Page 1

FREE PEOPLE A JOURNEY INTO EUROPE

ELLYN GRANT 1


FASH30002 | Ellyn Grant | N0307752 |Word count 5572.

2

Fig 1: Free People canvas bag. 3


Contents

6 | Introduction 12 | Methodology 24 | Brand values: Expression & connection 36 | The bohemian aesthetic 54 | Future trends 64 | The market 74 | How to make sustainable sexy 86 | Stores set to become focal points of the community 94 | Craft as brand handwriting 102 | Consumer 112 | Brands that have expanded into other cultures 120 | What’s next? 124 | The big creative idea 156 | Conclusion 160 | List of illustrations 166 | List of references

Fig 2: Collecting ceramics

172 | Bibliography 188 | Appendix

4

5


Chapter 1:

Fig 3: Relaxation space at home

6

| Introduction 7


F

ounded in Philidelphia in 1984, Free People was created for those who wanted to show a little creativity and freedom through the way that they dressed. The brand embodies bohemian and eclectic style influences and is directed towards the carefree, confident and curious young women who lives free through art, music and travel. With a distinct aesthetic apparent throughout all of their stores, Free People is able to extend the bohemian brand essence into a lifestyle creating a visually exciting retail space for consumers to enjoy. However recent influxes in technology innovation have changed the role and character of the high street. Once the physical store was at the centre of the consumer journey.Now however it is just one of many available options when it comes to shopping. This doesn’t mean that the in store environment should be overlooked, “the high street still has a place in the shopping journey but its role has shifted, and it now needs to offer a more dynamic experience’’ (Patel, D. 2013). This social shift is expected to develop in 2014 as it is predicted that stores are set to become focal points of the community. With the threat that 40% of high street shops could close in the next five years (Mintel, D, 2012: Online) it is crucial that stores recognise the importance of becoming places to socialise and relax rather than merely focusing on being places of consumption. If more brands achieve this it could present a way of silencing the ever growing concern for the continuing decline of the British high street whilst re-connecting communities at the same time.

Fig 4: Girls on film

8

9


T

he Free People in store environments however go beyond just pleasing the eye. They also please the planet. With all fixtures being handmade right down to the crochet coat hangers (See fig 5) the brand’s interest in sustainability and concern for the environment appeal to consumers on a deeper level. In a recent study Globescan and Sustainability revealed that “9 in 10 consumers globally say that ‘ingredient transparent’ is extremely important for companies to address in regards to their products and services” (Buckingham, F: 2013). Moreover with health and well being rated highly in consumer priorities it is evident across multiple markets and product categories that consumers are expressing a growing interest towards what goes in, on and around their bodies. Connecting with green aware consumers is something Free People further achieves through the medium of craft and DIY. One way in which Free People conveys its brand transparency, as mentioned earlier, is through developing the lifestyle which is evident through the brand blog. With a section based soley on DIY, Free People focus strongly on customisation, individuality and the notions of DIY culture. DIY culture isn’t however anything new or innovative. The trend developed in the 1970’s recession and is now something that in times of economic crisis rises to the surface. “DIY culture embraces a powerful notion: You can have what you want if you can learn to make it yourself.” (Gentile, T: 2011) and as our access to information and resources grows, so too does our desire to create. With consumers turned off by commercialisation they are instead looking towards personalisation and therefore today “it’s all about personalising the retail experience and focusing on the individual.” (Brandweiner, N: 2013).

10

Eager to explore and discover new cultures the Free People “design team have always been very inspired by British style and the fashion forward UK consumer” (Hayne, D, 2012) and with a growing UK fan base it seems like the next natural progression for Free People is to explore the idea of a physical UK store. This report will therefore outline the executions needed for the implementation of taking this brand into the UK with the view to creating a marketing strategy which is in unison with the social and cultural issues discussed above.

Fig 5: Instore enviroment moodboard

11


Chapter 2:

Fig 6: Eco dyeing with flowers

12

| Methodology 13


Research questions The research question for this report aimed to answer the key question: Is it the right time to launch the American brand Free People into the UK market, creating an effective brand store as opposed to just selling through the current concessions within brands such as Asos and Urban Outfitters. This was asked due to initial research at the beginning of this project which indicated increased demand for the brand following the recent launch of a UK Free People based e-commerce website last year. This opening question then led to further questions such as what is happening within the retail market today to potentially create an appetite for Free People within the UK? What are the most important promotional messages? How do we get the UK to be as excited and enthusiastic about the brand as they are in the US? Answers to these questions were revealed through both primary and secondary research.

Primary research

Research objectives

In order to gain research confirmation for the proposed ideas, primary research was key. Eager to uncover current perceptions and levels of awareness of the brand both in the UK and the US, I began by conducting a series of short interviews amongst Free People’s target demographic. I contacted a handful students from the University of Ithica USA and also questioned British girls in the format of an online interview sent out via social networking sites. As well as interacting with current and potential consumers, speaking directly to Free People representatives and employees was vital and this was achieved via email and a handwritten letter. In order to challenge , analyse and track the trend of the bohemian aesthetic, a street style excericse was also carried out.

Research throughout this project intended to discover what at the moment is being guessed and assumed. Brand values, personality and USPs needed to be explored in order to find some research validation to highlight what the most important promotional messages are that could then be integrated into the marketing and communication strategy.

14

15


Fig 7 |

Secondary research Secondary research was an essential aspect of this project and therefore a wide range of media formats were utilised. One of the main sources that influenced and provided inspiration for this project was the use of audio visual resources. Through sites such as Vimeo and YouTube I was able to explore the brand videos and gain a wider understanding of the Free People lifestyle. Reports were also a great aid in terms of research. Mintel and sites such as WGSN provided information for an in-depth study of the current retail market and future trends to be aware of. Insights into consumption, the way we consume, needs and trends were also covered within research found on Mintel, WGSN and a selection of further websites. Books were also utilised during the research stage, covering topics ranging from ways to market soley to women, exploring the ‘big idea’, to graphic inspiration.

16

Expert interviews:

Who: Edward Mullen. Job role: Designer of digital experiences in collaboration with Free People. Why: Knowledge of the brand and approaches to marketing due to the fact that Edward has worked closely with Free People since 2006 helping to design the e-commerce experience. Method: Email interview Transcription: Appendix 194. Date: 16th May 2013. Who: Allison Ditty Job role: Web manager at Free People head office Philadelphia. Why: Working in Free People’s head office Allison was approached due to her knowledge and understanding of the brand. Method: Email response to a handwritten card. Transcription: Appendix page 195. Date: 12th April 2013. Fig 8 |

Analysis of research methods:

Interviews with Free People staff were conducted to allow for a more detailed explanation of the topics covered within this report. Emails were sent to 5 people outlining the project details and asking to discuss it with them; it wasn’t expected that everyone would be willing to help or reply. Those receiving emails were chosen based on their knowledge regarding retail, Free People as a brand and initial research Out of the 5 people contacted, only 1 replied offering to help. Without having any personal connections with the respondents it was therefore difficult to find ways to communicate. The respondee was Edward Mullen, a designer who works directly with Free People helping to improve digital experiences.

17


This interview proved beneficial in terms of insight into the marketing and communication strategy aspect of my project. However after trying, and failing, via emails to get a response from Free People head office in Philadelphia I decided to hand write a letter instead. Hoping to stand out and make an impression, I hand made a card with the title ‘little help?’, inside outlined my project aims, a number of questions and my email address to respond to (see Figures 9-11). A week later I got a reply proving that speaking to the brand in an innovative way on a personal level was a success. One of the disadvantages of this method however was that I wasn’t able to ask too many questions in the card due to lack of space and the fact that a reply was uncertain. This did however lead me to get a contact email address for further communication. Despite being very happy with the response, upon reflection it would have been better had I been able to contact more people from the brand in order to gain a larger body of research. Both participants were interviewed via email. With both participants living or working in the USA, meeting face to face wasn’t a feasible option and therefore both opted to respond via email. Prior to each interview a list of slightly different questions were drafted and written objectively to encourage the respondent to answer honestly. One of the disadvantages however to an email interview is that the questions are set in stone beforehand and further questions could therefore not be asked depending on the direction that the conversation took. Consequently this eliminated the possibilities for new, advancing topics of conversation to arise. On the other hand however, an advantage of interviewing via emails is that the participants had time to think about and draft their answers before replying therefore allowing more consideration and thought to go into their responses. By interviewing online it also allowed people to choose the location of the interview beforehand therefore suggesting that they were in surroundings where they felt comfortable and relaxed providing a good basis for answering the questions honestly and comprehensively. The responses from the participants helped to direct and generate ideas in order to progress with this project. Fig 9: Handmade card

18

19


Fig 10: Project brief

20

Fig 11: Questions

21


Method: Email interviews with British girls. Date: March 25th 2013. (See appendix 5 page 206) Analysis of research method: Online interviews were piloted via email on social media sites in order to research general opinions, perceptions and statistics to aid future advances within this project. Ten, quick, simple, questions were sent out to 10 people, all of whom responded. The aim of this approach was to gain a better depth of understanding regarding brand awareness within the UK. The answers collected provided honest, useful insights to consider within the next stages of the project. Method: Email interviews with students at Ithica University USA. Date: March 27th 2013. (See appendix 3 page 198). Analysis of research method: Eager to find out if opinions of Free People were the same amongst both US and UK consumers American girls within the brands target demographic were contacted through Ithica university USA. With a view to identifying current competitors, existing perceptions and levels of understanding regarding the brand’s lifestyle I devised a series of questions to see how US consumers are responding to and communicating with Free People currently. The University of Ithica was chosen due to the fact that I had a contact there studying for a degree in marketing and communications. The 10 question survey was then passed on to 10 other students who all responded again via email. Again the main advantage of this approach was that the participants could answer the questions in their own time and consider their responses without being rushed. However upon reflection maybe it may have been more effective to have carried out these interviews in different formats as opposed to just email.For example conducting half by telephone could have provided extended answers and a more in depth insight. However the responses collected from this method of research were invaluable providing me with an insight into the American market that would have been challenging to achieve had I not utilised my contacts. Consent forms and information sheets regarding the project were again sent out to each respondent to ensure their clarity on the task.

22

Method: Street style. Date: 27th April 2013. Time: 11am-2pm. Analysis of research method: Conducting street style photography was an important aspect of this project enabling me to critically analyse the bohemian aesthetic and assessing the current market. This particular research method was carried out in order to discover current takes and interpretations of the bohemian trend. It was hoped that this research method would present the opportunity for an insight into peoples personal style and to provide the opportunity to discuss directly their outfit choices. The street style exercise took place in Nottingham city centre and a total of 6 people were photographed. All participants signed model release forms and consent forms ensuring that their pictures could be used to inform this project. This exercise proved effective in the sense that it presented primary research of a visual nature which suggested that the bohemian aesthetic and trend is still current however more partipants were needed in order to make it fully viable. Method: Street interviews asking what does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Date: 25th April 2013. Time: 12pm2pm. (See appendix 205). Analysis of research method: In order to discover peoples’ current perceptions regarding the brands synergy, a series of interviews amongst Free Peoples target consumers within the ABC1demographic of 20-30 year old females were conducted in order to uncover what connotations the word “bohemian” means to people. Taking place on the streets of Nottingham city centre,these interviews used a snowball sampling technique. Conducted at lunch time on a Friday the intention was to speak to young professionals on their lunch breaks. I positioned myself in a central location in Market Square in order to approach people easily. Of the ten people I spoke to, all consented to a short interview comprised of just one quick question. Answers were recorded and later transcribed. As participants were randomly selected with no advance warning that they were to be approached, they didn’t have time to think about their responses prior to the interview. Putting them on the spot meant that some may have been nervous and reserved about sharing information, particularly as they were aware that their answers were being recorded. Consent forms were however filled out in order to demonstrate the participants’ willingness to engage in the process and for their permission to be used within the future stages of my report.

23


Chapter 3:

Fig 12: Wanderlust: Travel essentials

24

| Brand values: Expression & connection 25


Brand values: Expression & connection. S

ince it was founded 30 years ago, Free People has since put down roots not only across 75 US stores but also globally with over 1,500 concessions and speciality boutiques. Currently operating in the UK through concessions such as Asos and Urban Outfitters, Free People also launched a UK e-commerce site earlier this year. Web manager at Free People, Allison Ditty, states how “we are fortunate to have distinctive items both in our wholesale line and on our website. This gives our customer reason to visit us in many channels.” (Ditty, A: 2013. Appendix 1.2 P 195), thereby offering exclusives as a tactic to drive traffic. The Free People UK website, according to managing director David Hayne, was created as a result of “great demand for the brand already through the US site and our British fans have been requesting through social sites and our BLDG5 blog that we bring the brand to the UK so we were eager to satisfy them with a faster easier and more hassle free shopping experience.” (Hayne, D, 2012). E-commerce is a powerful marketing tool and one that “has transformed what was once a game anchored in local markets- with retailers choosing to expand internationally when they reached saturation nationally-into one where they can pursue internationalisation at the same time as domestic expansion.”( Balchandani, A: 2013). E-commerce has allowed Free People to put down roots in the UK market but it is also a powerful tool when it comes to communicating with consumers and building brand awareness, this is something that needs to be addressed due to the fact that only a third of British girls surveyed have heard of the brand. ( See appendix page). Forming genuine connections and relationships with consumers is however something that Free People are currently very aware of and work hard to achieve. At a recent UK retail week conference led by Andrew Jobling, he explained the importance of communication due to the fact that today “consumers are looking for deeper relationships with retailers but in exchange for that have greater expectations which need to be met” (Joblinng, A, 2013: Online). Focusing on individuality and expression, one way in which Free People are set to achieve this is through the way that they communicate with consumers. Speaking to customers in line with the brands friendly tone of voice, as opposed to being just another corporate voice trying to tell us something allows the brand to engage and connect with consumers on an emotive, personal level. “As consumer behaviours change, businesses have an opportunity to maximise the potential of new technologies to create meaningful connections with their customers” ( Mast, S, 2012: Online). One way in which Free People are achieving this is through the creation of a brand lifestyle. Providing consumers with what they are demanding, Free People integrates it’s brand essence across all social networking platforms. Creating and spreading an authentic brand story from the the brand blog, Instagram, Twitter and Facebook right down to the Youtube channel, presents consumers with the opportunity to communicate and be connected with the brand in whichever way they desire.

26

Fig 13: Brand personality moodboard.

27


Fig 14: Bohemian bliss.

28

"The brand is a lot more than clothes. It is more of a lifestyle that speaks to a certain type of girl. Anyone can buy the clothes at a department store, but the individual stores speak to a specific customer from the employees to the decore. You don't however have to own the clothes to be part of Free People. Beyond the clothes, the Free People blog talks about music, DIY projects, films and more subjects. Overall the brand is its own culture and that is what I love about it the most". (Kelly S, 2013. Appendix 3.1 page 202). 29


WHAT MAKES FREE PEOPLE SPECIAL?

Fig 15: Free People Aaker model

30

Fig 16: Free People garments

31


The Free People pet project is a rang of ecofriendly pet accessories in collaboration with Philadelphia’s largest animal shelter with 100% proceeds from certain items, and a percentage of others going towards the cause. All the animals featured in the look book are rescued or adopted animals and the range mixes practical chic with eco friendliness.

Fig 17: Areas of brand innovation moodboard.

32

Bike and skate board accessories: A range of artisan accessories to make bikes stylish including Hand tooled painted bike seats, crochet skirt guards, and wine bottle holders. With a look book based around the idea of girls and their bikes and an organic, DIY video for the blog showing how to decorate your bike Free People have also collaborated with bike brand Schwinn to provide competition opportunities and chances to win the featured bikes.

Health and fitness is a large part of the free people lifestyle. Revolving around the idea, and trend, of health well being Free People have developed food recipes and products to reflect this. Yoga is a current big trend and Free People have noticed this and as a result created a range of yoga accessories from clothes down to matts as well as also recently bringing out a line of hula hoops.

The Free People style me gallery is an innovative online space in which consumers are encouraged to upload style pictures, curate collections, follow stylists and heart their favourite things on the website. Based around the idea of creating a style ‘community’ the gallery allows consumers to share their own images and showcase their personal style, sharing and communicating with the brand and other fans. The heart it concept is an innovative tool that allows consumers to bookmark their favourite items without being pressured to buy whilst also being beneficial for Free People as it automatically creates a log of popular products amongst consumers. Fig 18: Free People Style me gallery moodboard

33


One of the major aspects of the Free People online lifestyle is the BLG25 blog. Covering topics such as music, food, fashion, and photography one of the main features is the DIY section. Focused around the idea of up-cycling everyday items available in and around the home, Free People come up with simple yet effective ways to revitalise them through craft. Step by step guides allow consumers to get involved and to make their own versions as well as being encouraged to share comments and images of their creations online.

Fig 19: Free People DIY & Artisan moodboard

34

With really strong music links and a focus on playlists and covering a wide range of US festivals such as Coachella, Free People translates its musical influences across all channels of the brand. The blog creates DIY projects such as festival flag making, the YouTube site shows 60 second festival style videos and the website shows a festival shop now range of looks whilst the Instagram collects all the images that have been hash tagged from the festivals themselves. Therefore using music as a vechicle in which to integrate all of their social networking channels around one theme and offering exclusives on each encouraging fans to follow them on numerous platforms and engage with the brand as opposed to just one.

