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November 7, 2013 | 56 pages

Inside College FEATURE

November is Women Abuse Prevention Month. – Page 19

FEATURE

The second part of a series on energy production and prices in Ontario. – Page 23

COMMUNITY

Check the list of Remembrance Day services you can attend. – Page 40

students learn ‘cost of carbon’ Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

News - On the day a coal-fired electricity plant in Lambton, Ont. produced it’s last kilowatt, students at Algonquin College learned about the cost of carbon. The college hosted the Climate Change Reality project on Oct. 23, a group dedicated to improving awareness and action surrounding climate change, founded by former U.S. vice-president Al Gore. A panel of speakers that included Charles Hodgson, from Ecology Ottawa, Chris Henderson, president of Lumos Energy and Terrence Audla, president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, talked about everything from melting polar ice caps to the cost of storm activity on the economy. Hodgson said just in Ottawa, the cost of storm activity reached $4.6 million in 2005, due to things like overflowing storm sewers. “Things like green energy certainly come at a cost,” he said. “But it’s a pay-me-now-to-avoid-more-costlater idea.” Henderson echoed Hodgson’s statements adding the Inuit are the canary in the coal mine and were the first to sound the alarm over the thinning of the ozone layer. “They see very clearly the consequences of what the rest of the world is doing,” he said. “A two-degree hike in the rest of the world is a 10-degree hike in the arctic.” Henderson founded Lumos Energy in 2006. Henderson has helped enhance the capacity Canadian firms, utilities, communities and governments to develop clean energy projects and finance new technologies. See NORTH, page 2

JON PETERSEN

Taking it on the road The Canadian Showtime Chorus, which features women from across the city, are now in the Sweet Adelines International competition, which runs from Nov. 4 to 9 in Hawaii. For the full story, see page 31.

Budget prompts questions on roads, transit Planned increase is 1.9% Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

News - Roads and transit were highlighted by residents who turned out at the city’s third public consultation on the 2014 draft budget at Nepean Sportsplex on Oct. 30. Kyle Peori, vice-president of the National Capital Heavy Construction Association, thanked council for its $45-million investment in resurfacing roads and asked if there was an appetite for a bigger tax increase to increase the amount available for road reconstruction. Council is aiming for a 1.9 per cent tax increase, which is the smallest increase in seven years. Peori said topping

up the increase to 2.5 per cent would allow for another $7 million to be spent on road infrastructure. “That’s about 20 to 30 kilometres of road,” Peori said. Mayor Jim Watson said the target for the tax increase was to match inflation – which is two per cent. “We have spent a record amount on road resurfacing and rebuilding over the last three years,” he said. “I wouldn’t support a tax increase above inflation.” Barrhaven Coun. Jan Harder echoed the mayor’s comment. “We placed an affordability lens on the TMP (transportation master plan), so we have control over when we complete projects, when we can afford it,” she said. “It’s ambitious.” Knoxdale and Baseline roads in Nepean are among the ones to be resur-

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faced under the city’s plan. “Baseline is badly in need of asphalt,” Piero said. “I often tell people I don’t get coffee when I am driving on Baseline because by the time I get to where I am going the cup will be empty.” Rideau-Goulbourn Coun. Scott Moffatt said his residents will be pleased with the improvements to Rideau Valley Drive. It will get a $2.6 million facelift, replacing the storm sewers, the road, curbs and sidewalks between Rogers Stevens and Dorack drives. “It’s something that needed to be done,” he said. Gloucester-South Nepean Coun. Steve Desroches said residents are happy to see road improvements and other new infrastructure. See BUS, page 5

            

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Nepean couple continues to get praise for tale of journey Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

North already feeling climate change Continued from page 1

Audla, whose organization represents 53 Inuit communities across the country, said that most of those communities are coastal and feel the effects of climate change keenly. Hunters have found themselves drifting away from land, he said. “That never used to happen, but it’s tough to know the waters now.” Audla added that while there is concern over hunting polar bears, the real fear should be increasing temperatures and other seasonal changes. Mitchell Beer, who is a volunteer

with the project, said he travelled north in 2001 and the changes were already being felt. “I was there (Iqaluit) for a conference and the cab driver said ‘I don’t need a conference to tell me there’s climate change. There are pussy willows in the ground in May,’” Beer said. Audience members were invited to ask questions of the panelists at the end of the day and some local initiatives were highlighted. “It doesn’t have to be all doom and gloom,” Hodgson said. “It’s not hopeless.”

INNER PEACE

The pair, now married, said they wanted to pass their own inner peace to their daughter. “We really want to encourage her to have a healthy view of herself,” Dojeiji said, adding the graphics in the book created by Agraso show a child with a belly to celebrate her natural shape. Other characters in the childrens

JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

Alberto Agraso and Mony Dojeiji pose with their childrens’ book I am Happy, which recently won two literary awards. book are patterned after neighbours and their daughter’s teachers. “They aren’t exactly the same but they serve as the inspiration for the drawings,” Agraso said. The book received a silver award for inspirational book as part of the Mom’s Choice Awards this summer in New York City. The book also won a Mariposa Award for Best First Book at the 15th Annual International Latino Book Awards. Walking for Peace has received similar accolades, from the 2012 Global Ebooks for action adventure and more recently, a first place in the Latino Books into Movies Awards for best action/adventure book to be made into a movie. The award is organized by Latino Literacy Now

and was handed out in Los Angeles in September. The amateur author and illustrator are thrilled with their success and are currently planning a sequel for Walking for Peace. The next book will talk about a period of time when the two separated on their journey to Jerusalem. The plan is to write mostly from Agraso’s point of view, as he had to return to Spain due to the death of his father. “I think it is an important hole in the story we need to fill,” Dojeiji said, adding the couple will once again collaborate to write the book. For more information on the two books, visit www.walkingforpeace. com.

Hydro Ottawa joins Councillor Qadri to celebrate St. Daniel School mural In September, students at St. Daniel School gave a makeover to the fence surrounding Hydro Ottawa’s transformer station near Woodroffe Avenue and Baseline Road. This new mural, painted on the cement wall which backs on to the school yard, was officially unveiled at a heart-warming ceremony held at the school on October 25th. The learning mural was created by artist Nicole Bélanger and depicts children enjoying sports and recreation throughout the four seasons. Funding for the project was provided by the City of Ottawa/Crime Prevention Ottawa Paint It Up! youth engagement mural program. Councillor Shad Qadri, Chair of the Board for Crime Prevention Ottawa, joined Hydro Ottawa staff to celebrate the mural with students, parents and teachers. The painting at St. Daniel School is part of a larger initiative to introduce outdoor classrooms, trees for shade and other natural spaces to facilitate learning, playing and socializing for students.. The process of planning, designing and creating the mural with students, teachers, parents and the community at large was a great kick-off to the school’s greening project and will build interest, excitement and pride in the school yard.

Councillor Shad Qadri with artist Nicole Bélanger and representatives from Hydro Ottawa, St. Daniel School and Crime Prevention Ottawa at the mural unveiling on October 25th.

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

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JENNIFER MCINTOSH/METROLAND

From left, Charles Hodgson from Ecology Ottawa is pictured with John Hamel, president of Ottawa Renewable Energy Corporation and Audrey Depault, a climate change leader with the Climate Change Reality Project during a seminar hosted at Algonquin College on Oct. 23.

News - A Nepean couple continues to get kudos about their story of a journey for peace that started on the Camino de Santiago – an 800kilometre pilgrimage in northern Spain and ended up in Jerusalem. Mony Dojeiji left her job in 2001 and started walking. She said the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001 left her feeling like she needed to find inner peace. Along the way, she met Albert Agraso, a native of Spain who decided to join her on a walk to spread their message of peace from Rome to Jerusalem. And the rest is history. The couple pooled their respective journals from the trip and published Walking for Peace: An Inner Peace in 2012. Later that year they also published a story for children called I am Happy, a book that deals with themes of self-image and conflict. The story is about a child named Angela who sees the world through the eyes of love. Angela appreciates the seemingly ordinary in her life – her room, her toys, her family, her neighbours, her friends, her school, and perhaps most importantly, herself.


NEWS

Connected to your community

Residents look for compromise over development height Traffic named as chief concern Jennifer McIntosh jennifer.mcintosh@metroland.com

We are not going to put our fathers, mothers, grandmothers and grandfathers in an industrial park. RICK CHIARELLI

Another resident, who owns two rental properties across the street, said she is worried she may lose tenants because of the development. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have to look at it,â&#x20AC;? she

7,&2

News - College A steering committee is still seeking a compromise on a planned retirement home for Meadowlands Drive, said College Coun. Rick Chiarelli. Chiarelli hosted an open house at Ben Franklin Place on Oct. 28 to give residents a chance to air their concerns about the proposed development, which could be up to six storeys tall. Clausi Developments owns four bungalows from 145 to 155 Meadowlands, just east of Woodroffe Avenue, and originally planned a threeand-half storey condo complex with 47 units. The proposal was approved by the city last year, but residents were against the development. Clausi went back to the drawing board and resubmitted an application to build a 186-unit retirement home, includ-

ing the parts are four storeys and another that is six storeys. Because Clausi is now part of a ďŹ ve-developer consortium working on the project, they were able to resubmit a different application for the same spot, Chiarelli said. Shawn Lawrence, the architect for the project, said the plan was to create smaller, affordable units for seniors. The price point may be $2,000 per month â&#x20AC;&#x201C; a low amount Lawrence said is nearly unheard of in other parts of the city. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There are subsidized units but they are usually older product and very small,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This will be a brand new product.â&#x20AC;? Residents who attended the open house were mostly concerned about the height of the building and the potential for trafďŹ c. One resident said the plan to have cars wait at the front of the building and then pull back out onto Meadowlands before entering the park-

ments on the development with Chiarelliâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ofďŹ ce or on the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website. The proposal is set to go to the planning committee on Dec. 10.

said to the developers doing the presentation at the meeting. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t we have residential there?â&#x20AC;? But Chiarelli said it has been city policy for decades to have retirement homes in neighbourhood settings. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are not going to put our fathers, mothers, grandmothers and grandfathers in an industrial park,â&#x20AC;? he said. Chiarelli said some of the steering committeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s concerns over the potential condo complex had been addressed, but height was a major sticking point â&#x20AC;&#x201C; particularly the sixstorey part of the building that faces west. Despite that, Chiarelli said it was in the residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; best interest to work with the developer on a compromise rather than try to block the project completely. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think we are going to see planning committee salivate over the creation of affordable seniors housing,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been identiďŹ ed as a need.â&#x20AC;? Residents are able to make com-

ing garage would jam up the ďŹ&#x201A;ow of trafďŹ c on the busy street. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Typically youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re not going to get a lot of trafďŹ c to retirement homes, and that trafďŹ c isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t going to be during rush hour,â&#x20AC;? Lawrence said.

 

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Bus pass questions raised Continued from page 1

“We are going to see five new parks in Ward 22,” Desroches said. TRANSIT

Catherine Gardner, a Bells Corners resident, asked council why her community pass – a discounted OC Transpo pass for recipients of Ontario Disability Support Program – is going up by 16 per cent, despite the fact that transit fare increases average 2.5 per cent. The pass is $35 per month, but users have to top up their fares by $2 if they ride ParaTranspo

buses. “The cost of my pass has gone up by 20 per cent since 2012,” she said. Pat Scrimgeour, manager of transit planning for OC Transpo, said the move was to bring the cost of the pass in alignment with the seniors pass. “It’s still the most heavily discounted pass we have,” he said. Gardner also called for a monthly pass to be made available for children between the ages of six and 12. She said she accompanies her young granddaughter on the bus to go to school and other social ac-

tivities. Being forced to pay per use is costly. “Between her father and I we pay almost $90 per month,” she said. Scrimgeour said if council directed staff to do so, they could look at a pass for children. He added if a child were taking the bus twice a day, five days a week, the monthly cost will be more than $60. The city’s last public consultation on the budget is set for city hall on Nov. 7. Residents can also provide feedback by emailing budget2014@ottawa. ca. “I think we’re on the right track,” Desroches said.

PLANNED WORK

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Fallowfield Drive (from O’keefe Court to Strandherd Drive), and Strandherd Drive (from Fallowfield Road to Kennevale Drive)

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hydroottawa.com/plannedwork Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013


Getting your flu shot Keeping babies and young in Ottawa has children fluless never been easier this season Busy families have more ways to keep healthy by getting the flu vaccine. Ottawa Public Health is holding flu clinics by appointment only for children under 5 and their parents and siblings.

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

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OPINION

Connected to your community

EDITORIAL

Just do it, for artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s sake

I

tâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time the city put its full weight behind the Arts Court expansion after patching together funding to get the long-running project off the ground. The expansion will now cost the city $34 million. The federal government was asked to pitch in $9 million to go along with $6 million contributed by the province â&#x20AC;&#x201C; money originally allocated for a performing arts centre on Elgin Street before those plans fell through â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but declined to help out. The city has now approved an extra $8.2 million to make up for the federal share. Mayor Jim Watson is enthusiastic about the project, saying itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a rare opportunity to build this type of infrastructure in the downtown core. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a strong desire certainly on my part to see that we invest in a significant facility for arts and culture in the downtown core,â&#x20AC;? he said. This project is a boon to the arts community, and will provide space to nurture and promote creative endeavours. It has the potential to not just help the Ottawa arts scene, but to also attract artists from outside the capital to what should be a wonderful new facility. But the city needs to take one further step to help the Arts Court reach its full potential: foot the whole

bill. As it stands, the current Arts Court tenants will be on the hook for $3.2 million of the expansion cost. While they may be happy to raise the money in exchange for the improved facilities, couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t that money be put to better use by those tenants? That sum â&#x20AC;&#x201C; $3.2 million â&#x20AC;&#x201C; is no small change in the artistic world. It could go a long way toward making art, rather than paying for equipment and fixtures for the expanded facility. Why then isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t the city just coming up with another $3.2 million? There was money allocated in the budget for a great many things, a budget featuring the lowest property tax increase of the current council term at 1.9 per cent. Adding an extra few million wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have changed that amount in any noticeable way. The argument could be made that if the tenants have a stake in paying for the expansion, it will make for a stronger partnership. The tenants already have a significant stake in the project: they were involved at every step of the planning process so far. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s no reason to believe they would all of a sudden take such a small gesture by the city for granted. In light of multi-billion dollar transit visions, significant stadium renewals and extensive road renovations, surely the city can come up with a few extra million to help a worthwhile arts project.

COLUMN

Taking a small risk to right the wrongs of the world

G

ame 3 ended on a play that had never been seen before in a baseball World Series: a St. Louis Cardinals runner thrown at home plate was called safe because it was ruled that he had been obstructed by a Boston Red Sox player. A terrible ruckus ensued but the call stood. The run the umpires allowed to count was the winning run in the game. Even people who were delighted that Boston lost were a bit chagrined at the call. There had been no intent to obstruct (although that turned out to be irrelevant). More important, it just seemed like an unfortunate way for a game that had been exciting and well-played to end â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with an umpireâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s interpretation of an obscure rule. No one was really happy about it â&#x20AC;&#x201C; although it could safely be said that the Red Soxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; unhappiness exceeded that of the Cardinals. But since these were professional players with professional umpires and a professional rule book, there was no alternative, no going back. Which is too bad, because if the game had been played by little kids, the outcome would have been much more satisfactory. When little kids play games, as memory serves, a controversial play such as that one would spark an intense argument, but there

Nepean-Barrhaven News !URIGA$RIVE 3UITE /TTAWA /. +%"

613-723-5970 Published weekly by:

CHARLES GORDON Funny Town would be no umpire there makimg a definitive ruling. Therefore, the kids would fall back on a tried-and-tested solution: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take it over,â&#x20AC;? someone would say, and they would all agree on that. The play would be repeated, probably with an outcome that no one could argue about and that would be that. That methodology survives to this day and is not reserved for children. Adult players of games such as tennis will sometimes use it, when there is no agreement on whether a ball was in or out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Play it again,â&#x20AC;? someone will suggest, and they will. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a good solution: the game is won or lost without the bitterness of controversy. And it makes you wonder whether â&#x20AC;&#x153;take it overâ&#x20AC;? might usefully be applied to other aspects of life.

