZAR 25.4M 8.3M

ZAR 540K

Number of jobs created by member entrepreneurs

1,750

539

151

0

Loan default rate

2.3%

0%

0%

N/A

THE EAST AFRICA scorecard Number of chapters

1

Number of members

62

% who are women

41%

Number of support hours provided throughout the year

1,515

Number of jobs created by member entrepreneurs

N/A

For the year ended March 31st — In Canadian $

2008

2007

2006

2005

revenues 3,038,000

2,144,108

3,272,042

1,311,504

Government of Canada

0%

2,150,110

1,379,926

2,094,747

1,281,883

Contributions of other revenues and rendered services

0%

5,188,110

3,524,034

5,366,789

2,593,387 expenses

1,972,690

2,037,485

2,151,759

1,720,554

Staffing and travel

433,624

393,210

352,253

290,365

Corporate and professional services

384,713

411,863

452,180

197,472

Office and other expenses

233,610

372,193

1,057,352

109,448

Services and marketing

2,000,000

300,000

1,343,419

264,663

Contributions to the Enablis Khula Loan Fund

5,024,637

3,514,751

5,356,963

2,582,502

163,473

9,283

9,826

10,885

Excess of revenues over expenses


Job creation by Enablis entrepreneurs creates economic development in the countries where we operate. This year’s independent survey showed that Enablis entrepreneurs are sustainable: over 44% of members’ businesses have now been in operation for more than 36 months, plus another 26% of members have been paying salaries for more than three months. Growth like this leads to employment, evidenced by the fact that 1,211 new jobs were created by our members this year alone. What’s more, 60% of Enablis members are involved in community organisations and 52% are engaged in social issues such as good business practices, gender equality and child welfare. All of which means that Enablis members are creating a multitude of advantages for their countries and continent, both within and external to the network.

The member survey results

Enablis members’ businesses are growing and an impressive 43% of members have created new businesses in the past year. Furthermore, the survey demonstrated that Enablis entrepreneurs created an average of 4.8 jobs per member, 56% of members saw their business expand to a new geographic region, 49% saw a rise in profit, 55% increased their turnover – of which 7% saw an increase of over 100% – 72% introduced new or improved products, and 66% grew their customer base. In addition, 94% of members improved in at least one discipline of business acumen.

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At this point in time, the Enablis network has attained critical mass. It is a vibrant network that gives its members greater value. Over the past year, members have made 891 business contacts within the network –


that’s an average of 3.5 member-to-member contacts. There were also 225 business opportunities created for members by other members this year, averaging nearly one business opportunity per member. Members spent more than 1,972 days with other members, and 86% say that they are active in their Enablis Circles, our keystone program that evolved from successful microfinance investment groups. Additionally, members continue to see ICT as a valuable business tool, with 95% believing their ICT use is significant, 92% using technology to some extent to do business and 69% feeling that they have reached their personal ICT goals to some extent. Entrepreneur members are gaining value from Enablis: 63% feel they have increased their capacity since becoming members, 68% believe that Enablis has helped them grow as a businessperson, 58% feel that the organisation has helped them grow their business, and 45% believe working with us has helped improve their standard of living. What’s more, the survey showed that 88% of members are satisfied with Enablis and its services overall.

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OUR MISSION Enablis is a non-profit organisation created to drive measurable economic development and build thriving and self-sustaining small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the developing world. This is done through a membership-based approach aimed at empowering individual entrepreneurs and their ideas in partnership with governments, the private sector and civil society. our VISION To nurture a dynamic entrepreneur network of men and women connected to global markets that is the benchmark for sustainable enterprise development initiatives. our five KEY OBJECTIVES To provide innovative and complementary non-financial and financial support services to entrepreneurs; To create a member-focused network of peer entrepreneurs dedicated to the pursuit of success in their personal and business lives, as well as that of the network as a whole; To nurture entrepreneurs through networking, capacitybuilding and financing, with a view to ensuring success of their respective businesses; To use information, communications and technologies as an enabler, assisting the delivery of services to our members and enhancing the competitiveness of their own businesses; and To partner with private and public sector entities who share a common desire to contribute to the development of entrepreneurs, economic growth, job creation and poverty reduction.

