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LIZ SACKS

LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE


EDUCATION Ball State University, College of Architecture and Planning |Muncie, IN Master of Landscape Architecture, May 2017 Graduate Merit Scholarships 2015, 2016 University Olmsted Scholar 2017

Temple University, School of Environmental Design | Ambler, PA Part-time graduate cousework, Spring 2013-Spring 2014

Haverford College | Haverford, PA Bachelor of Arts, (History) May 2009

EXPERIENCE Ball State University, Department of Landscape Architecture | Muncie, IN Graduate Assistant, August 2014 to present

Bayer Landscape Architecture Honeoye Falls, NY Summer Intern, May-August 2016

Langsam Stevens Silver & Hollaender Philadelphia, PA Legal Assistant, June 2010 to June 2014

SKILLS Adobe Photoshop Adobe InDesign Adobe Illustrator SketchUp AutoCAD

ArcGIS Microsoft Office Sketching Research Writing

Elizabeth Sacks (nĂŠe Parsons) | liz.c.parsons@gmail.com | (585) 267-0496


CONTENTS MOUNDS GREENWAY INTERPRETATIVE CENTER

01

McKINLEY ECO-VILLAGE

09

RICHMOND-SUMMER SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER ROOF-TOP GARDEN

17

MEDORA BRICK PLANT PARK

23

EMERALD HILLS NATURE CENTER

31

Site Design Studio | Fall 2014 Planting Design | Spring 2016

Community & Urban Design Studio | Fall 2015

Therapeutic Landscapes Elective | Fall 2016

Comprehensive Planning Studio | Fall 2016 with Yizhu Zou and Brian Kowalski

Landscape Architectural Engineering | Spring 2016 with Jin Xing


MOUNDS GREENWAY INTERPRETIVE CENTER ANDERSON, INDIANA The Mounds Greenway Interpretative Center aims to connect visitors to local ecology and demonstrate sustainable landscape practices. Designed for and sited in the existing Rangeline Nature Preserve, the project aims to complement the proposed Mounds Greenway along the White River in Anderson, Indiana. The design draws visitors through a dynamic sequence of naturalistic and semi-formal garden spaces that highlight the sustainable site design, such as passive-solar architecture, permeable pavement, stormwater collection, and bioretention.

COURTYARD GARDEN

At the entrance to the Center, a sunny courtyard beckons visitors out into the landscape. A row of Paperbark Maples extends the rhythm of corten steel columns of the surrounding collonade and offers textural interest in the winter months. ‘Gro-Low’ Fragrant Sumac complements the low profile of the terrace steps, and Lavender and Catmint provide tactile and olfactory stimulation. 01


GOALS & OBJECTIVES

Celebrate the Natural Ecology of the Site • • •

Provide naturalistic plantings that reflect the historic ecology of the site Offer opportunities for visitors to view wildlife Integrate the building and parking lot sensitively and with minimal visual impact

Demonstrate Sustainable Stormwater Management and Landscape Maintenance • •

• •

Minimize lawn Demonstrate “Right Plant Right Place” * Mass prairie plants in the meadow * Plant a shade garden at edge conditions * Use hardy plants near the parking lot Invite visitors to slow down and learn about the cistern * Create an educational garden room Highlight bioswale and retention pond * Make focal point to visitors from parking lot with semi-transparent enclosure

Enhance Views of the Meadow from the Interpretative Center

Provide sweeping open views of prairie and low-lying plantings

Enhance edge of woods at southern end to create strong horizon

Frame views with trees

Attract Greenway and Trail Users to Site

• •

Enhance drama at meadow/woodland threshold Create dynamic sequence of plantings that draw users up to building

SHADE GARDEN

The shade garden, including Hostas, Virginia Bluebells, Bottlebrush Buckeye and Heuchera, serves as a transition between the Center and the surrounding woods. 02


SITE PLAN 14

13

15

12 11

1

9

2

10

7

3

4

6

5

1

Interpretative Center

7

Arts and Events Lawn

12 Drop-Off and Entrance Plaza

2

Terrace

8

Solar Aquatic Greenhouse

13 Shade Garden

3 Prairie Garden 4

Prairie Garden Meadow

5

Greenway

6

Trailhead

03

Conference Room with Green 14 Entrance Drive Roof 15 Bioretention 10 Bike Parking 16 Boardwalk 11 Colonnade 17 Retention Pond 9


RANGELINE NATURE PRESERVE

Site

16

W te

hi

17

r ve Ri The Center is sited in an existing meadow in order to preserve trees and take advantage of the prospect afforded by the meadow’s gentle slope to the south. A patchwork pattern of prairie grasses and perennials enlivens the view with color and thrives in the direct sun. More manicured beds of hardy perennials beautify the areas around the Center’s terrace and Trailhead, while large massings of shrubs and perennials in the bioretention area are visible to vehicle passengers.