Vice President & Regional Publisher Mike Mount mmount@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 104 Regional General Manager Peter Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Leary poleary@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 112 Group Publisher Duncan Weir dweir@perfprint.ca 613-283-3182, ext. 164 Regional Managing Editor Ryland Coyne rcoyne@perfprint.ca Publisher: Mike Tracy mtracy@perfprint.ca

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

Take the Senate. Please. Suppose Nigel Wright could have said â&#x20AC;&#x153;take it overâ&#x20AC;? after writing Mike Duffy the cheque. That would have been better for him and the prime minister, if not for Mike Duffy. Going back even earlier, the prime minister might have wanted to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;take it overâ&#x20AC;? after making the original appointment of Duffy to the Senate. And going back even further, the Fathers of Confederation might, in retrospect, have wanted to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;take it overâ&#x20AC;? after creating the Senate in the first place. A lot of work has to be done on this concept, no matter how useful it might seem on the surface. How many take-it-overs should any one person be allowed? Under what conditions might â&#x20AC;&#x153;take-it-overâ&#x20AC;? be accepted or rejected? And, inevitably, is â&#x20AC;&#x153;take it overâ&#x20AC;? a federal or provincial responsibility? Further, there is a need for a cultural shift, as people learn to shed their winner-take-all mentality and accept the notion that a defeated or hideously embarrassed person deserves another chance. But once we got over the initial awkwardness, we might be pleasantly surprised at the number of improved results in our day-today living and the life of our governmental

institutions. Now, you have to be careful with this. As readers of Stephen King will know, taking it over does not always produce the best result. In his novel 11/22/63, Kingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s protagonist journeys back in time with the intention of preventing the assassination of John F. Kennedy. Along the way he prevents other small mishaps from happening, and this version of taking it over causes all sorts of unintended calamities. Still, it might be worth the risk if it could prevent the Senate scandal, not to mention the Senate itself, as well as the obstruction call at third base.

Editorial Policy The Nepean-Barrhaven News welcomes letters to the editor. Senders must include their full name, complete address and a contact phone number. Addresses and phone numbers will not be published. We reserve the right to edit letters for space and content, both in print and online at ottawacommunitynews.com. To submit a letter to the editor, please email to patricia.lonergan@metroland.com, fax to 613-2242265 or mail to The Nepean-Barrhaven News, 80 Colonnade Rd. N., Unit 4, Ottawa ON, K2E 7L2.

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OPINION

Connected to your community

Accessibility renovations – Not just for old people

M

ore than two-thirds of Canadian homeowners are expected to renovate this year, according to a poll released by Scotiabank last month. For most, home renovations will account for the largest lump sum of money they’ll ever spend at once. But how much forethought are people putting into remodelling? “People can be pretty cavalier about adding a bathroom, kitchen or addition,” says Moneca Kaiser, the owner of Moneca Kaiser Design Build in Ottawa. “They’re thinking, I want a new kitchen now, but they don’t take time to think about how their family will interact in and with that space for the next 10, 20 or 50 years.” Good design, says Kaiser, is not static. Real design is “flexible, multi-faceted and adaptable.” “People often think of blueprints as design,” says Kaiser. “But a blueprint is just one of the tools in design. You’re going to have a blueprint for what you need right now, and another blueprint for what you may need if your in-laws move in temporarily or if you break your leg.” True design, she says, is fluid and dynamic. Design is living and takes into account the lifecycle and

BRYNNA LESLIE Capital Muse environment of the people living in a space or interacting with an object – and it considers both the present and the future of the space. Kaiser is writing a book called “Curing Dysfunctional House Syndrome.” In it, she outlines her own design program developed over the past two-and-a-half decades as a designer and carpenter, which includes an extensive investigation of the people for which she’s designing. “I start every project by asking people what their values are,” says Kaiser. “I take them through a fourpage exercise to get to the heart of what’s really important to them. If I value family life, that’s going to require a certain kind of kitchen. If, on the other hand, I value efficiency, that’s going to require an entirely different space.” Kaiser delves further into her

clients’ lives, getting to know everything from their state of health and their age, the people around them, who they spend time with, their favourite recipes, even how much money they make. “If I’m doing a kitchen and my client says they have a goal to eat healthier, I’m going to figure out what I can do in that kitchen to make it easier for them to make more salads,” Kaiser explains. And as Canada faces the challenge of an aging population, design becomes ever-more important, particularly in home renovations. Hard built-in components of standard heights that are mass-produced by manufacturers are not going to suffice. On the other hand, says Kaiser, things like cabinets on castors and counters with different elevations

can accommodate the now – say a couple who are different heights – and the future if one day someone needs space and height required to prepare food in a wheelchair, for example. “And if people are thoughtful in design, they may integrate a ledge, just at the right height beside the toilet, that can be used as a grab bar

... regulators and developers also need to be thinking about flex-housing and design on a larger scale

if there’s ever a need,” says Kaiser. “It doesn’t scream convalescence because, as part of the design, it’s almost invisible, yet it’s completely

efficient and effective.” As Ottawa makes efforts toward a city that’s more senior-friendly, regulators and developers also need to be thinking about flex-housing and design on a larger scale. The modern response to urban density seems to be stacked townhomes, where people live on multiple levels. This type of design has replaced the popular horizontal duplex of the last century, where families lived on a single floor, but shared property. But as Kaiser notes, it’s a lot more difficult to think about installing ramps, integrating a main floor powder room with shower floor, or cordoning off a dining room to be used for convalescence if people are living on multiple levels. “People are not taking enough time with design,” says Kaiser. “We pay lip service to it, but design isn’t pretty pictures and blueprints. It requires very deep engagement with the people using it and it has to be flexible.”

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

9


LETTERS

Connected to your community

Drivers need to heed ! % 0 9 o T p U e rules at crossings Sav To the editor,

Re: “Safety changes coming to Transitway crossing,” Oct. 24. That terrible and tragic collision between a Via Train and an OC Transpo bus in Ottawa on Sept. 18 that left six bus passengers dead and 30 injured, many seriously, has raised many questions about the safety of railway crossings not only in Ottawa but across Canada. Let’s put the facts into perspective. Before this country, including this city, embarks on a very costly, panic/politically driven national program, estimated at hundreds of millions of dollars, aimed at improving safety at rail crossings in Canada, lets’s consider the following. As reported by the Canada Safety Council, there were 169 rail/highway crossing crashes in Canada in 2011: 25 people were killed and 21 were seriously injured. It is suspected that some of those killed are suicides. A motorist is 40 times more likely to die in a crash involving a train than in a collision involving another vehicle. Most collisions occur within 40 kilometres of the motorist’s home.

The largest health food chain in the area, Kardish is known for its clean and modern stores with a wide selection of specialty health and bulk foods, gluten-free products, natural health and beauty aids, vitamins, and other natural health supplements. Friendly, knowledgeable team members are available to support customers along their paths to personal health. Kardish has a rich history in Ottawa that dates back to 1979. Kardish owners, Robert and Carey Assaf, grew up in Ottawa and worked alongside their father, Michael, in a Kardish store the family owned back when the chain was run as a franchise. Throughout the years, the two brothers played various roles in the family business, eventually acquiring full ownership of the company in 2010. Since then, they have worked together to grow the company and have opened three new stores across the city. Now with more than 50 employees, a team of dynamic managers, and

To the editor,

centralized operations, Kardish offers the community the perfect blend of family tradition and modern business practices. “Our biggest strength is in the relationships we build within the communities we are a part of. With the growth of Barrhaven, we see an amazing opportunity to provide the best natural health products growing families can get.” says Kardish owner Robert Assaf. “Carey and I are blessed to have a great team around us and we are all having a blast growing the business to expand into growing communities like Barrhaven.” Store Manager and Registered Holistic Nutritionist Jennifer Kane is a Barrhaven native who has been working with Kardish for more than two years. She looks forward to playing a part in helping her own neighbourhood become informed about healthier alternatives and she invites anyone who has never (or ever) set foot in a health food store to come in for a visit.

Re: Brynna Leslie’s “Throne speech short on substance,” Oct. 24. This delightful columnist should stay away from politico-economic commentary, which obviously isn’t her forte. She sneers at the throne speech for addressing consumer issues like cable bundling and cellphone fees. These matter to a lot of people. My wife and I wanted to order Treehouse for our 10-year-old son and had to buy a lot of stations we would never watch to get it. Roaming charges are likely to be an issue now my wife and son are Canadian

citizens and will be able to travel in the U.S. without a visa. Bizarrely, Leslie completely ignores the trade agreement between Canada and the European Union. When she writes about job creation under the Conservative government she becomes delusional: “… most of the jobs created in Canada over the last five years have been low-paying, part-time positions.” In fact, of the 653,000 jobs created between September 2008 and September 2013 (raw estimates), 506,000 were full-time. Andrew Baldwin Ottawa

“Our stores are for everyone – those with special dietary needs; those looking for better choices for their families; and those who simply have a question about a product they saw on TV. We are here to help!”

Crestway Dr

ve eA roff

od Wo

herd

Emile Therien public health and safety advocate Ottawa

Keep away from politics

Barrhaven welcomes first health food store! Residents of Barrhaven and Manotick now have healthy choices closer to home as Kardish Health Food Centre opens its newest location at the corner of Strandherd Drive and Woodroffe Avenue. The new store, which opened October 21, is the seventh location for this local, family-owned health food chain.

The principle cause of level crossing collisions is the failure of the motorist to stop or exercise due care and caution, or to observe and comply with existing laws and regulations. Roughly, 50 per cent of all rail/highway crossing crashes occur at crossings equipped with flashing lights and bell, or flashing lights, bell or gate. If there is a problem at that crossing in Barrhaven, it will not be fixed solely by the “quick fix” measures announced by the city. One would think these measures – removing and trimming vegetation around that crossing, installing warning lights – would have already been in place. Why they were not begs scrutiny! Most of the collisions at railway crossings in this country can be reduced by driver behavior combined with enforcement and common sense, and at very modest costs. In the grand scheme of things, should this approach not be considered? If not, why not?

Dr

nd Stra

Barrhaven 3101 Strandherd Drive, Ottawa, ON K2G 4R9

10

613.224.1414

Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Conditions apply. Contest draw December 29th, 2013. No purchase necessary. Contest rules and regulations available on our website and at reception. All guests must be over the age of 19 with valid, government issued, photo identification to enter the SLOTS & Dining Room. Everyone between 19 and 25 will be required to also show a second piece of non-photo ID. Exception: Sundays 11am - 10pm and Thursdays, 5pm - 10pm; the family entrance is located on the south side of the building.

R0012396955_1107


NEWS

Connected to your community

Richcraft rec complex to open Dec. 5 Winter program guide released Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

News - The newly built Richcraft Recreation Complex is slated to have its grand opening on Dec. 5. The state-of-the-art facility, located at 4101 Innovation Dr., will have a soft opening for the month of December, so people have time to try about the facilities, classes and pool, said Chantal Laporte, recreation portfolio manager. Programming will start in January. “You get to see what’s offered,” she said of the December opening date, adding staff are planning to move in the last week of October. “Right now I have to say that it’s looking very good.” A winter program guide has been released, but it’s “a living document,” said Laporte, adding programs and classes may be added or changed depending on public demand. “Fitness classes evolve constantly,” she said, adding “You will see that there’s programming for all age groups.” The $43.14-million recreation complex will serve residents of north Kanata and West Carleton with an eight-lane, 25-metre swimming pool, two gymnasiums, a fitness centre, a community room, outdoor skateboard park, basketball fields and a lighted artificial turf soccer pitch. Preschool-age programs include: • Pre-ballet • Ball hockey • Baby singing time • Crafty Chefs Children and youth programs include: • Badminton • Basketball basics • Mini triathlon training • Cheerleading Adult programs include: • Bootcamp training • Pilates • Yoga “The complex … has, and I know a lot of people are excited about that, a large pool,” said Laporte. “We have more time for people to swim laps and exercise.” Once a week, the centre will also offer a women’s only swim. Memberships to the facility are also transferable to any other city-run centre, and several different packages are available. Kanata North Coun. Marianne Wilkinson said there is a youth room in the centre and she plans to get local teens involved in deciding what the centre offers.

“We’re going to get some of the youth from the high schools to design the programs,” she said. “It gives them a real ownership.” She added that the complex’s outdoor facilities, such as the skate park and children’s play area, will be open before the building’s grand opening. The complex is being built to LEED gold certification standards for energy efficiency and sustainability. Laporte said feedback from the public is welcome and will help the recreation centre shape its classes and programs. “Do not hesitate to provide it,” she

said. “They want to know what you want. It’s not about us, it’s about you. It sounds cheesy but it’s true. “The more you tell us what you want, the more we modify the schedule.” FUNDRAISERS

Kanata Race Day, a fundraiser for the centre, will be held on Nov. 3, with the one- and fivekilometre races starting at the new recreation complex. “We’re going to be able to use a corner of the building where there’s washrooms and a meet-

ing room,” said Wilkinson. Participants will run through the woods and Goulbourn Forced Road will be closed for a portion of the day for the event, said Wilkinson. Runners will also receive a voucher for a onetime visit to the pool or fitness centre. Time capsules are still being sold as well, said the councillor. The vault, which will be opened in 50 years, won’t be sealed until all the capsules are sold. For more information, visit Ottawa.ca/richcraft.

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Santa Hours November 16 - December 23, 2013 Monday to Friday 4:30pm - 7:30pm Saturday 11:00am-1:00pm 2:00pm - 4:00pm Sunday 1:00pm - 4:00pm

Mall Hours in December Monday to Friday 9:00am - 9:00pm Saturday 9:00am - 6:00pm Sunday 10:00am - 5:00pm

CHRISTMAS EVE 9:00am - 5:00pm CHRISTMAS DAY MALL CLOSED BOXING DAY 9:00am - 5:00pm NEW YEAR’S EVE 9:00am - 5:00pm NEW YEAR’S DAY MALL CLOSED

Your neighbourhood mall that has it all! All guests must be 19 with valid, gov’t issued, photo ID; 19-25 will need 2 pieces of ID. Exception Sunday 11 am-10 pm & Thursday 5-10 pm; Family Entrance on south side.

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1642 Merivale Road Ottawa l 613-226-1290 l www.merivalemall.ca R0022394022-1107

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Connected to your community

Councillor Comments By Jan Harder

NEVIL HUNT/METROLAND

Ready for kickoff The first Ottawa RedBlacks season ticket holders have picked their seats for the team’s inaugural CFL season at the team’s new preview centre on Ogilvie Road. From left, Susan, Patrick and John Heward try out the brand new seats at the centre on Oct. 29. The countdown to kickoff stands at 242 days as of Oct. 31.

In mid-October, Mayor Jim Watson and a delegation of more than 40 people representing Ottawa’s tourism, academic and economic-investment sectors took part in the City’s largest-ever mission to China, visiting our sister city Beijing and Shanghai at the invitation of the consul general. The 10-day mission featured meetings, promotional forums and business tours that showcased Ottawa as a dynamic, multicultural city for investment, education and tourism, and provided participating businesses and organizations the opportunity to interface with potential clients, sector partners and investors. While we normally think of Canada purchasing goods from China, it’s important to note that China is an emerging market in today’s global-based economy and there are many reciprocal business opportunities for both businesses in Beijing and businesses in Ottawa. Discussion points for the panels included: how Ottawa’s strengths can meet China’s growing demands for higher-quality services; establishing a research and development centre in Canada; connecting innovation with broader social trends; commercializing Canadian innovation and technologies through Chinese investments and markets; market opportunities for Canadian innovation; successes in Canada-China technological collaboration; and Ottawa’s strengths in innovation support, outbound foreign direct investment, overseas education, outbound tourism and professional services. The mission was successful and even included a SoftLanding Agreement signing between Mr. Lazenby, who represented Invest Ottawa, and Jianwei Health Products. The foreign direct investment agreement formalizes the establishment of Jianwei’s North American office at Invest Ottawa’s Aberdeen Street offices. The Invest Ottawa soft-landing program provides foreign businesses with guidance and support during the site-selection process as they evaluate Ottawa as a potential market. The University of Ottawa and Carleton University are also signing agreements in China. These signings are in addition to agreements and memoranda of understand signed by Mayor Watson, Mr. Buckley, who represented Ottawa Tourism, and Invest Ottawa incubation companies iNano Medical, JP Canshielding, Viscore and GREENERGY. Finally, it is very exciting to say that Mayor Jim Watson signed an Exchange and Co-operation Agreement with Beijing at a meeting with Beijing Mayor Wang Anshun. While Mayor Watson first signed Ottawa’s sister city agreement in 1999, this stronger agreement establishes key common goals in business, trade, investment, culture, education, tourism and municipal administration. The agreement states that both cities will support local companies to invest and start businesses in each other’s cities, as well as work to strengthen trade and investment cooperation in the high-tech industry. Through the exchange and co-operation agreement, Beijing will: work with Ottawa Tourism to establish a platform for a business and government tourism think tank to jointly develop the business tourism market; support Ottawa’s application to host the 2017 World Tourism Cities Federation Beijing Fragrant Hills Tourism Summit; invite and support Ottawa’s participation in events such as the China (Beijing) International Service Trade Show, the China Beijing International Science and Technology Industrial Expo and the China Beijing International Cultural and Creative Industry Expo; send a folk music performing group to participate in the 2014 Music and Beyond Festival in Ottawa; invite twenty middle and high school students from Ottawa to participate in the Beijing International Students Summer Camp in July 2014; invite Ottawa to attend the Beijing International Friendship Cities Chinese Language Teachers’ Training Class; and Ottawa and Beijing will also participate in various exchange programs for artists, cultural professionals, public servants, and elementary and secondary school students and teachers. http://www.janharder.com

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As always, I welcome your feedback. Contact me at jan.harder@ottawa.ca or 613-580-2473, and visit my webpage at www.janharder.com. Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

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Rebecca Stanisic of a Little Bit of Momsense and Jody Mitic, contestant on the Amazing Race Canada, mingle at United Way Ottawa’s annual Schmoozefest on Oct. 30. This year’s fundraiser recipient was the Lunch Box program, which provides children and young people in the community living in shelters and community health centres with the resources, materials and knowledge to make healthy lunches with their families to ensure healthy development and success in both school and life.