The revised vision 24

IN TEGRI TY RESPECT PRO FESSIONA LISM SUSTAIN ABILI TY


The overall objective of the Enablis expansion strategy for Africa is to increase its impact on economic development by extending support to entrepreneurs across the continent. Enablis will help boost the SME sector, create jobs, and benefit previously disadvantaged individuals and communities. For expansion, Enablis has developed a hub and spoke model that involves creating a hub in a region, with satellite countries supported by it. We now operate in two hub countries – South Africa and Kenya – and are working to establish a third in French West Africa in 2009. The hub countries will expand to satellite countries in the region. By 2011, we aim to have 2,000 member entrepreneurs in 10 countries across Africa.

expansion IN Africa

WEST EAST

The Enablis implementation process involves two stages.

The first stage is a feasibility study performed by Accenture Development Partnerships’ consultants who visit the target countries. It serves as a business plan for the recommended point of entry and the rollout into the area. The business plan is region-specific, and it identifies how the Enablis model should be customised to become an efficient rollout plan for the particular area. The study also serves as a submission to potential donors who may be interested in becoming Enablis partners.

SOUTH AFRICA

The second step is the execution of the business plan. At this stage, the Enablis implementation team partners with a local project manager. This team takes the business plan and establishes the foundation and processes required to open an Enablis House that will support member entrepreneurs in the new region.

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As Enablis grows across the continent, so do the opportunities for our member entrepreneurs. The larger the network is, the greater the networking opportunities. In this way, our increasingly diversified areas of operation will enable members to grow, develop and partner across borders.


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Being Part Of It

Business Plan Competition Since its inception in 2005, the FNB Enablis Business Launchpad has been growing in size and popularity in South Africa. This year, as in years past, the competition was kicked off in May to an audience of sponsors, media and other stakeholders. Throughout June and July, thousands of people attended business plan workshops across all provinces and tens of thousands of entry forms were distributed nationally via partner organisations. From the time the competition was launched until its closing on August 31, 2007, 1,400 people attended 21 workshops around the country. The dedicated competition website, www.enabliscompetition.co.za, recorded a staggering 22,841 unique visits, which in turn reflected entry form downloads of 32.67 gigabytes and 2,992,299 page views. In addition, around 1,500 people called the competition helpdesk. The end result was that over 1,800 business plans were submitted – nearly triple the number from the previous year. The success of the competition was due, in large part, to our media partnership with The Sunday Times, as well as our new partnership with PostNet. The 19 winners of the ZAR 20 million competition were announced in Johannesburg on October 18, 2007, after 56 finalists presented their business plans to a panel of local and international judges. All finalists were granted Enablis membership while winners benefited from a fast track to funding and prizes like media exposure, laptops, business training, stationery, and books from the many business plan competition partners. Finalists and winners alike profited from their exposure to the network of participating investors, entrepreneurs and advisors. The member agreement The member agreement was put into place to ensure members understand their roles and responsibilities, and can derive the maximum benefit and value from their membership in the network.

For their part, members must agree to promote the Enablis mission of driving social and economic development through encouraging small-and medium-sized enterprises as well as abide by our core values of respect, integrity, professionalism and sustainability. They promise to promote the economic and social development of the countries in which Enablis operates and continue to strive, grow, enhance and add value and knowledge to the Enablis network, to the benefit of all Enablis members.