Fig 20: Free People music links

35


Chapter 4:

Fig 21:Day dream believer

36

| The bohemian aesthetic

37


Bohemian

native or inhabitant of Bohemia.

Free People is based on, and inspired, by everything

bohemian and eclectic and

therefore it is vital that this aesthetic is explored in detail. In order to expand into the UK there must be an identified market. Therefore how successful is

this aesthetic from a brand point of view?

Who is doing it well? What aspects of the market are being covered? These are all questions needing to be addressed.

a socially unconventional person, especially one who is involved in the arts.

38

39


D

eriving

from

gypsy

hippy culture bohemian style was born out of an expression against authority. Distinct clothing was, and still is, an expression of individuality against the mainstream. On the other hand some may suggest that today bohemian style is becoming more of a state of mind as opposed to a look thus reflecting the carefree, adventurous and independent individual that Free People is targeting. It could however

Bohemian as aesthetic has been slightly

be argued that

an ‘over done’ which is something that Free People need to be cautious of. Marie Greene, contributing editor on

“bohemian boho, reached the

Ehow believes that

Chic, or height of it’s popularity in 2004 to 2005 when it was associated with actresses like Sienna Miller and Mischa Barton” (Greene, M, 2010) allowing many celebrities at the time to build their own brands on the back of the bohemian aesthetic, Nicole Richie, Kate Moss for Topshop, and Harlow created by Mary Kate and Ashley to name a few. Greenes quote maybe be correct but the fact cannot be ignored that every year, especially around festival season, floppy hats, floaty maxi dresses, and floral prints sneak back into fashion. While they might not resemble the

40

What does Bohemian mean to you?

and

past boho aesthetic in full,

hippie

spirit still shines through regardless.

Subtly re-imagining the past has ensured that “bohemian sentiments of the 60s and 70s get a modern and ultra-luxurious reshaping for spring 2013. Subtly infusing garments with a hippie spirit, it’s an evolution we can all embrace come the warmer weather.” (Fashionising, 2013: Online),

bohemian style influences are here to stay. proving that

From street style, interior, photography and editorial content, to high street & designer fashion, bohemian and eclectic style influences lend themselves to many different aspects of the market. The following mood boards highlight the visual inspiration that benchmark Free People as a brand and how the bohemian aesthetic is currently being portrayed in British culture today.

Fig 22: What does Bohemian mean to you? See appendix 4 page 205.

41


HIGHSTREET

FRENCH CONNECTION

Every year we see high street brands taking inspiration from bohemian influences, the following moodboards highlight what is currently on offer and how a handful of brands have interpreted the aesthetic.

Fig 25: French Connection moodboard

H&M

Fig 24: H&M moodboard

PULL & BEAR Fig 23: Pull & Bear moodboard

42

43


ZARA

Fig 26: Zara moodboard

TOPSHOP

Fig 28: Topshop moodboard

RIVER ISLAND Fig 27: River Island moodboard

44

45


INTERIORS

With trend focuses within interiors currently steering away from minimalistic design and instead focusing on bohemian and eclectic influences they lend themselves also to a variety of different concepts such as ethnic, modern and art deco. Many trend books and blogs are showcasing bohemian style interior spaces which are visualised over the next few pages.

Fig 29: Bazaar style moodboard 1

Fig 30: Bedroom

46

47


Fig 31: Bazaar styles moodboard 2

48

Fig 32: Lounge

49


STREET STYLE

50

In order to see first hand how everyday people are interpreting the bohemian aesthetic a street style exercise was carried out highlighting how it translates into personal style.

Fig 33: Street Style Photography

51


EDITORIAL

The bohemian aesthetic, as a theme, influences a lot of photography and editorial content. The following moodboards highlight recent spreads.

Fig 34: Bohemian editioral moodboard Fig 35: Vogue Japan a bohemian calling

52

53


Chapter 5:

Fig 36: Washed out

54

| Future trends 55


Spring/Summer 14. Trend

forecasting is a major aspect for all brands to consider however in recent years it has “become somewhat of a trend in itself as we have seen the proliferation of so-called ‘cool hunters’ and ‘trend hunters’ emerging onto the scene.”(Sheppard, S,2013). Most companies tend to collaborate with international trend agencies however the sheer amount of information overload has lead to some opting to set up their own internal trend forecasting teams. The following three Micro trends have therefore been devised in order to inspire and inform Free People’s future vision when expanding into the UK market.

Fig 37: The meaning of white

56

57


BLOOM REVIVAL INFLUENCES| GRID | PHOTOGRAPHIC FLORALS | TRANSPARENCY | ANGULAR | REPEAT PATTERN | SEQUENCES | STRUCTURED | CRISP | Perfect to be translated into the Free People dress shop and skirts.

Fig 38 :Bloom revival moodboard

58

59


FOLK MENAGE INFLUENCES| Beading | Stich | Tribe | Community | |Hand made |Rag doll | community | Detailed | Global | | Asia | Traditional | Perfect

to

be translated into Free accessories & footwear.

People

Fig 39: Folk menage moodboard

60

61


GALACTIC GRUNGE INFLUENCES | Geometric shapes | Gaming | Cyber | Street art | Graffiti | Graphics | Repeat patterns | Animalistic | Hypnotic | Trance | Out of this world | Noise | Perfect to be translated into Free People casual tees and jewellery.

Fig 40: Galactic grunge moodboard

62

63


Chapter 6:

Fig 41: Office space

64

| The market

65


The Market. D

espite tough economic circumstances as a result of the ongoing recession in the UK, clothes still remain more of a necessity as opposed to a want and for that reason the women’s retail sector continues to thrive. “Womenswear dominates the clothing industry and accounts for two thirds of the value of the adult outerwear market, reflecting women’s affinity for fashion and enjoyment in the clothes shopping experience.’ (Mintel, D 2012: Online). Younger women make up most of that statistic as they are the most avid followers of trends and regard fashion to be a key weapon in regards to expressing their personality, attracting attention and fitting in with peers. In terms of consumer behaviour we have seen disposable incomes fall under constant pressure leaving almost half of women with no choice but to buy clothes in sales, but recent shifts however have seen the proportion of women who are shopping more frugally decline in the last 12 months (Mintel, D, 2012: Online) proving that climates are changing rapidly. One explanation for this shift could be as a result of a zeitgeist picked up by the cover of New Yorker magazine back in 2010. (See Fig 42) The cover featured a young man hanging up his PHD certificate in a bedroom reminiscent of his childhood, a cardboard box at his feet hinting that he plans to move back home instead of moving forward towards independence.

66

In the back ground stand his parents, with facial expressions oozing worry, and almost fear regarding the situation. Sociologists have responded and made light of this image explaining how we are in the thick of what they have titled “the changing timetable for adulthood” (Marantz, H, 2010: Online). This quote represents the fact that the milestones in life that we prepare for whilst growing up such as buying our first house, getting married and starting a family are occurring at a slower pace. This could be because of a lack of disposable income due to a shortage of jobs and rising unemployment levels, and less of an urge to rush into marriage because of the general acceptance towards premarital sex. This however is not by any means a negative thing, it is merely representative of changing times and attitudes. In fact in terms of the womens retail market in particular this idea of delayed adulthood is having a very positive effect on the economy due to the fact that “young women are delaying making big financial commitments, cushioning them from the worst effects of the recession and allowing them to splash out on fashion,” (Mintel, D 2012: Online). Delaying the transition to adulthood therefore means that people have more disposable incomes and have greater spending potential than younger consumers.

Fig 42: The Boomerang generation

Women falling with Free Peoples’ target demographic of ABC1 consumers aged between 20-30 are more likely to invest in fewer well produced garments as they would “rather spend money on high quality products that will last longer” (Kelly, S, 2013. See appendix 3.1 P202) as opposed to bulk buying cheaper, shorter lasting items of clothing. This doesn’t mean to say however that ‘budget’ retailers within the UK are suffering. In fact “the value of budget stores such as Primark, Tesco, Matalan, Asda and TK Maxx has increased by 45% over the past 5 years to more than £6 billion” ( Maris, J, 2008. P.2), as there is still a larger percentage of consumers who say they “wish I had the will power to save up for something really nice, but I just don’t” (Link, K, 2013. See appendix 3.7 P198). However with an increasing concern towards the environment and a desire for items of higher quality growing at a fast rate, consumers are becoming more interested in how and where garments are being made.

67


Monsoon & Accessorize

COMPETITORS When planning an expansion into the UK market it is vital that all possible competitors are identified before hand. The following moodboards and perceptual map are designed with the intent of identifying brands for Free People to look out for.

68

Arguabley Free Peoples’ main competitor on the UK high street Monsoon & Accessoize have an established USP due to their inspirational, globally sourced, good quality collection of garments and accessories. Targeting the demographic of ABC1 consumers ages 18-35 the brand has a strong bohemian brand essence which would rival that of Free People.

Fig 43: Monsoon & Accessorize moodboard

69


Pull & Bear

Despite being sister brands Urban Outfitters and Free People share the same brand values and eclectic essence. Both targeting a care-free, confident consumer, Free Peoples’ demographic is however slightly older distinguishing a gap between the two. It is important that the difference between the brands however remains apparent in order for both to succeed within the same market and therefore this is something that will need to be taken into consideration.

Pull & Bear are an interesting competitor for Free People. Despite having lower price points the brand is one to watch due to their recent expansion into the UK market. With a bohemian essence evident within their designs and a similar mission statement to Free People aimed at “young people who have a casual dress sense, who shun stereotypes and who want to feel good in what they are wearing.�

Fig 44: Pull & Bear moodboard

70

Urban Outfitters

Fig 45: Urban Outfitters moodboard

71


PERCEPTUAL MAP BOHEMIAN INFLUENCED

Accessorize Monsoon

Bohoo.com

The perceptual map is designed

Free People Anthropologie

Pull & Bear Ted Baker

Zara

French Connection

LOW END

HIGH END

Urban outfitters H&M

Asos Topshop River Island

Warehouse Oasis

to show where Free People would position themselves within the current UK market. With a heavily saturated market within womens wear on the British high street Free People need to use a perceptual map in order to highlight any possible USPs and niche markets for them to expand into. From the map it is evident that Free Peoples main identified competitors would be Monsoon and Anthropologie. Both are however positioned to a slightly older demographic than Free People and therefore for that reason it there does appear to be a gap in the market for a bohemian brand in the higher price bracket targeting the demographic of 2534 year old young professional women.

Primark MAINSTREAM INFLUENCES

72

73


Chapter 7:

| How to make sustainable sexy Fig 47: Patchwork denim

74

75


ECO FASHION...

THE GOOD 76

V

THE BAD Fig 48: Eco fashion: Good Vs bad

77


GREEN GREEN ISIS THE THE

BLACK BLACK NEW NEW Fig 49:Snakeskin mimic

A

s highlighted, consumers beginning to express As highlighted, consumers are are beginning to express their interest and desire for more sustainable their interest and desire for more sustainable and ecoand eco friendly products. However, these friendly products. Traditionally these traditionally products have products have not made themselves easy to love. not made themselves easy to love. Many people Many people hold the opinion that “sustainable isn’t hold the opinion that “sustainable isn’t sexy, which sexy, which is a huge problem if you are linking it to is a huge problem if you are linking it to the fashionthe fashion(Jobling, industry”A,(Jobling, A, 2013). This isn’t industry” 2013). This isn’t helped byhelped the by the fact that in the past “everybody who was in eco fact that in the past “everybody who was in eco fashion fashion like a bag of(Shah, potatoes” (Maris,PAGE J, 2007 looked likelooked a bag of potatoes” D, 2007.) P 28) and unfortunately many perceptions NUMBER) and unfortunately many perceptions ofof ecoeco fashion are still based on these negative associations. fashion are still based on these negative associations.

78

At a recent sustainable brands conference Lance Hosey explained how “there’s still a fundamental disconnect between form and function in green product design. Simply put, the products that are more sustainable tend to telegraph not sexy” (Hosey, L, 2012). This quote supports the fact that sustainable and sexy are two words you don’t often see together. Sustainability is a serious world regarding saving the planet and sexy is one that implies pleasure. It comes as no surprise therefore that brands are finding it challenging to join the two.

Sustainability as a goal and as a practice is however not only attainable but with it also comes endless possibilities for creative expansion if done correctly. Once brands find ways to communicate green ideals without resorting to cliches such as wind farms and ice caps and actually start to engage with a wider audience as opposed to just hard core green consumers, then they have every opportunity to challenge and change current perceptions about sustainability not being sexy or cool. If sustainability is injected within a brand essence as a primary objective then it presents the brand with the opportunity to tell a strong, genuine story of positive impact - one that consumers can relate to, empathise and engage with.

When it comes to communicating with consumers there are 2 identified main groups that I feel need to be addressed: The Hand Holders & The Hanger on-ers. (See fig 50 & 51 )

79


THE HAND HOLDER Consists of cautious consumers who are presenting an obstacle. These people are environmentally aware and happy to help but however don't want to do it alone. They want their hands to be held and they want, and need, to be encouraged and praised in order for them to make progress. Interested and tuned on by affordable, practical and easy to understand sustainability which presents 'green' behaviour in a more familiar, relatable and digestible way.

Fig 50:The hand holder

80

81


THE HANGER ON-ER A group of mature minded thirty consumers. The waste watchers. People who don’t easily let go. The ones who some would

label ‘hoarders’. Turned on by up cycling, knowledge sharing and community engagement this particular group are always eager to inject new life into old things finding an alternative use for objects which may have lost their original purpose. They need no encouragement. Instead they strive to encourage others to share their mindset and spread green ideals further than their comfort zone. Fig 51: The hanger on-er

82

83


N

" o one is blinded by brand aura and marketing messages anymore. What is demanded are transparency, authenticity and dialogue with 'aware' manufacturers." (Maris,J. 2008: P5).Anybody can ‘claim’ sustainability to justify any kind of action including disguising and cushioning what they were already doing to appear more green. In society today huge sums of corporate money are spent on massaging our perceptions through advertising media. Anyone can claim sustainability but its much harder to actually DO it.

Centered around the idea of beauty engineered for Ever B_E_E is a range of sexed up, eco friendly cleaning products that refine popular perceptions of clean and green. With flirtatious talking bottles speaking messages such as ‘I’ll do your dirty work’ and ‘i’m great all over the house’ the New Zealand based brand is breaking the industry mould and spreading it’s provocative voice. Priding themselves on their innovation and difference they are proud of the fact that “no one else has managed to create products like we have. Products that not only perform, but are also better environmentally, ethically and sensually. These are things that nature would have designed if it could. And we have. To love our products is to love your world and love your life.” (B_E_E, 2013, online) (expand)

Who is making sustainability sexy right now?

Fig 52 :B.E.E

84

85


Chapter 8:

| Stores set to become vocal points of the community Fig 53: Decor ideas from our stores

86

87


text

Fig 54: Summer store display

T

oday the consumer is in charge. “The UK retail sector has been moving fast in recent years as new technology has shifted the consumer landscape.” (Jobling, A, 2013: Online) However in contrast to Joblings quote it could be suggested that in terms of the bigger picture, it seems highly unlikely that the volume of innovation regarding technology will remain constant. Surely it is unlikely that something as revolutionary as the iPad or the tablet will appear and change things on such a wide scale and for that reason in the future these offerings might settle down shifting the focus from online back to offline. This idea is something that Asda CEO Andy

88

Clarke expanded upon in a recent ‘state of the nation’ keynote address during which he described how “technology isn’t king. The consumer is king. They need us as retailers. Technology can’t beat happy to help. Our biggest challenge is trust and it can’t be bought, it must be earned. (Clarke, A, 2013: Online) thus emphasising the importance of customer service. In his quote Clarke also refers to what is one of retailers biggest challenges; trust. In the wake of the recent horse meat scandal that swept the UK and as a result slashed consumer confidence, consumers are actively seeking closer engagement with retailers in order to build up trust.

An effective way of achieving this is through the way that brands communicate with consumers. Brands, like Free People, with a welcoming and engaging tone of voice who speak to consumers in a friendly way are therefore for that reason, surely set to become more desired and respected in the near future. The final point to consider from Andy’s quote is that it reminds us of the sometimes forgotten importance of the in-store environment, emphasised further when he later explains “how consumers are looking for stores to become focal points of the community.” (Clarke, A, 2013: Online). Team these ideals of trust and deeper relationships with brands and the desire for stores to become not only places of consumption but also spaces to meet and relax and it could present a way of silencing the ever growing concern for the continuing decline of our British high street. If stores become focal points for local communities then it may be a way of ensuring that the high streets of Britain begin to flourish again. In contrary to Clarke’s opinions a recent report by Econsoltancy (Econsultancy 2012: Online) claims that online shouldn’t be overlooked and how “the internet can save the high street.’ He goes on to claim that to succeed in this challenging retail environment retailers will need to dovetail their offline actives with increased savvy online digital technology and communications to drive consumers into their shops. The high street is traditionally regarded as being a community hub and providing much more than merely a place to shop. A handful of brands have succeeded in creating a community feel and a retail space that goes beyond merely consumption and instead creates somewhere for people to really feel at home.

89


SELFRIDGES SILENT ROOM.