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NEWS

Connected to your community

CHEO taking the ouch out of flu immunizations sabine.gibbins@metroland.com

News – Babies can say goodbye to the “ouch” when it comes to getting their flu vaccine. CHEO recently launched a new program called Be Sweet to Babies, aimed at helping parents find way to reduce the pain when it comes to immunizations. The research team behind the project is lead by Dr. Denise Harrison, chair in nursing care of children, youth and families at CHEO and University of Ottawa. The group put together a YouTube video which demonstrates ways for parents to help alleviate the immunization pain. As many moms and dads can tell, said Harrison, immunizations can be painful for infants and distressing for parents, but it doesn’t have to be. Through breastfeeding or offering their infant sugarwater, the pinch of the needle is not even felt. “This is something we all need to consider doing from a parent’s perspective,” she said. But, she added, the majority of parents or doctors are not made aware of these simple and effective ways to reduce the pain. Research shows that breastfeeding babies or giving them sugar water (also known as sucrose), as well as holding them upright in a secure front to front position, effectively reduces pain during immunizations. “Sugar water is also given to young mammals,” said Harrison. “It increases their endorphins. Sugar water works well for babies up to one year of age, she said. While breastfeeding and sugar water work best for babies, upright front-front holding and distraction work for young children as well while they’re given immunizations, she added. However, these strategies are rarely used by health care providers and parents. There are hundreds of videos currently on YouTube of babies being injected; however, proven pain reduction techniques are rarely used.

“Some nurses and doctors don’t even know about this, which is why we are trying to show the video to as many people as possible,” she said. CHEO’s Be Sweet to Babies research team carried out a review of 142 of the videos. “We noticed almost all of the babies cried before or during their injections, with some crying solidly for over two minutes after the injections,” said Dr. Harrison. “No videos showed breastfeeding or use of sugar water during the injections and only four babies were held in a front-front position.” As a result of their findings, CHEO’s Be Sweet to Babies research team decided to post their own video on YouTube demonstrating effective pain reduction techniques being put into practice. The goal of the project is to help parents and care providers to find better ways of managing children’s pain during vaccinations. “It’s mind-blowing how these simple distractions can help them,” Harrison said. “It really does give them comfort.” The team will monitor the number of hits, comments, likes and dislikes the video receives over the next 12 months. It will also monitor all newly posted videos to see whether effective pain reduction strategies are starting to be implemented as a result. “At CHEO, we believe in using evidence-driven health care to ensure the best outcomes for our children, youth and families,” said Harrison. “We hope this project will change standard practices for giving shots, therefore reducing tears and fears during injections now and in the future.” In addition to the YouTube videos, CHEO, in partnership with Ottawa Public Health, has developed and disseminated immunization pain fact sheets. These fact sheets have easy-to-follow advice on how to reduce pain during injections for babies, children and teens. For more information about Harrison and her research, visit www.cheori.org and click the link on the right-hand side of the page.



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Connected to your community

‘The older woman is the most vulnerable of us’ When it comes to leaving an abusive relationship, those over 60 face increased barriers Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

News - November is Woman Abuse Prevention Month and the Western Ottawa Community Resource Centre is helping by providing options and a support system for women and children who experience violence. Violence against women can take many forms: physical, sexual, psychological, verbal and financial. It’s not limited to a specific culture, income level or community where people live, said Vivienne, a peer support worker at the resource centre who preferred not to use her last name. “They come from all walks of life; it impacts everyone,” she said. “It’s surprising to some to learn that.” According to a document recently released by the resource centre:

• Six per cent of Ontario women living in a common-law or marital relationship report experiencing physical or sexual assault by their partner. • Less than 25 per cent of victims of spousal violence report the incident to the police. • Spousal violence is most prevalent among 25- to 34-year-olds. • Eighty-three per cent of victims of spousal violence are women. Sandy, a peer support worker at the resource centre who preferred not to use her last name, said the statistics on violence against women are alarming. “One in three women will experience sexual abuse; for disabled women, it’s 85 per cent,” she said. Metroland Media is publishing articles throughout November on

various aspects of violence against women. The first installment focuses on older women and the barriers they face when deciding to leave an abusive relationship. INCREASED BARRIERS

There are a number of barriers women who experience abuse face when making the decision to leave an unhealthy relationship, said Vivienne. Some of the reasons highlighted in the resource centre’s Handbook on Abuse include: • Fear: abused women are in the most danger when they try to escape. • Lack of economic resources: many women in an abusive relationship have no control over their

finances. They fear they may not be able to provide for themselves or their children if they leave. • Isolation: many abusers isolate their partners from family and friends, leaving abused women with no support system. • Societal denial: abused women feel no one will believe their partner is capable of violence. • For the children: some women stay in unhealthy relationships because they believe it’s better for their children to have a father, even if he’s abusive. • New Canadians: they may not speak the language or feel their cultural community isn’t supportive of them leaving their partner. As women age, they face even more barriers when it comes to leaving an abusive relationship, said

Sandy. “If they’re married for 40, 50, 60 years, how do you leave that person?” she asked. “The older woman is the most vulnerable of us,” said Vivienne. “It’s the old school way of thinking, ‘I don’t want people to know.’ There’s a huge stigma attached.” Older women may have tried to leave their abusive partner in the past only to have an authority figure tell her to work it out behind closed doors. “Because of the way the systems were in the past, a woman was told to go home and fix the marriage,” said Sandy. She’s had clients who were told by their priests that they weren’t See Abuse, page 20

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Abuse is a learned behaviour: peer support worker Continued from page 19

allowed to leave the marriage because they made a vow to God and others who contacted police to report abuse against themselves and their children. The answer at the time was to remove the abused children â&#x20AC;&#x201C; but if there were others who hadnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been touched they remained in the home. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She felt she had to stay to protect those other children,â&#x20AC;? Sandy said. Because there were little to no support systems in place in the past for abused women, many older victims who initially tried to get help fear the same lack of response and so remain with their abusive spouse, she said. Compounding the past lack of supports, as children age they can become part of the problem. Abuse is a learned behaviour, said Sandy, and adult children can use emotional blackmail to keep their mother in the

relationship. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Adult children) can both pressure the mom to stay in the marriage, as well as they can perpetuate the abuse because theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve learned it,â&#x20AC;? she said, adding subsequent generations can also play a factor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women are afraid theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to lose contact with the grandchildren.â&#x20AC;? Health issues may also play a role as women and their abusers age. Women may not have access to a health plan because her partner controls the benefits. Vivienne said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen cases where the partner threatens his spouse by withholding medication or benefits. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Abusive characters tend to get worse with age,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve hidden medication. They do things deliberately to get a kick out of it.â&#x20AC;? She said sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s seen other cases where the abuser may be ill and the woman feels guilty if she leaves him.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;No matter how heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s treated her, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a huge issue to ask a woman to walk away from the role,â&#x20AC;? Vivienne said about being a caregiver.

She said she may only have a few years left but she was going to live them in peace. SANDY, PEER SUPPORT WORKER

In line with financial abuse and the barrier of limited economic resources, an older woman may feel itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s too late for her to find work to support herself if she leaves her husband. â&#x20AC;&#x153;These are additional barriers for older women,â&#x20AC;? said Vivienne. But supports have changed â&#x20AC;&#x201C; there

are new resources available to help women leave a violent or abusive partner, no matter how long theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been in a relationship. Vivienne recalled helping an 87year-old woman break free from her abusive partner. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If an 87-year-old can do it, then itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible for anyone over 65 to take that step,â&#x20AC;? she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s just that first step thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the hardest.â&#x20AC;? The Western Ottawa Community Resource Centre has a large violence against women program that helps women living in Kanata, Goulbourn, West Carleton, Rideau, Nepean, Osgoode and Bay wards. The program offers peer support, individual and group counselling services, transitional housing, referrals and resources. The resource centre also runs Chrysalis House, a secure 25-bed shelter in the city for women and children fleeing an abusive home.

Counsellors and peer support workers wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ask or tell women who call to leave their situations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; that is up to them to decide. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We just give options,â&#x20AC;? said Vivienne. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phoning here, just breaking the silence is the biggest thing,â&#x20AC;? said Sandy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Women, often they donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t tell anybody at all because they think people will look at them badly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The shame that women carry, it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t belong to them; it belongs to their abusive partner. And there is help to empower her, not to make her dependent again; help to establish her own life,â&#x20AC;? she added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The same messages are not there now that were there 50 years ago.â&#x20AC;? And itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never too late to get help. Sandy said a client in her late 70s expressed it the best. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She said she may only have a few years left but she was going to live them in peace.â&#x20AC;?

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s never too late to get help An abused woman is most as risk when sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaving her partner, said Vivienne, a peer support worker at the Western Ottawa Community Resource Centre. But there are ways to minimize the risk. If planning to leave, women should decide where they can go that is safe. This could be a shelter, or a family member or friendâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s house. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s very scary for a woman,â&#x20AC;? said Vivienne, about making the decision to leave. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It takes great courage.â&#x20AC;? If a womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal safety or that of her children is at risk when sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leaving â&#x20AC;&#x201C; call 911 immediately, said Vivienne.

  

   

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CONTACTS

There are a number of resources available for women and children who want to leave an abusive household or want more information: â&#x20AC;˘ Western Ottawa Community Resource Centre: 613-591-3686 â&#x20AC;˘ 24-hour crisis line for Chrysalis House: 613-591-5901 â&#x20AC;˘ 24-hour Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Crisis Line: 613-745-4818 â&#x20AC;˘ Femaide assaulted womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s help line: 1-877-336-2433 â&#x20AC;˘ Ottawa police partner assault line: 613-236-1222 ext. 5407 More resources and information is available at wocrc.ca.


NEWS

Connected to your community

Science and tech museum inducts three new members Pioneers in technology, radiation therapy and cancer research Michelle Nash michelle.nash@metroland.com

News - Three pioneers of science are the most recent inductees to the Canadian Science and Engineering Hall of Fame. Part of the National Science and Technology week activities, the Canada Science and Technology Museum announced it was inducting Arthur Porter, Sylvia Fedoruk and M. Vera Peters into the museum’s hall of fame. Porter (1910-2010) has been named a pioneer in the field of computers, building one of the world’s first analog computers in the early 1930s. He has also been credited with leading biomedical research programs in Canada. Fedoruk (1927-2012) was part of a team that helped develop the Cobalt-60 cancer therapy unit, which according to the museum, has helped millions of people. The therapy unit became the international standard for cancer treatments. Fedoruk also created one of the first nuclear scanners in the world, which helped to detect both liver and thyroid cancer. In 1998, Fedoruk, served as lieutenant-governor of Saskatchewan after leaving her position as chancellor of the University of Saskatchewan. She was the first woman to hold both of these positions. Fedoruk is also a member of the Canadian Curling Hall of Fame. Peters (1911-1993) early research involved finding a cure for Hodgkin’s disease, which was at the time considered impossible, and her breast cancer research in the late 1950s demonstrated that a lumpectomy with radiation therapy is just as effective as a mastectomy - this method has

SUBMITTED

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M. Vera Peters early research involved finding a cure for Hodgkin’s disease, which was at the time considered impossible.

Scientist and researcher, Sylvia Fedoruk, served as Lieutenant Governor of Saskatchewan.

A pioneer of technology, Arthur Porter is credited with developing one of the world’s first analog computers.

now become the norm in treating breast cancer. A partnership with the National Research Council of Canada, Industry Canada and the Association of Partners in Education, the museum established the hall of fame in 1991 to mark the council’s 75th anniversary.

There are currently 57 members inducted into the hall of fame, including Alexander Graham Bell, J. Armand Bombardier and Sir Sandford Fleming. The hall is part of the museum’s Innovation Canada exhibition. Anyone can nominate a per-

son or an organization that has made exceptional contributions to the fields of science or engineering. The museum welcomes new inductees each year and more information about the hall and the museum is available at sciencetech.technomuses.ca.

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Ontario’s Power Struggle Part 2: The need to grow the economy amid growing electricity rates Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

News – Five years after the onset of the economic downturn, Ontario’s economy is struggling to retain the status – and job numbers - it once boasted as Canada’s economic powerhouse. Since 2008, Ontario’s economy has been battered, with an unemployment rate of 7.5 per cent in the third quarter of 2013 and annual gross domestic product increases of 1.8 and 1.4 per cent in 2011 and 2012 respectively, according to Statistics Canada. By comparison, Alberta’s GDP rose 5.4 per cent in 2011 and 3.9 per cent in 2012, while Saskatchewan’as rose 5.5 and 2.2 per cent in the corresponding two years. With an economic growth rate lower than the national average and an unemployment rate higher than the national average – coupled with a still-increasing debt of $260 billion – Ontario’s economic situation is far from rosy. Turning this situation around will require a combination of increased investment and maintenance of existing employment levels. One factor that can have a sizeable effect on a company’s financial viability or decision to set up shop in Ontario is energy rates. With another rate hike planned for Nov. 1, Ontario’s electricity rates have risen dramatically over the last five years. Renewal of grid components, the addition of heavily subsidized renewable energy such as wind and solar power, backed up by new gas generators to provide grid stability have all played a role in driving hydro rates up for not just consumers, but businesses as well. Ontario Energy Minister Bob Chiarelli has stated the province made some strategic alterations on the energy file and related contracts to mitigate those increases, adding the province was “starting to turn the corner” on rising rates. Chiarelli would not, however, discuss when rates might stop their upward climb, preferring to wait until the province’s long-term energy plan is released later this year. Keeping existing jobs, especially the manufacturing jobs that long served as the backbone of Ontario’s economy, has been a challenge, with companies drawn to lower labour costs in the United States. Taxation and energy rates are the other big considerations for industry. In Canada, Quebec and Manitoba boast significantly lower energy rates than Ontario, with rate decreases actually reported in Quebec in

STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

The Port Alma Wind Farm in Chathan-Kent, Ont., contains 44 wind turbines, capable of producing an output of 101 megawatts. The site went online in 2008. High rates paid to wind producers is one of the reasons behindthe skyrocketing electricity rates in Ontario. 2011 and 2012 due to surplus power. Ontario also has periodic power surpluses, which the Independent Electrical System Operator - the crown corporation that runs Ontario’s power grid - sometimes sells to neighbouring jurisdictions below cost, a situation that has a negative impact on ratepayers. Like the manufacturing industry, the northern Ontario mining industry has traditionally played a large role in the province’s economic fortunes, putting places like Sudbury and its iconic big nickel on the map. Earlier in October, a North Bay newspaper published an article on the increase of heavy truck traffic on Highway 11 north of the city. The trucks are carrying mine concentrates from the Sudbury area to Noranda, Que., for refining. Mining is an industry prone to boom and bust cycles that create uncertainty for individuals and whole regions. But, it can be very profitable over a sustained period, and the province – tasked with wrestling down a deficit first and a debt later - would like to see mining thrive. The much-talked about Ring of Fire deposit in the James Bay Lowlands of northern Ontario has the potential for mass extraction of a num-

ber of valuable metals, the most lucrative being chromite -- a key ingredient in stainless steel. Currently the project is still in its infancy, with a lack of either rail or road access to the remote

area and two key land holders locked in a legal battle over the one access route. If extracted, the chromite contained within the Ring of Fire would be transported to a smelter in Sudbury for processing under a plan mapped out by the Liberal government. The largest land-holder in the Ring of Fire – U.S.-based Cliffs Natural Resources – is now threatening to pull the plug on the project if it can’t get the all-weather road it wants, which would threaten the Sudbury smelter and the economic benefit such an operation would bring. Energy comes into the equation when one factors in the huge amount of electricity needed to run a smelter. With Ontario’s rates already higher than Quebec’s and rising, the worry is that some of the economic benefit from the Ring of Fire could bypass Ontario for refining in another jurisdiction, such as the province next door. One bill-reducing energy incentive listed by Chiarelli is the Northern Industrial Rate Program, which provides a rebate approximately equal to a 25 per cent reduction in bills for the largest consumers, such as smelters. Depending on how much Ontario’s hydro rates rise, that could soon be not enough to entice business of that size to set up shop in Ontario. Questions also remain in the northern business community about the power needed to serve the Ring of Fire area, and whether there See LOCAL, page 24

It is our honour to recognize your valour

Public Meetings All public meetings will be held at Ottawa City Hall, 110 Laurier Avenue West, unless otherwise noted. For a complete agenda and updates, please sign up for e-mail alerts or visit Public Meetings and Notices on ottawa.ca, or call 3-1-1.