To facilitate personal and business improvement and best practice, members must share and document knowledge, successes, learning and experiences with other members of the network. They must operate their business with consideration of their social impact, with particular regard to increasing employment, improving information, communications and technology skills and availability, increasing access to markets, and encouraging innovation. Members agree to act in a manner that encourages and promotes entrepreneurship, and inspires people to become entrepreneurs. Enablis agrees to help members develop as entrepreneurs through a variety of programs, activities, training and events, and to provide members with access to relevant and practical business experience, knowledge and expertise. Enablis will assist members in developing better business strategies, solving business problems and gaining the knowledge, skills and ability to identify specific and practical solutions to business problems and issues. The Member Induction process Through the Enablis member induction process, new members are introduced to all facets of the Enablis network. Members meet with the Entrepreneur Development Associate (EDA) or Chapter Associate that has been assigned during accreditation, and Enablis programs, services and networking opportunities are outlined. New members participate in a GENIE training session so they can navigate and benefit from the online content and services of our exclusive member portal. They are also trained in the Enablis Circle program and then placed into an Enablis Circle group. To help identify their business strengths and weaknesses, and create a business plan reflecting this, members have the opportunity to do the Enablis Roadmap business assessment and complete an Enablis priority matrix. The Enablis Roadmap identifies the critical steps required over 12 to 24 months to take members and their businesses to the next level. It’s unique to each member and helps pinpoint where skill gaps exist, which Enablis services will be required, and, most importantly, in what order these services should be provided.


READY TO SHARE

Enablis Circle The Enablis Circle is a self-managed peer support group that exists to provide learning, support and growth opportunities to its members. Eight to ten times a year, a group of six to eight Enablis members meet to share knowledge, skills and experiences, using a process that has proven incredibly effective. The Enablis Circle provides a framework for the personal and business development of each member through: — A confidential, safe context for sharing ideas, skills and information; — A platform for growth, through exploring and integrating business and personal issues; — Opportunities to network with diverse individuals; — Practical input from different but like-minded entrepreneurs. Because the entrepreneurial process can be isolating, Enablis Circles were developed to enable people to get together and talk about common interests. Members learn from each other and exchange information about the challenges of entrepreneurship – in effect, they form a team to help each other become more effective in their respective business and personal lives. Exposé The Enablis Exposé showcases members’ businesses. It provides a unique opportunity for members to present their products and services to an audience of potential customers, partners and investors who may have not otherwise been accessible. Before the event, member entrepreneurs undergo training on how to most effectively present their business. The two-part training workshop includes sessions on public speaking, marketing and PowerPoint presentation skills. Members invite contacts to an Enablis-sponsored location. The Enablis brand is able to attract more contacts than small businesses usually have access to. At the Exposé, seven selected members present for seven minutes each. Afterwards, there is a reception where they can circulate among the audience of other members and meet potential business contacts. Entrepreneurs find this experience rewarding because of the access to the business community it provides, as well as the credibility that comes with being a part of Enablis.

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Networking Events Enablis believes its real power lies in its network – our strength is providing members with the tools and resources to create connections. To foster the network, Enablis holds a variety of events, including guest speakers and receptions, where members interact and meet potential business contacts. The events, wide in scope or geared to a specific business sector, provide a forum in which members can develop their networking and other business skills. Enablis Networking Events have proven to be a very useful way for members to find partners, suppliers, customers and peer support groups. Members report that they have experienced valuable exchanges, discussed deals, identified partners for a tender proposal, and found potential suppliers and customers.

Our coaches Enablis offers its members the services of coaches – specialists in a variety of fields including business strategy, financial management, human resources, legal, marketing and sales strategy, technology, project management, and Black Economic Empowerment strategy. Screened and selected for proficiency in their field, every Enablis coach is qualified to help member entrepreneurs learn to help themselves as well as provide them with first-hand, best practice skills. Our capacity-building programs are designed so members can interact with coaches in the most convenient and effective way. Members have access to coaches in one-on-one sessions, interactive workshops and seminars, during weekly Tele-Assist hours, and even through our 24/7 response system and Online Resource Center available on GENIE.