8

0

30

60

120 Feet

04


PLANTING PLAN

Pinus sylvestris

Itea virginica ‘Little Henry’ Bouteloua curtipendula Coreopsis palmata


KEY Shade Trees ACE-G ACE-A ACE-S ACE-J CAT-S CLA-K FAG-G GYM-D

QTY

BOTANICAL NAME

COMMON NAME

3 12 25 7 2 1 2 2

Paperbark Maple Armstrong Maple Sugar Maple Autumn Fest Maple Northern Catalpa Yellowwood American Beech Espresso Kentucky Coffee Tree

PLA-O QUE-A SAL-A Ornamental Trees CER-C CER-F

9 2 1

Acer griseum Acer rubrum ‘Armstrong’ Acer saccharum Acer saccharum ‘JFS-KW8’ Catalpa speciosa Cladrastis kentukea Fagus grandifolia Gymnocladus dioicus ‘Espresso JFS’ Platanus occidentalis Quercus alba Salix abla ‘Tristis’

20 10

Cercis canadensis Cornus florida ‘Cherokee Princess’

Eastern Redbud Cherokee Princess Dogwood

4 20 17 62

Picea omorika Pinus sylvestris Pinus strobus Tsuga canadensis

Serbian Spruce Scotch Pine Eastern White Pine Canadian Hemlock

95 163

Bottlebrush Buckeye Brilliant Red Chokeberry

Evergreen Trees PIC-O PIN-SL PIN-ST TSU-C Deciduous Shrubs AES-P ARO-B

Ratibida pinnata Sporobolus heterolepis Monarda fistulosa

American Sycamore White Oak Golden Weeping Willow

COR-C COR-SG HYD-L

176 115 87

ILE-BP ILE-MP ITE-LH LIN-B RHO-WL RHU-A VIB-CP

27 3 79 198 30 1,374 40

VIB-W Evergreen Shrubs KEY RHO-WC Perennials AMS-T ASC-T BAP-A BOU-C CAR-C CAR-P CER-P CHA-L COR-P ECH-P ELY-C EUP-M FOR-A HEU-D

90

Aesculus parviflora Aronia arbutifolia 'Brilliantissima' Cornus sericea ‘Cardinal’ Cornus sericea ‘Silver and Gold’ Hydrangea paniculata ‘Little Lamb’ Ilex verticilliata ‘Berry Poppins’ Ilex verticilliata ‘Mr. Poppins’ Itea virginica ‘Little Henry’ Lindera benzoin Rhododendron ‘White Lights’ Rhus aromatic ‘Gro-Low’ Viburnum nudum ‘Count Pulaski’ Viburnum nudum ‘Winterthur’

QTY 127

BOTANICAL NAME Rhododendron ‘White Cascade’

COMMON NAME White Cascade Azalea

528 1,260 133 3,040 247 5,894 3,015 7,025 1,260 3,129 2,520 342 1,432 219

Blue star Butterfly Weed Blue False Indigo Side-Oats Grama Crested Oval Sedge Pennsylvania Sedge Plumbago Northern Sea Oats Prairie Coreopsis Purple Coneflower Canada Wild Rye Spotted Joe Pye Weed Christmas Fern Coral Bells ‘Dale’s Strain’

HEU-S HOS-G HOS-I IRI-S IRI-V GAU-L

218 330 327 331 63 23

LAV-G LIA-A LUP-P MER-V MON-F NEP-W PHL-G RAT-P ROS-B RUD-S SAL-A SCH-S SOL-O SOL-R SPO-H STA-B SYM-NA VER-L

7 2,687 1,260 501 145 162 323 1,510 46 1413 1,260 3,260 548 1,685 2,520 330 1,680 593

Amsonia tabernaemontana Asclepias tuberosa Baptisia australis Bouteloua curtipendula Carex cristatella Carex pennsylvanica Ceratostigma plumbaginoides Chasmanthium latifolium Coreopsis palmata Echinacea purpurea Elymus canadensis Eupatorium maculatum Folystichum arostichoides Heuchera americana ‘Dale’s Strain’ Heuchera ‘Stainless Steel’ Hosta ‘Grand Tiara’ Hosta ‘Ivory Queen’ Iris shrevei Iris virginica var. shrevei Gaura lindheimeri ‘Whirling butterflies’ Lavandula x intermedia 'Grosso' Liatris aspera Lupinus perennis Mertensia virginica Monarda fistulosa Nepata x faasenii ‘Walker’s Low’ Phlox glaberrima Ratibida pinnata Rosa blanda Rudbeckia subtomentosa Salvia azurea Schizachyrium scoparium Solidago ohioensis Solidago rigida Sporobolus heterolepis Stachys byzantina Symphotrichum novaue-angliae Vernonia lettermannii

Baptisia australis

Redtwig Dogwood Yellow Twig Dogwood Little Lamb Hardy Hydrangea Winterberry ‘Berry Poppins’ Winterberry ‘Mr. Poppins’ Little Henry Sweetspire Spicebush White Lights Azalea Gro-Low Fragrant Sumac Count Pulaski Smooth Witherod Winterthur Smooth Witherod

Coral Bells ‘Stainless Steel’ Grand Tiara Hosta Ivory Queen Hosta Wild Iris Southern Blue flag Whirling Butterflies Fat Bud French Lavender Rough Blazing Star Wild Lupine Virginia Bluebell Wild Bergamot Catmint Smooth Phlox Gray-headed Coneflower Meadow Rose Sweet Coneflower Blue Sage Little Bluestem Ohio Goldenrod Stiff Goldenrod Prairie Dropseed Lamb’s Ear New England Aster Ironweed

Aronia arbutifolia ‘Brilliantissima’