Tuesday, November 12 Planning Committee 9:30 a.m., Champlain Room

Thursday, November 14 Built Heritage Sub-Committee 9:30 a.m., Champlain Room

Wednesday, November 13 City Council Meeting 10:00 a.m., Andrew S. Haydon Hall

Friday, November 15 Transportation Committee – Special Meeting 9:30 a.m., Andrew S. Haydon Hall

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23


NEWS

Connected to your community

Local business owner talks about impact of rising rates Continued from page 23

will be enough when and if the area comes alive. The Thunder Bay Generating Station, which traditionally provided excess power to the region, is currently idled after its conversion from coal to natural gas was stopped, with no official word yet on its eventual fate. Chiarelli stated that despite the status of the Thunder Bay plant, “we’ve given (the region) complete assurance in principle that they will have power when they need it.” A number of solutions being worked on in northwestern Ontario, said Chiarelli, including new transmission lines from Wawa, new generation planned for the Dryden area, and the restarting of the converted Atikokan Generating Station, located about 200 kilometres west of Thunder Bay. Mining and manufacturing are but one part of the economic story in Ontario. Serving smaller areas and moving smaller amounts of product, small and medium-sized businesses are numerous and employ many. Businesses that use less than 250,000 kilowatt hours of power a year are billed for their energy consumption no different than residents. STORE

Ottawa businessman Jim Sourges finds himself in a difficult situation, as his stock-and-trade is the very appliances and fixtures that consume that pricey electricity. As owner of the Electrical & Plumbing Store’s two Ottawa locations, Sourges knows all too well the impact of rising hydro rates and has little recourse in stemming the rising tide of energy bills. He’s replaced all of the bulbs in his showrooms with compact fluorescent lightbulbs and has darkened the chandelier showcase as much as possible, but a storefront business that has to be open during peak hours can’t do much to mitigate costs before staff or the customers become affected. “Hydro rates have continued to climb over time, especially with time-of-use billing,” said Sourges, whose father founded the store’s origi-

nal Ogilvie Road location 32 years ago. “With us, given that we can’t control timeof-use or our hours of operation we can’t do all of the (conservation tips) the government proposes. We signed a fixed-rate contract, but we’re probably paying the same as if it were time-ofuse.” Signing a contract with a third-party energy retailer is the single, only option for small business owners in areas where time-of-use rates are in effect, and the savings are minimal. Being in the business for so long, Sourges knows that eventually his business and others like it will be forced to pass the cost of the power bill on to customers. Some current business owners in his line of work could easily be swayed into storing merchandise in a darkened warehouse and handling sales through a website, thus eliminating staff members. “There are ramifications to rising hydro rates that aren’t as obvious as saying ‘I’m going to have to pay a few hundred a month more,’” said Sourges. “If you’re a manufacturer and your location isn’t important, if you find a place that costs 20 per cent less, you go there. If you’re serving a local market you might have to change your type of operation, fire a few staff or increase the cost to the buyer. Ultimately the customer pays in the end - it doesn’t matter what type of business. No one likes to hear that, but that’s the reality.” For his Northside Road location in Bells Corners, Sourges estimates his electricity costs have risen by $1,500 a month in the past five years. Sourges, who serves as chair of the board of the Bells Corners Business Improvement Area, said the small- and medium-sized business that make up a community could use some form of relief. He stressed that he understood the need for regular grid improvements and maintenance, and knows such work isn’t cost neutral, but did say that businesses need to be able to stay competitive in the marketplace. Without this, businesses both large and small will suffer, harming both the economy and the province’s future. “In most business, when you buy in bulk, you get a deal. With a regulated monopoly like

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hydro, it doesn’t work that way. At a minimum, larger power users should be able to deal with lower than existing kilowatt hour rates.” Despite continued sluggish, marginal growth in the province’s economy, there has been little word from Premier Kathleen Wynne on how the provincial government plans to turn the situa-

There are ramifications to rising hydro rates that aren’t as obvious as saying ‘I’m going to have to pay a few hundred a month more.’ JIM SOURGES

tion around. That could change after Finance Minister Charles Sousa delivers his fall economic statement, scheduled for Nov. 7. In his previous statement from May of this year, Sousa said the province is on track to eliminate the budget deficit -- pegged at $11.7 billion for 2013-14 -- by the 2017-18 fiscal year. During that time, however, the province’s debt is expected to rise, hitting $303.9 billion in 201516, according to the 2013 Ontario budget. These forecasts could change, especially if economic growth projections aren’t realized. It remains to be seen what changes will be found in the province’s long-term energy plan, the contents of which also have a bearing on the economic future of the province. The recent announcement that Ontario would not be moving forward with a planned build of new nuclear generators -- instead relying on a refurbishment of existing reactors -- is an indication the Liberal government might be recognizing the potential economic impact of rising rates. Changes made earlier this year to the FIT program (under which wind and solar generation are managed and paid for) and the contract with Green Energy Act partner Sam-

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

sung reinforce this notion. The early estimates of long-term rate increases needed to accommodate grid improvements and the rollout of the act were seriously underestimated. As well, the projected power needs for the province in the near future were overestimated. The Independent Electrical System Operator projects a 0.5 per cent decline in energy demand in 2013, and a 0.1 per cent decline in 2014, a situation that was not envisioned at the end of the last decade. The opposition Progressive Conservatives and New Democratic Party, as well as the Green party of Ontario, have all criticized elements of the Green Energy Act, while the province’s auditor general slammed the Liberals in the wake of the 2011 election for not performing a cost analysis of the act before moving forward with it. A report published in June of this year, however, sheds some light on where rates could go in the near future. “Ontario Electricity Options Comparison: Illustrating the Economics of Ontario Energy Supply Options” is a report by Strategic Policy Economics that was commissioned by the Power Worker’s Union, which representing Ontario Hydro workers. The paper sought to explore the electricity rate impact and overall economic impact of policies stemming from the previous long term energy plan, giving two projections going forward – one where investments in nuclear generation are continued while investments in wind energy are curtailed and the other where nuclear investments curtailed and wind energy targets laid out in the Green Energy Act are continued. COSTS

“Many arguments support that high costs will arise and other arguments suggest that cost growth will be moderate,” the report states, referring to assumptions based on the 2010 long term energy plan. “As such, the costs portrayed have varied significantly and no discovered publicly available source appears to be definitive on the topic of total systems cost.” Stating that its estimates are accurate to between two and three per cent, the report determined that under the 2010 plan, the average residential electricity bill would rise by 52 per cent between 2011 and 2017 (prior to the addition of the 10 per cent Ontario Clean Energy Benefit), leading to household monthly bills of $865 (for consumption of 800 kWh/month) once the benefit is removed in January 2016. Between 2011 and 2024, residential rates would rise by 75 per cent. Under the same plan, industrial rate impacts would increase 34 per cent between 2012 and 2017, tripling the gap that already exists between Ontario rates and the U.S. average. This figure would rise by 87 per cent between 2012 and 2024. The report found that the bulk of the increases between now and 2017 stemmed from investments in renewable energy generation. To what degree recent changes made to the energy file have changed these projections is unknown, but the study’s findings casts some doubt on Chiarelli’s assertion that the province is starting to “turn the corner” on rate increases. As for the economic projections based on wind and/or nuclear investments, the report takes a longer view, looking ahead to 2035 when wind installations procured under the Green Energy Act will have reached the end of their lives. See OPPOSITION, page 25


NEWS

Connected to your community

Opposition criticizes Green Energy Act Continued from page 24

The study found that by retaining investments in nuclear while reducing investments in wind generation, Ontario stood to receive $56 billion in direct benefits to its economy - $27 billion in savings to ratepayers and $29 billion in direct investment. “By contrast, reducing the nuclear footprint in favour of the retained wind scenario would result in increased costs for electricity ratepayers, lower investment in Ontario’s economy and would increase GHG emissions,” the report states. A retained wind scenario would also see 313 million tonnes of GHG emissions between 2014 and 2035, instead of the 206 million tonnes under a reduced wind, heightened nuclear scenario. For a plan that was introduced as being the saviour of the environment while being easy on

By contrast, reducing the nuclear footprint in favour of the retained wind scenario would result in increased costs for electricity ratepayers, lower investment in Ontario’s economy and would increase GHG emissions. ONTARIO ELECTRICITY OPTIONS COMPARISION

wallets, the Green Energy Act has proven to be something far different. And, while the economy struggles for momentum, it is clear the province’s focus needs to recognize all factors that can impact the economy, including energy.

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Help children and youth create lifelong connections The focus of the Children’s Aid Society of Ottawa (CASO) is child safety. We work in collaboration with families and community partners to resolve any concerns or struggles parents may be faced with. We provide the family with support to ensure children and youth receive safe and nurturing care, while staying at home. If a child does come into care, CASO continues to provide support so that the family, if possible, can be reunited. When a child comes into the permanent care of the Society, a permanency plan is created. This plan may include living with kin, legal custody, or adoption. Customary care is also an option for First Nation, Inuit and Métis children, which allows a child to live with a caregiver identified by the child’s community.

MARC LABREQUE

Singing for a cure For the seventh year in a row, local singer-songwriters gather for Babes4Breasts, a fundraiser for the Ottawa Regional Cancer Foundation’s music therapy program and the Maplesoft Centre for Cancer Survivorship Care. The concert took place at Southminster United Church on Oct. 24 and featured local artists Amanda Rheaume, Matthew Barber, James Keelaghan, Ana Miura and Lyndell Montgomery.

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Dickinson House honours local war efforts Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

News - Manotick’s role in Canada’s great wars will come alive at the Dickinson House this November. The Rideau Township Historical Society presents a special exhibit between Nov. 9 and 11 chronicling the Dickinson House in times of war. The exhibit follows Manotick’s contributions through the First World War, Second World War and the Korean War, personi-

fied through First World War soldier Hubert Stamp, who died in battle, and the five Spratt siblings who all served in the 1940s. “We’re hoping people will take away the examples of the types of contributions that local families made,” said Maureen McPhee, chairperson of the Dickinson House committee. The exhibit begins in the First World War. The parlour will be set up as though the ladies of the Manotick Women’s Institute have See CONTENTS, page 28

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Actress part of new Cronenberg project Emma Jackson emma.jackson@metroland.com

Arts â&#x20AC;&#x201C; At only 19, Greely actress Stephanie La Rochelle has entered the weird and warped world of Canadian ďŹ lmmaker David Cronenberg. La Rochelle, who made national headlines

Contents of pockets on display Continued from page 27

as a ďŹ nalist on CBCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Over the Rainbow competition to ďŹ nd Canadaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s best Dorothy last year, has left Greely for greener pastures â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Toronto â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and has now landed herself a role in Cronenbergâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s latest futuristic project. The concept, called Body/Mind/Change, See MULTIMEDIA, page 29

just left the room: half-ďŹ nished knit socks and scarves will be strewn about, and nightshirts will be under construction at the vintage sewing machines. McPhee said the womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s institute spent much of the First World War sewing and knitting to make care packages for local boys ďŹ ghting overseas. Along with the necessities to keep soldiers warm in the trenches, the women also sent Christmas stockings and other treats to help morale, McPhee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to set up the room as if the women had just stood up and walked away,â&#x20AC;? she said. MEMORABILIA

Alongside the knitting party, McPhee and her team have pulled together information and memorabilia belonging to Hubert Stamp, a local soldier who would have received some of these packages. Money from his pocket, letters and other clues to this soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s life will be on display. Visitors can then get to know the Spratt family, which lived in Dickinson House from the early 1930s until 1948. All ďŹ ve surviving Spratt children (one died in childhood) served in the Second World War, including Helen Spratt. Helen served as a civilian cipher clerk

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t start this Autumn with a fall!

in Gaspe, Que. unravelling radio frequency transmissions from German u-boats in the North Atlantic. Using a system called highfrequency direction ďŹ nding, land stations would triangulate their signals with signals received on Royal Canadian Navy ships to determine where the enemy submarines were hiding. Helen later became a chief cipher clerk for the navy. Her brother Charles, the oldest sibling, received a military medal of bravery for helping his platoon get past enemy lines in 1944. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During an attack he had a machine gun and he allowed his platoon to reach their objective,â&#x20AC;? McPhee said. William and Kenneth Spratt also signed up, although by the time Kenneth was done his training, the war was winding down. Richard served in the Korean War in the 1950s carrying troops to Japan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a striking example of the type of commitment that was there,â&#x20AC;? McPhee said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;To have every member of the family involved in the war, I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know how unique it is but itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certainly impressive.â&#x20AC;? Richard Spratt now lives in British Columbia but will be attending the exhibit on Nov. 11. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He has reviewed everything weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done and provided information,â&#x20AC;? McPhee said. The exhibit will be open Nov. 9 and 10 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Nov. 11 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m.

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Multimedia project a tribute to director Continued from page 28

builds on his fictional biotechnology ideas from previous films like Scanners and Videodrome to create an interactive videogame experience for online users. The idea revolves around the POD (personal on-demand), a biotech implant that claims to know what you want before you do. “POD reinvents the recom-

mendation engine to make discovering the things you need, love or desire effortless,” a website explanation reads. “This state of the art biotech implant will guarantee you personalized recommendations that are 99.999 per cent relevant all the time. POD grows with you to become an intuitive companion, enhancing your life and storing the best that the world has to offer for immediate recall

MORGAN PIIRONEN PHOTOGRAPHY

Greely native Stephanie La Rochelle is part of a new David Cronenberg project in Toronto.

at any time. After a light training period, POD will be able to predict your deepest unfulfilled desires – even the ones you didn’t know you had.” TRIBUTE

The multimedia project is part of a tribute to Cronenberg through the TIFF Bell Lightbox theatre. “It’s a little strange,” La Rochelle said. “Cronenberg’s projects are usually different. But it’s a cool concept.” La Rochelle plays a 14year-old girl in the interactive video game, which is a younger flashback version of a character named Elena. Every so often the game flashes back to the younger Elena with her brother. “When they were younger she went through a traumatic experience with him,” La Rochelle said. “It goes through times in their life when he was mean to her and she sort of gets back at him in a way.” La Rochelle didn’t want to give too much of the storyline away. She said working on a

Cronenberg project is exciting, especially at such an early stage of her career. “It’s incredible to be affiliated with such a big name,” she said. La Rochelle will soon start rehearsing for her role in the Sound of Music at Hamilton’s Theatre Aquarius, which will run between December and

January. She said she is enjoying her life in Toronto. She has been taking classes while auditioning for roles. “Things are good,” she said. The singer said she wanted to come back to perform at the Greely Players Christmas concert at the end of Novem-

ber, but she will be too busy with rehearsals. Even if she can’t visit very often, La Rochelle said she still draws support from her Greely Players family. “I am always in contact with them,” she said. For more information about the Cronenberg project visit bodymindchange.ca.

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The Canadian Showtime Chorus, which features women from across the city, will participate in the Sweet Adelines International competition, which runs from Nov. 4 to 9 in Hawaii.

