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Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012


Projecting ideas, Delivering solutions The Elia Groupâ€&#x;s Approach to Innovation

Hubert Lemmens Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

hubert.lemmens@elia.be


Today’s objective Share Elia Group vision on Power System innovation Receive your feedback

Explore how and on what topics we can collaborate

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Agenda

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Agenda

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Elia+50Hertz: a unique situation in the EU

Ownership Elia

Elia

50Hertz

• •

100% of 380-150kV network 94% of high voltage network (70-30kV)

50Hertz

100% of 380-220kV network

-

34% of the German 380kV network 19% owner of the German 220kV network 6


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The challenges of energy revolution

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Integrated structure From a hierachical organisation to multi directional energy flows

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Balancing In a turbulent environment

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Storage Different technologies, applications and costs

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Storage Different technologies, applications and costs

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Higher uncertainty & complexity Deterministic

Probabilistic

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Integrated market

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Putting the pieces together Integrating new assets in old assets

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Critical data Data integrety, quantity, exchange

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Knowledge

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Nine challenges

Larger flows Omnidirectional

Knowledge

Critical data

Balancing

Putting the pieces together

Storage

Integrated market

High uncertainty & complexity

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ELIA Group Situation

• Deliver electricity from the North to the South

• Crossed by larger and larger flows

• Generation exceeds consumption, and is more and more volatile

• Lack of usable flexibility in existing generation assets

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Vision

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Elia Group Innovation Priorities

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Approach

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Thank you

http://www.eliagroup.eu/en/activities/research-and-development http://www.eliagroup.eu/en/about-us/newsroom/news/2012/06-07-2012-brochure-ikm 23


Integration of renewables Increased flexibility for the electricity system ‌ and how to keep the pendulum stable?

RESMAN program (REServe MANagement) Patrick De Leener Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

patrick.deleener@elia.be


Some hard facts for more and more EU countries‌ 1. At peak demand + few wind & sun: structural import needed 2. When low demand + a lot of wind & sun: structural export needed

ďƒ¨ Market functioning in a European context is essential for the European electricity system Horizon 2020 (BE-DE-NL) - RES (wind, solar) will represent more than 50% peak demand - RES capacity will continue to increase: > x3 in next 10 years

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Integration of RES: need for a cost-effective adaptation of grids for 2020…

~€104 bn investments, to be compared with 2% of the bulk power prices and

less than 1% increase of end-users’ E-bills

+1.3% per year grid length to match a major shift in generation mix and +3% p.a. of generation capacity growth

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… and implemention of a EU wholesale market model NWE

Forward Year ahead/ Month ahead (capacity auctions by TSO’s)

In cooperation with auction offices (CASC, CAO, …)

Day Ahead Central clearing for each hour of the next day

Intraday Continous adaptation of positions until 1- 2 hours before real time

In cooperation with Power Exchanges (incl implicit allocation of capacity); Important evolution: market coupling

Balancing Real time management of imbalances + financial settlement

TSO’s using ancillary services delivered by generation and demand side

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Ensuring the balance of the electricity system: a matter of “and, and, and, …” to enhance flexibility Generation

2012

Classical (gas) generation & pumpstorage Very limited participation from CHP & nuclear

+ >2020

Participation of: RES (wind, solar) More CHP Flexible gas units Storage technologies

Smart support mechanisms

+

Demand

Interruptible contracts (large industry)

+ Active demand participation Aggregators

Aggregators and balancing service providers

+

Import/Export

Based on DA programme Low ID exchanges Netting between TSO’s of imbalances

+ More ID exchanges EU – balancing

Grid operators & power exchanges

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EU balancing: cfr Framework Guidelines Balancing (ACER)

.

Energy from:

Manual reserves

Automatic reserves

2 years after NC

TSO-TSO CMO with margins for RR

Imbalance netting

3 years

CBA for 6yr target

Target model for 6y target

4 years after NC

TSO-TSO CMO with margins for RR & mFRR

Coordination / optimisation of FRR

6 years after NC

EU-wide TSO-TSO CMO w/o margins for RR & mFRR

Target model for FRR, CMO or similar

2-year derogation

CMO = Common Merit Order RR = Replacement Reserves (>15 minutes) FRR = Frequency Restoration Reserves (<15 minutes activation) a=automatic m=manual

From a single-TSO approach towards a pan-EU approach for Balancing 29


RESMAN programme RESMAN provides the vision and architecture of the future balancing market and integrates different solutions for balancing our systems  Define a vision and architecture for the future balancing system & balancing market … involving new players: aggregators, balancing service providers (BSP) … for seamless integration of national market to (future) European market  Design & develop new products (energy & capacity) to be provided by current & innovative technologies  Better capture existing sources of flexibility  Investigate new sources of flexibility (RES, DER, Active demand, Storage, EVs,…) High priorities 30