GETTING support

Our mentors There is no one better suited to provide personal and professional guidance to aspiring and emerging entrepreneurs than business leaders who have been through it and succeeded themselves. That’s why, in addition to the capacity-building and skill-development programs and services, networking opportunities and access to financing, Enablis offers a mentorship program that partners members with successful business professionals. Launched in 2007, Enablis members in Gauteng were selected to be part of a mentoring program offered in partnership with the Johannesburg chapter of the Young Presidents’ Organization (YPO). The Enablis member and volunteer business leader from the YPO are encouraged to meet, speak on the phone, and exchange e-mails at least once a month. Enablis members in other regions are also starting to benefit from this program. Through this experience, not only does the Enablis member gain invaluable guidance, but the mentor is also afforded the opportunity to gain exposure to the everchanging, dynamic entrepreneurial environment.

Enablis professionals Because we realise that an organisation is only as good as its employees, Enablis employs highly skilled professionals from all sectors and walks of life. Our vast and varied team has experience in everything from development to finance, from business and marketing to project management. But whatever their background, the one thing Enablis employees have in common is their passion for entrepreneurship and SME development. The Enablis team, through cooperation and skill-transfer, is constantly building a better model and future for Enablis and its members and partners. 54

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Enablis Khula Loan Fund (EKLF) In 2004, Enablis, Khula Enterprise Finance and First National Bank joined forces to establish the ZAR 50 million Enablis Khula Loan Guarantee Fund Trust. EKLF guarantees business loans exclusively for Enablis South Africa members who want to access loan finance to expand their existing small businesses. Members with viable and sustainable business plans have access to loans up to ZAR 2,750,000. The Manager of this Trust is Enablis Financial Corporation (Pty) Ltd., Enablis’ banking arm. EKLF’s performance (from its inception to March 2008):

Value of loan applications approved: ZAR 37,285,000 Number of loan applications approved: 35

Getting funding Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund (KESAF) In 2006, Enablis Financial Corporation partnered with Khula Enterprise Finance to create the ZAR 100 million Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund Trust. This pre-venture capital Fund was designed to accelerate SME growth in South Africa by fostering entrepreneurship, reaching out to entrepreneurs in remote areas, creating jobs, and encouraging meaningful economic participation by previously disadvantaged individuals.

The first Fund of its kind in the country, KESAF is able to withstand a much higher level of risk because of the turnkey solutions that Enablis offers its members, including networking opportunities and skill development. Focusing on high-potential growth sectors, the Fund exclusively helps Enablis members with needs of between ZAR 25,000 and ZAR 2,500,000 to start or expand their small businesses. Also managed by Enablis Financial Corporation, this Trust uses a combination of debt and quasi-equity instruments. KESAF’s performance (from its inception to March 2008):

Value of loan applications approved: ZAR 22,177,080 Number of loan applications approved: 27

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FNB Fast Track Loan In 2007, Enablis launched the FNB Fast Track Loan, a subset of the Enablis Khula Loan Fund. The purpose of the Fast Track Loan is to focus on small loans (between ZAR 100,000 and ZAR 200,000) over a shorter term and make them available to members quickly. As such, members are approved within 30 days of receipt of an application and loans are repayable in either 12 or 24 months. Fast track loans are available to members who have been part of the network for more than 12 months. When applying, members require the support of another Enablis member. Thanks to network activities, Enablis Financial Corporation has prior knowledge of the member and his or her business, and can recommend the loan quickly, getting much needed financing into the hands of the entrepreneur.

Getting connected Global Enablis Network and Information Exchange (GENIE) This year, Enablis launched the new GENIE v2 powered by Microsoft. Our Internet-based member portal is one of the most useful tools in promoting networking and facilitating communication between Enablis members.