Local chorus heads to Hawaii Jessica Cunha jessica.cunha@metroland.com

Arts - In a harmonious lead-up to its 30th year, the Canadian Showtime Chorus has headed to Hawaii for an international singing competition. The chorus, which features more than 100 vocally talented women from across Ottawa and the Valley, will participate in the Sweet Adelines International competition, which runs from Nov. 4 to 9 in Honolulu. “We’ll be seeing some of the top choruses in the world,” said Nancy Lambrechts, a Katimavik resident. “Just to experience this whole international competition on such a grand scale.” The Canadian Showtime

Chorus is one of hundreds of groups from around the world – including Sweden, New Zealand, Australia, Great Britain, and the United States – that belong to Sweet Adelines International, which focuses on the art of barbershop harmony. Even though they’re up against strong competition, the Ottawa chorus is aiming for the top. “We are absolutely aiming for the top 10,” said Canadian Showtime Chorus director and founder Sandie Nason, who lives and works in Nepean. “All of the judges who have seen us have said we have everything we need to make the top 10.” In Hawaii, the chorus will perform two songs in six minutes – Time After Time and

Oh, You Beautiful Doll. “When the lights come up there will be 10,000 people in the audience,” said Nason. “We want to move that audience. We want them to get teary. We want their heart to race and laugh a little.” The group practises every Tuesday at the Nepean Creative Arts Centre in Bells Corners and works with coaches on the weekends leading up to the competition. “It’s incredible walking into a room with 100 excited women because they don’t hide it,” said Nason. “They are just (so) excited. Me, I’m just hugely proud of them because they’ve worked so hard.” The Ottawa chorus is part of the largest region in the Sweet Adeline organization, competing against 30 other

choruses in the regional contest to land a spot at the international competition. This is the fifth time the Canadian Showtime Chorus will compete at the international level. 30 YEARS

The Canadian Showtime Chorus will celebrate its 30th anniversary in January. Nason had been a chorus director in Alberta for five years when she moved to Ottawa. She didn’t want to lose her connection to the Sweet Adelines so she went door-todoor in Barrhaven, handing out pamphlets about what she wanted to do. The first meeting saw four people gather at the Larkin House community building, which the singers shared with

hockey players. “It just grew and grew; every week it grew,” said Nason, adding they now have more than 100 members who hail from as far away as Carleton Place, Kars, Rockland, Orléans and Manotick. “It’s hard to put into words. Sometimes I look at them now and I’m awestruck,” she added. “I just wanted to sing; it’s fairly amazing to me (how much it’s grown).” There are women of all ages who participate in the chorus, ranging from 20s to late 70s. The tagline is Real women. Real harmony. Real fun. Lambrechts joined the group in 2010 after searching for something to do after retiring. “I went to listen to them

one night and said, ‘Oh, I really, really want to do this,’” she said. “You don’t have to be trained singer, you just have to love music.” Lambrechts said being part of the group isn’t just about performing. “It’s about being part of something that makes such an incredible sound,” she said. “If we do it right, it can even send tingles up your own back.” The Canadian Showtime Chorus will have a rookie program in 2014, where new and prospective members will have a chance to see what it’s all about. No experience is necessary, but the ability to read music is an asset. For more information, visit www.canadianshowtimechorus.com.

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COMMUNITY

Connected to your community

Trick or treat with the mayor Annabelle, Joshua and Tatijana Alsabeh are seen with a trio of citycommissioned witches at the Oct. 26 Trick-or-Treat with the Mayor event. City hall transformed into a spooky Halloween funhouse on Oct. 26, for the annual Trick-orTreat with the Mayor event. Costumed kids and their parents took part in trick-or-treating, activities and even horse-drawn wagon rides. STEPH WILLEMS/METROLAND

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Elvis lives to support United Way Metcalfe Public School Grade 7 teacher Cam MacDonald struggles to catch up during a tricycle race in support of the United Way on Oct. 31. Staff raced against each other, much to the amusement of the student body, who gathered in the gym to cheer and jeer on Halloween day. The school raised about $100 for United Way. At right, principal Rian Bayne highfives students after her team won the annual tricycle race. PHOTOS BY EMMA JACKSON/METROLAND

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Public health budget aims for food safety, active kids Health authority slates $391,000 for expanded programming Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - More restaurant inspections and getting kids to walk or bike to school are priorities in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2014 public health budget. Ottawa Public Health is proposing to spend $12.4 million in city dollars in addition to $42.6 million in funding from the province next year. The health department says it will need about $1 million more than it did last year to continue offering the same services. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s within the two per cent increase cap that city council set for each department at the beginning of its term. In the budget tabled on Oct. 21, public health manager Esther Moghadam said the agency wants to reinvent some of the money itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s saving, including $600,000 in efficiencies from having nurses work remotely with laptops. Public health is also reducing

its base budget by eliminating three positions from the books that have been vacant for several years. The health authority wants to put $391,000 of those savings back into expanded programming, including more food-safety inspections of high-risk restaurants, outdoor food vendors and special events and programs aimed at increasing physical activity levels for schoolchildren, including promoting walking and biking to school. That would include eventually developing active-transportation plans for all 230 public elementary schools in Ottawa. The city is already working on demonstration plans with 12 schools, said Ottawa Public Health manager Sherry Nigro. Health board chairwoman Coun. Diane Holmes said the city has â&#x20AC;&#x153;gotten away with murderâ&#x20AC;? by not providing infrastructure that lets kids safely get to school by walk-

ing or biking. Holmes said she thinks school boards bus students from door to door because the city doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t provide safe infrastructure for them to walk or bike. Wallace Beaton of Green Communities Canada conducts similar active transportation audits. He told the committee his group has faced a slow and frustrating process

unless itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s comprehensive,â&#x20AC;? he said, suggesting the board tell the city to adopt the 10 key elements developed by the National Complete Streets Coalition in the United States, which include specific implementation steps, performance measures and design criteria, among other factors. Transportation committee chairman and health board member Coun. Keith Egli

You run the risk of creating expectations that you are not able to meet. WALLACE BEATON

to get the city to agree to infrastructure improvements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You run the risk of creating expectations that you are not able to meet,â&#x20AC;? he said. Trevor HachĂŠ of Ecology Ottawa said the boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s support of a â&#x20AC;&#x153;complete streetâ&#x20AC;? policy in the proposed transportation master plan is a step in the right direction in that regard, but it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t go far enough. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t achieve results

said he and city transportation staff have agreed to meet with Ecology Ottawa on that topic. Health board member Marguarite Keeley said staff should pay special attention to how to increase physical activity for children who live and go to school in rural areas, since they have fewer safe ways to get to school on foot or by bike. Public health is also pro-

posing a one-time investment of $200,000 to continue a program to improve infection control standards in personal service businesses such as tattoo and body-piercing parlours and full-service salons that offer things like acupuncture. Public health is working on a training program for operators of those types of business, as well as a public education campaign. But a couple members of the board of health, including Dr. Atul Kapur, said the city should look at requiring those businesses to be licensed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It surprises me that in the city of Ottawa you need a license to be an auctioneer, but you donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t need a license to be a body piercer,â&#x20AC;? he said. City council will also be asked to pre-approve $200,000 for cost-shared programs for which provincial funding is expected to be made available next spring. That money could go towards programs such as: â&#x20AC;˘ Increasing immunization coverage for schoolchildren; â&#x20AC;˘ Expanding awareness of low-risk alcohol use guidelines;

â&#x20AC;˘ Outreach to parents for youth mental health supports; â&#x20AC;˘ Aboriginal infant health services; â&#x20AC;˘ Promoting active transportation; â&#x20AC;˘ Promoting â&#x20AC;&#x153;healthy food environmentsâ&#x20AC;? by encouraging menu labeling, improved signs and customer surveys. There is one remaining public consultation at which residents can ask questions and share thoughts on the drafts budgets: Thursday, Nov.7 at council chambers in city hall, 110 Laurier Ave. W. from 7 to 9 p.m. Public delegates can present to the health board on the draft budget on Nov. 18. City council is set to approve the budgets on Nov. 27.

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Come to Worship - Sunday 10:30 Bible Preaching, Hymn Singing & Friends

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St Catherine of Siena Catholic Church in Metcalfe on 8th Line - only 17 mins from HWY 417

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Riverside United Church 3191 Riverside Dr (at Walkley)

414 Pleasant Park Road 613 733-4886 www.ppbc.ca

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Invites you to our worship service with Rev. Dean Noakes Sundays at 11 am,

meets every Sunday at The Old Forge Community Resource Centre 2730 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7J1

Rideau Park United Church

off 417 exit Walkey Rd. or Anderson Rd.

Worship - Sundays @ 6:00 p.m.

Join us for worship, fellowship & music Nursery, children and youth ministries Sunday Service at 10:30 am Rev. Kathryn Peate

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s program provided (Meets at the 7th Day Adventist Church 4010 Strandherd Dr.) Tel: 613-225-6648, ext. 117 Web site: www.pccbarrhaven.ca

Sunday November 10th WORSHIP 9am â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let Us Rememberâ&#x20AC;?

Gloucester South Seniors Centre 4550 Bank Street (at Leitrim Rd.) (613) 277-8621 Come for an encouraging Word! R0011949748

Location: St. Thomas More Catholic School, 1620 Blohm Drive

Ottawa Citadel

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at lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ĂŠglise Ste-Anne

Sunday 11:00 a.m. Worship & Sunday School 1350 Walkley Road (Just east of Bank Street) Ottawa, ON K1V 6P6 Tel: 613-731-0165 Email: ottawacitadel@bellnet.ca Website: www.ottawacitadel.ca

Celebrating 14 years in this area!

St. Clement Parish/Paroisse St-ClĂŠment

You are welcome to join us!

Sunday Masses: 8:30 a.m. Low Mass 10:30 a.m. High Mass (with Gregorian chant) 6:30 p.m. Low Mass

We welcome you to the traditional Latin Mass - Everyone Welcome For the Mass times please see www.stclement-ottawa.org 528 Old St. Patrick St. Ottawa ON K1N 5L5 (613) 565.9656

HAWTHORNE UNITED CHURCH Rev. Dr. Sam Wigston Come and Join us Service Sundays 10:00am

2244 Russell Road Ottawa Ont. 613-733-4446 www.hawthorneuc.com

    

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2400 Alta Vista Drive (613) 733 0131 Sunday Worship at 10:00 a.m. Sunday School; Ample parking; OC Transpo route 8 A warm welcome awaits you. Minister: Alex Mitchell sttimothys@on.aibn.com www.sttimsottawa.com



St. Timothyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Presbyterian Church

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For more information and summer services visit our website at http://www.stmichaelandallangels.ca â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Everyone welcome â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Come as you are â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Email: admin@goodshepherdbarrhaven.ca Telephone: 613-823-8118

Service Time: Sundays at 10:30 AM

We are a small church in the city of Ottawa with a big heart for God and for people. newhopeottawa.co

355 Cooper Street at Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor 613-235-5143 www.dc-church.org

NOT YOUR AVERAGE ANGLICANS St. Michael and All Angels Anglican Church 2112 Bel-Air Drive (613) 224 0526 Rector: Rev. Dr. Linda Privitera

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Christmas Craft Fair Saturday November 23rd 10-2pm at the church

located at 2536 Rideau Road (at the corner of Albion) 613-822-6433 UNITED.CHURCH@XPLORNET.CA

Giving Hope Today

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Worship services Sundays at 10:30 a.m.

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South Gloucester United Church

A warm welcome awaits you For Information Call 613-224-8507

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BARRHAVEN PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

ALL WELCOME Sundays at 10:30 a.m. The Salvation Army Community Church Meeting at St. Andrew School 201 Crestway Dr. 613-440-7555 Barrhaven www.sawoodroffe.org

Sunday Services: Bible Study at 10:00 AM - Worship Service at 11:00 AM

Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x201C;äĂ&#x17D;Ă&#x160;Â?Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160;6Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x203A;i

Worship and Sunday School 9:30am Contemplative Worship 11:15am

Bethany United Church

613-737-5874 www.bethanyuc.com

Sunday Services Worship Service10:30am Sundays Prayer Circle Tuesday at 11:30 Rev.10:30 Jamesa.m. Murray

Watch & Pray Ministry

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3150 Ramsayville Road

Dominion-Chalmers United Church

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Two blocks north of Carlingwood Shopping Centre on Lockhart Avenue at Prince Charles Road.

The West Ottawa Church of Christ

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All are welcome to come hear the good news in a spiritually uplifting mix of traditional and forward looking Christian worship led by the Reverend Richard Vroom with Sunday morning services at 8:30 and 10.

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Pleasant Park Baptist

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ËĄË&#x;ˤÂľÇ&#x2039;ssĹ&#x2DC;EĹ&#x2DC;Ĩ Ç&#x160;Ÿ_Ę°šǟǟÉ  www.woodvale.on.ca info@woodvale.ca ɠɠɠʳɠŸŸ_É&#x161;ÄśsʳŸĹ&#x2DC;ĘłO ʚ˼ˠˢʺ˧˥˨Ë&#x161;˥ˢ˼˥ NĂ&#x152;Ă&#x17E;Äś_OÇ&#x2039;sĆźÇ&#x2039;ŸÉ&#x161;Ă&#x17E;_s_ĘłƝĜsÇŁsOĜĜŸÇ&#x2039;É&#x161;Ă&#x17E;ÇŁĂ&#x17E;ÇźČ&#x2013;ÇŁŸĹ&#x2DC;Ë&#x161;ÄśĂ&#x17E;Ĺ&#x2DC;sĘł

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Refreshments / fellowship following the service

All are Welcome Good Shepherd Barrhaven Church Come and Worshipâ&#x20AC;Ś Sundays at 10:00 am Pierre Elliott Trudeau School 601 LongďŹ elds Dr., Barrhaven

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37


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Simply e-mail in your favourite holiday recipe (with a picture if possible) by November 13th, 2013. Be sure to send it with your name, address, and phone number. If chosen, we will publish your recipe in our

L>Coliday

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1 of 2 $100 Gift Baskets courtesy of Kardish Foods www.kardish.com

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Your community’s favourite holiday recipes for 2013.

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Contest Rules: 1. Employees of participating sponsors and their immediate families and Metroland Media employees are not eligible to compete in this contest. 2. Contestants must abide these general contests rules and all specific rules applied to contests to be eligible to win available prizes. 3. Prize winner selection is by random draw. Winners must correctly answer a skill-testing question to win. Prize winners will be contacted by telephone. 4. Winners must bear some form of identification in

order to claim their prize. 5. There is no cash surrender value to prizes and they must be accepted as awarded. 6. Metroland and participating companies assume no responsibility whatsoever damages, be they physical or monetary, injury or death, as a result of this contest or any part of it. 7. Metroland and participating retailers reserve the right to limit the numbers of entries received from any particular contestant(s).

8. Metroland and the participating companies reserve the right to change, rearrange, and/or alter any of there contests policies at any time whatsoever without prior notice. Also these contest rules are subject if necessary to comply with the rules, regulations, and the laws of the federal, Provincial, and local government bodies. 9. One entry per household.

NOTE: All recipes must be typed or neatly handwritten. All others will not be accepted. Photocopies from books and magazines will not be accepted.

E-MAIL US AT: 38

Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

R0012396230

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NEWS

Connected to your community

Mayor calls for feds, province to be partners in light rail Transit, cycling key to Ottawa’s economic future: Watson

gave them $660 million for a threestop subway extension,” the mayor said during his speech. Ottawa only wants its fair share of the federal government’s infrastructure funding program, which will dole out $53.5 billion for infrastructure projects across Canada over the next decade. Ottawa’s $975-million ask of the federal government represents two per cent of the federal infrastructure

Laura Mueller laura.mueller@metroland.com

News - Mayor Jim Watson called for co-operation from the federal and provincial levels of government to build the extended light-rail system he envisions. In an address on Ottawa’s economic outlook delivered to local business leaders on Oct. 24, Watson said the proposed Stage 2 plan to bring light rail east to Place d’Orléans, west to Bayshore and Baseline stations and to bring the O-Train south to Bowesville can only happen if the upper levels of government are on board. “The federal and provincial governments were excellent team players with the first phase of light rail,” Watson said. “We are counting on them to continue to be our partners.” The mayor called out Orléans MP Royal Galipeau for suggesting the city write to Santa Claus for funding for the project shortly after it was announced. “Well, you know, Santa made a pre-Christmas visit to Toronto and

Projects like this one are bigger than any one mayor, premier or prime minister. JIM WATSON MAYOR OF OTTAWA

fund – less than Ottawa’s proportion of the country’s population, which is three per cent, Watson said. “I expect our local MPs will work with us to ensure our city gets its fair share as well,” Watson said. He urged politicians in other levels of government to look beyond

the next election to the future generations that could benefit from the transit system. “Projects like this one are bigger than any one mayor, premier or prime minister,” Watson said. The mayor also had a message for people who don’t see the value of a $3 billion investment in the next phase of light rail. Pitting drivers against transit users and cyclists is a debate of the past, Watson said. “Our economic future is too important to resort to such old-school arguments,” he said. Even those who could never see themselves hopping on a train, bus or bike can see the benefit of one less car in front of them on the highway, Watson said. Promoting other forms of transportation helps prevent gridlock and keep goods and services moving, he said. “It is in our economic interest to get more people on the bus, and more people walking and cycling,” Watson said.