PRAIRIE GARDEN AND TERRACE

Open Views from Terrace

1/16” = 1’-0” 2X Vertical Exaggeration

07

Lawn Pathways

Masses of Colorful Sun-Loving Perennials

Specimen Trees in Distance


BIORETENTION PARKING LOOP

1/16” = 1’-0” 2X Vertical Exaggeration New England Aster provides fall interest

Two species of Iris are planted on a pond shelf

Sugar Maples surround the parking loop

08


McKINLEY ECO-VILLAGE MUNCIE, INDIANA The McKinley Neighborhood in central Muncie is a prime example of the vacancy, population decline and poor quality of life that plague the city in general. Muncie has lost a greater share of its residents than Detroit, and 15% of its housing stock is vacant. In the McKinley Neighborhood, abandoned houses are open to the elements, their once cheery facades turning into a haunted-house gray. Yet, this picture need not be the end of Muncie’s story. The McKinley Neighborhood is particularly well situated for redevelopment; just across from the central High School, just north of downtown, and surrounded by greenways and parks, it has all the pieces for a vibrant community. An investment in McKinley, a place that already possesses history and infrastructure, is an investment in both people and place, a strategy that reinforces quality of life.

In the proposed design, the existing Greenway passes by the reservoir, which serves a hydroelectric station, clad in local stone. The generated hydroelectricity powers the grain mill, which processes the grains grown on site. To the right of the Greenway, fields of vegetables and fruits as well as the Aquaponics Complex beckon Greenway users to explore the water, energy and food systems that sustain McKinley Eco-Village. 09


WATER-ENERGY-FOOD NEXUS Social scientists developed the WaterEnergy-Food nexus as a sustainability framework, which informs this design. These three elements are managed on site wherever possible using strategies which are congruent and harmonious with the residential setting.

SITE CONTEXT

0

1200 Feet

PRECENDENTS RADBURN, NEW JERSEY The design for Radburn provides separate pedestrian paths, and the car is directed to the rear of homes. The pedestrian-only paths link interior parks that are shared by residents.

VILLAGE HOMES, DAVIS, CALIFORNIA In Village Homes, houses are oriented away from the street and toward communal spaces, replete with agriculture, recreation and open space.

10


MASTER PLAN

WHI

TE R

42

IVER

41

39

38

40 43

37

1

34

19

23

18

WALNUT STREET

20 33

9

21

10

22

11

8

5

12

4

6 3

7

45

1

2

11

RACE STREET


Muncie Central High School

24 Grain Mill

2

Muncie Field House

25 Apiary

3 Social Security Building

Car Share

27 Recycling Center

5

Concannon’s Pastry Shop

28 Compost Facility

6

Townhouses

29 Goat Barn

7

Geothermal Well Field and Agriculture

30 Chicken Coop

Community Center

4-Story Mixed Commercial/ Residential 10 Child Care Center 9

11 House of Worship 12 Community Pantry/CSA 13 Grains and Legumes 14 Brewery and Pizzeria

32

15 Commercial Space

31

16 Commercial Space

44

17 Historic Rail Depot 24

18 4-Story Mixed Commercial/

25 26

Residential 19 Maker Space

27

20 Art Center

28

35 30

21 Water Tower and Lookout

29

22 Aquaponics Complex

13 36

15

26 Maintenance

4

8

3

14

1

23 Cardinal Greenway

31 Hydroelectric Power

Reservoir

32 Hydroelectric Generator 33 Vegetables and Fruits 34 High-Line Garden 35 Orchard 36 Grains and Legumes 37 UV Radiation Water

Treatment 38 Constructed Wetland 39 4-Story Mixed Commercial/Residential 40 Meadow 41 Edible Gateway Park 42 Amphitheater

43 Playground Plaza 44 Existing Railroad 45 Arboretum Park

0

150

300 Feet

16

17

12


SITE PLAN

15

16 14

SUGAR PARK

19 18 21

23

WALNUT STREET

17

22

13

20

12 11

10 9

MULBERRY STREET

CONCANNON’S PASTRY SHOP

3

1

8

B

5

2

4 6

7

13


COMMUNITY VISION

Different households can choose from a variety of housing types, including apartments, townhouses and single-family homes. The private landscape is subsumed to the efficiency of community-managed and productive green space. Lots are oriented in the southwest direction so that photovoltaics panels on the roofs receive the maximum possible solar radiation. Shared parking lots are tucked behind the houses, as some houses are oriented toward a conventional street and others are oriented toward a common green lined with pedestrian lanes. This design aims not only to privilege the pedestrian and reduce impervious surfaces but also to connect to the existing network of roads and greenways in Muncie. Residents should be able to travel locally on foot and access buses or shared cars for farther trips. The connections should make the neighborhood feel welcome to the High School and those using the Greenway.

B’

1 2

24

3 4 5 6 7

8 9

0 60 120 240 Feet

10 11 12 13

Community Center

14 4-Story Apartment Building,

First Floor Commercial Space 4-Story Apartment Building Drop-Off and Main Entrance 15 with First Floor Arcade Street Parking Only Nut Tree Groves and Forage 16 Oak and Maple Woodland Dog Run Garden Single-Family Homes, Street 17 Native Wildflower Meadow Parking Only Single-Family Homes,Shared 18 Child Care Center Driveways, 2 Parking Spots 19 Single-Family Homes Shared Driveways per House Townhouses Conventional 1 Parking Spot per House Parking 20 Single-Family Homes Electric Car Share Lot and Shared Driveways Charging Stations 1 Parking Spot per House Car Share Office 21 Community-Managed Green: Lawn, Meadow, Groves, Bike Share Herbs, Vegetables Bus Shelter 22 Pedestrian-Only Lane Event Lawn

4-Story Apartment Building with First Floor Arcade Street Parking Only

23 Pedestrian-Only Lane 24 House of Worship


The park, named for its Sugar Maples and tucked into the clustering of apartment buildings, offers a backyard to apartment dwellers. Ample lighting, lack of cars, and visibility to the apartment windows makes this a safe place for children to play. The park is divided into three sections--a woodland garden, an open lawn, and a wildflower meadow--that are stitched together by curving allees of trees.