Fig 55: Selfridges silent room

O

ozing innovation, Selfridges London have recognised consumer desire for places and spaces in which to relax and have therefore created a room based soley for this purpose and called it “the silent room.” Doing what it says on the tin, the room is based on the original silence room created by Mr Selfridge himself in 1909 offering consumers a chance to retire from the hustle and bustle that is shopping. A somewhat genius concept providing consumers embrace the concept fully. Fast paced living, long working hours and a drive for consumption have led us all to become increasingly urban creatures frequently craving time to wind down, relax and let our minds shut down completely. “Delinked from the natural rhythms of our bodies and the rest of the planet, we struggle with diminishing success to adapt to the strange mechanical and disembodied world we have created.” (Buzzel, L. 2009) The concept of the Selfridges silent room, may be a unique way of addressing these problems.

90

Fig 56: Selfridges silent room moodboard

91


APPLE STORES.

Fig 58: Apple store moodboard

Fig 57: Apple store

A

rguably Apple stores aren’t just stores they are gathering places and as a result play an important role in communities. The stores open layout, display of the latest technology and an army of technically genius staff have enticed us all inside at some point, if not only to use the free wifi or play around on photo booth. Apple stores, in a way, seem to resemble galleries. Every piece of art is on display, the only difference being that we are actually allowed and encouraged to touch this ‘art’. Apple are unlike other brands in the sense that they let us try their products before we buy inviting us to play and experience the product before purchasing. This technique, especially when dealing with higher price points and items of consumption that we don’t tend to just buy on a whim, has proved extremely beneficial and is an effective way of building brand trust.

92

93


Chapter 9:

Fig 59: Ressurection fern

94

| Craft as brand handwriting

95


DIY and craft W

ith a nation growing ever curious as to how things are sourced and produced we are therefore accepting and warming to the idea of craft again. “The British have always been famous for having a spirit of “make do and mend”. (John lewis, 2009: Online) something which has recently been re-embraced due to the economic recession which has seen the nation recall the thrift of wartime Britain. “Research has shown significant shifts in consumer demand, towards value centred products, services and experiences which meet emotional- as well as functionalneeds. As markets evolve in response to recession and a changing economy, there is a need to understand how these values and their associated behaviours may shift and settle into new patterns of consumption relevant to craft.” (Crafts council, 2010: Online) Mass produced Vs homemade will never be comparable. However it is arguable that making things ourselves holds social, cultural and economical values that are particularly suited to our times and to shaping our futures. Individualisation and personalisation are powerful tools when applied to marketing as they allow brands to make consumers feel valued and considered. Simple things like a happy birthday message or an email linking customers to products they might like, add a human touch.They are proving how “personalised marketing campaigns or one-to-one marketing strategies are cutting through the cyber babble and striking a cord with target customers, who want to be treated as an individual” (The marketer, 2012: online).

96

Fig 60: Free People DIY projects moodboard

Craft as an industry is often overlooked and misunderstood, but there is no denying the fact that it contributes £3 billion to the UK economy each year (Craftworks, 2013: online) and is therefore an important part of the overall economic footprint that is UK’s creative industries. Craft and the notions of sustainability go hand in hand, so instead of looking at making commercial industries sustainable why don’t we look at making sustainable industries commercial instead?

97


A

country that is putting this theory into action and applying it within its craft sector is Sri Lanka. With a culture rich in the production of crafts ranging from pottery to mat weaving, Sri Lanka is trying hard to protect and pull together all details regarding distribution and handicraft industries within the country. Earlier this year the Sri Lankan national crafts council launched a handicraft map designed to identify the modern and traditional industries and distribution areas across the country and to point out the hereditary villages specialising in certain workshops and handicrafts. Commercial value will therefore be achieved through attracting domestic as well as foreign tourists and boosting economy. In a recent sustainable fashion symposium Jonas Hansen from the Danish fashion institute shed light on how “the new ideas of luxury are going to come from the learnings you can take from craft.� (Hansen, E, 2013). Therefore now more so than ever we need to make a conscious effort to protect crafts in order to make commercial value out of them.

Kinfolk

Magazine Fig 62: Kinfolk

Fig ?:Sri Lankan crafts

SriSri

A

lanka lanka Fig 61: Free People DIY projects moodboard 98

n example of a brand who uses craft within their handwriting is Kinfolk magazine. Describing themselves as being 'a guide for small gatherings' (Kinfolk, 2013: Online) Kinfolk focus on celebrating the simple things in life, the outdoors, friends, family, community, craft and good food. The main craft focus of the magazine is the art of food and recipes encouraging groups of people to get to together and create meals and enjoy each others company. In terms of its offline presence Kinfolk has no inserts or adverts and instead focuses on white space and beautiful photography. Online Kinfolk has a Vimeo page full of organic shorts to celebrate new issues illustrating romantic notions and a slower pace of living. The two combined therefore create an extended lifestyle that consumers can opt into.

99


WHAT’S HAPPENING IN CRAFT?

100 Fig 63: What’s happening in craft moodboard

101


Chapter 10:

Fig 64: Colour Psychology

102

| Consumer 103


SISTER BRAND CONSUMER DIFFERENTIATION

URBN

Fig 65: Urban INC consumer demographics

INC F

ree People belongs the group URBN INC home also to sister brands Urban Outfitters and Anthropolige. All however have different target consumers...

Our established ability to understand our customers and connect with them on an emotional level. The reason for this success is that our brands — Urban Outfitters, Anthropologie, Free People, Terrain and BHLDN — are

Each brand chooses a particular customer segment, and once

both

compelling

and

distinct.

chosen, sets out to create sustainable points of distinction with that segment.

(Urbn Inc, 2013: Online)

104

” 105


WHO IS SHE? “F

ree People is just like our customer:

creative, confident, adventurous, sweet to tough to tomboy to romantic – pushing life to its limits, with traveling, hanging out and everything in between” (Ditty, A, 2013. See appendix 1.2 P.195).

The Free People girl doesn’t take life too seriously and is

comfortable in all aspects of her being. She is independent, she is carefree and she is loyal. Both the US and UK consumers share similar interests and passions something that Allison Ditty confirmed when she told me that “ similar

items

are bestsellers for both the UK and the US. Our British

customers are especially loving our boots and dresses right now,”(Ditty, A, 2013. See appendix 1.2 P.95) and for that reason the target demographic will not alter.

106

Fig 66: Who is she moodboard?

Free People’s audience, the FP Girl as they often refer to her, is seeking a life filled with excitement, travel, expression, and individual identity. That can seem silly to say “buy our stuff and be an individual just like everyone else”, but Free People products are sort of like raw materials that can be combined with other stuff to make something original. This sort of expression is at the heart of the Free People idea. That excitement over mashing things up, combining things someone else wouldn’t think to combine, is really important. (Mullen, E. 2013. See appendix 1.1 P.194)

107


Fig 67:The modern Hippy consumer profile.

108

109


Where do you shop for clothes? I tend to shop everywhere. My favourite highstreet shops though are probably Topshop, Urban Outfitters and Zara. I often shop vintage because I don’t like the idea of looking like everyone else which is often the case with highstreet. If i’m looking to spend a little bit more on something more long lasting I go to Whistles or French Connection.

110

111


Chapter 11:

| Brands that have expanded into other cultures Fig 68: Motivate and decorate

112

113


The context F

or many years brands have been expanding into other cultures and gaining new territory. More common amongst designer labels, expansion is achievable because “Fashion design retailing is synonymous with brand image. The marketing of designer fashion ensures that this shared international understanding of brand identity and meaning is developed and preserved through the standardisation of communications strategies. and by the exercising of tight controls over merchandising, distribution and pricing strategies” (Moore, C: 2000). However mid market level retailers have more of a challenge when it comes to expansion due to lack of brand awareness on a wide scale. In an historical context “The UK is invariably cited as the entry market for US companies seeking European expansion” (Davies & Finney, 1998: online) and vice versa. A market move that would be deemed ‘culturally proximate’ expansion “however, it has been shown historically that well established US retailers tend to operate in the early stages of internationalisation in Canada, Mexico and even Cuba” (Davies & Finney 1998: online) ensuring a more ‘geographically proximate’ market. These techniques still remain in operation today with brands, including Free People, opting to expand into local territories as a sort of trial run before making the bigger leap towards embedding themselves in other cultures further afield.

114

WHO HAS DONE IT WELL? The notion of 'Culturally proximate' expansions is evolving and today it seems that no place is too far, and no idea is too big when it comes to brands extending their roots beyond their comfort zone. Fig 69:Watercolour world map illustration

115


WAITROSE

METHOD

Fig 71:Method UK moodboard

Fig 70:Waitrose Dubai moodboard

O

ne example of a brand spotting a gap in the market was Waitrose who last year opened up its first standalone store in Abu Dhabi. The Middle east has recently become the priority market for British retailers due to the fact that “the region has great spending capacity and the demographics are in retailers’ favour (Jameson, A, 2012). Shopping is part of the culture which is reflected by the UAE having some of the highest earning malls in the world. It isn’t however just natives that are attracted to luxuries. With an estimated 240,000 Brits living in the country in 2012, (Qassemmi, S, 2010) Waitrose spotted a niche market which would allow British expats to feel at home by providing them with access to the British goods they were missing and craving. Similarly with a reputation in the UK as luxurious and of a high quality it was important that these aspects of Waitroses’ brand personality were not lost in transit and appealed to locals. Positioning itself as “the first truly high-end supermarket in Abu Dhabi’ (Yahya, A, 2012) ensured that it was made popular with the local population and fed their desire for luxury. Literally.

116

A

nother case study is the cleaning brand method. Method is an innovative environmentally friendly brand with a brand slogan of “clean happy! We are the people against dirty.” (Method, 2013. Online). Working to inspire people to make choices around their home that are not only healthier for them but healthier for the planet too, Method are up and coming innovators in the market. Based in America originally all of the product formulation/ packaging is done in the States but they have recently expanded into the UK market. Identifying the British populations growing interest towards eco friendly, green ideals, Method spotted a niche market for making cleaning products cool, as opposed to items we hide under our sinks. Brain parents of Method, Adam Lowry and Eric Ryan created a product range with soft environmentally friendly ingredients but a strong tone of voice. Describing their products as ‘gentler than a thousand puppy licks” (Method, 2013: Online) Methods main communication strategy revolves around a serious of clever viral video campaigns angled towards British humour. Witty video titles such as ‘clean like a mother’ and ‘say no to jugs’ feature over the top props and actors based around a hand written song thus embedding the American brand into British culture through humour. As a result, since expanding into the UK market in 2005 Method have since joined forces with Ecover to create the world’s largest green cleaning company.

117


American Apparel

Abercrombie & Fitch

Starbucks

Anthropologie

Forever 21

Victoria’s secret Ben & Jerry’s

Fig 72: Hero brands: US to UK moodboard

118

119


Chapter 12:

| What’s next? Fig 73:Summer atmosphere

120

121


WHAT’S

NEXT

? In order for the proposed idea of a Free People flagship store to be a success a strategy in line with Free Peoples’ brand values as well as the previously identified current social and cultural climates needs to be created. “It need to be authentic. Whenever the style has veered to close to anything feeling too “corporate”, the fans have gotten mad. So whats really important is staying true to the brand while also remaining relevant.” (Mullen, E, 2013. See appendix 1.1 page 194). I therefore propose an innovative marketing and communication strategy focused around the idea of community, craft, making and personalisation.

Fig 74:Free People UK

122

123


Chapter 13:

| The big creative idea Fig 75: Traveller

124

125


Where

it

all

starts

...

Brand awareness is something that Free People need to build in order to be successful and it is therefore

vital that the brand makes a good impression within the UK market and creates a buzz prior to the store launch thus generating word of mouth. One way in which this will be achieved is through the introduction of a promotional video for Free People which is designed to bring the brand lifestyle to life. Created as a vehicle in which to introduce the brand to the UK, like a teaser, the video will go online across various channels prior to the launch. In order to promote awareness the campaign will be designed with the intent of letting UK consumers know that Free People is coming. Figure 76 shows the inspiration and aesthetic for the video. Focusing on a mixture of surroundings and themes, models will be captured and filmed in an organic, playful and stripped down way. Similar to previous Free People videos, the focus will be on capturing the female personality whilst also touching upon the themes identified earlier on in this report such as brand personality and expression. Today “video is a powerful platform to attract shoppers and retailers must exploit its potential� (Patel, D: 2013). This quote supports the idea that videos are globally appealing and as a result the world has already been considered as a market. For that reason the proposed video will be created in the existing style of current Free People videos and will not be angled differently towards the UK market. The focus will instead remain on Free Peoples existing brand values and embedding them into the UK market. The video will be used as a tool to ultimately spread Free Peoples’ brand essence and personality and to resonate with consumers on a personal level encouraging consumer curiosity and excitement towards the brand expansion.

126

Fig 76: Video inspiration moodboard

127


128

129


Public craft workshops.

Although brand awareness will be built to a certain

extent through the proposed promotional video, realistically that channel will only reach a limited number or potential consumers. Therefore it is important also to focus on the offline and creating ways in which to attract and target unsuspecting consumers in an innovative way creating curiosity. As a brand Free People embodies creativity, forward thinking and togetherness and therefore all of these factors will be integrated within the marketing and communication strategy. The big creative idea will be centred around the idea of craft and community as identified earlier within this report.

Public workshops are popping up in cities globally bringing people together through craft. The images in this moodboard showcase a recent one in Tokyo at valentines day. Members of the public were invited to decorate a blank card that was then sent out to loved ones. Pictures were taken of all submissions & placed on a large wall showcased to the public spreading love and happiness.

This will be achieved through various different methods encouraging consumer participation and interaction. A series of outdoor workshops, stunts and installations around London, where the flagship store will be situated, will be arranged in the build up to the launch. The inspiration for this idea has come from various different touch points and brands. (See figures 77-79).

Fig 77: Public craft workshops: Tokyo moodboard.

130

131


PLAY ME I’M YOURS PIANOS BEFORE I...WALLS.

Before I die walls are part of an ongoing project set up in New Orleans after a woman lost somebody she loves & decided to share her feelings publicly and maintain perspective through inviting members of the public to write their hopes, dreams and ambitions on a wall. A simple concept that joins communities together & ultimately creates a piece of art for anyone to enjoy. The project is a global success and also continues online in a space where anybody can submit responses and track the projects success via various channels.

“Play me i’m yours” is a concept that has been touring internationally since 2008. Set up by British artist Luke Jerram the project places pianos in public spaces for members of the public to play, each one personalised and decorated by local artists or community members. Spreading creativity, entertainment and joy whilst inviting every day people to engage, activate and take ownership of their urban environment.

Fig 79: Before I die moodboard

Fig 78: Play me i’m yours moodboard

132

133


Unilever’s five levers of change Keeping it current and keeping awareness and consumer engagement constant. How Free People will meet the five levers of change (Unilever).

MAKE IT A HABIT.

| Make it a habbit. Social network sites such as Twitter, Facebook & Intstagram are huge habits amongst the young adult demographic, by linking the campaign with this and encouraging consumer participation hopefully it will be used, and checked frequently.

MAKE IT UNDERSTANDABLE. | Make it understood. Free Peoples’ brand personality and tone of voice should be apparent at all times in order to communicate with consumers.

MAKE IT REWARDING. | Make it rewarding. Offering consumers the chance to enter competitions and the opportunity to win Free People goods will provide an incentive for fans to engage.

MAKE IT EASY. | Make it easy. Free Peoples’ online pressence should require no effort to use, it should be easy to navigate and simple requiring no effort.

MAKE IT DESIRABLE. | Make it desirable. The desirable elements will come from the fact that Free People is more than just a label. The lifestyle it provides will hopefully be clearly translated the UK market and attract a lot of attention.

Fig 80: Unilever’s five levers of change

134

135


THE WHOLE COMMUNICATION STRATEGY WILL BE WELL THOUGHT OUT WITH THE CONSUMER IN MIND.

PRODUCT

The gaments are the product and will be promoted in a way that emphasizes the ways in which they provide a USP to the current womens market: High quality, globally sourced, bohemian clothing for young professionals.

PRICE

Free People is a competitive womenswear retailer with relatively high price points. In order to encourage purchases and build brand awareness introductory offers, deals and promotions will be considered.

PLACE

Free People sell their products currently online and through concessions but the main focus will be on the proposed UK flagship instore environment.

PROMOTION Fig 81: 4 P’s

136

what’s

next

...

“You never know where Free People will pop up next!” (Ditty, A, 2013 see appendix 1.2 p.195).

A quote from Allison Ditty at Free People head office, as well as the previous inspiration mooboards, provided the creative idea behind the proposed communication strategy. What if Free People literally ‘popped’ up in various locations for a limited amount of time in the run up to the launch. Teasing the public, generating a buzz and offering the community an insight into what the brand is all about in an innovative way. All of the following propsed ideas are centred around the idea of bringing the community together and inviting members of the public, at their own will, to interact, create and engage with Free Peoples projects in a physical way. Free People presents: Be Free.

The launch of Free Peoples’ flagship store will be promoted through an online interactive campaign but also though innovative offline executions.

137


#1: freedom of speech Focusing around the idea of freedom of speech and expression Free People will place a megaphone in a public space for anybody to utilise. What they do with it, what they say and how they use it is entirely up to them. Providing people with their 15 seconds of fame, the opportunity to have their voices heard and a way in which to communicate with one another this guerrilla marketing tactic will create publicity, curiosity and brand awareness for Free People.