The completely redesigned portal is a project supported by Microsoft and designed to move Enablis onto a more user-friendly and stable platform. With it, members can take advantage of a variety of services including access to Enablis-accredited experts who provide specialised advice and guidance. With the new discussion boards and forums, members can discuss topics of common interest and exchange relevant business information. What’s more, members can easily access news articles, calendars of events and other relevant online resources. Internally, GENIE is a powerful tool that allows Enablis staff and coaches to track interactions, support activities and communication with members, including their participation in Enablis programs and events.

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KEY EVENTS

2001

Digital Opportunity Task Force (DOT Force) presents their conclusions about the importance of ICTs for development

2002

Canada Fund for Africa is created, and it commits to providing CDN $10 million seed funding to an initiative that would become “Enablis�

2003

Enablis is founded as a Montrealbased Non-Profit Organisation

2004

Enablis South Africa becomes the first Enablis country operation

2005

Enablis accredits its 50th member and launches a national business plan competition for entrepreneurs in South Africa

2006

Enablis accredits its 150th member and prepares for expansion in Africa

2007

Enablis launches in Kenya and is over 275 members strong

2008

Enablis boasts over 400 members and initiates further expansion in Africa


P ink y

Pinky Duma

Pinky Duma joined Enablis in 2007. She was selected to be part of the Young Presidents’ Organization’s (Johannesburg Chapter) Mentoring Program where she is being mentored by a top executive.

Through the Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund, Pinky and her partner, Steph Hartung, were awarded ZAR 1.5 million to start their business. The pair started out with 61 hectares of agricultural land to farm herbs for essential oils. After selling the herbs to processors who extract the oil from them, they went on to establish BioAfrica and began producing the oils themselves. Now they sell their product in its raw form as well as in lip balms, hand creams and perfumes. Despite their best efforts, the company’s crops suffered from the harsh weather conditions earlier this year. The partners decided to invest heavily in an irrigation system and small transformation facility, but their first harvest still yielded insubstantial results. Other startup ventures might have folded at that point, but BioAfrica persevered, and when Enablis agreed to release additional funds, the company was able to plant and process a new crop and produce an essential oil that is in high demand in Europe. Pinky and Steph are now looking forward to a bumper harvest.

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Mt ho be li

Mthobeli January Mthobeli January has been actively participating in Enablis since his accreditation and is one of the first members to be trained in Enablis Circles.

As founding partner of Ubuntu Financial Solutions, Mthobeli has played an instrumental role in helping set up events in Khayelitsha Township and introducing new members to the organisation. Mthobeli is also the Executive Director of Laphumilanga Youth Development Association, an organisation that focuses on entrepreneurship, placement and career development for young people in Khayelitsha and the surrounding areas. In addition, Mthobeli is the Facility Manager of Nyanga Job Centre, a project owned and funded by the City of Cape Town. Based in Nyanga Township, the project’s premises host 12 businesses and employ a total of 22 people.

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Mthobeli credits the guidance that Enablis staff and fellow members gave him for his growth as both an entrepreneur and individual.


AYOOB MOTA

Ayoob Mota saw Enablis as an opportunity to obtain funding for the expansion and consolidation of his business. He first got involved with Enablis when selected as a finalist in the 2006 Business Plan Competition – the same year the Durban chapter of Enablis was established. By getting involved in an Enablis Circle group, Ayoob found that his small business struggles were similar to those of his peers and that he was not alone.

“Enablis has taught me the true value of my small business – not only monetarily, but also in terms of the feelings of self-worth and dignity that come from mastering your own destiny,” says Ayoob. “They’ve enabled my business to not only make it through the first critical three to five years but to become profitable. Here’s to another five years with Enablis and an Enablis Circle at my side!”

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A YOO B


S ha lo m

Shalom Munyiri

The moment Shalom Munyiri was accredited as a founding member of Enablis East Africa, she began taking advantage of a variety of services including her roadmap, one-on-one coaching, Enablis Circles, Advantage Workshops, Exposés and the GENIE portal. After her roadmap clearly identified weak points, a priority matrix was developed and Shalom began attending coaching sessions. A combination of human resource, business strategy, and finance coaching has given Shalom the confidence to make strategic decisions that have had a positive impact on her business.