FILE

Mayor Jim Watson delivered a message to upper levels of goverment during a recent economic address: partner with Ottawa on light rail.

BUY YOUR TICKET TODAY… CALL 613.260.2738

ST. PATRICK’S HOME OF OTTAWA FOUNDATION LOTTERY

$55,500 IN CASH PRIZES TO BE WON! Early Bird Draw: Wednesday, January 22nd, 2014 with total cash prizes of $15,000 St. Patrick’s Week Draw: Friday, March 7th, 2014 with total cash prizes of $27,000. You have a chance to win a total of $1,000 or $500 in cash prizes every month from April to December. Proceeds will go towards the purchase of medical equipment, programs and services for our Residents.

St. Patrick’s Week Draw

Early Bird Draw $10,000 & $5,000 Final ticket deadline: January 14, 2014 at 5:00 p.m.

TICKETS

$100 EACH

1st Draw $10,000, 2nd Draw $5,000, 12 Draws of $1,000 each

Final Ticket deadline: February 24th, 2014 at 5:00 p.m.

Early Bird Draw

$10,000 & $5,000

January 22, 2014

St. Patrick’s Week Draw

1st Draw $ 10,000 2nd Draw $ 5,000 12 Draws $ 1,000

March 7, 2014

Monthly Draws

1st Draw $ 1,000 2nd Draw $ 500

April-December. Every second Wednesday

ONLY 2,000 TICKETS PRINTED

Provincial License No. 5935 Charity Registration #88897 0399 RR0001

For more information, or to purchase tickets, please contact the Foundation Office at 613.260.2738. Lottery Tickets are available at the Foundation Office at 2865 Riverside Drive, Ottawa, Ontario, K1V 8N5 R0012396773-1107

In support of the Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario

LIGHT THE LIGHTS FOR CHEO’S KIDS!

Fairmont Château Laurier presents the 16th annual Trees of Hope in support of CHEO. Get a team together, purchase a tree and join us at the decorating party and lighting celebration on November 25, 2013. Your tree will be on display in the Fairmont Château Laurier throughout the holiday season— helping to raise funds for CHEO’s kids as the public votes on their favourite tree. Trees Are Limited. Visit www.fairmont.com/laurier | www.cheofoundation or contact: Deneen.perrin@fairmont.com | 613-562-7001 /cheotreesofhope

@fairmontlaurier

MEDIA SPONSORS

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

39


R0012396397

,ESTWEFORGET Ottawa to pause and remember November 11 TRANSIT SERVICE

NATIONAL EVENTS

OC Transpo will operate on a regular schedule on Monday, Nov. 11. The sales and information centres and customer relations department, however, will be closed, with the exception of the Rideau Centre office, which will be open from 12:30 to 9 p.m. Veterans wearing their medals or uniforms will be able to ride free with their companions on OC Transpo, Para Transpo and STO Nov. 5 to 11. Where it is safe to do so, OC Transpo buses will pull over and observe two minutes of silence on Remembrance Day at 11 a.m. The Last Post and Reveille will play over the radios of OC Transpo buses.

National War Memorial (10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.) Every year, the Royal Canadian Legion organizes the National Ceremony of Remembrance at the National War Memorial in downtown Ottawa. Highlights include the veterans on parade, attendance of the Prime Minister, the Governor General of Canada, and the Silver Cross Mother – a woman whose child has died while serving in the military. There is also a wreath laying ceremony, a children’s choir performance and a rousing fly-past (weather permitting). For more information visit www.legion.ca/ honour-remember/the-national-ceremony Canadian War Museum

(10:40 a.m.). At 11 a.m. on Nov. 11 a beam of sunlight will shine through a single window into Memorial Hall, located inside the Canadian Ware Museum’s main entrance, to perfectly frame the headstone from the grave of Canada’s Unknown Soldier. To observe the beam of light from within Memorial Hall, tickets are available on a first-come, first-served basis as of 9:30 a.m. Museum admission is free on Remembrance Day. Every year, the program also invites students from across Canada to attend the Remembrance Day wreath-laying ceremony at the National War Memorial and a special tour of the War Museum, where students have the opportunity to talk to veterans.

A Day of

Remembrance More information can be found at www.warmuseum. ca/remember

Every November 11th, Canadians pause in a silent moment of remembrance for the men and women who served their country during wartime and in the

Beechwood Cemetery (10:30 a.m. to 12 p.m.) East of Ottawa, a ceremony of remembrance takes place at the National Military Cemetery on the grounds of Beechwood Cemetery. The ceremony honours all

those who have fallen in the service of Canada and all Canadian Forces members interred at the cemetery. There is also a marching contingent including veterans, a band and a children’s choir performance. More information can be found at www.beechwoodcemetery.com

The following parades and ceremonies will be held in various communities in and around Ottawa to commemorate Remembrance Day: See CEREMONIES, page 41

COMMUNITY EVENTS

cause of peace. More than 1,500,000 Canadians served overseas—in the First World War (1914-18), the Second World War (1939-45), and the Korean War (1950-53). More than 100,000 died. We honour their sacrifice and the sacrifices of our soldiers today, who serve so we may live in peace.

Bob Chiarelli, MPP Ottawa West - Nepean

R0012395408-1107

201 - 2249 Carling Avenue, Ottawa, ON K2B 7E9 T: 613-721-8075 | F: 613-721-5756 | E: bchiarelli.mpp.co@liberal.ola.org 40

Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

R0012395566

For information regarding Remembrance Day events in Ottawa West-Nepean, please contact my community office:

Lest we forget our fallen mothers and fathers, brothers and sisters. May we forever remember the sense of duty, and the many sacrifices these great Canadians gave for a world in turmoil. May we together say, “Never Again.”

www.JanHarder.com


R0012396397

,ESTWEFORGET Ceremonies to be held across the city

Lest We Forget To all the men and women who have served Canada, your service and your sacrifice is remembered and appreciated.

Councillor Keith Egli

Ward 9 Knoxdale - Merivale Telephone: 613.580.2479 Email: ward9@ottawa.ca www.keithegli.ca

R0012395432

ORLEANS – The Orléans Legion branch 632 will host their annual parade at the Orléans cenotaph at 800 Taylor Creek Drive on Nov. 11 at 11 a.m. NEPEAN – The Bells Corners Legion, branch 593 will have their annual parade at the Centrepointe Cenotaph at 11 a.m. on Nov. 11. BARRHAVEN – 10:40 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 11, fall-in for the Barrhaven legion branch’s annual Remembrance Day parade at the underpass of the Public Library (Walter Baker Centre. Official ceremonies start at 11 a.m. in the Memorial Garden located at the main entrance to John McRae High School, 103 Malvern Dr. Refreshments will be served following the ceremonies in Halls A and B of the Walter Baker Sports Centre. Members and guests are welcome to return to the branch for refreshments and entertainment. For more information, please contact Jim Ireland, parade commander, at 613-843-8691. KARS - 11:15 a.m. on Sunday, Nov. 10 there will be a ceremony at the Kars cenotaph. Refreshments will follow at St. John’s Anglican Church. MANOTICK – 9:30 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 11 there will be an Ecumenical service inside St. James Anglican Church on Bridge Street. The parade will form at 10:15 a.m. at the Manotick Mews entrance on Beaverwood Road, and will depart for the cenotaph at 10:30 a.m. MUNSTER – 2 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 10 there will be a memorial at the Munster Union Cemetery. NORTH GOWER – 12:45 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 10 there will be a ceremony at the cenotaph on Perkins Drive, and refreshments will follow at the United Church in North Gower. OTTAWA WEST – 11 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 11 the Westboro legion branch 480 is holding ceremonies in centre court of Carlingwood Mall.

A parade will form on Richmond Road at 1:30 p.m. and travel to the Westboro cenotaph in Byron Linear Park (near Golden Ave.), where ceremonies will take place at 2 p.m. Following the ceremony, members and residents are invited back to the legion branch, located at 391 Richmond Rd. RICHMOND – 11 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 11, a Remembrance Day ceremony will be held at the cenotaph at Memorial Park. The parade to the cenotaph leaves Richmond Plaza at 10:45 a.m. to arrive at Memorial Park just before 11 a.m. STITTSVILLE – 2 p.m. on Monday, Nov. 11, there will be a ceremony at the cenotaph in front of the Johnny Leroux Stittsville Community Arena, with the parade leaving from Legion Hall on Main Street at 1:30 p.m. to arrive at cenotaph just before 2 p.m.

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Continued from page 40

Deputy Mayor City Councillor Gloucester-South Nepean Steve.Desroches@Ottawa.ca (613) 580-2751

www.SteveDesroches.ca Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

41


NEWS

Connected to your community

Building blocks ! % 0 9 o T p SaveU of children’s brain health

home is

ming, are ways for the entire family to exercise together. • Building block 2: Nourish the body and mind. Maximize your child’s intake of DHA, the fatty acid that makes up 97 percent of the omega-3s in the brain. Find it in fatty fish (salmon, tuna, mackerel) or, if your child doesn’t like fish, look for it in Dairyland L’il Ones yogurt (lilones.ca/products. php), in Natrel Baboo milk (natrel. ca/en/baboo) and in Sunrise Soya SuperSqueezies (sunrise-soya.com/ super-squeezies). All of these foods and beverages are fortified with a vegetarian and sustainable source of DHA from algae. • Building block 3: Embrace new activities. Continually challenge their brains inside and outside of school through activities such as reading or playing games. Creative pursuits like dancing, painting, learning a new language or skill, will help keep your child’s mind active. • Building block 4: Expand their Social network. Nurturing friendships and engaging in social activities such as play dates, clubs and volunteering will help keep your child’s mind engaged.

Lifestyle - Experts across the globe suggest that lifestyle factors play a significant role in the brain health of people of all ages, including children. Dr. David Perlmutter, a board-certified neurologist and a fellow of the American College of Nutrition and the author of Raise a Smarter Child by Kindergarten says: “Parents have the opportunity to give their children the tools needed to help maintain a healthy mind early in life. By incorporating the four dimensions of positive brain health into their daily activities, including physical exercise, good nutrition, mental engagement and social connectedness, children will be positioned to have a wellnourished and mentally-active mind throughout life.” • Building block 1: Get moving. Engaging in physical activity for at least 30 minutes a day encourages new brain cells and connections to form. Playing catch, hiking or swim-

where you have fun with friends independent of the weather

BOOK YOUR TOUR TODAY!

– News Canada

Lunch is on us!

Ottawa Valley Tours

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MOTORCOACH HOLIDAYS

Branson Country Christmas Extravaganza November 16-24 Featuring 7 Live Shows $1619 Join us as we travel to America’s Live Entertainment Capital, Branson. Together we will enjoy seven Spectacular Christmas Shows, have time for shopping and tour the Town. This tour is sure to put you in the Holiday Spirit.

Each day should be a time to treasure, to focus on what’s important—and Alavida Lifestyles makes it easy. Life with us offers countless advantages: fitness and entertainment facilities, social activities, fine dining and so much more. You can live exactly as you choose, and leave the details to us. Alavida has two locations in Ottawa’s west end—The Ravines and Park Place— both featuring a Retirement Residence and condo-like Seniors’ Suites, for more independent living. The buildings offer luxurious living spaces, plenty of amenities, and a warm and welcoming community. Join us anytime for a guided tour of these elegant properties.

Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

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other was always concerned that we ďŹ ve children didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the proper respect for the true meaning of Remembrance Day. The school at Northcote with only 18 pupils, had no piano and the few county ofďŹ cials were already involved with the ceremony in the town of Renfrew, and so there was little in the way of observance at the school. For this reason, Mother, each year, piled all of us into the Model T and headed into town where, as she put it, there would be a proper and ďŹ tting ceremony to remember those who had fallen in the First World War. Motherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s three young brothers had all been in the army, even though Mother said they werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t old enough to vote, but they were old enough to ďŹ ght in the war. By the way Mother talked about her brothers, I wondered if

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MARY COOK Mary Cookâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Memories they perhaps had won the war singlehandedly. Without fail, the weather was always dreadful on Remembrance Day. We would drive through freezing rain or snow, it seemed, and at a very young age I wondered if the terrible weather had something mysterious to do with the sombreness of the day. And so when we headed into Renfrew, we were bundled up like mummies with hats and mitts and winter boots. We certainly wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have the luxury of wearing slacks on such a day and even though I usually hated them with a passion,

I was very grateful for the heavy navy blue, ďŹ&#x201A;eecelined bloomers over our long underwear and long beige, ribbed stockings. But it never mattered how much clothes we had on, there was always a piercing wind rolling down Raglan Street where the parade took place at the war memorial and it penetrated our bodies and had us shivering like leaves on tree. The children from the Renfrew schools always marched to the place where the ceremony was held. See SOMEONE, page 47

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

43


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44

Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013


FOOD

Connected to your community

Open mushroom, tomato lasagna makes unique appetizer

Insecticide linked to mass die-off of bees

Lifestyle - Mushrooms are the stars in this pasta appetizer, so use a variety for maximum impact. Leave small mushrooms whole and slice large ones. Preparation time: 10 minutes. Cooking time: 15 minutes. Makes six appetizers.

Derek Dunn derek.dunn@metroland.com

INGREDIENTS

• 6 sheets lasagna • 75 ml (1/3 cup) extra-virgin olive oil • 2 shallots, sliced • 2 cloves garlic, minced • 375 g (12 oz) mixed mushrooms (crimini, shiitake, oyster and white button – remove woody stems from shiitake mushrooms), thickly sliced • 25 ml (2 tbsp) balsamic vinegar • 8 cherry tomatoes, quartered • 2 ml (1/2 tsp) dried basil • Salt and freshly grated black pepper • 75 ml (1/3 cup) chopped fresh parsley • 12 curls freshly shaved asiago or parmesan cheese

Bad seed

PREPARATION

Cook the pasta in boiling water until tender. Meanwhile, in a large nonstick skillet, heat 50 ml (1/4 cup) of the oil over mediumhigh heat. Add the shallots, garlic and mushrooms and cook for two to three minutes or until slightly softened. Stir in the vinegar and tomatoes and heat just until warm. Remove from the heat. Season with the basil and add salt and

pepper to taste. To serve, drain the pasta well in a colander and toss with the remaining 25 ml (2 tbsp) oil. Loosely fold one lasagna noodle in each shallow flat soup bowl or dinner plate. Scatter mushroom mixture over top. Sprinkle with parsley and garnish with shaved cheese. Serve immediately. Foodland Ontario

News - About 30 per cent of bee colonies were lost last spring; the second year in a row for mass die-offs. The federal government has linked large-scale farming practices to the decline of insects that pollinate $2 billion worth of fruit and vegetables every year. In September Health Canada’s Pest Management Regulatory Agency (PMRA) issued to farmers a series of recommendations against certain insecticides known as neonicotinoids. Is it enough to recommend against the usage of neonicotinoids? Dwight Foster is a farmer in North Gower. He’s been scratching a living off the land for many years. A grain farmer with 4,000 acres – and a feed lot with 1,500 head of cattle – Foster can’t underestimate how crucial insecti-

cides are to his operation. “The seed treatment is very important for the development of the crops,” said Foster, a man of few words. He said there is no reason to rush to judgment on neonicotinoids; that very little science has been done on the issue in Canada. He wonders if insecticides are killing the bees or something else or a combination of multiple factors. Health Canada blamed last year’s die-off to weather: one cold snap at the wrong time could devastate colonies. Then there’s exotic mites and fungi shipped in unwittingly or otherwise from far flung parts of the world that attack native bees. Or even if it is insecticiderelated, at which point in the farming process do neonicotinoids attack them? Foster’s point is that no one at this stage can say for sure. And for him, the stakes are too high to act without certainty: a neonicotinoid ban

would be a deal-breaker. “There’s no reason to throw the baby out with the bath water,” he said. “Without another product in place that does what it does, it would be huge disaster.” Many large-scale farm operations are highly efficient but deeply susceptible to unravelling at the slightest change. Expensive equipment needs to be paid for through expected high yields. The slow eating away at profit that nature caused in the past is, today, replaced by a solid defence against losses – thanks in large part to insecticides. Beekeeper Arnold Polk lives in West Carleton between Pakenham and Arnprior. He has been an apiculturist since the mid 1970s when he took over his father-in-law’s farm. It supplements his income, along with driving a bus and onetime pursuits such as lambing. But beekeeping didn’t supplement his income last winter. “It was a wake up call,” said Polk, who is happy to produce 30,000 pounds of honey a year. He managed just 2,000 this year. “I’ve never experienced anything like this before.” Polk is aware of the neonicotinoids debate. He has mixed feelings over farming practices. See PESTICIDE, page 46

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

45


NEWS

Connected to your community

Pesticide use driven by profit-focused farming Continued from page 45

On the one hand, he knows they must grow more and more efficient to keep up with the competition, including the use of pesticides. On the other hand, he says the relentless pursuit of profit at all costs is having a devastating affect on the natural world. “Farming has changed completely in my lifetime. They don’t even cultivate anymore,” he said. “They are perfecting the bottom line today, but maybe not tomorrow.” However, the die-off on Polk’s property this year had no direct link to neonicotinoids. It was the combination of a Varroa mite infestation and extreme weather. “We didn’t use enough treatment to solve the problem,” he said. “In July we had a cool period. And they never made honey after that.” Others would say neonicotinoids played an indirect role in the decimation. After many years of usage, industrial insecticides are omnipresent: in water, soil, plants and animals such as bees. It could make them more susceptible to parasites and fungi. Polk accepts that the sci-

DEREK DUNN/METROLAND

Dust is kicked up from a field tilled in Dunrobin. Grain farmers and beekeepers agree neonicotinoids are killing insects in mass numbers. They disagree whether “planter dust” is doing it or the crops - contaminated throughout - are poisoning them during pollination. ence isn’t out on a cause, but conventional wisdom tells him that the two don’t mix. “I think it’s a contamination but I don’t have any proof of that. There’s a lot of research to do, a lot of unknowns right now,” Polk said. “All I know is that pesticides and bees don’t mix well together. DuPont and Monsanto (companies) do lots of research, but nobody knows

the long term.” Beekeepers are anxious for a solution to stave of future losses. Farmers are unwilling to change the status quo for fear of losing profit. That may seem like a strict dichotomy. But according to the Arnprior area’s vice president of the Ontario Federation of Agriculture, Debra Pretty-Straathof, it is more complex.