Fig 82: Freedom of speech mock up

138

139


#2: FreE hand ‘Free hand’ is a concept which will be executed in various different ways. Pop up craft work shops similar to the Tokyo valentines one (See figure 77) will be created across various different London locations inviting members of the public to come and create and make with Free People. DIY projects from the BLG25 blog will be brought to life through live demonstrations and step by step guides. Also similar to the before I die wall (see fig 79) Free People will set up an installation in a central London location designed with the same idea in mind. However this wall will be focused around the title what does “Free” mean to you. Members of the public will be encouraged to interact with and illustrate the wall in which ever way they desire with a focus on the ‘free hand’ and creating something together which can be enjoyed by both those participating as well as those just passing by.

#3: Set it free ‘Set it free’ is a concept based around the idea of letting balloons free. A simple stunt but one that will hopefully encourage further engagement and awareness for Free People. People will be encouraged to illustrate, personalise and write their ambitions and dreams on a balloon and then set it free, almost like a wish concept.

Fig 83: Set it free

140

141


What’s in it for Free People? | | | | |

Building brand awareness. Getting to know consumers. Building trust. Building relationships. Spreading brand essence and personality. | Creating a reputation as an innovative,

foward thinking brand. | Guerrilla tactics will drive traffic to social networking channels. | Attracts publicity within Press & media. | Keeping in line with the brands core values.

What’s in it for the consumer?

Fig 84: Be free advert

142

| | | | | |

Becoming aware of a new brand. The opportunity to express themselves The chance to enter competitons. Introductory offers and discounts. Aquire new skills. Creating something for others to enjoy.

| Share their experiences online as well as offline. | The chance to communicate with other members of the community. | Being approached on a personal level as opposed to a corporate one.

143


measuring

Success

...

Guerrilla marketing is classed as “any promotion that’s unconventional, unexpected and usually evocative of a unique, memorable reaction from or interaction with the viewer” (Business insider, 2010: Online). Investing time, energy and imagination into the marketing process will see Free People building not only awareness but also trust and a relationship with its consumers.

Fig 86: Social network tracking

Fig 85: Rodger’s curve of innovation.

144

145


The

Store

...

The physical Free People store itself will be more than just a place of consumption it will be a community. An innovative space in which consumers can come to relax, appreciate and create. The instore environment will be a community hub with a busy schedule of events. Activities within store such as craft workshops, demonstrations, concerts, book signings, blogger events, fashion shows and many more will ensure that Free People keeps its reputation as being an energetic, engaging and consumer orientated brand. By doing so Free People will be responding also to the issues highlighted earlier in this report such as the importance of craft within brand handwriting, the urge for stores to become focal points of the community in order to restore the former glory of the British highstreet and the increase in consumers reaching out for a deeper relationship with brands. Fig 87 shows the vision for the Free People flagship store in London.

146

Fig 87: Store environment moodboard

147


148

149


future

recommendations

...

In terms of the bigger picture as well as instore activities and demonstrations it would be beneficial for Free People to come up with an additional way of continuing the theme of craft & creating. One way in which this could be done would be through the introduction of a brand publication or zine available instore only providing another medium in which to communicate with consumers whilst also further emphasising the Free People brand lifestyle. The unique thing about zines is that they are self publishing and are created to be “passed physically through a network, connecting people together, sharing the sense of solidarity in their interest in the underground of independent culture.” (Spencer, A: 2009, P3.) Zine culture is therefore a way in which big corporations can show transparency, a key focus as identified earlier. Ironically a big brand and a zine don’t, in historical context, necessarily go hand in hand. Zines are all about self publishing, do it yourself, self promotion and frankly an attitude of ‘fuck the establishment,’ fuck big corporate brands’ and instead focusing on the notion of individuality. Climates have however changed and today zines could provide a big brand like Free People with a platform in which to say yes, we might be a big brand but we believe that people should feel unique and individual so we are publising ourselves with this zine because the culture and history and zines personifies our brand essence. Focusing on being your own person, expressing individuality and embracing craft.

150

Fig 88: Personalised envelopes

What will it contain? | Step by step instructions to make various different craft projects. | Competition opportunities such as illustrating a postcard for the chance to have it made into a Free People t-shirt design. | Organic, original photography.

| An offline version of content on the BLG25 blog bringing it to life in a physical form. | Calls to action for consumers such as encouraging them to complete the projects then upload photos to an online gallery via a hash tag.

151


Fig 89: Vision for the Free People zine

152

153


154

155


Chapter 14:

Fig 90: DIY terrariums

156

| Conclusion 157


This report set out to consider if now is the right time

for Free People to expand into the UK market through the introduction of a physical, flagship store. The way that we shop, where, when and why has evolved over time. With Britain experiencing a heavily saturated retail market, brands need to steer clear of mass selling tactics and instead speak to consumers in an emotive way thus humanising the brand. Also, as highlighted earlier, with an increased interest and desire for well produced products consumers are more willing to spend that little bit extra for luxury with many saying they “would rather save up for high quality garments” (Kelly, S, 2013. See appendix 3.1 P.202.). Furthermore, although Free People’s price points would place them in the higher price bracket of the high street, the brand’s sustainable edge would stand them in a good position. Existing Free People consumers recognise the fact that although they “believe the price points are completely reasonable” they “do understand why they could be expensive for some people” (Kelly, S, 2013. See appendix 3.1 P.202) which, due to the previously identified ever changing climates, would undoubtedly be the same in the UK too. I do however believe that Free People’s brand essence is in keeping with the current, social and cultural trends and issues evident within the UK market today. “There may be some cultural things to tweak here and there, but largely the Free People idea is the same in both places” (Mullen, E: 2013. See appendix 1.1 P.194). Using craft within their brand handwriting and focusing on innovation within store environments puts Free People in a unique position ahead of other UK competitor brands and would also enable them to culturally embed themselves into the current UK market. Therefore I feel that now is the perfect time for Free People to ‘make’ their mark on British soil by implementing the proposed marketing and communication strategy focused around the idea of craft, making and personalisation.

158

Fig 91: Free People shoot

159


Chapter 15:

| List of illustrations Fig 92: Art attack

160

161


Fig 1: Free People canvas bag (2010) by unknown in Solfistyle, 2010: Online. Fig 2: Collecting ceramics (2013) by Jemma in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online/ Fig 3: Relaxation space at home (2013) by Bridgette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online. Fig 4: Girls on film (2012) by Free People in mamasarollingstone magazine, 2012: Online. Fig 5: Instore environment moodboard (2013) by Ellyn Grant. Images from Free People blog and google images. Fig 6: Eco dyeing with flowers (2013) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online. Fig 7: Expert interviews (2013) by Grant, E. Fig 8: Analysis of research methods (2013) by Grant, E. Fig 9: Handmade card (2013) by Grant, E. Fig 10: Project brief (2013) by Grant, E.

Fig 16: Free People garments moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People UK, 2013: Online.

Fig 27: River Islandmood board (2013) by Grant, E. Images from River Island, 2013: Online.

Fig 17: Free People innovation moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People BLG25 blog and Free People UK, 2013: Online.

Fig 28: Topshop moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Topshop, 2013: Online.

Fig 18: Free People style me gallery moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People BLG25 blog and Free People UK, 2013: Online. Fig 19: Free People DIY & artisan moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People BLG25 blog and Free People UK, 2013: Online. Fig 20: Free People music links moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People BLG25 blog and Free People UK, 2013: Online. Fig 21: Daydream believer (2013) by Jemma in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online.

Fig 11: Questions (2013) by Grant, E.

Fig 22: What does bohemian mean to you info graphic (2013) by Grant, E. Images from google.

Fig 12: Wanderlust: Travel essentials (2013) by Jemma in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online.

Fig 23: Pull & bear moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Pull & Bear UK, 2013: Online.

Fig 13: Brand personality moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People blog and Pinterest.

Fig 24: H&M moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from H&M, 2013: Online.

Fig 14: Bohemian bliss (2013) by Braedon in Sterling Social, 2013: Online.

Fig 25: French Connection mood board (2013) by Grant, E. Images from French Connection, 2013: Online.

Fig 15: Aaker brand model (2013) by Grant, E.

Fig 26: Zara moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Zara, 2013: Online.

162

Fig 29: Bazar styles moodboard 1 (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Treloar, D in Bazaar Style, 2008: P 91, 129 & 135. Fig 30: Bedroom (2008) by Treloar, D in Bazaar Style, 2008: P 124. Fig 31: Bazaar styles mood board 2 (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Treloar, D in Bazaar Style, 2008: P 118 & 136. Fig 32: Lounge (2008) by Treolar, D in Bazaar Style, 2008: P 56. Fig 33: Street style photography (2013) by Grant, E. Fig 34: Bohemian editorial moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Trend hunter, 2013: Online. Fig 35: Vogue Japan a bohemian calling (2013) by Rahlwes, K in Vogue Japan, 2013: Online. Fig 36: Washed out (2012) by Brigette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 37: The meaning of white (2013) by Brigette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online. Fig 38: Galactic grunge moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Grant, E and WGSN, 2013: Online.

Fig 39: Folk menage moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Grant, E and WGSN, 2013: Online. Fig 40: Bloom revival moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Grant, E and WGSN, 2013: Online. Fig 41: Office space (2012) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 42: Boomerang generation (2010) by The New Yorker Magazine, 2010: Online. Fig 43: Monsoon & Accessorize moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Google and Monsoon & Accessorize, 2013: Online. Fig 44: Pull & Bear moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Google and Pull & Bear, 2013: Online. Fig 45: Urban Outfitters moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Google and Urban Outfitters, 2013: Online. Fig 46: Perceptual map (2013) by Grant, E. Fig 47: Patchwork denim (2012) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 48: Eco fashion: Good Vs Bad moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Ecosalon, Beyond Skin, Edun, Near Far, Google, 2013: Online. Fig 49: Snakeskin mimic (2013) by Nieuwenhuyse in Methodology, 2013: Online. Fig 50: The hand holder: Consumer profile (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Google, River Island, Rayban, Toms and Pull & Bear, 2013: Online.

163


Fig 51: The hanger on-er: Consumer profile (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Google and River Island, 2013: Online. Fig 52: B.E.E (2013) by unknown in B.E.E, 2013: Online. Fig 53:Decor ideas from our stores (2012) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 54: Summer store display (2013) by Brigette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online. Fig 55: Selfridges silent room (2013) by unknown in Canvas8, 2013: Online. Fig 56: Selfridges silent room moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Google, 2013: Online. Fig 57: Apple store (2013) by unknown in Neonplay, 2013: Online. Fig 58: Apple store moodboard 92013) by Grant, E. Images from Google, 2013: Online

fair, 2013: Online.

Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online.

Fig 64: Colour psychology (2013) by Bridgette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online.

Fig 75: Traveler (2012) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online.

Fig 65: Urban INC consumer demographics (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Urban Outfitters, Free People and Anthropologie, 2013: Online.

Fig 76: Video inspiration moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Tumblr, weheartit, Free People BLG25 blog, Hunt, M, Google &LF Stores, 2013: Online.

Fig 66: Who is she moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People style me gallery, 2013: Online.

Fig 77: Public craft workshop: Tokyo moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images by Grant, E.

Fig 67: The modern hippy consumer profile (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Sophie Dopierala, Google, River Island and PulL and Bear, 2013: Online.

Fig 78: Play me i’m yours moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Play me i’m yours, 2013: Online.

Fig 68: Motivate and decorate (2012) by Bridgette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 69: Watercolour world map illustration (2013) by unknown in Visualize us, 2013: Online.

Fig 79: Before I die moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Before I die, 2013: Online. Fig 80: The 4 P’s (2013) by Grant, E. Fig 81: Unilever’s five levers of change (2013) by Grant, E.

Fig 59: Resurrection fern (2012) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online.

Fig 70: Waitrose Dubai moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from The Telegraph and Google, 2013: Online.

Fig 60: Free People DIY projects moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online.

Fig 71: Method UK moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Method, YouTube and google, 2013: Online.

Fig 61: Sri lankan crafts (2011) by unknown in Flextiles, 2011: Online.

Fig 72: Images from: The times, The Sun, my retail media, The standard, tumblr , echo chamber, Pinterest, The Gurardian,

Fig 85: Social networking tracking (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Apple, Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

Fig 73: Summer atmosphere (2012) by Bridgette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online.

Fig 86: Rodger’s curve of innovation (2013) by Grant, E.

Fig 62: Kinfolk (2013) by unknown in first we feast, 2013: online. Fig 63: What’s happening in craft mood board (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Vintage Folly, Ebay, Google and British Craft trade

164

Fig 74L Free People UK (2012) by Julia in

Fig 82: Freedom of speech mock up (2013) by Grant, E. Image from clipart.

the root connection, Instagram, Pintrest, Termanon, J in Styleabaad, Burkhart, L. Diskin, C: 2013: Online. Fig 88: Personalised envelopes (2013) by Jemma in Free People BLG25 blog, 2013: Online. Fig 89: Vision for brand zine (2013) by Grant, E. Images by Grant, E. 2013.. Fig 90: DIY Terrariums (2012) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 91: Free People shppt (2013) by Roper, S. Fig 92: Art attack (2012) by Jemma in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 93: Over the rainbow (2012) by Julia in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 94: Decor crush (2012) by Brigette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online. Fig 95: Cinco de Mayo (2012) by Brigette in Free People BLG25 blog, 2012: Online.

Fig 83: Set it free mock up (2013) by Grant, E. Image from clipart. Fig 84: Be free advert (2013) by Grant, E

Fig 87: Store environment moodboard (2013) by Grant, E. Images from Jessie in LesMads,

165


Chapter 16:

| List of references Fig 93:Over the rainbow

166

167


Patel, D, 2013.The importance of instore video for retailers. The Guardian [online] 25th April. Available at: http://www. guardian.co.uk/media-network/medianetwork-blog/2013/apr/25/video-in-storeimportance-retail. [Accessed 4th May 2013]. Mintel (C), 2012. Women’s fashion lifestyles: UK. Mintel [online]. May. Available at: http:academic. mintel.com/display/590148/?highlight=true/ [Accessed 1st April 2013].

http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/news-features/ TMG9649405/Free-People-launches-in-theUK.html. [Accessed 25th March 2013]. Durrani, A, 2013. Overseas online sales to generate £28bn for British retailers by 2012. Marketing Magazine [online] 30th April. Available at: http://www. marketingmagazine.co.uk/article/1180549/ Overseas-online-sales-generate-28bn-Britishretailers-2020. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Buckingham , F, 2013. Consumers rank ingredient transparency among most important issues for brands. SustainAbility [online] 25th April. Available at: http:// www.sustainability.com/news/consumersrank-ingredient-transparency-amongmost-important-issues-for-brands#. UYVnETn3A1A. [Accessed 4th May 2013].

Email interview, 2013. Email interview. See appendix 5.

Gentile, T, 2011. What is DIY culture? Scoutiegirl [online] 1st February. Available at: http://www.scoutiegirl.com/2011/02/what-isdiy-culture.html. [Accessed 4th May 2013].

Mast, S, 2012. Ten ways to reach customers through digital platforms. The Globe and Mail [online] 26th March. Available at: http:// w w w. t h e g l o b e a n d m a i l . c o m / r e p o r t - o n business/small-business/sb-tools/ten-waysto-reach-customers-through-digital-platforms/ article535445/. [Accessed 26th April 2013].

Brandweiner, N, 2013. From retail to me-tail: 2013’s most important customer experience changes. MyCustomer [online] 24th January. Available at: http://www.mycustomer.com/ topic/customer-experience/customerexperience-management-2013-expertspredictions/161617. [Accessed 4th May 2013]. Bergin, O, 2012. Free People launches in the UK. Telegraph [online]. Available at: http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/news-features/ TMG9649405/Free-People-launches-inthe-UK.html. [Accessed 25th March 2013]. Ditty,A, 2013. Expert interview. See appendix 1.2 Bergin, O, 2012. Free People launches in the UK. Telegraph [online]. Available at:

168

Jobling, A, 2013. Sustainable fashion: SLDF. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www. wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/report/ Sourcing/2012/December/sustainable_ fashionsldf.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013].

Kelly, S, 2013. Email interview. See appendix 3.1 Greene, M, 2010. What is bohemian chic? Ehow [online]. Available at: http://www. e h o w. c o m / f a c t s _ 6 7 6 6 2 2 3 _ b o h e m i a n chic_.html. [Accessed 30th April 2013]. Parascan, N, 2013. Modern Bohemia: Fashions subtle way of remaining the past. Fashionising.com [online] 31st January. Available at: http://www.fashionising. com/trends/b--boho-bohemian-fashionhippie-42959.html. [Accessed 30th April 2013].