SUGAR PARK TOWARD CHILD CARE CENTER

Single-Family Houses embrace the New Urbanist colorful aesthetic; homeowners are encouraged to express individual taste with architecture and landscape, but the scale of houses meets community guidelines. Roofs are oriented Southwest to capture sunlight on photovoltaics that power the homes. The pedestrian lanes connect to Sugar Park and Walnut Street. Students can easily walk to High School, and elders can grab a donut from the beloved Concannon’s Pastry Shop without hopping in a car. Buses also stop on Walnut Street and provide access to most Muncie destinations.

SECTION B-B’ THROUGH SINGLE-FAMILY HOMES

Single-Family Home, Oriented toward tree-lined Street, with extra parking

15

Single-Family Home Oriented to Community Green

Shared Parking Lot, One Spot Per House

Community-Mana lawn space for rec vegetable and orna

Wide Pedestrian Lane can accommodate vehicles in emergency


Single-Family Home, Oriented toward Single-Family Home, Oriented toward aged Green can offer tree-lined Street, with extra parking Community Green creation as well as amental gardening Shared Parking Lot, One Scale 1”=30’-0” Pedestrian Lane Spot Per House 16


RICHMOND-SUMMER SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER ROOF-TOP GARDEN BUFFALO, NEW YORK This project proposes a roof-top garden with opportunities for social horticulture for seniors on the Richmond-Summer Senior Citizen Center in Buffalo, New York. Social horticulture is a form of horticultural therapy with the goal of social interaction through horticulture. Seniors, who are more likely to widowed or retired than others, are at increased risk of social isolation, which has deleterious health effects. The Richmond-Summer center provides a suitable location for social horticulture for seniors because it already hosts events for seniors and it is adjacent to a city housing authority high-rise, Sedita Apartments, for seniors and the disabled. Moreover, it is also the meeting place for Buffalo’s popular garden walk, where neighborhood houses open their gardens to visitors. Its central location and role in the garden walk would enable it to showcase therapeutic garden elements to the broader city. This design offers social benefits, sensory stimulation, and mental restoration to seniors with elements for socializing, gardening, and relaxing.

SITE CONTEXT

RICHMOND STREET

ELMWOOD VILLAGE NEIGHBORHOOD

17

SENIOR CENTER SEDITA APARTMENTS

SUMMER STREET SYMPHONY BIBLE CHURCH


GOALS & OBJECTIVES Promote Social Support and Community Engagement for Buffalo Seniors • • •

Provide shared space for gathering and group activities Offer sheltered seating, placed to encourage eye contact Welcome and accommodate all seniors with universal design

Exercise and Preserve Seniors’ Cognitive and Physical Abilities • • •

Stimulate the senses Provide opportunities for physical exertion at various levels of ability Offer programmed space for activities that engage the brain

Foster a Sense of Well-Being Among Seniors • • •

Create a sense of safety and coherence with clear boundaries, visible entrances, memorable components, and clear organization Evoke fascination with multi-layered views and mystery Design comfortable spaces for seniors with frequent seating, ample shade, protection from wind, and reduced glare

CONCEPT STORAGE RESTING SPACE GREENHOUSE

SOCIAL HORTICULTURE

GATHERING SPACE

18


SITE PLAN

17

4 NEW ENTRANCE TO ROOF-TOP GARDEN FROM RICHMOND 1 STREET

13

16

7

14 7

5

3

10

12

10

16

11 15

6

14

15

5

13 16

5

16 13

8

2 9

ENTRANCE TO CENTER FROM SUMMER STREET

SEDITA APARTMENTS (9 STORIES)

1

Elevator

7

Plant Containers

13 18”-High Planter with Ledge

2

Stairs - Entrance

8

Turf

14 24”-High Planter

9

Glass Railings

15 Trellis

3 Covered Entrance 4

Greenhouse

10 Maintenance Shed

16 30”-High Planter

5

Existing HVAC

11 Fountain

17 Building Facade

6

Movable Tables and Chairs

12 Pergola

19

4’ Brick Wall to Match


SOCIAL HORTICULTURE Planters of various heights are arranged around a

soothing fountain. Seniors can design and plant the planters while reaching them comfortably. The raised height also brings the plants closer to eye level for better appreciation of sights and smells. Frequent benches encourage people to stop and meet others. The planters are made of white-washed brick to match the building and the terra-cotta floor tiles reduce glare. The width of paths between planters allows two wheelchairs to pass.

UNIVERSAL DESIGN

The roof-top garden has raised planters of various heights to accommodate seniors of differing abilities and to reduce the strain of crouching at ground level. The planters are distributed evenly to encourage social interaction among all users, regardless of ability.