RESMAN programme To be developed in the future  Dimension our reserves optimally  Develop new methods & tools to optimal dimension the reserves needed for maintaining system stability…  … considering large share of variable generation & demand, as well as of converter-connected devices  … according to appropriate reliability criteria, source from within and beyond our control area

 Implementation of a dynamic reserve management:  Methodology and tools for dynamic management of reserves & flexibility…  …linking with appropriate observability of balancing needs and…  … taking into account reserve requirements, technical capabilities, availability, grid constraints,…

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Thank you for your attention

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STORAGE technologies for the future grid

Klaus von Sengbusch Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

Klaus.vonSengbusch@50hertz.com


Motivation  Dealing with a high proportion of renewable energy sources

 Ensuring flexibility for both system operators and market participants  Necessary to determine a clear view on specific storage application and to select appropriate technologies  Storage technologies could have a positive impact on price volatility on the electricity market

Storage technologies are currently one promising solution for providing balancing services 34


General Types of Storages

Short-term Storages (STS)

Long-term Storages (LTS)

-

- Technology: - Power to Gas - efficiency factor: ~ 40% - capacity / power: unlimited

-

Technologies: - Pumped Storage - Batteries - Compressed Air efficiency factor: ~ 80% capacity / power: ~5 Wh/W

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Influence of Storages on Generation “Copperplate” Germany

Source: VDE Studie „Energiespeicher für die Energiewende“, 2012

40% RES Share

80% RES Share RES energy not dumped lignite

Biomass

coal gas

15GW STS

25GW LTS

28GW STS

40GW LTS

Massive generation driven LTS needs for RES not expected before 2020 Focus of ELIA Group on storage use cases for secure grid operation 36


Main Elements of Storage Program STORAGE Program

Compressed air Batteries

Pumped storage

Power to gas

Power to heat

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Use Cases

Compressed air Batteries

 Save energy during off-peak hours or periods of high RES supply  To avoid the provision of power peaks

Pumped storage

via conventional power plants  Support providing primary and secondary reserve via storage system

Power to gas

 To maintain grid stability in case of the outage

of large conventional power plants or high RES feed-in with high power ramps Power to heat

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Projects

Compressed air Batteries

ADELE-ING Adiabatic compressed air energy storage power plant

Pumped storage

SDL-Batt Power to gas

Ancillary services and energy storage by means of large

Power to heat

batteries

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Long-term storage systems at a considerable share of RES Compressed air Batteries

ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Incorporate storage technologies ď&#x192;  To relive the grid locally in case of high RES feedin

Pumped storage

Project Power to gas Power to heat

Power to gas

Power to heat

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Storage technologies as economic efficient assets Compressed air Batteries

 Continuously support the development of market mechanisms by investigating aIl possible options regarding the ownership and operation of storage

Pumped storage

plants  Provision of recommendations to Belgian, German and European policymakers

Power to gas

 To allow the deployment of the selected storage

technologies Power to heat

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Vielen Dank f端r Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Thank you for your attention

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Distributed Energy Resources Integration into the GRID

Frank Wellens Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

frank.wellens@elia.be


1. What it is all about at Elia… “Decentralized energy resources – integration into the grid “ •

“energy resource”  decentralized production, demand facilities, storage  Offering flexibility for balancing & congestion

“decentralized”  ≥30kV = local transmission: covered by Elia tools & mechanism  <30kV = distribution: tools & mechanisms to be developped

“Integration into the grid”    

In an economic acceptable way Planning and forecast needs Technical needs Market needs 44


Large increase of DER is driver for urgencyâ&#x20AC;Ś

DER 45


Flexibility on DER needs for balancing Min. demand Marginal cost â&#x201A;Ź/MWh

(summer night/

Max. Demand

Sunday noon)

(winter day) Peak units (reserve, incidents) Hydro storage

f (ĂŠolien, solaire)

P.V.

GW

(priority)

Max. available

Wind

power

(priority)

Biomass and/or cogeneration (prioritaire - must run)

Nuclear

Combined cycle Fossile Gas

(Coal-Gas-Fuel)

Possible scenario 2020 46


Flexibility needs on DER for Congestion Flanders â&#x20AC;&#x201C; example for wind

Connection ( wind ) 533 windturbines - low grid investment 339 windturbines - high grid investment

87 windturbines - very high investment

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Flexibility needs on DER for Congestion Wallonia

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Flexibility needs on DER: balancing vs congestion Different

Equal

Functional need

Balancing = global Congestion = local (always DER)

Increase/decrease of Power

Trigger for flexibility need

Congestion = …”N-1”grid situation? Balancing = …central resources inflexibility Balancing = also low wind and sun&…

Mainly high wind & sun & …

Preserving Measures responsability

Avoiding balancing: BRP Avoiding congestion: TSO/DSO (investment)

TSO in near real time (=balancing)

Market offer

Balancing=Liquid, market driven Congestion=scarse, regulated?

Both should be paid for in future? Congestions offers will become more liquid (ANM)?