Sheppard, S, 2013. Forecasting the future. Global influences [online]. Available at: http:// global-influences.com/interview/forecastingthe-future/. [Accessed 14th May 2013]. Mintel B, 2012. Women’s fashion lifestyles: UK. Mintel [online]. May. Available at: http://academic.mintel. com/display/590148/?highlight=true/ [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Maranrz, H, 2010. What is it about 20 somethings?The New York times [online] 18th August. Available at: http://www.nytimes. com/2010/08/22/magazine/22Adulthood-t. h t m l ? p a g e w a n t e d = a l l & _ r=0. [Accessed 26th April]. Mintel B, 2012. Women’s fashion lifestyles: UK. Mintel [online]. May. Available at: http://academic.mintel. com/display/590148/?highlight=true/ [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Kelly, S, 2013. Email interview. See appendix 3.1 Link, K, 2013: Email interview. See appendix 3.7 Maris, J, 2008. Beyond green, sustainability and fashion. The Neverlands. D’Jonge Hond Publishers: Page 28 Jobling, A, 2013. Sustainable fashion: SLDF. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www. wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/report/ Sourcing/2012/December/sustainable_ fashionsldf.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Stoiber, M, 2005. Making sustainable sexy, from an ad man’s point of view. Grist [online] 1st Decemeber. Available at: http://grist.org/ article/stoiber/. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Maris, J, 2008. Beyond green, sustainability and fashion. The Neverlands. D’Jonge Hond Publishers. Page 5 B_E_E, 2013. Our story. B_E_E [online]. Available at: http://www.bee.net.nz/ background.html. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Jobling, A, 2013. UK retailing: Insights from retail week live. WGSN [online] 25th Match. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/ content/report/Business_Strategy/Thought_ Leadership/Conference_Reports/2013/March/ uk_retailing_insightsfromretailweeklive. html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Clarke, A, 2013. UK retailing: Insights from retail week live. WGSN [online] 25th Match. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/ content/report/Business_Strategy/Thought_ Leadership/Conference_Reports/2013/March/ uk_retailing_insightsfromretailweeklive. html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Econsoltancy, 2012. How the internet can save the high street. Econsultancy [online] September 2012. Available at: http://econsultancy. com/uk/reports/how-the-internet-can-savethe-high-street. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. McCan, J, 2013.Shhh…I’m in Selfridges: department store unveils Silence Room to calm frazzled shoppers. London Evening Standard [online]. Available at: http://www. standard.co.uk/news/london/shhh-im-inselfridges-department-store-unveils-silenceroom-to-calm-frazzled-shoppers-8445284. html. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Buzzel, L. 2009. Ecotherapy: Slowing down

169


to natures pace. Huffington post [online blog] 6th Septemeber. Available at: http:// www.huffingtonpost.com/linda-buzzell/ ecotherapy-slowing-down-t_b_213288. html [Accessed 10th April 2013].

Available at: http://urbn.com/profile/. [Accessed 10th May 2013].

Available at: http://urbn.com/profile/. [Accessed 10th May 2013].

Mullen, E, 2013. Expert interview. See Appendix 1.1

Mullen, E, 2013. Expert interview. See Appendix 1.1

Poulter, S, 2009. Make do and mend: Thrifty tips to help you ride out the recession. Daily mail [online] 28th August. Available at: http:// www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1209530/ Make-mend-Thrifty-tips-help-riderecession.html. [Accessed 12th April 2013].

Ditty,A, 2013. Expert interview. SeeAppendix 1.2

Ditty,A, 2013. Expert interview. SeeAppendix 1.2

Moore, C, 2000. Brands without boundaries: The internationalisation of the designer retailer’s brand. Market planet [online]. Available at: http:// www.marketplanet.ru/filestore/0022/0089/475/ p0919.pdf. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Moore, C, 2000. Brands without boundaries: The internationalisation of the designer retailer’s brand. Market planet [online]. Available at: http:// www.marketplanet.ru/filestore/0022/0089/475/ p0919.pdf. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Davis & Finney, 1998. Brands without boundaries: The internationalisation of the designer retailer’s brand. Market planet [online]. Available at: http://www. marketplanet.ru/filestore/0022/0089/475/ p0919.pdf. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Davis & Finney, 1998. Brands without boundaries: The internationalisation of the designer retailer’s brand. Market planet [online]. Available at: http://www. marketplanet.ru/filestore/0022/0089/475/ p0919.pdf. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Jameson, A, 2012. British brands find hope in the golf. The National [online] 29th May. Available at: http://www.thenational. ae/thenationalconversation/industryinsights/retail/british-brands-find-hopein-the-gulf. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Jameson, A, 2012. British brands find hope in the golf. The National [online] 29th May. Available at: http://www.thenational. ae/thenationalconversation/industryinsights/retail/british-brands-find-hopein-the-gulf. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Qassemi, S, 2010. The other special relationship: the UAE and the UK. The national [online] 21st November. Available at: http:// www.thenational.ae/thenationalconversation/ news-comment/the-other-special-relationshipthe-uae-and-the-uk. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Qassemi, S, 2010. The other special relationship: the UAE and the UK. The national [online] 21st November. Available at: http:// www.thenational.ae/thenationalconversation/ news-comment/the-other-special-relationshipthe-uae-and-the-uk. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Kinfolk, 2013. About us. Kinfolk [online]. Available at: http://www.kinfolkmag.com/ aboutus. [Accessed 10th May 2013].

Yahya,A, 2012. Waitrose opens inAbu Dhabi. The telegraph [online] 11th July. Available at: http:// www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/ expat-money/9392357/Waitrose-opens-inAbu-Dhabi.html. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Yahya,A, 2012. Waitrose opens inAbu Dhabi. The telegraph [online] 11th July. Available at: http:// www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/ expat-money/9392357/Waitrose-opens-inAbu-Dhabi.html. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Urban INC, 2013. Company profile [online]. Available at: http://urbn.com/ profile/. [Accessed 10th May 2013].

Method, 2013. Methodology. Method [online]. Available at: http://www.methodproducts. co.uk/. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Method, 2013. Methodology. Method [online]. Available at: http://www.methodproducts. co.uk/. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Craftworks, 2010. Crafts and the economy. Craftworks toolkit [online]. Available at: http://craftworkstoolkit.org. u k / v a l u e o f c r a f t / c r a f t s a n d t h e e c o n o m y. [Accessed 13th April 2013]. The marketer, 2012. Personalised marketing. The marketer [online] 22nd August. Available at: http://www.themarketer. co.uk/archives/trends/personalisedmarketing/. [Accessed 25th April 2013]. Craft works, 2013. Crafts and the economy, craft toolkit. Craft works [online]. Available at: http://craftworkstoolkit.org. u k / v a l u e o f c r a f t / c r a f t s a n d t h e e c o n o m y. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Hansen, E, 2013. Sustainable fashion: SLDF. WGSN [online]. Available at: http:// www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/ report/Sourcing/2012/December/sustainable_ fashionsldf.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013].

170

Mullen, E. 2013. Expert interview see 1.1 Patel, D, 2013.The importance of in-store video for retailers. The Guardian [online] 25th April. Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/ media-network/media-network-blog/2013/ apr/25/video-in-store-importance-retail. [Accessed 4th May 2013]. Ditty, A, 2013. Expert interview see appendix 1.2 Unknown, 2010: How to pull off a Guerrilla marketing campaign, Business insiders [online] 19th April. Available at: http://www. entrepreneur.com/article/206202, [Accessed 10th May 2013]. Spencer, A, 2008. DIY: The rise of Lofi Culture. Great Britain. Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd. Page 3. Kelly, S, 2013. Email interview see appendix 2.1 Mullen, E, 2013. Expert interview see 1.1

171


Chapter 17:

| Bibliography Fig 94:Over the rainbow

172

173


Books| Bartos, R, 1989. Marketing to women. Oxford. Heinemann professional publishing Ltd. Blanchard, T, 2007. Green is the new black. How to change the world with style. Great Britain. Clays Ltd. Blythe, J, 2013. Consumer behaviour. London. SAGE publications Ltd Blythe, J, 2000. Essentials of marketing communications.Essex. Pearson education limited. Hooley, G, 2012. Marketing strategy and competitive positioning. Essex. Pearson education limited. Jones, R, 2000. The big idea. London. Harper Collins publishers. July, M, Learning to love you more. London. Prestel publishing Ltd. Lake, S, 2008. Bazaar style. London. Ryland Peters & small. Maris, J, 2008. Beyond green, sustainability and fashion. The Neverlands. D’Jonge Hond Publishers. McKeown, M, 2001. E-customer, Great Britain. Pearson education limited. Power, A, 2001. Weird like us: My bohemian America. America. Da Capo Press. Turner, G, 1996. British cultural studies an introduction. New York. Routledge Spencer, A, 2008. DIY: The rise of Lo-fi Culture. Great Britain. Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd.

174

Spencer, A, 2008. DIY: The rise of Lo-fi Culture. Great Britain. Marion Boyars Publishers Ltd. Wills, P. 1978. Profane culture. London. Routledge & Kegan Paul Ltd.

Articles & magazines| Barber, L, 2013. The human desire to participate can help brands create deeper connections with consumers. This is BD [online] 28th June. Available at: man-desireto-participate-can-help-brands-create-deeperconnections-with-consumers. [Accessed 26th April 2013]. Brandweiner, N, 2013. From retail to me-tail: 2013’s most important customer experience changes. MyCustomer [online] 24th January. Available at: http://www.mycustomer.com/ topic/customer-experience/customerexperience-management-2013-expertspredictions/161617. [Accessed 4th May 2013]. Bergin, O, 2012. Free People launches in the UK. Telegraph [online]. Available at: http://fashion.telegraph.co.uk/news-features/ TMG9649405/Free-People-launches-in-theUK.html. [Accessed 25th March 2013]. Buckingham , F, 2013. Consumers rank ingredient transparency among most important issues for brands. SustainAbility [online] 25th April. Available at: http://www.sustainability. com/news/consumers-rank-ingredienttransparency-among-most-important-issuesfor-brands#.UYVnETn3A1A. [Accessed 4th May 2013]. Carmamanica, J, 2013. Coachella: A heavy lean toward the British. The New York times [online]. April 13th. Available at: http://artsbeat.

blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/13/coachellaa-heavy-lean-toward-the-british/?ref=arts. [Accessed 13th April 2013]. Durrani, A, 2013. Overseas online sales to generate £28bn for British retailers by 2012. Marketing Magazine [online] 30th April. Available at: http://www.marketingmagazine. co.uk/article/1180549/Overseas-onlinesales-generate-28bn-British-retailers-2020. [Accessed 2nd May 2013]. Fryatt, J. NYC conference makes event sustainability sexy. The content roundtable [online]. 11th December. Available at: http:// smartershift.com/2012/12/nyc-conferencemakes-event-sustainability-sexy/. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Gentile, T, 2011. What is DIY culture? Scoutiegirl [online] 1st February. Available at: http://www.scoutiegirl.com/2011/02/what-isdiy-culture.html. [Accessed 4th May 2013]. Greene, M, 2010. What is bohemian chic? Ehow [online]. Available at: http://www.ehow. com/facts_6766223_bohemian-chic_.html. [Accessed Hardy, Q, 2013. One on One: Douglas Rushkoff on everything happening now. The New York times [online], April 12th. Available at: http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/04/12/ one-on-one-douglas-rushkoff-on-everythinghappening-now/?ref=technology. [Accessed 11th April 2013]. Hyslop, L, 2012. Waitrose opens in Abu Dhabi. The telegraph [online] 11th July. Available at:http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/ /expatmoney/9392357/Waitrose-opens-in-AbuDhabi.html/expat-money/9392357/Waitroseopens-in-Abu-Dhabi.html. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

Jameson, A, 2012. British brands find hope in the golf. The National [online] 29th May. Available at: http://www.thenational.ae/ thenationalconversation/industry-insights/ retail/british-brands-find-hope-in-the-gulf. [Accessed 2nd May 2013]. Johnson, A, 2013. Will more people start living in the high street? The Independent [online] 1st February. Available at: http:// blogs.independent.co.uk/2013/02/01/willmore-people-start-living-in-the-high-street/. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Kahn, J, 2013. Apple stores aren’t just stores, they are gathering places. 9to5Mac [online] 12th February. Available at: http://9to5mac. com/2013/02/12/cook-apple-stores-arentjust-stores-they-are-gathering-placesentertainment-venues-and-prozac/. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Kemp, M, 2013. Marketers need to embrace cultural change to drive technology. Marketing Magazine [online] 20th April. Available at: http://www.marketingmagazine.co.uk/ article/1180579/Marketers-need-embracecultural-change-drive-technology. [Accessed 2nd May 2013]. Kucharek, J, 2013. Selfridges’ silence room. Riba journal [online] 10th January. Available at: http://www.ribajournal.com/pages/selfridges_ silence_room_200927.cfm. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. London, B, 2012. U.S clothing line ‘Free People’ adored by the A-list set to take British high street by storm. Daily Mail [online]. Available at: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/ femail/article-2179830/U-S-clothing-line-FreePeople-adored-A-list-set-British-high-streetstorm.html#comments. [Accessed 26th March 2013].

175


Maranrz, H, 2010. What is it about 20 somethings?The New York times [online] 18th August. Available at: http://www.nytimes. com/2010/08/22/magazine/22Adulthood-t. html?pagewanted=all&_r=0. [Accessed 26th April].

Patel, D, 2013.The importance of in-store video for retailers. The Guardian [online] 25th April. Available at: http://www.guardian.co.uk/medianetwork/media-network-blog/2013/apr/25/ video-in-store-importance-retail. [Accessed 4th May 2013].

Mast, S, 2012. Ten ways to reach customers through digital platforms. The Globe and Mail [online] 26th March. Available at: http:// w w w. t h e g l o b e a n d m a i l . c o m / r e p o r t - o n business/small-business/sb-tools/ten-waysto-reach-customers-through-digital-platforms/ article535445/. [Accessed 26th April 2013].

Ping Chan, S, 2013. US economy stalls as retail sales fall. The Telegraph [online], April 12th. Available at: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/ finance/economics/9990178/US-economystalls-as-retail-sales-fall.html. [Accessed 14th April 2013].

McCan, J, 2013. Shhh…I’m in Selfridges: department store unveils Silence Room to calm frazzled shoppers. London Evening Standard [online]. Available at: http://www. standard.co.uk/news/london/shhh-im-inselfridges-department-store-unveils-silenceroom-to-calm-frazzled-shoppers-8445284. html. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. McKinnon, C. 2013. The great British sewing bee- final review. Radio Times [online]. Available at: http://www.radiotimes.com/ news/2013-04-23/the-great-british-sewingbee---final-review. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Oakes, G, 2013. Tech: The power of the ‘internet of things’, Marketing magazine [online] 18th January . Available at: h t t p : / / w w w. m a r k e t i n g m a g a z i n e . c o . u k / a r t i c l e / 11 6 6 5 7 4 / Te c h - p o w e r - I n t e r n e t Things?HAYILC=RELATED. [Accessed 2nd May 2013]. Parascan, N, 2013. Modern Bohemia: Fashions subtle way of remaining the past. Fashionising. com [online] 31st January. Available at: http://www.fashionising.com/trends/b-boho-bohemian-fashion-hippie-42959.html. [Accessed 30th April 2013].

176

Portas, M, 2010. Shop! Mary Portas at Anthropologie. The Telegraph [online], 28th January. Available at: http://fashion.telegraph. co.uk/news-features/TMG7079836/ShopMary-Portas-at-Anthropologie.html. [Accessed 13th April 2013]. Poulter, S, 2009. Make do and mend: Thrifty tips to help you ride out the recession. Daily mail [online] 28th August. Available at: http:// www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1209530/ Make-mend-Thrifty-tips-help-ride-recession. html. [Accessed 12th April 2013]. Qassemi, S, 2010. The other special relationship: the UAE and the UK. The national [online] 21st November. Available at: http:// www.thenational.ae/thenationalconversation/ news-comment/the-other-special-relationshipthe-uae-and-the-uk. [Accessed 2nd May 2013].

at: ttp://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/ green-living-blog/2012/feb/20/clothesswishing-parties. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Sisarios, B, 2013. Twitter will introduce a music application. The New York times [online], April 12th. Available at: http://www. nytimes.com/2013/04/13/business/media/ clues-emerge-about-twitters-music-feature. html?ref=technology&_r=0. [Accessed 10th April 2013]. Stampler, L, 2012. Free People and Urban Outfitter’s Instagram advertising. Business insider [online] 25th July. Available at: http:// www.businessinsider.com/free-people-andurban-outfitters-instagram-advertising-20127?op=1. [Accessed 17th April 2013.] Stiober, M, 2012. Designing sustainability that sells. Co.Exist [online] 28th June. Available at: http://www.fastcoexist.com/1680101/ designing-sustainability-that-sells. [Accessed 20th April 2013] Stoiber, M, 2005. Making sustainable sexy, from an ad man’s point of view. Grist [online] 1st December. Available at: http://grist.org/ article/stoiber/. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Thomson, R, 2013. The changing face of fashion retail. Retail week [online]. 13th June. Available at: http://www.retail-week.com/ the-changing-face-of-fashion-retail/5037465. article. [Accessed 25th April 2013].

Rose Dickley, M, 2013. Emily White bringing ads to Instagram. Business insider [online] 3rd April. Available at: http://www.businessinsider. com/emily-white-bringing-ads-toinstagram-2013-4. [Accessed 17th April 2013].

Unknown, 2013. High Street retailers: Who has been hit the hardest? BBC News [online], 13th February. Available at: http://www.bbc.co.uk/ news/business-13977255. [Last updated 13th February 2013].

Rowley, S. Clothes ‘swishing’ parties go global. The Guardian [online] 20th February. Available

Walker, H, 2012. Bright sparks: Urban Outfitters. The Independent [online], 23rd

January. Available at: http://www.independent. co.uk/life-style/fashion/features/bright-sparksurban-outfitters-6293036.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. WGSN, 2013. More than three-quarters of women still prefer clothes shopping in store. WGSN [online] 19th April. Available at: http:// www.wgsn.com/content/report/News/2013/ Apr_Stories/Apr_19/News_Story_Apr_192. html. [Accessed 30th April]. Yarrow, J, 2013. Instagram needs to copy twitter’s video service vine as soon as possible. Business insider [online] 7th April. Available at: http://www.businessinsider.com/instagramneeds-to-copy-twitters-video-service-vineas-soon-as-possible-2013-4. [Accessed 17th April 2013].