Those who farm corn and soya use neonicotinoids. They are predominately in south western Ontario. Farmers in the Ottawa Valley area include those who require pollination, either because they are growing vegetables or feeding animals on food that flowered. “You will have polar opposites in any group, but we are trying to work together,”

Pretty-Straathof said. “Neither side wants to wipe out the other. Everybody wants to help (bees) but nobody wants to have a knee-jerk solution.” She said it is widely accepted among farmers that neonicotinoids are a cause. What is less certain, at least from the beekeepers side, is at what point the insecticides affect pollinators. PMRA is studying contaminated “planter dust.” The hypothesis states that a coating of insecticide on each seed comes off during the farming process. It creates a dust cloud that bees fly though, causing them to ingest the neonicotinoids and die. Anecdotal claims from southern Ontario on this theory reached Polk. “He (a beekeeper) said when (bees) were coming back through the cornfield they were falling like rain, and were in some kind of paralysis state,” Polk said. “They’ve lost hundreds of colonies of bees.” Critics say inhalation of dust plays a less significant role than does consumption. Neonicotinoids could be fused into the seed and, over many years, the soil, and taken up by the plant through the soil to kill insects feeding on them. Ponds and other water spots could be chemical soups after this many years of using insecticides too, adding to

chances bees could be ingesting them. Health Canada regulators have proposed better labelling on insecticides and require farmers to implement safer seed planting practices. Those moves aren’t enough for beekeepers, who are fewer in number and therefore hold less clout over lawmakers. Another year of mass die-offs could harbour untold calamity for many common foods such as: apples, onions, pears, beans, celery, broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage, common peppers, eggplant, tomatoes and much more. However, at this stage it doesn’t seem those welding power are willing to move any time soon. Carleton-Mississippi Mills MPP Jack MacLaren is a farmer, and sold seed to farmers throughout the region. He lauds the effectiveness of neonicotinoids while reserving judgement until further study is done. “It is commonly used on corn seed to protect against insects and disease. It does work. It helps farmers,” MacLaren said. “Canada has very stringent rules about pesticides.” Still, if further studies show them to be harmful to bees or other animals, MacLaren said he has no problem with an outright ban.

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

Neil Yorke-Slader Superintendent of Instruction OCDSB 1107.R0012393985

Jean Fulton-Hale Principal Colonel By SS


NEWS

Connected to your community

Youths!

Adults!

Seniors!

Someone always fainted Earn Extra Money! Continued from page 43

We five country children were very aware that we weren’t really a part of a group, but that certainly didn’t matter to our mother. She would wait until the town school pupils had formed perfect lines, looking neither left nor right, and would march the five of us right up to the front row, and position us so that we were actually an extension of the line-up of town kids. My older sister Audrey was most embarrassed, but her protests did nothing to sway our Mother. The town children had sheets of music and we would shudder in embarrassment when we would see Mother walk right over to a teacher, whisper in her ear, and then point to us. We would then see her head back to us with five sheets of music. For reasons much beyond my comprehension, someone from the town ranks of pupils always fainted. Just as sure as death and taxes, as soon as the person leading the program opened his mouth, one or two would topple over. If the overcome person was a girl, the teacher would rush up, fan her with the sheet music, and

if that didn’t help, she would be carried off with her eyes rolled into the back of her head. But if it was a boy pupil who had succumbed to the pressures of the day and toppled over, he was left to lie there until he either revived on his own or the ceremony ended. Emerson said, on the way home, “those Renfrew kids are a sickly lot ... certainly none of us ever fell

He would walk the full length of the parade area, and he wore a soldier’s uniform that obviously had been borrowed

over in a dead faint.” After all the war songs had been sung, out of the crowd would come a very old man with a shiny trumpet tucked under his arm. He would walk the full length of the parade area, and he wore a soldier’s uniform that obviously had

been borrowed. His hands were all but covered with the cuffs and the pant legs bagged over his swath-covered legs. He was very elderly and Mother, ever the one to add drama to any situation, said he probably fought in the Boer War. He played the trumpet loud and clear as a bell, and there wasn’t a dry eye in the crowd. The Renfrew children were the first to march off the parade grounds and Emerson, not to be outdone by kids from town, turned on the heal of his gum-rubbers and with his arms swinging, marched back down the street to where Mother had parked the Model T. On the road back to Northcote we would be subjected once again to Mother’s stories of how her own brothers went off to war and often her voice would catch with the memory. But we knew she was filled with pride and I too would be caught up in the stories. I would think of those uncles, who returned safely from battle unscarred and I would think I was related to true war heroes. Then I would know, even though I was very young, why Remembrance Day was so important to our mother.

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House cleaning service. Give yourselves some extra time. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll work for you to clean your house. We offer a price that meets your budget. Experience, references, insured, bonded. Call 613-262-2243, Tatiana.

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Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bladder Health free information session: Mon. Nov. 18, 2013, 7 pm. Ottawa Hospital-Riverside Campus, 1967 Riverside Dr, Lower level amphitheater. Please call to register (613)738-8400 extension 81726.

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Duquetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s FirewoodGuaranteed seasoned oak and maple. Free delivery. Kindling available. Member of BBB. 613-830-1488. MIXED HARDWOOD 8â&#x20AC;? length excellent quality, by the tandem load. We also purchase standing timber and hard or soft pulp wood, land and lot clearing, tree trimming, and outdoor furnace wood available. Call 613.432.2286 Mixed hardwood- dried 1 year. $100/face cord. Free delivery to most areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. 613-229-4004

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HELP WANTED-LOCAL PEOPLE NEEDED!!! Simple & Flexible Online Work. 100% Genuine Opportunity. F/T & P/T. Internet www.rankinterrace.com Needed. Very Easy...No Experience Required. Income is Guaranteed! West End Bungalow! $1795/month, 4 bdrm, 2 w w w . e z C o m p u t e r Work.com bath, great location, Pet/smoke free I am looking for a special Blair Brockley person who wants big reRoyal Lepage Performance wards in both financial and Realty leadership growth and 613-733-9100 who is willing to accept a challenge. Call 613-762-9519 .

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FOR SALE Walter Baker Christmas Craft Sale Saturday November 16th and Saturday December 14th Over 50 Crafters and Artisans Free admission Www.Goldenopp.ca

Apples, cider and apple products. Smyths Apple Orchard, 613-652-2477. Updates, specials and coupons at www.smythsapples.com. Open daily 9-5. Also check us out on Facebook!

48

Cruickshank is looking for ON-CALL combination snow plow/salter drivers with an AZ/DZ license for the following cities:

             

PT Painters & General Handymen, experienced professional, required immediately for all areas. Organized, conscientious and people friendly. All tools, & reliable vehicle required. Good compensation & flexible hours. Apply to handymanplus@ourgoldenyears.ca

To apply please send your resume to chr11@cruickshankgroup.com no later than November 15, 2013. Cruickshank thanks all applicants.

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

CL457669

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Candidates must live within 30 minutes of one of the cities listed above.

Reward!! Lost small black note book (Support our Troops decal on one side), October 11 along road during bike ride between Barrhaven, Stittsville, Almonte, Rosetta, Pakenham area. Email greg@earthenwind.ca or 613-851-3663.

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SALES AND MARKETING MANAGER The position will coordinate and supervise the day to day operations of sales, marketing, tradeshows and Online Catalog Department. Must have strong organizational and communication skills. Attention to detail, working under pressure, ability to meet tight deadlines, handle stress and deal with difficult people. Excellent computer skills in Microsoft Excel and Power Point. 7-10 years of Sales Experience in a manufacturing environment preferably in Fiber Optics or Optics.

PRODUCTION SCHEDULER / PLANNER Must have minimum 5 years experience in production scheduling FIBER OPTIC PRODUCT MANAGERS Responsible for R&D, Production and sales of fiber optic products, such as fiber pigtailing of laser diode/lasers or polarization maintaining fiber components or high power components or hermetic/ photodiodes/ feed thru for opto electronic packaging or fiber optic sensors. Must have 5 years experience in either of the above fiber optic fields and have a University or College degree.

QA MANAGER Must have minimum 8 years experience as a QA Manager. Must have good communication and organizational skills along with an understanding of mechanical drawings and inspection of mechanical parts is an asset.

LOGISTICS/TRAFFIC MANAGER The candidate will be responsible for the day to day operations of the international shipping and receiving/traffic department. The candidate must have strong organizational, communication and computer skills, along with 7-10 years experience in worldwide import and export rules and regulations.

Please Submit your Resume to: Email: hr@ozoptics.com or Fax: (613)831-2151 www.ozoptics.com

Best Theratronics Ltd. is a Canadian company of TeamBestâ&#x201E;˘. We became a member of the Best family in May 2008. We manufacture external beam therapy units and self-contained blood irradiators. We have created a new product line of cyclotrons (B14p, B35p and the B70p) for radioisotope production. The team brings with it a diverse range of knowledge from around the world. TeamBestâ&#x201E;˘ is driven by one primary goal - to provide the best products and services to customers.

KEY RESPONSIBILITIES: t $PNQVUFTEJNFOTJPOTXJUIJOUPMFSBODFTUPMBZPVUXPSLGPS fabrication or fitting by working directly from engineering blueprints. t Selects proper tools to perform shop operations in a skillful, precise and efficient manner employing a general knowledge of materials and metal working techniques. t Performs machining tasks as required by using engineering sketches or verbal instructions. t Prepares set-ups using jigs, fixtures or machine attachments required for complex precision parts and equipment. Makes precision measurements using precision measuring instruments and techniques. t Initiates changes and completes related documentation to meet Quality Program requirements. t Participates in the accurate preparation of written documentation such as procedures and preventative maintenance records. t Assembles fits, aligns and adjusts components to precise tolerances. Maintains the workplace in a neat and safe condition. t Provides technical advice to planning, the Process Specialist relating to prototypes, design of jigs and fixtures as required. Performs other related duties as required.

QUALIFICATIONS: t Normally Community College graduation (2 year Machine Shop program) plus completion of a recognized machinist apprenticeship program. Must have a Provincial Certificate of Qualification or equivalent. Can work independently with minimum supervision. t Must have a thorough knowledge of machining methods and shop mathematics and be able to carry out machining instructions. t Must be able to compute dimensions, tapers, cutting angles, tool settings, feed rates and machine speeds. t Must be able to operate manual and computerized numerical control equipment, as well as run prototype N.C. programs and recommend production changes to manufacturing methods. t Must be able to operate overhead cranes with slings and lifting attachments, perform medium to heavy work, lifting and positioning materials, parts and tools weighing up to 25 kg. t Ability to assist with design of prototypes Jig and fixtures on new and existing equipment as required. t Must have excellent interpersonal skills and the ability to work effectively in a team environment. t Must be an NEW (Nuclear Energy Worker) or prepared to train. r May be required to work evening shift. All applicants should apply in writing to Human Resources: Email: jobs@theratronics.ca or Fax #: (613) 591-2176 NOTE: Only successful candidates shall be contacted for interviews.

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Butcher Supplies, Leather + Craft Supplies and Animal Control Products. Get your Halfords CRIMINAL RECORD? 136 page FREE CATALOG. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let your past limit 1-800-353-7864 or Email: your career plans! order@halfordhide.com. Since 1989 Confidential, Visit our Web Store: Fast Affordable - A+ BBB w w w . h a l f o r d s m a i l o r Rating der.com EMPLOYMENT & TRAVEL FREEDOM Call for FREE INFO BOOKDisability Products. Buy LET 1 - 8 - N O W - P A R D O N and Sell stair lifts, scooters, bath lifts, patient lifts, (1-866-972-7366) w w w . R e m o v e Yo u r R e - hospital beds, etc. Call Silver Cross Ottawa cord.com (613)231-3549.

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Inspired Hearts and Hands Craft Sale- all handmade by local Vendors, November 9, 2013. 9 am-3 pm. Britannia United Church, 985 Pinecrest, Ottawa. (613)794-5709. 33+ vendors. New: gluten free baking.

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TOWNHOMES

3 Bedrooms, 2.5 Bathrooms, 5 appliances and 14 CONVENIENT more, located in established LOCATIONS IN ONTARIO area, on site management ofďŹ ce, from $1445 + up Urbandale Corporation 323 Steeplechase Dr. FIREWOOD (just off Stonehaven Dr.) All Clean, Dry & Split. Kanata, K2M 2N6 100% Hardwood. Ready to Call 613-592-0548 burn. $125/face cord tax

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Eastern Ontarioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Largest Indoor Flea Market 150 booths Open Every Sunday All Year 8am-4pm Hwy. #31 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 2 kms north of 401

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49


COMMUNITY

Connected to your community

The North Gower cheese factory built in 1867

Turnbull School launches 18th United Way campaign Steph Willems steph.willems@metroland.com

Community â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Each year, the United Way Ottawa collects funds to beneďŹ t the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s most vulnerable residents, and each year Turnbull School lends its help. For the 18th consecutive year, the students and staff of Turnbull School on Fisher Avenue are putting their minds together to come up with fundraising ideas for the campaign. While the United Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual campaign began in September with a $21-million goal, Turnbullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commitment to three causes meant their campaign just got underway. The schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Oct. 23 campaign kickoff was attended by Barbara Cook and Goldy Hyder, the Ottawa United Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campaign co-chairs. So, with all of the charities and initiatives out there, why does the school return to the cause year after year? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a simple answer â&#x20AC;&#x201C; we want to get behind so many of the charities helped by the United Way to help others in our city,â&#x20AC;? said Gareth Reid, director of Turnbull School. Reid added that each year, as new faces replace graduating students,

SUBMITTED

Goldy Hyder, United Way Ottawa community campaign co-chairman, was the guest speaker at Turnbull Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s United Way launch assembly on Oct. 23. new ideas for fundraising initiatives emerge from the student body. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s all about getting students involved with a focus of building a stronger community in Ottawa,â&#x20AC;? said Reid.

Jennifer Westendorp jwestendorp@perfprint.ca

Turnbull is home to about 320 students, from kindergarten to Grade 8. While the school has set a fundraising goal in past years, this time around they felt it best to make the goal one of personal involvement. With more students on board, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re likely to raise more money. Some of the activities planned so far include a school-wide dance-athon, a tried-and-true bake sale, a Turnbull families recipe book, the annual (parent organized) Ottawa 67s hockey game, and more. During the kickoff event last week, sisters Hannah and Sophie Weider spoke to the student body about their experience addressing homelessness. Sparked by an encounter with a homeless youth outside a local grocery store, the sisters took it upon themselves to enlist their family and friends in raising funds and awareness to combat the issue. While the United Way campaign runs until early in the new year, Turnbullâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s will wrap up on Nov. 21. The school also organizes an annual Ottawa Hospital campaign, as well as one for Help Lesotho, a charity that assists residents of the HIV/ AIDS-stricken African nation.