Providers view

Balancing = acceptable (free to offer) Congestion = acceptable within certain “quality” limits

Same effect on product (decrease/increase consumption/generation)

 Will flexibility needs for balancing and congestion be one “product” in the long term?

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1. Prerequisites for DER is having control overâ&#x20AC;Ś Transmission

Local Transmission

Distribution MV Distribution LV

(Congestion) Voltage frequency

(Congestion) (balancing)

Voltage Reactive power

Short Circuit Power

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1. Where to act? Energy resources: Transmission

Local Transmission

Distribution MV Distribution LV

Decentralized intelligent units â&#x20AC;&#x201C; less communication Centralized intelligence â&#x20AC;&#x201C; more communication 51


What are the challenges? Grid Planning DER DER Inventory Inventory Available Available net net capacity capacity & priority & & priority priority clusters clusters clusters Probabilistic Probabilistic criteria criteria For Grid For For Grid Grid Planning Planning Planning

Framework What’s it for for What’s in in it me? me? Incentivising Incentivising Support Support Mechanismes Mechanismes Develop Develop market market products & products products & & Define Market Define Define Market Market players players players Contracts Contracts

Operational Planning Wind&Sun Wind&Sun Forecasting Forecasting DER Availability DER Availability Information Information Allocated Allocated Energy Energy resources resources forecasting forecasting

Real time operation ANM-models & ANM-models & equipment equipment Smart Smart metering metering functionalities functionalities f, f, V, V, Q, Q, Pcc Pcc control control tools tools Storage utilization

Mobile Mobile Energy Energy resource resource forecasting forecasting (e-vehicles) (e-vehicles)

Settlement Grid Settlement Grid Requirements Requirements Framework Framework Framework  Requires involvment of authorities, regulators, researchers, manufacturers, market players, DSOs, TSOs … 52


The Elia DERIG program DERIG is a R&D program in the innovation action plan to answer mainly : • The balancing needs from DER

and will partly contribute to answer : • The infrastructure needs (linked to DER) • The needs for new knowledge DERIG is focusing on the “local TSO/DSO grids” and will interact with the other programs RESMAN, OPFUT, STORAGE, GRIDFUT, POWERTECH, KNOWFUT 53


Objectives of DERIG (1/4) â&#x20AC;˘

â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

Demonstrate how to integrate Decentralized Energy Resources into the grids with a view to ensuring flexibility for both system operators and market players; Define new standards for increasing interoperability among all the parties; Develop novel grid planning and operation approaches

in order to facilitate the deployment of DER.

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DERIG’s objectives for Elia Belgium (2/4) •

Develop a methodology and tools for integrating distributed generation in the transmission system at grid development level and operational planning :  These should focus on the specific nature of TSO/DSO interaction and should be based on risk-based reliability criteria.  Demonstrate strategies to maximize system utilization and active management of the network  including new technologies such as Dynamic Line Rating (DLR).

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DERIG’s objectives for Elia Belgium (3/4) •

Identify, select or develop tools for local congestion management due to a high concentration of RES in specific areas :  Develop a methodology and tools for the supervision and control of DER production for implementing an Active Network Management (ANM) strategy along with DSOs.  Demonstrate these solutions with the regional DSOs and regulators.

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DERIG’s objectives for Elia Belgium (4/4) •

Facilitate the involvement of DER in future balancing markets • Design business models and market mechanisms for the trading of ancillary services provided by DERs or active demand through different participants (suppliers, aggregators, DSOs, prosumer DSOs, BRPs). • Integrate demand flexibility into the system through demandresponse mechanisms and • Demonstrate such integration.

Make recommendations to the legal and regulatory bodies on the implementation of the proposed business models and electricity markets.

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Thank you for your attention

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GRIDFUT - Grid of the Future

Frédéric Dunon Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

frederic.dunon@elia.be


Some quotes EC Roadmap 2050 (85% reduction of energy related CO2 emissions compared to 1990: “Our current energy system and ways of producing, transforming and consumming energy seem unsustainable for the future due to high GHG emissions, security of supply risks and competitiveness risks related to high energy costs and underinvestments” “The composition of energy mix would differ significantly in a decarbonised system with strong increase in RES in all scenarios (up to 60% share of RES in primary energy consumption) ” EC: “EC will as a matter of priority promote demand response, including the roll out of smart grids and meters and the development od demand response services and promote the integration of storage and flexible generation” EC: “All Member States can benefit from a coordinated approach to assessing generation adequacy in the internal market” EC: “To avoid the risk that competition distorted and ensure that renewable energy resources are developed cost effectively, the Commission announced that it plans to prepare guidance on best practice and experience gained in renewable energy support schemes...” In Germany: “nuclear moratorium in 2011... DC backbones in 2020” NSCOGI: “Even with relatively small volumes of offshore RES expected in the North Seas between 2020 and 2030 in the reference scenario some meshing emerged, particularly in the Channel” EC Roadmap 2050: “All policy options require more and more sophisticated energy infrastructures” “ Discussion about policies for 2020 – 2030 should start now” “The Skagerrak 4 link shows that voltages up to 500kV are currently possible. Therefore it would appear that a ±500kV, 2000MW system could be procured, installed and commissioned by 2017. Cigre foresee no technical obstacles to developing and constructing VSC HVDC converters for very high voltage and power (e.g. 600kV, 3000MW)” 60