Audio visual resources | FP girls by Free People, 2011. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/ w a t c h ? v = X r I B u j L 2 y AY & l i s t = U U c j 2 o OOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=122. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. FP pet project! 2013. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=ksC_dj2uV7E&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=28. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Free People: Through the decades, 2011. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=T3dPcC6f__s&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=57. [Accessed 1st April 2013].

177


Free People Throwback: The March 2011 Catalog Video, 2013. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www. youtube.com/watch?v=c6Lt32ym6C0&list=P LzAs7pubkF_guUNLe3WVSjt1Ws4oJ81sx. [Accessed 3rd April 2013]. Free People’s coming to canada, 2012. Vimeo video added by Free People [online]. Available at: https://vimeo.com/45666645 [Accessed 15th April 2013]. Home sweet home episode 2 by Free People, 2011. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=XD0RITjqAFg&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Intimately Free People, 2012. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=DUiUZSrLJdE&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Introducing vegan leather by Free People, 2011. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=KWobUaZnGvI&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=84. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. Kinfolk dinner, 2012. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=gpU_ywbW-ZI&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=39. [Accessed 3rd April 2013]. Making of clean happy anthem, 2012. YouTube video added by methodproductsuk [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=veU39eN09qE. [Accessed 29th April

178

2013]. Method hand wash. Because all hands want to smell like heaven, 2012. YouTube video added by methodproductsuk [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M-HFZ_ J2Mrg. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

The hunt is on by Free People, 2012. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=LqiQYXqu7nQ&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=41. [Accessed 1st April 2013].

Method laundry liquid: Small packs a punch, 2012. YouTube video added by methodproductsuk [online]. Available at: http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=l8ZLgRj8In8. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

We decorated a bike, 2013. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/ watch?v=OdwYd9NnEwo&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=27. [Accessed 2nd April 2013].

Method non-toxic surface cleaners: clean like a mother, 2012. YouTube video added by method productsuk [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X8OtdozsP 6o&feature=context-gau. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Wee People muse by Free People, 2011. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube. com/watch?v=rmVbqDAymlU&list=UUcj2oOOQ0YAzrdlPnc7s1Q&index=112 .[Accessed 4th April 2013].

Method washing up liquid: give your nose a hug, 2012. YouTube video added by methodproductsuk [online]. Available at: http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=voDTSR3zOzk. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Method? What’s Method? Check out our brand anthem, 2012. YouTube video added by methodproductsuk [online]. Available at: http:// www.youtube.com/watch?v=yeICGBk1ZsA/ [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Roshambo, 2013. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www. youtube.com/watch?v=1S4NWYDlSrY&list= PLzAs7pubkF_guUNLe3WVSjt1Ws4oJ81sx. [Accessed 3rd April 2013]. Sh*t Free People girls say, 2012. YouTube video added by Free People [online]. Available at: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uNfDtJ_ Whds. [Accessed 3rd April 2013].

Blogs | Buzzel, L. 2009. Ecotherapy: Slowing down to natures pace. Huffington post [online blog] 6th Septemeber. Available at: http://www. huffingtonpost.com/linda-buzzell/ecotherapyslowing-down-t_b_213288.html [Accessed 10th April 2013]. Free People, 2011. Cambridge crafting party photo diary. BLG25 blog [online] 9th November. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2011/11/cambridge-crafting-party-photodiary/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2011. DIY inspiration. BLG25 blog [online] 7th September. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2011/09/our-littleinstallation/. [Accessed 7th May 2013].

Free People, 2011. Wednes-DIY. BLG25 blog [online] 25th May. Available at: http://blog. freepeople.com/2011/05/wednes-diy-69/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2011. Wednes-DIY: Making natural dyes. BLG25 blog [online] 31st August. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2011/08/diy-natural-dyes/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2011. Wednes-DIY home decor: The lightbulb vase. BLG25 blog [online] 27th July. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2011/07/wednes-diy-home-decor-thelight-bulb-vase/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2011. Our little installation. BLG25 blog [online] 30th September. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2011/09/ourlittle-installation/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2012. A love for London from British and American points of view. BLG25 blog [online] 6th Septmeber. Available at: http:// blog.freepeople.com/2012/09/love-londonamerican-british-points-view/. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Free People, 2012. British meals I adore. BLG25 blog [online] 13th September. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2012/09/britishmeals-adore/. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Free People, 2012. DIY bottle cap birdcage. BLG25 blog [online] 11th December. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/diy/page/4/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2012. DIY creative ways to gift wrap. BLG25 blog [online] 19th December. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2012/12/diy-creative-ways-gift-wrap/. [Accessed 7th May 2013].

179


Free People, 2012. Desktop dream catchers. BLG25 blog [online] 29th August. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/diy/page/7/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2012. DIY festival flag. BLG25 blog [online] 16th April. Available at: http:// blog.freepeople.com/diy/page/9/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2012. DIY Instagram photo strips. BLG25 blog [online] 24th October. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2012/10/diyinstagram-photo-strips/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2012. Office style Americans Vs British. BLG25 blog [online] 13th September. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2012/09/office-style-americans-british/. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Free People, 2012. One sweater goes to NYC. BLG25 blog [online] 14th August. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2012/08/sweaternyc/. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Free People, 2012. DIY patchwork denim throw rug. BLG25 blog [online] 24th September. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2012/08/diy-patchwork-denim-throw-rug/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2012. DIY supplies- what do you need for DIY projects. BLG25 blog [online] 21st November. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2012/11/10-supplies-crafter/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2012. DIY terrariums with Terrain. BLG25 blog [online] 1st September. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2012/09/diyterrariums-terrain/. [Accessed 7th May 2013].

180

Free People, 2012. DIY wrapped headphones. BLG25 blog [online] 21st March. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2012/03/diywrapped-headphones/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. April catalog sneak peek: La Dolce Vita issue. BLG25 blog [online] 29th March. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/03/april-catalog-sneak-peek-ladolce-vita-issue/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Beauty. BLG25 blog [online] 23rd April. Available at: http://blog. freepeople.com/beauty/ [Accessed 8th April 2013] Free People, 2013. British sayings we love. BLG25 blog [online] 17th March. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2013/03/britishsayings-love/. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Free People, 2013. Decor. BLG25 blog [online] 24th April. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/decor/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Decor inspiration: Our new Spring store displays. BLG25 blog [online] 25th January. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/01/decor-inspiration-spring-storedisplays/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. DIY. BLG25 blog [online] 2nd May. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/diy/. [Accessed 8th May 2013] Free People, 2013. DIY decor: How to use dried flowers. BLG25 blog [online] 2nd January. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/01/diy-decor-decorating-driedflowers/ [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. DIY eco dyeing with flowers. BLG25 blog [online] 29th January .

Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/diy/ page/2/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. DIY make an egg crate garden for spring. BLG25 blog [online] 8th March. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/03/diy-egg-crate-garden-spring/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. DIY painted feathers. BLG25 blog [online] 7th May. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2013/03/diypainted-feathers/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. DIY wool thread coasters. BLG25 blog [online] 23rd April. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2013/04/diy-woolthread-coasters/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Fashion. BLG25 blog [online] 24th April. Available at: http://blog. freepeople.com/fashion/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Inspiration. BLG25 blog [online] 24th April. Available at: http://blog. freepeople.com/inspiration/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Making everyday tasks more meaningful. BLG25 blog [online] 19th February. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/02/making-everyday-tasksmeaningful/. [Accessed 19th February 2013]. Free People, 2013. March catalog sneak peek. BLG25 blog [online] 1st March. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2013/03/marchcatalog-sneak-peek-2/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Me tile photos we love!. BLG25 blog [online] 18th April. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2013/04/fp-style-

photos-love-6/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Music. BLG25 blog [online] 23rd April. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/music/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Poll: Our February catalog. BLG25 blog [online] 7th February. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2013/02/pollfebruary-catalog/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. Planting a tree for earth day. BLG25 blog [online] 22nd April. Available at: http://blog.freepeople.com/2013/04/ planting-tree-earth-day/. [Accessed 7th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. The concept behind dark rose. BLG25 blog [online] 22nd March. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/03/concept-dark-rose/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. The history of British picnicking. BLG25 blog [online] 6th April. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/04/history-british-picnicking/. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Free People, 2013. Video. BLG25 blog [online] 22nd April. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/video/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Free People, 2013. You guys, we have a YouTube. BLG25 blog [online] 1st March. Available at: http://blog.freepeople. com/2013/03/guys-youtube-channel/. [Accessed 8th May 2013]. Sara, 2013; You, me and Anthropologie. You, me and Anthropologie [online]. Available at: http://youmeandanthropologie.blogspot. c o . u k / 2 0 11 / 11 / a n t h r o p o l o g i e - g i r l . h t m l . [Updated May 10th 2013].

181


Unknown, 2013. A word on sussing out sustainability. Sustainablog [online] 18th April. Available at: http://sustainablog.org/2013/04/ a-word-on-sussing-out-sustainability/. [Accessed 21st April 2013]. Unknown, 2013. Why Free People’s social media gurus constantly rock my world. Eagle Strategies blog [online] 24th February. Available at: http://eaglestrategies.blogspot. co.uk/2013/02/why-free-peoples-socialmedia-gurus.html. [Accessed 17th April].

ntu.ac.uk/content/report/Design_Direction/ Print_and_Graphics/AW_14_15/Womens/ cosmic_folk_womens.html. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. Clifford, E, 2012. Organic food and drink- UK. Mintel [online] September. Available at: http:// academic.mintel.com/display/590386/?highlig ht=true#. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Journals|

Jobling, A, 2013. Sustainable fashion: SLDF. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www. wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/report/ Sourcing/2012/December/sustainable_ fashionsldf.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013].

Rawlinson, J, 2009. Yoga and pilates tourism- international. Mintel [online] May. Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/ display/451583/?highlight=true. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Keating, S, 2013. Fantastical Folk: A/W 14/15. WGSN [online] Available at: http://www.wgsn. com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/report/Design_ Direction/Print_and_Graphics/AW_14_15/ Womens/fantastical_folk_womens.html. [Accessed 4th April 2013].

Reports| Bezabat, B, 2013. A/W 13 South America: campaign trends. WGSN [online] 25th April. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com/content/ report/Marketing/Campaigns/Seasonal/ Spring_summer_2013/a_w_13_south_ americatop10campaigntrends.html. [Accessed 28th April 2013]. Bouvier, E, 2009. Environmental concerns in household cleaning- UK. Mintel [online] February. Available at: http://academic. mintel.com/display/393882/?highlight=true#. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Clarkson, A, 2013.Cosmic Folk: A/W 14/15 women’s print & graphics. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.

182

Keating, S, 2013. Modern Collage: A/w 14/15 women’s print & graphics. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy. ntu.ac.uk/content/report/Design_Direction/ Print_and_Graphics/AW_14_15/Womens/ modern_collage_womens.html. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. MacKenzie, L, 2012. Global traveller: emerging textile trend. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/ content/report/Trend_Analysis/Materials/ Inspiration/2012/August/global_traveler_ textilefocusjapan.html. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. Magnussen, K, 2009. Ethical clothing- UK. Mintel [online] February. Available at: http://academic. mintel.com/display/393875/?highlight=true. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Miller, L, 2013. Email marketing: Top tips for driving conversion. WGSN [online] Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/ content/report/Retail_and_VM/Retail_ Strategy/Retail_Marketing/2013/March/email_ marketing.html. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. Mintel (A), 2008. Ethical and green retailing: UK. Mintel [online]. September. Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/display/416235/. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. Mintel (B), 2011. Women’s fashion lifestyles: UK. Mintel [online]. May. Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/ display/578314/?highlight=true. [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Mintel (C), 2012. Women’s fashion lifestyles: UK. Mintel [online]. May. Available at: http:academic.mintel.com/ display/590148/?highlight=true/ [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Monk, H, 2012. Clothing retailing. Mintel [online] October. Available at: http://academic. mintel.com/display/590374/?highlight=true. [Accessed 25th April 2013]. Pasquier, L, 2013. Waste not: innovations in garbage cans. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/ content/report/HBL/Trend_Analysis/2013/ January/garbage_cans.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Preston, L, J (A), 2013. Essential womenswear looks: Urban youth Europe. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy. ntu.ac.uk/content/report/Youth/Youth_Think_ Tank/2013/January/essential_womenswear_ looks_urban_youth_europe.html. [Accessed 3rd April 2013].

Preston, L, J (B), 2013. Top women’s apparel trends: Urban youth Europe. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy. ntu.ac.uk/content/report/Youth/Youth_Think_ Tank/2013/January/top_womens_apparel_ trends_urban_youth_europe.html. [Accessed 3rd April 2013]. Preston, L, J (C), 2013. Youth Style tribes: Leeds guys. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/ content/report/Youth/Youth_Think_Tank/2013/ February/leeds_guys_styletribes.html#ed_ morrison_urban_lumberjack. [Accessed 3rd April 2013]. Ramirez, E, 2012. Retail app trends: top five. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www. wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/report/ Marketing/Communication_Strategy/2012/ N o v e m b e r / R e t a i l _ A p p _ Tr e n d s . h t m l . [Accessed 4th April 2013]. Rawlinson, J, 2009. Yoga and pilates tourism- international. Mintel [online] May. Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/ display/451583/?highlight=true. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Saunter, L , 2013. Drapers Ecommerce Summit 2013. WGSN [online]. Available at: http:// www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/content/ report/Retail_and_VM/Retail_Strategy/ Retail_Conferences/2013/March/drapers_ ecommerce_summit_2013.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013]. Telsey, D, 2013. US retail: February samestore sales analysis. WGSN [online]. Available at: http://www.wgsn.com.ezproxy.ntu.ac.uk/ content/report/Business_Strategy/Business_ Insight/2013/March/us_retail_februarysamestoresalesanalysis.html. [Accessed 2nd April 2013].

183


Unknown, 2013. High street stores as focal points of the community. The WI [online]. Available at: http://www.thewi.org.uk/__ documents/key-document-downloads/2013agm-resolution-briefing.pdf. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Websites| Alexander, E, 2012. Free People’s UK launch. Vogue [online]. Available at: http://www.vogue. co.uk/news/2012/11/05/free-people-clothinglaunch-in-the-uk. [Accessed 27th March 2013]. BBMG, 2013. Meet the new consumer, brand innovation for the new consumer. BBMG [online]. Available at: http://www.bbmg.com/ how/the-new-consumer/. [Accessed 21st April 2013]. B_E_E (A), 2013 . Beauty engineered forever. B_E_E [online]. Available at: http://www.bee. net.nz/products.html. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. B_E_E (B), 2013 (b). Our story. B_E_E [online]. Available at: http://www.bee.net.nz/ background.html. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Beyond skin, 2013. Vegan designer purses and bags. Beyond skin [online]. Available at: http://www.beyondskin.co.uk/vegan-designerpurses-and-bags-34/. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Craftworks (A), 2010. Crafts and the economy. Craftworks toolkit [online]. Available at: http://craftworkstoolkit.org.uk/valueofcraft/ craftsandtheeconomy. [Accessed 13th April 2013].