Says Shalom, “My Enablis Circle understands, accepts, encourages and guides me. The members are a good sounding board that will not judge or betray my confidence.”

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Participating in an Enablis Exposé allowed Shalom to further define her business. Shalom had thought she was in the conventional interior design business, but through the Exposé she discovered that what she really does is improve the quality of people’s lives using design and décor. As a result, she is already attending positive meetings that will translate into business. “The Enablis experience has led to my personal growth as well as helped me realise my business dreams,” says Shalom.


M p hag a

Mphaga ntlatleng

Mphaga Ntlatleng is the 27-year-old owner of Healthy Legumes Food, a start-up company that processes legumes into a nutritious powdered soup product.

Mphaga put all his resources into his business and raised additional capital for a factory through family members. Winning the FNB Enablis Business Plan Competition in 2007 was the turning point for his business development. “I had a good idea, a good product and lots of enthusiasm, but I just wasn’t getting anywhere with my business concept,” says Mphaga. “I worked day and night at my business plan and went all over looking for funding, but no one would help me. It wasn’t until I entered the competition and got the news that I was a finalist that things started to change.”

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In late 2007, Mphaga was approved for an Enablis loan. Since then, he has increased his production and orders exponentially. He has also created eight new permanent jobs. The funding made it possible for him to buy the right equipment and to promote his product. “I can honestly say that without the competition and support from Enablis, I would still be working in a job, not as an entrepreneur. I just would not have made it.”


CHRONOLO GICAL SPONSORSHIP SUPPORT HEWLETT-PACKARD KHULA ENTERPRISE FINANCE FIRST NATIONAL BANK KPMG IDENTICA CANADA FUND FOR AFRICA CANADIAN INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AGENCY

MICROSOFT

ACCENTURE

YOUTH ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT FUND

TELESYSTEM LTD. QUEBECOR WORLD INC.

EABS BANK REVLON MPUMALANGA ECONOMIC GROWTH AGENCY

2004

2005

2006

2007

TRANSCONTINENTAL LITHOACME

2008


Charles Sirois  Managing Director, Accenture Canada

(Chair), Chairman & Chief Executive Officer, Telesystem

Martin Feinstein 

Lynette Chen 

Bheki Sibiya

Connie Nkosi 

Chief Executive, Traction Enterprise Development Consultants

Chief Executive Officer, NEPAD Business Forum

(Deputy Chair), Non-Executive Chairman, Brait

(Chair), Executive Chairperson, Lidonga Group Holdings

East African partners

South African partners

African Partners

Global partners

Founding Partners

Our OUR parTboard ners and members sponsors Bill Morris Executive Chairperson, Lidonga Group Holdings

Enablis Entrepreneurial Network

Connie Nkosi 

Thomas Hansen

Chief Executive Officer, Enablis Africa

Regional General Manager, Microsoft West, East, Central Africa and Indian Ocean Islands, Microsoft

ENABLIS ENTREPRENEURIAL NETWORK SOUTH AFRICA

Paul Lamontagne David Milligan

Chief Executive Officer, Multisource Telekoms

Director, Accenture South Africa Managing Director, Khula Enterprise Finance

Head of Growth & New Markets BU, Commercial Banking, First National Bank

Hugh Myres

Donovan Muller Xola Sithole

Carol Musyoka 

Paul Lamontagne 

Rina Karina 

Thomas Hansen 

Maheboob Alibhai 

James Gachui

Corporate Social Responsibility Manager, Safaricom

Corporate Director, Barclays Bank of Kenya

Chief Executive Officer, Enablis Africa

Financial Analyst, Faida Securities

Regional General Manager, Microsoft West, East, Central Africa and Indian Ocean Islands, Microsoft