Main consequences -

Bulk transmission capacity Massive RES integration Integration of controllable devices System flexibility Uncertainties

ď&#x192;¨ Need of infrastructure and software both developed in a smart way -

Acceptability Governance

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GRIDFUT program GRIDFUT provides the methods and tools in order to develop the pan-EU grid subject to massive RES integration and numerous uncertainties

Develop consistent scenarios conciliating bottom-up (detailed) and top-down (high-level) approaches and integrating statistical aspects

Long term scenarios and system adequacy

• Network development In a reliable way

• Public Acceptance

Market Design

Planning the transmission grid and delivering reliability vis-àvis the required standards and flexibility by accommodating the complexity of probabilistic approaches and looking at multiple scenarios Facilitating the deployment of grid infrastructure by leveraging on synergies with other infrastructures, collaborating with the community and enhancing grid technologies

 Develop a vision on how market could support an optimal use of the available and to be developed infrastructure. 62


Current projects •

OPTIMATE: platform for assessing the impact of different market arrangements (DA, ID, BM)

eHighway2050: paving the way for developing a pan-European electricity highway

TRIP: Ph.D. on optimizing transmission investment plan

NSCOGI: offshore grid design optimization

Toolbox for enhancing public acceptance (submitted)

Revisit of reliability approaches (under construction) 63


Future projects •

3 focus areas • Top-down approach for LT market scenarios, which integrates the greater interactions among parties • Risk-based model to assess LT system adequacy, which anticipates future correlations and uses the available flexibility • LT approach towards system stability, which deals with the inability to model everything

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Thank you for your attention

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POWERTECH Power technologies and practices for the future grid Rainer Oettl Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

Rainer.Oettl@50hertz.com


Motivation POWERTECH: POWER TECHnologies and practices for the future grid

Coming challenges:  Enhancement of the capability of the grid  Integration of new with existing equipment

 Minimisation of downtime and maximisation of availability of our equipment

Innovative approaches for asset management are needed to integrate new and controllable equipment into our ageing static equipment and

deal with large volumes of critical data 67


Main objectives of POWERTECH New Technology POWERTECH

Innovative

Asset

Asset

Data and

overhead lines

supervision

management

information

strategies

management

and technologies

and control

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Future transmission assets require innovative technologies I Innovative overhead lines and technologies

Asset supervision and control

Asset management strategies

ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Development of a long-term roadmap ď&#x192;  To master new technologies

1. Innovative repowering of corridors

a. High temperature low sag conductors o 50Hertz: First pilot project with ACSS-conductors for appr. 20km in the 380-kV-OHL Redwitz/Remptendorf (Germany)

o ELIA: Data and information management

Pilot project with ACCC-conductors Beringen / Mol 150 kV; Upgrade 380 kV Zutendael / Van Eyck with HTLS conductors 69


Future transmission assets require innovative technologies II Innovative overhead lines and technologies

1. Innovative repowering of corridors b. New development of a conductor system (joint venture with SAG, application for public funds by the german Ministry of Economics) mit

Asset supervision

an additional steel rope in the conductor bundle fixed with insolators

and control

Asset management strategies

Data and information management

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Future transmission assets require innovative technologies III Innovative

2.

Composite crossarms towers • • •

overhead lines and technologies

Total height of the tower is less

No swinging of the insulators => narrower corridor Voltage upgrating possible with existing towers

Asset supervision

and control

Asset management strategies

Data and information management

3.

Less visual impact

HVDC-power links •

Target: +/- 500-kV-DC (OHL and/or cable); capacity of 1x2000-MW per system; appr. 450km in Gemany

• •

SVC-Technology

Planned within Germany (NEP) and „ALEGROProject “ (Amprion, Germany and ELIA, Belgium)

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Supervision to improve system operation I Innovative overhead lines and technologies

Asset supervision and control

 Installation of innovative sensors  To measure the condition of the equipment (e.g. OHL and cable systems)  Study the feasibility of an asset management

control centre

Asset management

strategies

Data and information management

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Supervision to improve system operation II Innovative overhead lines and technologies

 Update the operations and maintenance practices  To address future grid development and operation

» Outage planning Asset supervision and control

» To enhance flexibility of work schedules  Optimise remotely controlled protection systems

Asset management strategies

Data and information management

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Asset management approaches to optimise maintenance and replacement I Innovative overhead lines and technologies

 Implement life cycle optimisation methods and tools  Using of new methodologies for the prioritisation of investments and replacement

Asset supervision and control

of ageing infrastructure

 Handle the integration of ageing of “old” assets and “new” assets

Asset management strategies

Data and information management

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Asset management approaches to optimise maintenance and replacement II Innovative overhead lines and technologies

ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Deploy innovative planning tools and maintenance methods (from planned maintenance to CBM and RCM)

Asset supervision and control

ď&#x192;  To decrease maintenance costs ď&#x192;  To maintain grid reliability

Asset management strategies

Data and information management

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Adequately manage and ensure quality of data I Innovative overhead lines and technologies

ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Create a system for managing the information and data currently available: Quality of data (strong increase in data

Asset supervision

volume)

and control

Reliability of system on data quality Asset

Standardization of different tools

management strategies

Standards for choice of data

Data and

Cyber security

information management

ď&#x192;&#x2DC; Tools for automating incident analysis

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Vielen Dank f端r Ihre Aufmerksamkeit.

Thank you for your attention

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OPFUT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Operation of the Future

Wim Michiels

Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

wimmichiels@elia.be


The stakes are challenging • • • • •

System closer to the limits Flow management Balancing the system More players (TSO, DSO, generators, dynamic load,…) on the field and more dynamic/ volatile From local solutions to cross-border & European solutions

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Increase awareness & controllability •

Demonstrate and introduce new technologies, processes, tools and data management to improve system observability and operability • Connecting a large number of parties • TSOs, DSOs, power producers and consumers

• Monitoring asset conditions in real time • Lines, transformers, cables…

• Anticipating through accurate forecasting techniques • Facilitating the decision-making process • Very large number of variable to consider • Quicker “last-minute” decisions because of changing conditions • Predictable effects

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Flexibility

Design and demonstrate innovative procedures to route flows through the European grid • (pan)-European coordination • Specific optimization tools in larger regions Beyond operability • Integrating existing and new technologies • Strengthening coordination among many parties • Connecting a large number of parties is one thing • Coordinating them is one another

• Compensating the owners in a fair way • Market-based approach

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Reliability

Design and demonstrate new methods and tools for assessing the reliability of the European grid • Translating and aggregating uncertainties into risk indicators • Incl. uncertainties on some actions and on their effects

• Informing decisions • Consistently at all horizons • Possibly differently at different places because the situation is different

• Taking stability more and more into consideration Design and demonstrate new operational processes accordingly • Coping with uncertainties for doing maintenance and expansion  dynamic outage planning • Integrating all active parties into emergency and restoration plans 83


Train

Establish a training centre to enable joint training • Simulating future situations (flows and market) • Different market rules • Different control means

• Involving all active parties (TSO, DSO, generators, loads,…) • In the design of scenarios • In the training programmes

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Current projects •

TWENTIES: 6 large scale demo projects about integration of RES •

NETFLEX: demonstrate at regional level (CWE) how much additional wind generation can be handled thanks to DLR (Dynamic Line Ratings), coordination of controllable devices (PSTs & HVDCs) and usage of WAMS

Investigation of measures needed in critical conditions in the grid of 50Hertz

iTesla: new tools for assessing real time security taking stochastic and dynamic aspects into consideration

Influence of the feed-in of RES and the load on the Pendulum damping behaviour of the grid and measures for its improvement

AFTER: assessment methodologies for the security of installations

Development and implementation of a training approach for a grid restoration concept

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Future projects High priority focus  Revisit reliability criteria to integrate all uncertainties in a consistent way and improve risk indicators for decision-making purposes 2nd priority focuses  Impact of HVDC on meshed AC systems  Impact of uncertainties on operation (maintenance, work, etc)  Novel tools for GridLab

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How to capture new knowledge?

Peter Clybouw Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

peter.clybouw@elia.be


Agenda

  

Knowledge why & what for Elia Group Knowfut program How to capture new knowledge ?

88


Drivers KM Vision Technology

 Three main drivers for change : •

Knowledge environment is changing fast

Existing knowledge is more personbased than organization-based

Knowledge is a value creator for the whole Elia Group

People

Environment

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Mission of KM Mission Supporting the actual activities and preparing future activities of the Elia Group:

Persued objectives The aim is to achieve the following goals :

– Sharing and developing

 So that it enables the Elia

Group to retain, develop and apply the knowledge it needs to deliver it’s core objectives, and to acquire and build the knowledge it needs to play a leading role among European TSO’s

knowledge in the Group (as a source of satisfaction and staff development)

– Anticipating future knowledge needs

– Contributing to operational excellence, growth and innovation

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The Knowledge Cycle

Create Generate new knowledge from learnings, experience, research and application

Use Apply knowledge to improve work activities, decisions and opportunities

Capture Collect knowledge from individuals and groups, and document it so that it is shareable across the network

Organise & Access Make knowledge easily accessible through well understood means to those who want it

Manage Classify, categorise, and store knowledge in a structured way, so that it can be easily found by those needing it A clear system and processes are required

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Future knowledge: challenges

Detect & prioritize knowledge & expertise for RES integration & optimal asset mgmt