184

Design works, 2013. Making sustainability sexy. Design works [online]. Available at: http://www.designworks.co.nz/work-b-e-e. html. [Accessed 20th April 2013] Econsoltancy, 2012. How the internet can save the high street. Econsultancy [online] September 2012. Available at: http:// e c o n s u l t a n c y. c o m / u k / r e p o r t s / h o w - t h e internet-can-save-the-high-street. [Accessed 4th April 2013]. Edun, 2013: Edun’s mission. Edun [online]. Available at: http://www.edun.com/aboutedun. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Fashion hub, 2012. Free People’s UK launch. Every forum [online]. Available at: http://fashion.everyforums.com/?p=2516. [Accessed 26th March 2013]. Fibre2fashion, 2013. Sri Lanka: Sri Lanka crafts council t unveil handicraft map. Fibre2fashion [online] 8th February. Available at: http://www.fibre2fashion.com/news/textilenews/newsdetails.aspx?news_id=120887. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Gertner, J, 2012. Starbucks: The world’s 50 most innovative companies in 2012. Fast company [online]. Available at: http:// www.fastcompany.com/most-innovativecompanies/2012/starbucks. [Accessed 22nd April 2013]. Gigaom, 2010. What makes an Apple store so great? Gigaonm [online] 7th July. Available at: http://gigaom.com/2010/07/07/what-makesan-apple-store-so-great/. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Graze (A), 2013. Healthy snacks, about us: our packaging. Graze [online]. Available at: http:// www.graze.com/about/packaging [Accessed

20th April 2013]. Graze (B), 2013. Healthy snacks, how it works. Graze [online]. Available at: http://www.graze. com/uk/help/howitworks. [Accessed 20th April 2013.] Lakpura travels, 2013. Sri Lanka handicrafts. Lakpura travles [online]. Available at: http://www.lanka.com/sri-lanka/sri-lankahandicrafts-sri-lanka-941.html. [Accessed 23rd April 2013]. Marks & Spencer, 2012. FAQ Schwop. Marks & Spencer [online]. Available at: http://www.marksandspencer.com/FAQShwop/b/1723541031. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Method, 2013. Methodology. Method [online]. Available at: http://www.methodproducts. co.uk/. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Monsoon (A), 2013. Clothes for life. Monsoon [online]. Available at: http://uk.monsoon.co.uk/ view/content/tandc-clothes-for-life. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Monsoon (B), 2013. Heritage and ethics. Monsoon [online]. Available at: http:// uk.monsoon.co.uk/view/category/uk_catalog/ mon_7. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Monsoon (C), 2013. Our company. Monsoon [online]. Available at: http://uk.monsoon.co.uk/ view/content/our-company. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Mullen, E (A), 2013. Edward Mullen Studiostrategy and design. Edward Mullen [online]. Available at: http://www.edmullen.com/. [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Mullen, E (B), 2013. Free People previous-

evolving with the brand. Edward Mullen [online]. Available at: http://www.edmullen.com/work/ project/free-people-previous. [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Mullen, E (C), 2013. Free People retail- A partnership woven in creativity. Edward Mullen [online]. Available at: http://www. edmullen.com/work/project/free-people-retail. [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Mullen, E (D), 2013. Free People wholesalebringing the showroom to buyers. Edward Mullen [online]. Available at: http://www. edmullen.com/work/project/free-peoplewholesale. [Accessed 1st April 2013]. Pull & Bear (A), 2013. Company: About us. Pull & Bear [online]. Available at: http://www. pullandbear.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ category/pullandbeargb/en/pullandbear/5700 3?subsectionId=company_01_01. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Pull & Bear (B), 2013. Yumi cookbook. Pull & Bear [online]. Available at: http:// w w w. p u l l a n d b e a r. c o m / w e b a p p / w c s / stores/servlet/category/pullandbeargb/en/ pullandbear/620501/·%2BYumi. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Selfridges, 2013. Selfridges No Noise. Selfridges [online]. Available at: http://nonoise. selfridges.com/. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Sowumni, J, 2013. 100 Hot hippie photo shoots- from funky bohemian cookbooks to eclectic hipster editorials. Trend hunter [online]. Available at: http://www.trendhunter. com/slideshow/hot-hippie. [Accessed 13th May 2013]. Starbucks, 2013. Starbucks as a community. Starbucks [online]. Available at: http://

185


starbucks.co.uk/responsibility/community. [Accessed 22nd April 2013]. Stewart, D, 2008. Urban Outfitters, Free People & Anthropologie: What’s the difference? Jezbel [online]. Available at: http:// jezebel.com/366615/urban-outfitters-freepeople--anthropologie-whats-the-difference. [Accessed 30th March 2013]. Stoiber, M, 2012. Lessons from ecologic brands: how to make sustainability sexy. Green Biz [online] 29th June. Available at: http:// www.greenbiz.com/blog/2012/06/29/lessonsecologic-brands-how-make-sustainabilitysexy. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. Stylist, 2012. Free People line hits the UK. Stylist [online]. Available at: http://www.stylist.co.uk/fashion/free-peopleline-hits-the-uk#image-rotator-1. [Accessed 26th March 2013]. Sustainability in sport 2012.Can sport make sustainability sexy? Sustainability in sport [online]. Available at: http://www. sustainabilityinsport.com/news/blog/2012/cansport-make-sustainability-sexy. [Accessed 20th April 2013]. The marketer, 2012. Personalised marketing. The marketer [online] 22nd August.Available at: http://www.themarketer.co.uk/archives/ trends/personalised-marketing/. [Accessed 25th April 2013].

[Accessed 5th April 2013]. Urban INC (B), 2013. Free People Profile. Urban INC [online]. Available at: http://www. urbn.com/profile/freepeople.html. [Accessed 5th April 2013]. Urban INC (C), 2013. Terrain Profile. Urban INC [online]. Available at: http://www.urbn. com/profile/terrain.html. [Accessed 5th April 2013]. Urban INC (D), 2013. Urban Outfitters Profile. Urban INC [online]. Available at: http://www. urbn.com/profile/urban.html. [Accessed 5th April 2013]. Urban Outfitters (A), 2013. Social. Urban Outfitters [online]. Available at: http://www. urbanoutfitters.co.uk/page/festivals2013&festi val=calendar. [Accessed 13th May]. Urban Outfitters (B), 2013. Urban Outfitters home. Urban Outfitters [online]. Available at: http://www.urbanoutfitters.co.uk/page/home/. [Accessed 13th May]. Yes! Yes! Yes! 2013. Our values. Yes! Yes! Yes! [online]. Available at: http://www.yesyesyes. org/yes_values.htm. [Accessed 20th April 2013].

Trust pilot, 2013. Free People customer reviews. Trust pilot [online]. Available at: http:// www.trustpilot.com/review/www.freepeople. com. [Accessed 25th March 2013]. Urban INC (A), 2013. Anthropologie Profile. Urban INC [online]. Available at: http://www. urbn.com/profile/anthropologie.html.

186

187


Chapter 18:

Fig 95:Cinco de Mayo

188

| Appendix 189


Declaration|

fcp3

School of Art & Design ba

Declaration Form 2012/13 Module: Negotiated Project Stage 1 Module Leader: Tim Rundle Ref. no: FASH30001

I confirm that this work has gained ethical approval and that I have faithfully observed the terms of the approval in the conduct of this project. This submission is the result of my own work. All help and advice other than that received from tutors has been acknowledged and primary and secondary sources of information have been properly attributed. Should this statement prove to be untrue I recognise the right and duty of the board of examiners to recommend what action should be taken in line with the University’s regulations on assessment contained in its handbook.

signed .................................................................................................................... date .......................................................................................................................

Your questions answered Project title: Free People: A journey into Europe. What is this project about? Titled “ Free People: A journey into the Europe” my work explores the idea of launching the American womens wear brand Free People into the UK market through the introduction of a physical store. What are the research objectives? - Identify what is happening within the retail market today to potentially create an appetite for Free People within the UK? - Find out what the most important promotional messages are to utilise within the communication strategy? - Discover a way in which to get the UK to be as excited and enthusiastic about the brand as they are in the US? Answers to these questions were revealed through both primary and secondary research. ch as what is happening within the retail market today to potentially create an appetite for Free People within the UK? What are the most important promotional messages? How do we get the UK to be as excited and enthusiastic about the brand as they are in the US? Who is running the study? As a third year BA Fashion Communication and Promotion student at Nottingham Trent University, I, Ellyn Grant am undertaking research for my final year project. I have been trained to undertake this research and am being supervised by the Fashion Communication and Promotion staff at Nottingham Trent University. Why have I been chosen to take part? You have been chosen to take part because I value your thoughts on the research questions outlined above. This is due to your expertise in the filed of fashion/ strategy/ marketing/ advertising and retail. What do you want me to do? I ask that you let me interview you at a time and a place convenient for you. This could be in person, over the phone or via a series of emails. During this interview we will discuss the questions outlines above and your thoughts and opinions on these matters.

190

191


Do I have to take part? Your participation is entirely voluntary.No one else will be informed of your participation or non participation. At any subsequent point, you can withdraw from the project and if you wish, withdraw any of the information that you have given so far (through interview of other). You do not have to give any reason for withdrawing.

What will happen to the results? The results will be used as part of my university assessed work in a 5,000 word visual report to be submitted at the end of May 2013. It will be read by my tutors and made available to the external examiner, who is an academic from another university.

What will happen to the information I provide? In rode rot keep record of the interviews I would like to record the discussion and transcribe this into text. I will then analyse the information and feed it into my research findings and subsequent report. At the end of the study all the audio files, transcripts and any other information collected will be destroyed.

How can I find out more about the project and its results? By contacting Ellyn Grant on 07800568490 or via email at ellyngrant@hotmail.co.uk

How will you protect my confidentiality and anonymity? The tape and transcript will be handled only by me, in line with data protection principles and our approved research protocol. Electronic files are kept on password protected computers which are not accessible to any other person. You will not be names or otherwise identified in any other document or medium that is available to anyone, without your explicit consent. Without this, all evidence used in subsequent publications will be anonymised ( I will use a pseudonym or descriptor) and I will exercise all possible care to ensure that you cannot be identified by the way that I write up my research findings. What are the possible disadvantages and risks in taking part? The main cost to you will be the time required for me to interview you. I am confident that the arrangements described above will prevent any of your information being shared with anyone without your explicit consent. For this reason, I believe that the risk of deteriment is very low. What are the benefits? I hope that you will find participation interesting and an opportunity to see your expertise applied to a different field.

192

193


Appendix 1: Expert interviews 1.1 Edward Mullen, designer of digital experiences, New Jersey. 1: Your work with Free People has helped them to achieve an exciting, current and innovative online space, how valuable do you think this has been to the brand? Free People’s audience, the FP Girl as they often refer to her, is seeking a life filled with excitement, travel, expression, and individual identity. That can seem silly to say “buy our stuff and be an individual just like everyone else”, but Free People products are sort of like raw materials that can be combined with other stuff to make something original. This sort of expression is at the heart of the Free People idea. That excitement over mashing things up, combining things someone else wouldn’t think to combine, is really important. The Free People website embodies that by putting a much greater focus on constantly changing the drawings and style elements on the site to reflect that search for something new. There have also been a number of features added  specifically to help people express themselves on the site. I don’t think it’s super important to the audience that the site be cutting-edge for the sake of cutting edge. But it needs to be authentic. Whenever the style has veered to close to anything feeling too “corporate”, the fans have gotten mad. So whats really important is staying true to the brand while also remaining relevant.  2: How difficult was it to portray Free Peoples brand personality and values in an online form as opposed to physical? It wasn’t ever very difficult to communicate the FP brand online, really. In fact, I think it’s easier to do that in print and online than in the store. Especially for the ideas that are involved with FP. When you do a photo shoot and you go to a foreign location, find a beautiful old house, with vibrant colors and all kinds of texture, you’re able to produce a lot of artifacts that allow people to immerse themselves in the experience. and take a whole bunch of amazing photos and video. Those artifacts are better suited to online and print, where they can be mixed with hand-drawn elements. Online video, music, and interactive pieces can expand on what print does. Add to that all the behind-the-scenes content online, and girls can feel more deeply connected to the Free People team. It’s also more intimate. The suspension of disbelief is greater than in a physical store, which is still at your local mall.     3: Did you have any part to play in the launch of the Free People UK e-commerce site last year? Not really. A project like this one was largely logistical. The UK site features the same creative elements. It becomes more about figuring out shipping, price conversions, stock issues. There may be some cultural things to tweak here and there, but largely the Free People idea is the same in both places.  4: Trust is one of retailers biggest challenges, do you believe that through building the online community around the brand has helped to improve levels of consumer communication and participation? Yes, definitely. Trust and community go hand-in-hand. We’ve done a number of things recently specifically focused on making the online experience be more community-oriented. The introduction of FP-me—which allows people to share their own photos, make collections, follow and “love” other people’s creations as well as product—is all about helping people express themselves within the community and build connections to other “FP girls”. Along with this, there have been efforts to connect the online and in-store experiences. Store shoppers are encouraged to take and share photos on the site. There will be additional features rolling out over time.

194

5: Although your work focuses on the online presence of a brand, how important do you consider the instore environment to be in todays climate? I think it’s important to the trust issue. If the image portrayed in the catalog or online is exciting and vivid, and then you go into the store and it’s bland and unwelcoming, there is a big disconnect and any good will can be lost. There needs to be a connection between the ideas of the catalog and website and the physical space.    6: Do you think that there is a market for Free People to expand into the UK through the introduction of a physical store? I think that is one of the things the UK site is intended to explore. If sales are strong (and I have no insight into that), I’m sure they would explore a physical store. That’s the approach a number of UK retailers seem to have taken over here. Topshop, ASOS, and some others seem to have gone that route. On the other hand Tesco opened a whole bunch of stores here and it was total failure because they didn’t understand the market and how they needed to adapt. I think the idea is to start lean, establish some recognition and demand, get to know the customers a bit before sinking the money into a store.

1.2 Allison Ditty, Free People web manager, Philidelphia. 1. If you were to describe Free People in one sentence what would it be? Free People is just like our customer: creative, confident, adventurous, sweet to tough to tomboy to romantic – pushing life to its limits, with traveling, hanging out and everything in between.   2. Since the launch of the UK e-commerce site have you seen a rise in popularity and demand from your British fans? We have seen our British fans take greater advantage of the site as well as the in country returns we now offer.   3. Are the US bestselling items the same in the UK or do you notice a difference in consumer preference? Similar items are bestsellers for both the UK and the US. Our British customers are especially loving our boots and dresses right now.   4. Is your target demographic the same in the UK? It is!   5. Free People products are sold in the UK through concessions online at Urban Outfitters & ASOS, did those sales figures and demand influence the introduction of the Free People UK site? We are fortunate to have distinctive items both in our wholesale line and on our website. This gives our customer reason to visit us in many channels.   6. Would the introduction of a physical store be something that we can looking forward to in the future her in the UK? You never know where Free People will show up next!

195


Appendix 2: Interview with a British fan. 2. Harley Chapman, Student. Nottingham. 21.

1: What is it that you love about Free People? I love the brand essence and lifestyle Free People create of carefree, bohemian living. 2:How did you find out about the brand? I first found out about the brand when on holiday in New York, I came across a small store and thought they were the most beautiful clothes I have ever seen. 3: Are you suprised Free People haven’t opened a physical store in the UK yet?I am! As I think a store over here would do really well! They have launched a UK site so they know there are consumers within the UK. Have you shopped through the UK website? I have and always browse the site even if I am not buying. Describe Free People in 3 words... Bohemian, care-free, spiritual. What UK strores would you compare Free People too? Accessorize, Monsoon. Brands who love colour, pattern, print, use boho living in campaigns. Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I do!! There is already a UK site and it is sold in Urban Outfitters, there is 100% a UK consumer and even though there are UK stores that have a similar product Free Peoples brand promise is a lifestyle that promotes care-free bohemian living through the clothes, the blog with food & lifestyle sections which consumers would buy into.

196

2. Stu

197


Appendix 3: Email interviews with American girls. 3.1 | Shannon Kelly, 22.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? I have been wearing Free People since high school. I can’t remember the initial moment of finding out about them, but the first memory is seeing their store in my mall back at home and just thinking it was absolutely gorgeous and different.  2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Vintage, lifestyle and original. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? The brand is a lot more than clothes. It is more of a lifestyle that speaks to a certain type of girl. Anyone can buy the clothes at a department store, but the individual stores speak to a specific customer from the employees to the decor. Someone also doesn’t have to own the clothes to be a part of Free People. Beyond the clothes, the Free People blog talks about music, DIY projects, films and more subjects. Overall, the brand is its own culture and that is what I love about it most.  4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? Yes, we do.  5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? I would say it is very popular, especially where I am from. Everyone I know wears it.  6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? In some ways, I believe Free People competes against themselves because of their sister companies Anthropologie and Urban Outfitters. They also compete with stores lie Aritizia as far as style goes. For price, I believe they compete with stores like Forever 21 and H&M, which have similar styles with lower prices.  7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? I believe the price points are completely reasonable, but I do understand why they could be expensive for some people.  8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? I would rather save up for high quality garments.  9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? Yeah, definitely. I rather spend money on high quality products that will last longer.  10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I think the UK would really like Free People. Although I have never been to the UK, I believe the brand would speak to the culture there.

3.2 | Giuseppina Trapani, 22.

How did you find out about the brand Free People? It’s just a store that everyones aware of. If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Bright, original and fashionable. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? It’s not of my favourite stores, it’s a bit to feminine and girly for me. I do like the casual printed tees and I quite like the

198

the accessories but I wouldn’t plan to go there on a shopping trip its more of a place I just go to every now and then to browse but not necessarily with the intention to buy. I prefer sports/ skate wear stores that are a bit more causal and laid back. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? Yeh, not too far away there is one, it’s in a department store. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? Pretty popular, I think a lot of people shop online too. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? Erm I think Anthropologie and H&M have quite similar style clothes. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? For the things that i’m interested in in Free People then pretty expensive. The Tees are quite pricey for what they are so I tend to only buy things in there if I really REALLY like them (this isn’t often.) 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? I think somewhere in between. 9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? A little bit but not majorly. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I have never been to the UK, always wanted too but haven’t yet so I can’t really say…probably though.

3.3 | Emily Green, 22.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? I only found out about Free People when I moved away for College because I’m from a pretty small town so I never really lived by a mall or any where with fashion boutiques. It sounds awful but most people where I live shop in Wallmart or TJ maxx, so it was cool to get away and discover new stores such as Free People. 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Cool, colourful and quirky. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? I like how the clothes are different to what i’m used too. They say a lot about the person who is wearing them. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? Not at home. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? Where I’m from not very, but here at college all the girls seem to be wearing Free People, especially in summer. The first thing I ever bought from Free People was a aztech maxi dress. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? I’m not really too sure. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? More expensive than i’m used to so I find it quite hard to justify spending so much money on one thing but with my dress it was definitely worth it because I wear it all the time :). 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? It used to be the later but now I think I try to save up and shop in stores that are a bit nicer and higher quality! Not good for my bank balance but my fashion sense has definitely improved.

199


9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? I am quite conscious of what goes into things and how things are made so I guess whenever I am buying something the thought of how environmentally friendly is always at the back of my mind. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I don’t see why not!!