30”

24”

72”

18”

Planters raised to 30” are comfortable for working while standing, particularly while using long-handled tools. 24”-high planters are accessible to those in wheelchairs, because they can be comfortably reached from a sitting position. Trellises are also easily accessible from a standing position. Seniors can prune, deadhead, and harvest from a trellis without straining. 18”-high planting beds are a comfortable seat height. Planters of this height have a 16”-wide ledge on which to sit. 20


RELAXATION and MENTAL RESTORATION Shade is provided throughout the

garden with pergolas, rather than trees, to minimize weight. The pergolas also create a sense of enclosure for more intimate spaces where seniors can relax and enjoy the restorative environment of plants and dappled shade. The pergola along the northern end includes benches where seniors can experience a sense of refuge from the sun and prospect over the social horticulture area. A traditional design should appeal to many seniors.

LONGITUDINAL SECTION The Greenhouse is located on

western end of the roof so as to be minimally impacted by shade from the adjacent nine-story building. It is also conveniently located off of the covered elevator entrance and next to the storage shed. It opens on to the garden of raised beds for social horticulture. The beds are arranged on an axis for easy-to-read navigation. This highly social area is visible from the comfortable resting spots under the pergola. Benches are provided throughout for resting or socializing in sun or shade.

GREENHOUSE

21

SHED


GREENHOUSE Just off the elevator entrance, the Greenhouse opens onto the

social horticulture area. Here, seniors can meet to pot plants, make flower arrangments or simply chat, during inclement weather and the changing seasons. Round pedestal tables and movable chairs can be arranged to serve a diverse community of abilities.

RAISED BEDS

FOUNTAIN

RAISED BEDS Scale 1/8” = 1’=0” 22


MEDORA BRICK PLANT PARK MEDORA, INDIANA A group of committed residents in the small town of Medora would like to restore the unique site of the Medora Brick Plant, an endangered landmark noted by the Historical Landmarks Foundation of Indiana. The Brick Plant was one of the premier hand-made brick operations in the Midwest, making quality bricks that were used on the campuses of Purdue University and University of Kentucky, among others. Workers formed and dried the bricks on site; they then loaded the bricks into beehive-shaped kilns, designed to expand under blistering temperatures. The brick-making process was backbreaking and churned out over 50,000 bricks per day. After the brick plant closed in 1992, the site was left to the whims of nature. Grass grew up and over the brick paving, and trees and shrubs sprouted from the tops of the kilns. Eleven kilns and five stacks remain.

Medora residents recognize the unique landscape qualities of the Brick Plant. They hope the site can be reclaimed to honor its history and to reinvigorate their community today.

23


COMMUNITY-DRIVEN DESIGN In October 2016, students from Ball State’s landscape architecture graduate studio met with residents from Medora who were interested in restoring the Medora Brick Plant. We asked the community about the plant’s history, its significance to Medora, and the town’s vision for its future. From these interviews, we identified five key goals for the site’s restoration and design: celebrating Medora’s history, telling the story of the brick-making process, enhancing the regional tourism, bolstering Medora’s sense of community, and preserving the plant’s structures.

GOALS & OBJECTIVES Celebrate Medora’s History • • •

Display historical photographs in renonvated event lodge Utilize the kilns on the north side of the drying shed for displaying local history, while telling the story of the restoration process Engrave the names of workers into bricks in the event area

Educate Visitors • • •

Utilize the kilns (#5 and #6) on the south side of the drying shed as well as other materials and signage to teach the process of brick making Talk about the natural resource history of the site in the nature area Use an old boxcar to display the former transportation of the site

Enhance the Existing Regional Tourism • • • •

Connect brick plant to historical loop Utilize signage to create brand for regional tourism Provide on-site historical society office and tourism information Reuse foundation of former brick storage area for parking and drop-off

Bolster the Sense of Community • • • • • • •

Renovate the drying shed to be used as a pavilion with seating Renovate “shop” building as an event space and restroom Provide an open recreation space for festival or cultural event Provide garden spaces near the kilns Repurpose basement/ tunnel near drying shed as a water feature Provide a children’s play area north of the boxcar Use one stack as an observation structure 24


SITE PLAN

15

14

13 12 10 4

7

9

5 6

18 8

8

18

1

Illustrated by Yizhu Zou

25

4

18

18

11

3

18


1 Parking

10 Playground

2 Entry Signage

11 Ranger Station and Tourism Info

3 Brick-Making Trail

12 Maintenance Facility

4 Brick Plaza

13 Event Lodge with Kitchen and Restrooms

5 Walled Garden

14 Event Lawn

6 Excavated Basement Water Garden

15 Shale-Pit Pond and Natural Area

7 Open-Air Pavilion with Tables and Chairs

16 Deconstructed Kiln and Fire Pit

8 Restored Operational Kiln

17 Observation Tower

9

Reclaimed Boxcar

18 Brick-Process Display Kiln

CONCEPT 17

16

8 Illustrated by Liz Sacks

2

Our proposed design guides visitors along a timeline that tells the history of the plant and the brick-making process. We also provide spaces for community gathering and utilize signage to integrate the proposed park into regional tourism. Finally, our design preserves the structures and leaves them flexible for future events and uses. The community meeting was conducted by the entire 3rdyear graduate studio. This design is a collaboration among myself, Yizhu Zou and Brian Kowalski.