Embed new knowledge in the Group, with spread expertise

Capture & share information & knowledge from platforms, WGs, projects,â&#x20AC;Ś

Interact with network of research centres & universities 92


KNOWFUT program KNOWFUT is the link between all other programmes, providing an opportunity to channel knowledge from the different R&D projects into processes to be embedded into the group

Detection & selection of knowledge

 Detect the future critical knowledge for Elia Group and support selection of projects & partners to achieve development objectives  Capture knowledge systematically

Organisation & structure of knowledge

 Organise knowledge for knowledge creation and sharing: Support mapping of R&D activities, define & structure knowledge processes, support communities of practice (CoP)

Research community

 Support the knowledge capture and sharing within a network or research centers and universities, linking Elia Group priorities and the universities„ expertise to attract the best profiles

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Overview approach K-capture Objectives 

Develop and experiment knowledge capture and sharing concepts from R&D projects across Elia Group

Use pilot projects to implement good practices for the knowledge capture and sharing

Results provided 

Develop methods for capturing and sharing knowledge (how to’s): identification, list of capturable K , from knowledge to technical competencies

Implement knowledge capture and sharing: user guidelines, set-up a K-sharing tool

Do measurements and improve: recommendations, lessons learnt

Timeframe  Preparation: 2012  Experimentation Q1-2013  First evaluation Q2- 2013 94


e-Storage example Knowledge capture Concept: Capture specific knowledge of interest for Elia Group in the field of large-scale electricity storage Implementation:

• •

Template for K-Acquisition plan Summary document with relevant knowledge from given deliverable

Knowledge sharing process Concept: Summary documents and deliverables available Implementation:

• •

Thematic workshops with interested stakeholders Wiki page including summary document & link to deliverables of interest 95


â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knowledge is power, sharing the forceâ&#x20AC;?

Learning

Change

Knowledge

Innovation

Thank for your attention

96


How can a partner help to anchor new knowledge? Ronnie.belmans@energyville.be


Overview

• Relevant knowledge • Type knowledge • Research partners Research institutes Universities International frameworks National/regional platforms Scientific board of advice 98


Relevant knowledge

• Fundamental : no direct application (e.g. new materials) • Components and parts (e.g. power electronics) • Prototypes (e.g. DC circuit breaker) • Combinations (e.g. offshore substations) • Systems (e.g. dc overlay grid) • Software tools (e.g. market coupling) • ICT tools (e.g. advanced PLC) 99


Type of knowledge

• • • • • • •

Depends on the time horizon Public: scientific papers Open source software IPR drive Patents In-house or very specific Mutual exchange: back and forward ideas between TSOs and research partners 100


Research partners and organisation

Research institutes Universities International frameworks National/regional platforms Scientific board of advice

101


Research institutes

• • • • • •

Energyville Euref Fraunhofer IBBT-iMinds RSE ECN

102


Universities

• • • • • • • •

Teaching the Master students by specialists Master thesis Ph.d. studies In company training by universities Using mutual tools Reporting on conferences/scientific gathering Interaction within CIGRE Interaction within research projects 103


National/regonial platforms

• • • •

BERA: research alliance SGF: industry driven Ie-net: knowledge dissemination VDE

104


European frameworks

• • • • •

EERA EEGI ENTSO-E: R&D EDSO Technology platforms (more than ETPSmartgrids) • Eurelectric

105


International frameworks

• ISGAN-IEA • CIGRE: both national and international, not only Paris but also special gatherings • GSGF • IEEE

106


Scientific board of advice

• • • •

50 Hertz TenneT Academic input Industrial participation

107


Conclusions

• • • •

Knowledge is very broad Time dependent Anchoring is more than storing Too much person dependent often (people move within the company but also in the knowledge surroundings) • Exchange of human resources (e.g. German system of professors coming out of industry, guest professors for specific courses) 108


Energyville: collaboration is key

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The value of R&D partners for a leading TSO - What’s in it for a R&D partner?

Jacques Vandermeiren – CEO Elia Group Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012


Paving the roads for electricity and keeping the pendulum stable AndrÊ Jurres - CEO - NPG Energy Kai Strunz - Expert for Modelling Energy Systems and Smart Grids Technische Universität Berlin Claes Rytoft - Group Senior Vice President Technology Manager ABB Management Services Ltd Dominique Woitrin - Director - CREG Patrick De Leener - Head of Energy Management - Elia Rainer Oettl - Head of Asset Management - 50Hertz


October, 2012

ABB & Power A brief introduction Š ABB Group 8 November 2012 | Slide 4


A global leader in power and automation technologies Leading market positions in main businesses

© ABB ABB Group Group 8 November November2012 2012 ||Slide Slide55

135,000 employees in about 100 countries

$38 billion in revenue (2011)

Formed in 1988 merger of Swiss and Swedish engineering companies

Predecessors founded in 1883 and 1891

Publicly owned company with head office in Switzerland


How ABB is organized Five global divisions

Power Products

Power Systems

Discrete Automation and Motion

Low Voltage Products

Process Automation

$10.9 billion 35,300 employees

$8.1 billion 19,600 employees

$8.8 billion 28,500 employees

$5.3 billion 21,400 employees

$8.3 billion 28,300 employees

(2011 revenues, consolidated)