3.4 | Hilary Gordnier, 23.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? I am a massive fan, always have been…Free People is my favourite shop. 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Imaginative, bohemian and contemporary. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? I love everything. The stores are amazing inside, the visual merchandising is the best i’ve ever seen it’s all handmade and so cute. The clothes are amazing, I love all the floaty fabrics and gypsy style dresses that you can dress up or down. The contrast of simple garments against highly detailed and embellished ones. There is a real mix of styles and Free People cater for any kind of girl. I also love looking online at their website and blog, they update it everyday with so many cool things, I read their horoscopes everyday and am always browsing through the style gallery to get outfit inspiration. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? I live just outside of New York so theres a few near by!! 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? Very, I think even if you don’t live by a store or even necessarily shop there, their online presence is so huge that people just browse the blog and join the lifestyle so to speak without consuming. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? I would say stores like LF stores, American Eagle outfitters. Obviously Anthropologie and Urban Outfitters have a similar style but they are all part of the same brand family so I guess they can’t really be competitors. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? Great! 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? I definitely prefer to buy good quality items. 9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? For sure! 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? Yes! Anthropolgie went to the UK so i’m sure a move to the UK for Free People must be in the pipeline for the future right?

3.5 | Alanna Shannon, 23.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? You sort of just know its name even though I don’t actually know much about it other than it being a womens fashion store. 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be?

200

I guess fashionable, mass market and fresh. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? Like I said i’m not really that aware of the brand but I do know that its got quite a unique style, like boho. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? No. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? I think quite popular, it is a major chain. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? I have no idea. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? I hear they are quite expensive for non designer wear. 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? I prefer to buy cheaper items and have lots of things I can wear instead of just one. 9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? Not really no. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I’m not sure, i’d probably say yes though because a lot of US stores have gone to the UK and vice versa and it seems to work pretty well.

3.6 | Leah Morgenstern, 22.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? My friend at college, I kept seeing great clothes in her wardrobe and borrowing them, most of them were Free People so I started to shop there. 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Unique, tribal, fun. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? I just like how they are so detailed and I like the global, tribal feel to them because its just different and not something that any other stores have really picked up on over here. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? No, i’m from a pretty small town in Ohio, but I shop online they deliver. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? Quite popular, not majorly because quite a lot of people think it’s quite expensive but I think anyone who is interested in fashion is aware of it. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? LF stores, Anthropologie. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? Average sort of prices, middle market. 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? Somewhere in between, I like to buy things that aren’t too expensive but not too cheap. So like Free People. My favourite store is Urban Outfitters and I wouldn’t say thats expensive or cheap, just medium.

201


9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? I’d like to think so but really i’m not sure it does. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I went to England 2 years ago and really noticed the difference between American and US style. I think that British people have a more unique dress sense than people do here in the US. Like here a lot of people wear sweats, jeans and track wear and I think could find Free People a bit too edgey I mean I love it and so do my friends but initially I think that Free People in the UK would be a cool thing.

3.7 | Kelsey link, 22.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? From my mom…haha.  She said that she thinks the clothes are really cute but she is too old for them so I should shop there. 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Edgy, original, good quality (whoops technically 4 words!) 3: What is it that you love about the brand? I love how the clothes are pretty different from all other clothing stores and the general feel of the store.  This is kind of similar to the three words. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? We have a Free People store within a department store.  I think there might be a local smaller store but I have never shopped there. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? I would say that it is pretty popular.   I would put it less popular than some place like Forever 21 but more than the department store’s young adult/teen section. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? Urban Outfitters and Anthropologie are most like Free People in style and price.  Competitors within the young adult/ teenager market would be Forever 21, H&M, and maybe American Eagle.  These stores are cheaper and often have similar (but cheaply made) styles of clothes. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? It is near the top of my price range for clothing. 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? Lots of cheaper items.  :( Wish I had the will power to save up for something really nice. 9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? Depends.  If I am getting clothes that are for “going out” and aren’t classics that I could use for years I am fine with buying lower quality clothes. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? Yes!  It is like a smaller scale TopShop.  Has a nice boutique feel.  I could definitely see Free People in London on Regent St.

202

3.8 | Katelyn Jacoben, 24.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? I can’t even remember, it’s just a store i’ve always shopped in. 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Cute, bright, different.3: What is it that you love about the brand? 3: What is it that you love about the brand? I love the quality of the clothes and the finish. I am huge fan of embellishment and Free People, especially the dresses, are great for it 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? Yes a boutique store it’s super small but really great. The displays are always amazing, and it’s great when they change them because you see them making it instore. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? Very, for my age group it’s definitely one of the main go to brands. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? I think in terms of jewellery and accessorises i’d go with anthropologie or maybe even forever 21 even though thats a lot cheaper. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? Reasonable. 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? Each month I tend to buy a few more expensive items and a few cheaper ones too so both I guess. 9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? Yes in the sense that I appreciate quality and would pay for it, I’m not interested in poorly finished cheap clothes that look cheap. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I think so yes. Maybe in London with a cool store that would be a hit!

3.9 | Kelly Millin, 23.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? My sister is obsessed with the brand so I sort of had no choice. 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Colourful, hippy & unique. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? I wouldn’t say that I love it, I do like it as a store and to browse but I rarely make purchases there. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? Yeah we have one nearby about a 30 minute drive. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? Pretty popular, it’s a go to store for most of my friends and I. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? I don’t think there is another store thats really similar enough to be classed as a direct competitor. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People?

203


I think it’s pretty reasonable, average. I think the price points might be high for some but you can tell what your paying for because all the clothes are so delicate and detailed. 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? I prefer to spend a bit more on one nice thing rather than waste my money on crappy things that I will just leave in my closet with the tags on and never wear…which I have been known to do. 9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? For me it does definitely. I’m a label reader for sure. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? Yeah I don’t see why not, it’s definitely popular here in the US.

3.10 | Ally Hochman, 22.

1: How did you find out about the brand Free People? I’m from Philidelphia where the head office is based so everyone sort of knows about it, but also in our local mall King of Prussia Free People have a store which is really cute, quite small but fun! 2: If you had to describe Free People in 3 words what would they be? Feminine, Fun and floaty. 3: What is it that you love about the brand? For me it’s just the whole vibe, the stores are always really inviting, the staff are super friendly and obviously the clothes are beautiful. 4: Do you have a Free People store where you live? Yes. 5: How popular would you say Free People are in America? I’d say quite popular, it’s a store that everyone is familiar with because they are in every state. 6: What other stores would you compare Free People to and therefore identify as main competitors in the market? Pull & bear is quite bohemian, maybe h&m too but thats quite a lot cheaper, Free People can be pretty pricey. 7: What do you think of the price points at Free People? See above, but quite expensive I guess but i’d say its worth it. 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items or save up for one higher quality garment? I think a bit of both. I mean I like to save up and get something that I know i’m going to keep for a long time but then at the same time I like to buy a few more fast fashion cheaper items that are on trend now but aren’t necessarily timely. 9: Does the quality of products and the way that they are produced affect your consumer decision making process? It definitely makes me think before purchasing yes. 10: Do you think Free People would get a good reception in the UK? I have only ever been to Manchester once, but I think that Free People would really appeal to British style.

Appendix 4: What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you: Street interviews. 4.1 | Lisa Andrews, 24:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Music mainly, Sandi Thom just comes into my head straight away (laughs) you know the girl that sang I wish I was a punk rocker with flowers in my hair. I just imagine like tambourines and really upbeat sounds really god knows why (laughs)

4. 2 | Sophie Lightfoot, 20:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Erm I think i’d probably say sort of a care-free and relaxed attitude to living. It makes me think about like chilling out. Slow paced mellow times. Also festivals, you know like when people wear flowery headbands and stringy sort of dresses and tops.

4.3 | Kate Hulse, 22:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Peace and love. Make love not war (laughs) hippies thats what I think of. I just picture in my head a big group of happy people just loving life in wacky clothes.

4.4 | Lizzie Hancock, 21:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Freedom. Like a free spirited person. I don’t know really just a kind of vibe. You know like one that you feel at music festivals like festival where there is really strong colourful, bohemian things everywhere and everything is really quirky, its so cool there oh and theres a big massive tent which is literally so bohemianny, is that even a word (laughs). Erm but yeah its full of like fabric, dream catchers and big persian style carpets like a crazy little cove.

4.5 | Megan Waine, 23:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Well the actual word itself is like a geographical term isn’t it so initially that but erm really… I guess to me it means a style or a way of dressing. Like really colourful, elaborate, paisley, patterned clothing and the sort of painted toes and sandals in the summer look that everyone goes for.

4.6 | Milly Ollier, 20:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Erm like a hippy erm loose kind of clothes like 70s , long and flowy things, headbands. A natural look, feathers and flowers.

4.7 | Tasha Woodcock, 19:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? The only thing I can think about about bohemian is bohemian rhapsody by queen, thats the only thing. I don’t even know oh god. What would I think about…no haven’t got a clue.

204

205


4.8 | Virginia Arthur, 23:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? It just reminds me of my friend Jess, she is like the most bohemian person in the whole world always wearing floral dresses, really big and elaborate jewellery. I think its a sort of style really, not necessarily one for everyone though but it is cool. Not sort of your everyday I got it from Primark look is it it’s more of an individual thing.

4.9 | Victoria Clemson, 22:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Creative? I guess just yeah a creative person or thing erm a kind of alternative person. Yeah and for some reason I think of like a person who isn’t interested in money like a frugal person or one that just sort of has a really care-free simple life?

4.10 | Jenifer Ashley, 24:

What does ‘bohemian’ mean to you? Erm I guess it means like old school hippies with round sunglasses and flares and floaty dresses. It makes me think of the 60s and the 70s, and fancy dress because i’ve been prone to dress as a hippy (laughs).

Appendix 5: Email interviews with British girls. 5.1 | Madeline Smith, 21 1. What does free mean to you? Freedom, expression! 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? Yes they sell it on Urban Outfitters, I always come across it when I’m browsing the website. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Fairly unique, bright, warm. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? I tend to try not too because I can’t really afford to…not as much as i would like to anyways. I would say about once a month intentionally but then every time I actually go into town I seem to buy something even if it is really small. I just love shopping. 5. What are your favourite shops? Urban outfitters is my all time favourite, but I also like Topshop, they are my two main. 6. Do you ever shop online? Guilty. I enjoy looking online a lot, I tend to that before I go shopping so that I have things in mind when i’m actually in a shop. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? I do enjoy shopping, unlike most people though I actually prefer to shop on my own as opposed to with friends, I find it quite relaxing which is probably a bit weird to grasp.

206

8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? I like to thing the second one, but I’m partial to the first. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? Not really no, to a certain extent yes. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Monsoon.

5.2 | Kathleen Martin.

What does free mean to you? Not paying for something…freebies. 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? No I haven’t. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Probably…sensible, smart, accessorised. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? Every few weeks. 5. What are your favourite shops? I love Zara, thats always my first go to shop and to be honest I normally get everything from there. Today my whole outfit is from Zara. 6. Do you ever shop online? No not really, the delivery charges put me off. I live right in the city so I prefer to just go into the shops. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? Yes. 8: When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? I like to save up and buy clothes less often but things that I will actually wear and things that will last. I think thats why I like Zara because they do so many staple pieces that I wear time and time again. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? I do appreciate quality when it comes to clothes i’m not really interested in cheap clothes that look tacky. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Zara maybe to a certain extent but Accessorize is where i shop for jewellery quite a lot and all of their advertising and products have a bohemian vibe with all the beaded jewellery and ethnic style bags. 5.3 | Anna Thornton, 24. 1. What does free mean to you? Care-free. 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? Yes, I lived in New York for a year and I discovered it then. Such a beautiful brand the clothes are really unique and pretty!

207


3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Feminine, relatively stylish, floral. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? Too often! 5. What are your favourite shops? All of them! 6. Do you ever shop online? I do but I often don’t mean to. Whenever i’m online i’m always browsing, it’s become sort of a habit! I shop online also if they don’t have my size in something I like instore. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? I do like shopping, especially in new places thats always more fun! 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? More expensive ones if I can afford it. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? Not really. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Urban outfitters, Zara, Monsoon.

5.4 | Kaz Williams, 23.

1. What does free mean to you? Not paying. 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? No. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Bright, girly, fun. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? I normally go shopping every Saturday. 5. What are your favourite shops? French Connection and Whistles. 6. Do you ever shop online? Occasionally. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? Yes I really enjoy shopping. 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? A bit of both, I will buy cheaper items like for casual wear, t-shirts, plain jumpers and cardigans etc but when it comes to buying things to wear for special occasions or interviews then I would prefer to save up for something that is a bit more luxurious. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? I would like to think so.

208

10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Some of the dresses in french connection with the heavy beading have quite an eclectic feel but then thats the same with any high street store really there are always eclectic sort of tribal influences especially with all the aztech and statement jewellery that is everywhere at the moment.

5.5 | Samantha Town, 22.

1. What does free mean to you? A good feeling. 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? Yes my it’s my housemates favourite shop. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Casual, plain, pastel. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? Not that often. 5. What are your favourite shops? I really love Asos, I know it’s an online shop but it’s my ultimate favourite. 6. Do you ever shop online? Yes…at Asos, too much. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? Not really I don’t like queuing so I just prefer to shop on line for convenience. 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? Neither really, like I said I buy most of my clothes from Asos main reason being its fashion forward and reasonably price so it doesn’t feel like i’m breaking the bank. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? I guess in a way, I like material to feel nice and not hard and cheap. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Accessorize.

5.6 | Emily Fallon 23.

1. What does free mean to you? A good thing. 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? Yes, I really like it the dress shop is sooo nice. All the clothes are really unique and floaty and bohemian. My uncle lives in American and there is a Free People in his town, it’s like a little boutique, my cousins love it so whenever he comes over with work I always put requests in. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Relaxed, unique, vintage. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? Little and often.

209


5. What are your favourite shops? I really enjoy vintage shopping, I like the idea of having something a bit different to everyone else 6.Do you ever shop online? Very, very rarely. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? I do when i’m not in a rush because I enjoy rummaging. 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? Preferably cheaper, everyone loves a bargain don’t they! But if I love something i’m willing to save and splurge every once in a while. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? Not really, i’ll wear anything most of my clothes are vintage and god knows where they have been or who they belonged to. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Monsoon.

5.7 | Colette Kenny, 22.

1: What does free mean to you? Free means to be content 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? I love Free People, if it wasn’t so expensive I would look like a sponsor for them. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Mixed, varied, kind of original. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? Not that often. 5. What are your favourite shops? I literally love most high street stores. 6. Do you ever shop online? Not really for clothes but I always do my food shops online. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? Sometimes, I have to be in the right move though. 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? Due to a tight student budget unfortunately cheaper items. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? Not generally, but if i realise something has been made unethically it puts me straight off 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Anthropologie, Accessorize, Zara, Topshop sometimes. 5.8 | Lizzie Lonsdale, 21. 1. What does Free mean to you? Having nothing to do. 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it?

210

No I haven’t. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Considered, eye for detail, changeable. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? Whenever I feel like I need a pick me up, a change of style or just generally when I actually need something. 5. What are your favourite shops? Topshop and River Island. 6.. Do you ever shop online? I do shop on Ebay quite a lot. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? Yes. 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? Bit of both. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? It does, I hate companies such as Primark for exploiting workers and I do try to steer clear because of it. Generally though I do prefer good quality garments but obviously not everything I buy can be due to lack of money to spend on clothes. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Dorothy Perkins seem to be quite hippyish at the moment, a lot of maxi dresses, floaty skirts and sandals, probably because we’re coming up to festival season. 5.9 | Abi Jones 1. What does free mean to you? A mindset. 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? No I haven’t. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Colourful, patterned, clashing. 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? More than I should 5. What are your favourite shops? A real mixture, I like vintage shops, charity shops, high street shops and occasionally a designer if it’s for accessorises such as sunglasses or a nice bag etc. 6. Do you ever shop online? I browse but I don’t often actually buy things online I like to try things on before hand. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? Most of the time, I tend to steer clear at certain times though such as saturday mornings, I can’t deal with queues and too many people in one space I just don’t find it enjoyable. 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? Somewhere in between i’d say. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing?

211


Consent forms. Definitely. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? Some of H&Ms ranged are quite bohemian especially their swimwear, I like the beach kaftans they feel quite boho.

5.10 | Louise Smith, 25.

1. What does Free mean to you? Release 2. Have you ever heard of the brand Free People? If yes what are your opinions of it? It rings a bell, I know its a clothing brand but I don’t know that much about it. 3. If you had to describe your style in 3 words what they be? Embellished, floaty, clever (covers my bad bits). 4. How often do you go shopping for clothes? Quite rarely actually. 5. What are your favourite shops? Accessorize, Office, House of Fraser. 6. Do you ever shop online? Sometimes. 7. Do you enjoy the shopping experience? Yes! I like to try things on…even if I have no intention of actually buying them. 8. When shopping do you prefer to buy lots of cheaper items of save up for one more expensive one? Bit of a mixture, whatever I like I will buy, it suits me and I really like it then I don’t really mind too much about price. 9. Does the quality of garments and the way that they are produced affect your decision making process when purchasing? I definitely consider it. 10. Can you think of any existing brands in the British high street that have a sort of bohemian, eclectic essence/ vibe? I think most high street shops have the same essence and vibe at the same time because of current trends so pretty much all of them will in some way.

212

213


214

215


216

217


218

219


220

221


222

223


224

225


Time management: Tutorial record sheets.

226

227


228

229


230

231


Free people: A journey into Europe  
Advertisement
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you