26


PAVILION & BRICK-MAKING TIMELINE TRAIL LOOKING TOWARD WATER GARDEN & WALLED GARDEN

The brick-making timeline trail passes through the former drying shed, which is restored as a pavilion. The pavilion combines the existing brick piers with new subtle materials, lighting and furnishings. As the heart of the new park, it has views out to the event lawn and onto the water garden. The water garden is constructed from uncovering the underground cooling system. Near to the pavilion, a brick shed is remade as a walled garden to create a sense of mystery.

History of Wall Bricks Illustrated by Yizhu Zou & Liz Sacks

27

Pavilion


Illustrated by Liz Sacks

Water Garden

Walled Garden

History of Brick Pavers Scale 1” = 60’-0” 28


JACKSON COUNTRY TOURISM

The Medora Brick Plant Park can be promoted as part of a tourim loop throughout Jackson County. The county features numerous attractions, including the longest covered bridge in the United States. Signage can direct visitors to the Brick Plant Park from existing tourist attractions, such as the covered bridge.

Illustrated by Brian Kowalski

DECONSTRUCTED KILN

We propose the deconstruction of one of the kilns to be used as an intimate gathering space around a fire pit.

BRICK PROCESS DISPLAY KILN

Historic machinery, images and explanatory signage inform visitors about the process of making Medora brick; The installations are flexible enough that they can be removed for special events.

Illustrated by Brian Kowalski & Yizhu Zoe

29


Illustrated by Liz Sacks

OBSERVATION TOWER & DECONSTRUCTED KILN

Next to the deconstructed kiln, an existing stack serves as a new observation tower, from which the whole park is visible.

30


EMERALD HILLS NATURE CENTER NASHVILLE, INDIANA Given an existing two-story building plan and a site in Brown County, Indiana, Jin Xing and I were tasked with siting the building and designing the site for a nature center. We chose to locate the building to minimize cut and fill. Our circulation system includes an entry drive that is directed to the front of the building where we provide a drop off. We also provide a service loop with ample turning radii and an area for bus parking. The following drawings are a sample of the sheet set. For the complete set, please contact me.

EROSION AND SEDIMENT CONTROL PLAN PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT PROJECT LIMITS

4

85

3

85

2000 W. University Muncie, IN 47306

2

85

1

85

9

855 30" Tilia americana Elev. 855.31

854

9

853

1

852

85

0

84

85

0

85

84

855

848

848

847 846 845

Emerald Hills Nature Center

36" Fagus grandifolia Elev. 855.31

854

4

84

3

84 2

85

84

7

1

85

852

853

0

85

9 84

851

3

85

35" Liriodendron tulipifera Elev. 849.87

8

84

852

7

84

850

6

84

849

5

2

85

84

4

84

843

851

848

842

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1

85

841

840

850

84

4

84

7

84

5

840.00

84

8

84

6

85

847

0

849

846

850 849

5 3 844 84 842 841

83

845

6 84

848

40" Quercus borealis Elev. 847.65

847

PROJECT LIMITS

844

835

840

846

843

836 835

83

6

834

842

845

FFE 849.00 FFE 837.00

845

833

PROJECT LIMITS

832

841

831

Rev. Date Descrip 844

830

40

84

0

8

83

83

5

7

838 Material Storage Area

5

83

Issue Date:

Splash Blocks @ Pipe Outfalls

April 20, 2016 Drawn By:

830

Erosion control Blankets

Jin Xing

Straw Bale Fencing @ Active Drainage Areas

Approved By:

0

83

Meg Calkins Sheet Title

Material delivery and Staging Area

EROSION AN SEDIMENT CONTROL P

83

0

Sediment Control Bag

Temporary Grass Seeding Topsoil Storage Area Silt Fence @ Construction Boundaries

0

60

90

Sheet Number

FEET

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

31

30

PROJECT LIMITS

Tree Protection

Drawn by Jin Xing

L3


LAYOUT PLAN POB 1 34 '-5 "

PROJECT LIMITS

PDF underlays can only be viewed in the 2D wireframe vi

W. niversity v Muncie, N

36" Fagus grandifolia Elev. 855.31

92

'-9 "

6"

"@

S4

0°5

4'5

"E

'-0

"

30

71

0" 0'R1

19 (TY '-0" P.)

39'-

'-0

68

R10'-0"

'-7

"@

37

°54

'34

'-2 " "

12 (TY '-0" P.)

"

"

0 3'-

R

ST

80

AL

LS

19

YP 9' E

A,T

'-0

@

11

19

0"

7'0"

"

0'-0

R10

"

'R8

R2 1'0"

'-0

35" Liriodendron tulipifera Elev. 849.87

0"

'-0 1'5

20

2'-

4°3

0"

13

6'-

S4 "@

Five Points oad, Nashville, N

"

Emerald Hills Nature Center

'-1 " 21

'-0" R88

'-0

19

R2 0'0" 9'R2

R3

0" 0'-

E 7" '3 35 3° S2 "@ '-9 27

POB 2

R2

"

'-2

26

8 '13"W 72'-5"@S16°1

0"

12'-0" TYP

30" Tilia americana Elev. 855.31

'-1 "

4"E

0"

'-0 "

36

R10'-

32

'-0

"

R2 9

0"@

R12

"

E

'-0

Rip rap lined swale centerline

20

21 "

'-1 36

0" 8" 5'-

25

"