ABB’s portfolio covers: 

© ABB ABB Group Group 8 November November2012 2012 ||Slide Slide66

Electricals, automation, controls and instrumentation for power generation and industrial processes

Power transmission

Distribution solutions

Low-voltage products

Motors and drives

Intelligent building systems

Robots and robot systems

Services to improve customers productivity and reliability


Power Systems division Key deliverables Electrical, automation, control and instrumentation for power generation AC and DC power transmission grid systems for traditional and renewable energy integration (HVDC, HVDC Light, FACTS) Turnkey substations (incl. substation automation) Software solutions for Utilities Power systems services Consulting and system studies Repair, retrofit, refurbishment Software and hardware upgrades Asset management and diagnostics Š ABB Group 8 November 2012 | Slide 7


Grid Systems Offering HVDC and HVDC Light Low loss long power transmission by overhead lines, sea cables and land cables Asynchronous connections Power from shore to platforms and islands Connecting wind and solar energy to grid

FACTS - Series Compensation and Shunt compensation Increased transmission capacity Power Quality Better usage of transmission lines in a environmentally friendly way

High voltage cables Underground and submarine AC and DC cables

Offshore Wind Connections AC and DC connection of offshore wind farms

Power semiconductors T&D, industrial drives and traction applications with Bipolar and BiMOS technique

Consulting and service Transmission system consulting Š ABB Group 8 November 2012 | Slide 8


Example of Wind project in Germany BorWin1- the world’s most remote offshore wind farm The world’s most remote offshore wind farm cluster is connected to the German grid by HVDC Light transmission system Commissioning year: 2010 Power rating: 400 MW No of circuits: 1 AC Voltage: 170 kV (Platform BorWin Alpha) 380 kV (landstation at Diele) DC Voltage: ±150 kV Length of DC underground cable: 2x75 km Length of DC submarine cable: 2x125 km

© ABB Group 8 November 2012 | Slide 9


Ventyx Software solutions Information Technologies & Operational Technologies

Š ABB Group 8 November 2012 | Slide 10


Balancing the need for more power with lower climate impact – the challenges Connecting grids Renewables integration

Plug-in vehicles

Demand management

Power quality More power

© ABB ABB Group © Group November 2012 88 November 2012 || Slide Slide11 11

Improve network management, control & cyber security


The evolution of grids

1

2

3

4 Source: DG Energy, European Commission

Europe 1

Hydro power & pump storage -Scandinavia

2

>50 GW wind power in North Sea and Baltic Sea

3

Hydro power & pump storage plants - Alps

1 4 Solar power in S.Europe, N.Africa & Middle East © ABB Group 8 November 2012 | Slide 12

Germany  Alternatives  Role

to nuclear-distributed generation

of offshore wind / other renewables

 Political

commitment

 Investment  Need

demand and conditions

to strengthen existing grid


From traditional grids to smart grids

smart grids

traditional grid

Centralized power generation One-directional power flow Generation follows load Top-down operations planning Operation based on historical experience

Centralized and distributed power generation Intermittent renewable power generation Multi-directional power flow Operation based on real-time data

Š ABB Group 8 November 2012 | Slide 13


Chair of Sustainable Electric Networks and Sources of Energy (SENSE)

Panel Contribution ELIA Group Innovation Partners Day Professor Kai Strunz, TU Berlin

25 October 2012 Brussels

Outline

1. Future Power System R&D Needs 2. Co-Operative Project Examples Industry-University at TU Berlin 3. Role of Universities in ELIA Group Plan

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

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2


1. Future Power System R&D Needs Worked Out in Co-operation with German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology BMWi and Technology Innovation Agency Berlin TSB Contents Extended and Categorized by TU Berlin System Level

Component Level (Energy Conversion, Transmission, ICT)

(Functions, Concepts, Models)

a)

b)

Function of New Grid Types

c)

Systemic Reinforcing of Existing Power Grid

b)

a) Increase of Conversion Efficiency

Power Grid Modeling

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

Increase of Transmission Efficiency

25 October 2012

3

1. Future Power System R&D Needs System-based Increase of Power Grid Efficiency Component Level

System Level

(Energy Conversion, Transmission, ICT)

(Functions, Concepts, Models)

a) Function of new Grid Types

b) Systemic Reinforcing of Existing Power Grid

a)

c) Power Grid Modeling

Increase of Conversion Efficiency

b) Increase of Transmission Efficiency

a) Function of New Grid Types Function of • Grids With Very High Share of Renewable Energies • Intercontinental Grids • Meshed DC-Grids • Multi-energy Grids

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

2

4


1. Future Power System R&D Needs System-based Increase of Power Grid Efficiency System Level

Component Level

(Functions, Concepts, Models)