News â&#x20AC;&#x201C; It may be coincidence that the ďŹ rst cheese factory in Rideau Township opened on the same day as the Dominion of Canada was formed, but the symbolism is powerful. On July 1, 1867, the provinces of Ontario, Quebec, New Brunswick and Nova Scotia uniďŹ ed and the ďŹ rst cheese factory in the County of Carleton opened for business on a property in North Gower. The decision to erect the factory was made by a group of local farmers in April. Two months later, the farmers were driving their milk to the new factory. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The thing is they had to be close enough to the farm so the farmer could drive his milk to the factory,â&#x20AC;? said Iona Joy, author of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheese Factories of Rideau Township.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;They had to be within two and a half miles to the farm, which was a ďŹ ve mile round trip. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s why you see them dotted around farms.â&#x20AC;? Joy said that some of the factories were close to rivers, which enabled the cheese to be put on boats and get shipped to Montreal. Edward Kidd of Burritts Rapids purchased the North Gower factory 11 years later. Kidd, who served as

a Member of Parliament for several terms early in the 1900s, eventually owned a chain of cheese factories in Carleton County. Kidd trained for the cheese business at his fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s cheese factory in Burritts Rapids. This factory was located in Oxford Township across the Rideau River from Rideau Township, but nearby farmers from Rideau also drew their milk to this site. Successive owners included Thomas Hicks and Royden Olmstead. This ďŹ rst cheese factory burnt down in August, 1932. A second cheese factory was built in North Gower beside Stevens Creek and opened for business in the spring of 1933. The following year, Roy Olmstead sold the factory to Ivan C. Wiltse who operated it until Nate Stuart purchased it in 1945. It closed a few years later and in 1952 it became and remains a private home. The purpose of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheese Factories of Rideau Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; is to serve as a tribute to cheese makers and the farmers who contributed so much both to the local community and to the Canadian economy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I was a member of the historical society back in 1987,â&#x20AC;? said Joy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A couple of members suggested See CHEESE, page 51

Pet Adoptions Position: Job Inventory - Casual Waste Collection Operator Pool Competition Number: 2013-EX-EN-50654465-01 Competition posting date: 2013.09.30, closing date: 2013.12.31

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Note: Applications / resumes received will be used to staff current and on-going requirements until January 31, 2014.

Job Summary Operates vehicles and equipment and performs general labour in the collection and disposal of trash, brush, organics, solid waste or recycling materials (blue/black boxes). For more information and to apply, visit our career site at http://ottawa.ca/careers or to submit a resume and covering letter indicating the competition number to: City of Ottawa Recruitment & StafďŹ ng Human Resources Department 110 Laurier Ave. West, 5th Floor Ottawa, Ontario K1P 1J1 We thank all candidates for their interest, however, only those selected for an interview will be contacted. Applications received will be screened based on information provided. Please ensure you include all relevant details about your qualiďŹ cations for this position. The City of Ottawa is committed to providing quality services by establishing a qualiďŹ ed workforce that reďŹ&#x201A;ects the diverse population it serves. The City encourages applications from all qualiďŹ ed individuals. R0012300533-1107

50

Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013

ID#A153103

Consider Adopting a Special Needs Pet The Ottawa Humane Society is often full of people in the community cat rooms, playing with the kittens. Just across the way, animals like sevenyear-old Gunner the cat watch all the attention bestowed upon those tiny bundles of fur. Though theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d also make wonderful and loving pets, being a little older or having a â&#x20AC;&#x153;special needâ&#x20AC;? means Gunner and others arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always the recipients of the same kind of interest. Gunner has been at the OHS since February. People visit, perhaps take a look, but then pass him up for a younger, smaller cat or kitten. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for Gunner and the other older or special needs animals to ďŹ nd loving forever homes to call their own. Special needs pets may require medication, a special diet, or extra post-adoption vet care. In some cases,

they need nothing more than a little extra time, patience and love from their owners. Potential adopters may be reluctant to bring Gunner home because of his special needs designation. He has a condition called recurrent conjunctivitis with chronic ocular discharge, which just means the tissue around his eyes gets inďŹ&#x201A;amed. This is usually caused by a viral infection and itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s likely that once his stress level is reduced in his forever home, his immune system will get stronger and he will be less prone to these eye infections. Gunner loves to curl up on your lap for ear scratches and pets. He gets along well with other cats but prefers not to share his home with dogs as they scare him. He is also trained to walk on leash!

Please note: The Ottawa Humane Society has many other companion animals available for adoption. Featured animals are adopted quickly! To learn more about adopting an animal from the Ottawa Humane Society please contact us: Website: lll#diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Email: 6Ydei^dch5diiVlV]jbVcZ#XV Telephone:+&(,'*"(&++m'*-

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re thinking about adopting a special needs pet, here are some considerations: s 7HAT ARE THE CIRCUMSTANCES surrounding the animalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s needs? s -IGHTTHEREBEADDITIONALCOSTS Are there special medications, treatments or food your pet will require? s #AN YOU ACCOMMODATE THE animalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s need in your lifestyle? Special needs pets might need medications at certain times of the day or particular living arrangements. 6ISITTHE/(3!DOPTION#ENTREAT 7EST(UNT#LUB2DTOlNDYOURPERFECT COMPANION#ONSIDERADOPTINGASPECIAL needs pet! Have you ever adopted a special needs pet? Tell us about your experience on our Facebook page at Facebook/ OttawaHumane.

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City Operations Portfolio, Environmental Services Department, Solid Waste Services Branch Casual Positions AfďŹ liation: CUPE 503 Inside/Outside Salary: $15.000 to $18.500 per hour (2013 rates of pay) Location: 2799 Swansea Crescent

Bronx ! IS FULL OF LIFE AND ENERGY (E WAS surrendered to the shelter by his owner and is now available for adoption. This one-year-old old English bulldog and 2OTTWEILER MIX IS KNOWN TO MAKE ALL THOSE AROUND HIM laugh. Bronx is a strong boy and is looking for a family who will help him keep his macho physique by providing him with daily exercise. Bronx loves to make new dog and human FRIENDS-OSTOFALL THISSWEETBOYISLOOKINGFORAFAMILY that he can just love, and love, and love! Bronx needs a family that has previous dog experience and he will need to be enrolled in a dog obedience course. To learn more about Bronx, please contact the Ottawa Humane Society at 613-725-3166 ext. 258 or visit us at 245 West Hunt Club Rd.


NEWS

Connected to your community

Cheese Factories of Rideau Township Continued from page 50

SUBMITTED

The Rideau Township Historical Society and Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee joined forces to delve into the history of cheese factories in Rideau Township. Taped interviews were conducted with local residents. The first edition of Cheese Factories of Rideau Township was released in 1990. The second edition was launched Oct. 16. ond edition was launched last month. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The project really began in 1987, with the interview and

research we were doing at the archives and the land registry office,â&#x20AC;? said Joy. This edition has a lot more

      

   

   



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that we start to locate and identify old cheese factory buildings. At the time, we knew about four. Once we started talking to people, we found more.â&#x20AC;? Joy said it didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t take long to recognize the importance of cheese factories in the Rideau Township, all of which were closed down by the 1960â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Around the turn of the 20th century, it was at times the second and third largest export from Canada,â&#x20AC;? said Joy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Timber was at the top and cheese took turns with fish. It was a huge part of the Canadian economy, with 95 per cent being exported to Great Britain.â&#x20AC;? The Rideau Township Historical Society and Local Architectural Conservation Advisory Committee joined forces to delve into the history of cheese factories in Rideau Township. Taped interviews were conducted with local residents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At one point, there were 70 people involved,â&#x20AC;? said Joy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Once we had all this information, we decided to put it into a book. It was really fun to do.â&#x20AC;? The first edition of â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheese Factories of Rideau Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; was released in 1990. The sec-

material. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a new and improved version.â&#x20AC;? Joy spoke of five standing cheese factories in the Rideau Township, which include one on Roger Stevens Drive in North Gower, one in Kars, one in Carsonby, one off Malakoff Road and one in Goodstown. In total, there were 12 cheese factories serving farmers within Rideau Township, all of which are featured in â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheese Factories of Rideau Township.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Joy worked at the Rideau Township Archives from the time it opened until 2006. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I joined the historical society and found it really interesting,â&#x20AC;? said Joy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I met some wonderful people. I loved being there. I might volunteer again.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cheese Factories of Rideau Townshipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; can be purchased at Dickinson House in Manotick, the Rideau Branch of the City of Ottawa Archives in North Gower, the General Store in Kars and Office Pro in Manotick. For more information on the book, contact the Rideau Township Archives at (613)489-2926 or Jane Anderson at (613)-692-4147. The book costs $20 and all proceeds will go to the Rideau Township Historical Society.

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Local events and happenings over the coming weeks â&#x20AC;&#x201D; free to non-profit organizations Fax: 613-224-3330, E-mail: nepean@metroland.com

Nov. 7 Please join IODE Walter Baker Chapter and celebrity emcee Derick Fage at the Hellenic Meeting and Reception Centre, 1315 Prince of Wales Dr. for fun and fashion featuring the spectacular designs of Three Wild Women. Proceeds will support, Operation Veteran and other charitable projects. Tickets are $55 (includes dinner). Cash bar and silent auction starts at 6 p.m. Dinner is served at 7 p.m. For Tickets and more information call Dolores at 613-274-0598. Deadline for tickets Nov. 1.

Through Nov. 10 Foyer Gallery presents When Colours Change, a group exhibition featuring an exciting and diverse collection of art by local artists. Foyer Gallery is a non-proďŹ t artist run gallery located in the Nepean Sportsplex, 1701 Woodroffe Ave., entrance 1. For information call 613-580-2424, ext 42226 or visit www.foyergallery.com.

and speaker Sonja Pretorius speaks on A New Beginning. Cost is $8 (ďŹ rst timers $4). Refreshmnents, 1 p.m., Calvin Christian Reformed Church, 1475 Merivale Rd. RSVP: 613-692-6290. All women welcome.

we are always in need of new crochet participants. No experience is necessary and everything is supplied. Please consider joining the Barrhaven group that meets at the Metro Grocer at Strandherd and Woodroffe, the second Monday of the month from 1 to 3 p.m. For information contact crochetmats@rogers. com.

Four-hand euchre beginning at 7:30 p.m. in St. Philipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Parish Hall, 127 Burke St., Richmond. Admission, which includes a light lunch, is $5 per person. For more information phone 613-489-3996.

Nov. 12 Come pick up a bargain at our annual Harvest of Hands Auction and white elephant tables featuring John Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill from 9:15 to 11 a.m. at 225 McClellan Rd. Also enjoy Sonja Pretorius who will talk about A New Beginning and be serenaded by the exceptional voice of Corie Lanctin-Iles. Entry is $5 and $2 ďŹ rst time includes free childcare, light refreshment and door prizes. Reserve at 613-721-1257 or 613-829-2063. Sponsored by Ottawa West Christian Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club.

Nov. 15 Come out and enjoy a steak dinner on Friday, November 15th, 2013 at the Barrhaven Legion, 3500 FallowďŹ eld Rd. Dance to live music provided by Jim Simpson and Tom Hill. Tickets are $15 for members and $17 for non-members. Call the Barrhaven Legion at 613-843-8691 and make your reservation by Nov. 14 at 4p.m. Stillwater Creek Retirement Community annual bazaar at 2018 Robertson Rd. From 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free admission and parking. Baking, knit goods, books jewelry, crafts, silent auction and refresh-

Nov. 13

Nov. 11 Milk bag mats are still in need and while we have an overabundance of milk bags,

Central Christian Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Club invites you to their fall fair and silent auction with soloist Jessica Ferguson

ments. Proceeds to the Ottawa Heart Institute.

Nov. 16 The Trend Arlington Community Association is looking for additional vendors for itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual craft sale on Nov. 16th from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Table rental $25. Email carmen.parsons@rogers.com for details. Christmas fair from 9 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. at Bells Corners United Church, 3955 Old Richmond Rd. Crafts, baking , books, deli, ladies boutique, silent auction, lunch, childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s toys and treasures. All welcome. Information: 613-820-8103. Thorncliffe Place Retirement Home annual holiday bazaar from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at 1 Thorncliffe Place, Bells Corners, across the street from the Emmanuel Alliance Church. We will have a variety of crafts, knitting, jewelry, gift baskets, jams, preserves, books and more. Holly Days bazaar at Christ Church Bells Corners, 3861 Old Richmond Rd, starting at 9 a.m. Christmas crafts, gift baskets, wreaths. garlands, knitting, home baking, jams, jellies, delicatessen, jewelry, books, music, white elephant,

Nov. 18 The Manordale-Woodvale Community Association is holding its annual general meeting at 68 Knoxdale Rd., beside the ďŹ re station, starting at 7:30 p.m. Executive for the upcoming year will be elected and the associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ďŹ nancial report will be tabled. Coun. Keith Egli will be attending and available to discuss community issues. Light refreshments will be served.

Nov. 20 Joanne Plummer joins the Barrhaven Garden Club in demonstrating how to create fabulous holiday centerpieces at Barrhaven United Church, 3013 Jockvale Rd. at 7:30 p.m. Net proceeds to Barrhaven Food Cupboard. Guests $5.

Nov. 21 IODE Walter Baker Chapter will meet at 1 p.m. at 453 Parkdale Ave. Women of all ages are invited to attend and learn about volunteer work. For more information, please visit iodewalterbaker.weebly. com or call Alia at 613-864-

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Christmas bazaar at Barrhaven United Church, 3013 Jockvale Rd., from 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. Lunch served from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free admission and parking. For more info contact 613-825-1707 or visit www. barrhavenunited.org.

Nov. 29 Come out and enjoy a beef stroganoff dinner at the Barrhaven Legion, 3500 FallowďŹ eld Rd. Dance to live music provided by Hallman and Hoffman. Tickets are $13 for members and $15 for nonmembers. Call the Barrhaven Legion at 613-843-8691 and make your reservation by Nov. 28 at 4p.m.

Dec. 21 Visit with Santa, fun games, amazing rafďŹ&#x201A;e prizes, silent auction, refreshments and more at Prince of Wales Manor, 22 Barnstone Dr., from 1to 4p.m. Visit LivPolarBear.com in support of World Wildlife Foundation.

Through Dec. 23 Ottawa Neighbourhood Services Fall Clothing Drive. Drop off your gently used clothing, shoes and boots at any Browns Cleanersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; locations and get 10 per cent off your dry cleaning. Christmas sale now underway at 10 Rideau Heights Dr. Call 613728-3737 for details.

The TOPS (Take Off Pounds Sensibly) meet every Tuesday at the Barrhaven United Church, 3013 Jockvale Rd. Check out www.tops.org, call 613-838-5357 or email at cobillp@sympatico.ca First meeting is free; see what we are all about.

November 16 - 8:00 pm

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Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013


51. Within reach 56. Turkish brandy 57. Metal food storage container 58. Batten down 59. Assist in wrongdoing 60. Old world, new 61. Rust fungus spore cases 62. A way to wait 63. Point midway between S and SE 64. Adam and Eve’s third son CLUES DOWN 1. Has two wheels 2. “A Death in the Family” novelist 3. Fabric stuffing 4. Mix in a pot 5. Move up a mountain 6. Replenishment 7. Weight of a ship’s cargo 8. Flightless birds with flat breastbones 9. Scholarship bequester Cecil 10. Consumer advocate Ralph 11. Overgarments 13. Terminator

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17. Derive 24. Angry 25. Imprudent 26. Rural Free Delivery (abbr.) 27. __ Lilly, drug company 28. Chest muscle (slang) 29. Lease 35. Point midway between E and SE 36. Cool domicile 37. First woman 38. Radioactivity unit 40. Revolves 41. Incongruities 42. ___-Magnon: early European 43. Indefinitely long periods 44. Saturated 45. Mannerly 47. Abu __, United Arab Emirates capital 48. Move rhythmically to music 49. Cheerless 52. 4 highest cards 53. Criterion 54. Person from U.K. (abbr.) 55. Affirmative! (slang)

1107

CLUES ACROSS 1. Horse drawn carriages 5. Cathode-ray tube 8. Ribosomal ribonucleic acid 12. Marbles playing stone 14. Zodiacal lion 15. Whale ship captain 16. Hit the sack 18. Hostelry 19. People of southern India 20. Four 21. Male workforce 22. March 15 23. Food lifter 26. Copy 30. De Mille (dancer) 31. Overcharged 32. Conducted 33. Pronouncements 34. Flemish names of Ypres 39. Denotes three 42. Root source of tapioca 44. Animal track 46. Backed away from 47. Neighborhood canvas 49. Pigeon-pea plant 50. Nursing group

53


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54

Nepean-Barrhaven News EMC - Thursday, November 7, 2013


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