'-0

R5

26 S@ '-1" 10 .7'E A,T YP 5'0"

LL

8'-

0"

40" Quercus borealis Elev. 847.65

'-9

"

6'-

5"

0"

"

TA

1"

5"

'-4

'-1

6'-

18

0"

W

0"

"

"

'-0

FFE 849.00 FFE 837.00 °55

16'-6"@S

'5"

E

15

'-2

"

58°53'15"

"

40

'-9

"@

" 12'-0 TYP

PROJECT LIMITS

'-1

28

84

R2

"@S

'-8

281'-0"

24'-9

6'-

0"

42°1

29

'56"

'-1

8" "

9'-

'-0 31

15

20

2"

R1

3'-

PROJECT LIMITS

28

2S

1'-

"

'-1

'-1 22

10

'-0

-0"

15

R10'

"

10'-1

"

0"

2'-0

39

0"

2"

0'-

R1

39

0'-

7"

'-8

R1

"E

0'-0"

'-0"

R22

5'1

R2

17'39

0" R1 0'0"

S53°

8'-

245'-7"

1"@

"

S3

7°5

108'-

'-1

4'-0"

'-1

" 4'16 78°5

44

9"

Rev. Date Description

°4'4

79

"

R

20

'-0

"

5'-5

15'-2" 26'-9"

Issue Date: April 25, 2016 Drawn By: Jin Xing and Liz Sacks Approved By: Meg Calkins Sheet Title

LAYOUT PLA 0

PROJECT LIMITS

FEET

30

60

90

Sheet Number

FEET

L4

Drawn by Jin Xing PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2000 W. U Muncie, IN

1 L5

VERTICAL ROAD ALIGNMENT Vertical Scale: Horizontal Scale:

1"=4' (5X vertical exaggeration) 1"=20'

SECTION

Drawn by Liz Sacks

32 Rev. Date


PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDU

GRADING PLAN

PROJECT LIMITS

854.46 854.56

4

85 854.21 854.31

3

2. 00 %

85

SHP 853.50

2 5.1

85

SLP:850.20

8% 1

85

01

BW 845.

2.00%

854

4

84

853.35

853

847 846 845

SHP 853.50

855.1

HP:85 85 8

848 2.21%

853.43

3.49%

852

848

848.14

1 85

LP 848.06 81 7. 84 BW 98 TW 847. 31 BW 844.

0

9

84

9

36" Fagus grandifolia Elev. 855.31

84

68 TW 848. 51 BW 848.

85

0

85

HP 848.50

SLP:844.60 843

3.0

0%

854.12

854 853.93

LP 847.00

2

85

84

7

1 85 5. 1

853

2.00%

LP 842.00

1% 850

1.0

9

84 SHP 849.25

8

84

HP 843.20 7

84

0%

35" Liriodendron tulipifera Elev. 849.87

LP 846.50

3.0

0%

852

84

6

6

84

5

84

75

4

BW 843.

851 %

2.0

00

2.

843

84

0%

842

850.62

841

850.43

5%

9.4

2.5

9%

840 SLP:839.80

840.00 SLP:840.70

84

849

850

9

.99

849.70

839.84

84

4

BOA

RDW

LP 843.5

ALK

BS 839.95

BS 842.15 TS 844.65

84

7

84

84

8

84

5

6

BW 847.00 TW 847.25

BW 846.16 BS 845.51

2.00%

TS 848.01

BS 840.11

2.0

0%

LP:846.50

LP:848.23 848.40 1.5

849

0%

2.0

6

84

2.0

0%

0%

0%

HP 835.25

848.04

84

1.7

2%

848.18

1.5

0%

3.0

0%

8

848.50

PROJECT LIMITS

830

1.0

845

833

832 831

0%

2.9 4%

4.2

5%

2.0

0%

2.0

835

8

3.0

0% 0% 848.42 LP 848.50 2.00% 2.0 HP:848.79 0 % 844.5 2.0 849.00 0% 1.5 84 0% 849.00 5.6 6 84 5 84 848.50 84 .46 TS 8 6 .25 5.3 45 .63 6 848.50 BS 1.0 84 0% 3.4 9 B BS W 84 84 1.2 3 BW 3.73 TS 84 84 1.6 0 1 .98 .00 840 1 % BS 83 8.9 0 B 836 BS W 83 9 83 6.4 .04 0 835 837.00 83 8 6 36 83 . 5 1.0 32 .55 834 0% FFE 849.00 836 837.00 .62 FFE 837.00 83 6.5 0 83 6.5 0 SLP:832.33 83 6.3 8

3 844 84 842 841

LP 834.00

849

2.0

5

83

848 847

84

0

LP 829.00

HP 831.25

83

83

5

7

830

838

PROJECT LIMITS

DESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

33


UCATIONAL PRODUCT

2000 W. University Ave. Muncie, IN 47306

855

10 TC 855.47 BC 854.97 855 1.0

0%

0%

TC 855.21 BC 854.71

2.0

0%

%

30" Tilia americana Elev. 855.31

SHP 855.17

2.0

6"

Cu

rb

Ty

TC 854.90 BC 854.40

p.