(Energy Conversion, Transmission, ICT)

b)

a) Function of new Grid Types

Systemic Reinforcing of Existing Power Grid

a)

c) Power Grid Modeling

Increase of Conversion Efficiency

b) Increase of Transmission Efficiency

b) Systemic Reinforcing of Existing Power Grid • • • • • • • • •

Increasing Flexibility and Management of Generation Side Increasing Flexibility and Management of Demand Side Acceptance-friendly Grid Expansion Methods Congestion Management and Market Principles Development of Standards Maintenance Strategies Optimization of Interaction Between Distribution Grid and Transmission Grid Integration of Storage Applications Training Centers Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

5

1. Future Power System R&D Needs System-based Increase of Power Grid Efficiency Component Level

System Level

(Energy Conversion, Transmission, ICT)

(Functions, Concepts, Models)

a) Function of new Grid Types

b) Systemic Reinforcing of Existing Power Grid

a)

c) Power Grid Modeling

Increase of Conversion Efficiency

b) Increase of Transmission Efficiency

c) Power System Modeling • • • •

Real-time Modeling of Power System Operation Real-time Modeling for Hardware-in-the-Loop Simulation Scale-bridging Representation of Power Systems Representation of Tolerances

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

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6


1. Future Power System R&D Needs Component-based Increase of Power Grid Efficiency System Level

Component Level

(Functions, Concepts, Models)

(Energy Conversion, Transmission, ICT)

b)

a) Function of new Grid Types

Systemic Reinforcing of Existing Power Grid

a)

c) Power Grid Modeling

Increase of Conversion Efficiency

b) Increase of Transmission Efficiency

a) Increase of Conversion Efficiency • Improving Power Capability of Voltage Sourced Converters for HVDC Transmission • Offshore-capable Equipment • Power-to-Gas Conversion Engineering • Thermal Storage Conversion Engineering • Carbon Capture and Storage • Improving Flexibility of Power Stations

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

7

1. Future Power System R&D Needs Component-based Increase of Power Grid Efficiency Component Level

System Level

(Energy Conversion, Transmission, ICT)

(Functions, Concepts, Models)

a) Function of new Grid Types

b) Systemic Reinforcing of Existing Power Grid

a)

c) Power Grid Modeling

Increase of Conversion Efficiency

b) Increase of Transmission Efficiency

b) Increase of Transmission Efficiency • • • • • •

DC Circuit Breakers for HVDC Transmission Superconducting Cables XLPE Cables for High Voltages New Acceptance-friendly Corridors High Temperature Conductors Applications of Information and Communication Technologies for Power System Strengthening: Security, Signal Transmission, Signal Processing • Sensor System Components • Components for Protection of Systems With Renewable Energies Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

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8


2. Co-Operative Project Examples Industry-University at TU Berlin New Acceptance-friendly Corridors • • • •

Project co-ordinated by VDE TU Berlin, TU Ilmenau are university partners German TSOs involved Manufacturers involved Autobahn

Telecommunication

Cable systems

Cable systems

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

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2. Co-Operative Project Examples Industry-University at TU Berlin Increasing Flexibility and Management of Demand Side • Project performed in 2011 to calculate the impact of a Berlin Smart Grid on green house gases by 2037 when the city celebrates its 800th birthday • Project partners were TU Berlin, Vattenfall, Siemens

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

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10


2. Co-Operative Project Examples Industry-University at TU Berlin Real-time Modeling of Power System Operation • E-MERGE Smart Grid Lab at TU Berlin • Co-operation with European Institute of Technology EIT

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

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3. Role of Universities in ELIA Group Plan • ELIA Group´s “Innovation & Knowledge: Projecting Ideas, Delivering Solutions is an excellent way forward • Universities are eager to strongly support both theme thrusts “Balancing Needs” and “Infrastructure Needs” • Universities can play a key role in supporting the three approach pillars of “Expertise Know-how”, “Partnership”, “Innovation Culture”

Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

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12


3. Role of Universities in ELIA Group Plan • Expertise Know-how: To best leverage know-how, one could affiliate core topics with core partner universities • Affiliation could be made based on modeling capability • Partnership: Is an important element of  Preserving know-how  Extending know-how  Leveraging know-how • Universities help to do so through research and education • Beyond bilateral agreements between partners, co-operation in the context of national and EU projects can provide very high value • In such EU projects, universities would need to reach minimum critical involvement to be effective • Innovation Culture: is important and needs dedication for a good period to pay off • Universities can be a key supporter of that pillar, too Professor Dr.-Ing. Kai Strunz www.sense.tu-berlin.de

25 October 2012

Thank you to Elia and 50Hertz for participation and support of IEEE PES ISGT Europe 2012 from 14 to 17 October 2012 at TU Berlin Panel Presentations at www.ieee-isgt-2012.eu

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13


Conclusions

Hubert Lemmens Elia Group Innovation Partners Day October 25th, 2012

hubert.lemmens@elia.be


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