Chairman, Phoenix Assurance

(Chair), Chairman, Transcentury, Jimana

Pinnacle Micro

Mintek

Umsobomvu Youth Fund

Sunday Times

First National Bank

South African Business Plan challenge Partners

Rosemary Mutunkei Regional Director, Enablis East Africa

Enablis Entrepreneurial Network East Africa

Moses Mwaura 

Chief Operations Officer, Enablis Africa

Heather Lowe

Marc Balkin

Account Executive: Corporate Channel, Khula Enterprise Finance

Head of Enterprise Development, Commercial Banking, First National Bank

(Chair), Managing Partner, Hasso Plattner Ventures Africa

Paul Lamontagne

Marc Balkin 

Managing Director, Pleiad Capital

Channel Manager, Khula Enterprise Finance

Chief Executive Officer, Enablis Africa

(Chair), Managing Partner, Hasso Plattner Ventures Africa

Khula Enterprise Finance

Telesystem

Accenture

Pan MacMillan

PostNet

Pam Golding Properties

Shell

Media Diversity and Development Agency

Small Enterprise Development Agency (seda)

Microsoft

Gauteng Enterprise Propeller

Miana Naude 

Bettina Mokete 

Executive Chairperson, Lidonga Group Holdings

Enablis Khula Loan Fund Trust Investment Committee

Connie Nkosi 

Khula Enablis SME Acceleration Fund Trust

Mkhululi Mazibuko 

Investment Committee

Richard Parker


Enablis Global Team

Our team Daniel Cyr  Communications Director

President, Enablis Financial Corporation

Chief Financial Officer

Corporate Secretary

Paul Lamontagne 

Chairman, President & Chief Executive Officer

Francine Lefebvre  Director UK, Multilateral Relations

Charles Sirois

Liz Padmore  Financial Controller

Michel Cordeau

Gina Piccolo 

Brenda Twala

Shaheema Ryklief

Denvor Phokaners

Annie Oliver

Avesh Mahabeer

Lana Edwards 

Nadine Bundock

Safiya Ahmed

Miana Naude 

Ebenise Bester 

Paul Lamontagne

Legal Affairs

Coordinator

HR Manager

Communications and Knowledge Manager

Executive Assistant

IT Manager

Partnerships Manager

Financial Administrator

Financial Controller

Chief Operating Officer

Chief Financial Officer

Chief Executive Officer

Africa Operations Team

Mary Wamaitha

South Africa Member Support Team

Network Coordinator, Cape Town

Banker

Regional Head: Cape Town, Durban & Mozambique

Moeketsi Motsepe

Chapter Associate, Gauteng

Sally Moodley

Faghmieda King

Chapter Associate, Gauteng

Acting Regional Head: Gauteng, Mpumalanga & Northern Cape

Sharlene Diale

Coordinator, Durban

Valerie Flanagan

Noelle Ngobeni

Coordinator, Durban

Chapter Head, Nelspruit

Nishol Partab

Coordinator, Gauteng

Keolebogile Modise

Prenisha Maduaray

Office Assistant, Cape Town

Banker

Debbie Farah

Office Assistant, Gauteng

Chapter Manager, Cape Town

Busisiwe Mahuza

Victor Mzimela

Khanita Thomas

Office Assistant, Gauteng

Rodney Douglas

Sibongile Mltoshwa

East Africa Member Support Team

Network Coordinator

Entrepreneur Development Associate

Entrepreneur Development Associate Lillian Marenya

Regional Director, East Africa

Joan Wekesa

Office Coordinator

Moses Mwaura

Edna Chepnego

Office Assistant

Betty Kariuki

Fred Odhiambo


D E S I G N B Y I D E N T I C A P R I N T I N G B Y T R A N S C O N T I N E N TA L L I T H OAC M E B inding by multi - reliure I N C . PA P E R B Y D O M TA R P R I N T E D I N C A N A DA 2 0 0 8 O N E A R T H C H O I C E F S C C E R T I F I E D C O U G A R O PAQ U E


High - Enablis Annual report 2008