854.30 1.0

0%

853

1810 Five Points Road, Nashville, IN 47448

853.48 852 852.69

3

85

851 3.8

853.12

0%

850

853.31 2.0

0%

1.0

849

0%

2

85 848

1

85 2.9

SLP:840.20

0%

840.00 839.20

85

849.29

847

0

846

850 849.92 3.0

0%

48

848.94

845

40" Quercus borealis Elev. 847.65

847

%

844

LP:847.65

846

PROJECT LIMITS

847.54

843

SLP:845.50

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Emerald Hills Nature Center

54.90 54.87 854.78

842

845

849.00 0% 3.4

844

0% 1.0

845.00

Rev. Date Description

841 BW 841.00 TW 841.50

TW 844.25 0

BW 842.00 BW 841.00

TW 843.75

84 TW 843.00 BW 839.50

BW 840.00 TW 843.85 BW 839.00

TW 843.95

TW 843.50 BW 839.50

843

Issue Date:

5

83

March 15, 2016 Drawn By: Jin Xing and Liz Sacks Approved By: Meg Calkins/Chris Marlow 0

83

Sheet Title

83

0

DrawnGRADING by Liz Sacks & PLAN Jin Xing 0

30

60

90

Sheet Number

FEET

L6 34

PRODUCED BY AN AUT


TS 845.57 BS 845.15 TS 845.14 BS 844.72 TS 844.71 BS 844.29 TS 844.28 BS 843.86 TS 843.85 BS 843.43

DETAILS

TS 845.63 BS 845.21 TS 845.20 BS 844.78 TS 844.77 BS 844.35 TS 844.34 BS 843.92 TS 843.91 BS 843.49

2" Limestone Splash Block

TW 846.25 BW 845.75

6" Concrete Wheel Stop, 12" Steel Anchor Bolts, 1" Washer Between Wheel Stop and Asphalt

BW 843.50

4" Asphalt Paving Topsoil

LANDING

6"

PLANTING BED

4"

2.00%

6" Cheek Wall Typ.

1'-0"

6" Aggregate843

TW 843.50 BW 843.25

Bioswale Soil Mix Aggregate Resevoir Wrapped in Filter Fabric 6" HDPE Perforated Pipe

BW 843.50 TW 844.00

1.00%

PLANTING BED

TS 843.31 BS 842.89 1 BOARDWALK TS 842.88 L11 Scale: 1/4"=1' BS 842.46 TS 842.45 BS 842.03 TW 843.50 TS 842.02 BW 843.25 BS 841.60 TS 841.59 BS 841.17

TS 843.37 BS 842.95VALLEY BW 841.35 OVER TS 842.94 BS 842.52 TS 842.51 BS 842.09 TS 842.08 BS 841.66 TS 841.65 BS 841.23

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

0

2

4

Subgrade, Only Compacted in Paved Areas

30'-0"

3 L10

PARKING LOT BIOSWALE SCALE 1 4"=1'

6

FEET

1 L10

TERRACE STAIRWAY PLAN

Scale: 1/2"=1'

1'-0"

2'-3"

1.5"D

1'-2"

6'-0"

4"

6"

1'-2"

POST AND JOIST CONNECTIONS

5"

6"

2 BOARDWALK L11 Scale: 1"=1'

6"

SECTION

3 BOARDWALK L11 Scale: 1"=1'

TO TRAIL C

1'-0" TYP.

Scale: 1"=1'

K EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

35

TERRACE STAIRWAY TODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

2 L10


2000 W. University Ave. Muncie, IN 47306

SECTION

1 BOARDWALK L11 Scale: 1/4"=1'

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

OVER VALLEY

2" Limestone Paver Set on 12" Mortar Setting Bed 1 2" Fibrous Expansion Joint, Filler

6"x12" Movable Steel Dowel Between Concrete Slabs

1% Wash

#5 Rebar at 16" Clear O.C. Each Way, 2" Clear From Edge

Concrete Footing, Extends 6" Below Frost Line

CONNECTION SECTION

Compacted 4 Subgrade

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

6" Concrete Cheek Wall

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

Brushed Stainless Steel Handrail Set in Cheek Wall

PRODUCED BY AN AUTODESK EDUCATIONAL PRODUCT

1'-4"

1810 Five Points Road, Nashville, IN 47448

1'-6"

1'-10"

1 BOARDWALK OVER VALLEY L11 Scale: 1/4"=1' SECTION Drawn by Liz Sacks

Emerald Hills Nature Center 1810 Five Points Road, Nashville, IN 47448 Emerald Hills Nature Center

2000 W. University Ave. Muncie, IN 47306

Rev. Date Description

2 BOARDWALK L11 Scale: 1"=1'

POST AND JOIST CONNECTIONS

3 BO L11 Sca

SECTION

Rev. Date Description

BOARDWALK POST AND JOIST CONNECTION CRUSHED STONE2 TRAIL Drawn by Liz Sacks

L11 Scale: 1"=1'

L11 Scale: 1"=1' SECTION

SECTIO

Issue Date: April 29, 2016 Drawn By: Liz Sacks

Issue Date: Approved By: April 29, 2016 Drawn By:

Sheet TitleLiz Sacks

SECTION

Drawn by Liz Sacks

Approved By: TERRACE AND BIOSWALE Sheet Title DETAILS BOARDWALK Sheet Number AND TRAIL DETAILS L10 Sheet Number

36 L11

PRODUCED BY AN A PRODUCED BY AN AUTODE


Cover Photo: Linwood Gardens (Pavilion, NY) by Liz Sacks


Elizabeth Sacks, Landscape Architecture Portfolio