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ELENA MANGIGIAN

CONTENTS

ARCHITECTURE PORTFOLIO 35mangigian@gmail.com

EDUCATIONAL WORK

01 02 03 04 05

Re-Linking Evergreens Cemetery pgs. 03-10 Park Plus+ pgs. 11-18 El Sitio Feliz pgs. 19-26 Visitor Center & 9/11 Memorial pgs. 27-34 Semester Abroad pgs. 35-38

PROFESSIONAL WORK

06 07 08 09

Residential pgs. 39-40 Educational pgs. 41-42 Urban Landscape pgs. 43-44 Corporate pgs. 45-46

EXPERIMENTATION

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Bioplastic & Charcoal pgs. 47-48

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01 RE-LINKING EVERGREENS CEMETERY Graduate Thesis Studio Advisor: David Lewis, LTL Architects Parsons the New School for Design Spring 2017

The Evergreens Cemetery in Brooklyn, NY, sits quietly tucked away behind 11 foot high walls and iron gates. This 225 acre, nondenominational cemetery was designed to be an urban oasis for all, but it’s meandering and winding paths are very rarely traversed. The Evergreens Cemetery has a rich history that involves the intersection of cemetery and city politics. The physical tracings of the historic Brooklyn Battle and priceless artifacts can be seen not only as a place of rest for the deceased, but a repository of information for the living. East of the cemetery sits an existing train line that will be reinstated as a connector of the boroughs. Dividing the urban Brooklyn grid and the organic nature of the cemetery, this infrastructure creates a new opportunity for the public to view the cemetery in a new light. This thesis uses architecture as a current day response to the conceptualizations and under usages of cemeteries, and examines how they can be transformed and utilized in the future. Architecture, in the form of light elevated bridges and heavy vertical columbariums create a link between the history of the dead and a functioning space for the living. The building draws the public from the connecting train station into the space dedicated for the a research center, archive and gallery. Looking towards the future, the vertical columbariums that anchor the building to the sacred ground introduce a new way of efficient burial. As space in most cemeteries is diminishing the columbariums create an ever changing landscape in the future of the cities of the dead and their borders. These two worlds, one of the living, one of the dead, can be linked by transforming the past practices of the cemetery into programmatic needs of the present and future. Architecture is the link that brings these two worlds together by emphasizing the sacred ground and showcasing the history of the cemetery. By incorporating a train station and research center, it draws the people into the cemetery allowing the public to overcome negative perceptions associated with a place of burial; thus bridging the gap between community and cemetery.

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BROOKLYN CITY GRID

CROSSWALK TO TRIBORO TRACKS

FACADE ARCHIVE DISPLAY ARCHIVE & GALLERY

CENTRAL AVENUE

TRIBORO TRAIN TRACKS

LOBBY/TICKET BOOTH EGRESS TO TRACKS

Section perspective revealing the inside of one of the columbariums

COLUMBARIUMS

COLUMBARIUMS

EVERGREENS CEMETERY

1/8”=1’-0” basswood model

Exploded axon

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1/8”=1’-0” basswood model 06


Archive Entrance

The interior archive shelving pattern is reflected in the pattern of the exterior louvers. The columbarium pierces through the floor slabs in the distance.

Interior view showing a lookout to the cemetery and columbarium access.

Vertical columbariums are dispersed throughout the existing cemetery landscape.

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Site section showing the circulation throughout the building and site. This highlights the different usages of the building from the train station, data and research center to the transition of civil program to sacred.

The part of the building that hovers over the sacred ground is meant to act as a welcome gate to the cemetery; centered above the path that the funeral procession would take.

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02 PARK PLUS+ Graduate Urban Studio Advisor: Andrew Bernheimer, Bernheimer Architecture Parsons the New School for Design Fall 2017

With Amazon and other conglomerate companies on the rise, the monopolization of supply and delivery of goods has lead to the closure of small businesses. This redevelopment of Sara Roosevelt Park explores the near future option of drone transportation. Although companies such as Amazon have already produced drone delivery systems, this drone port supports smaller businesses in Manhattan and the boroughs. This allows them to have access to the same technological advancements for more efficient and faster deliveries, while also eliminating the amount of traffic and pollution in the streets of New York. This redesign keeps the existing athletic programs of Sara Roosevelt Park the same and ads a layer of piezoelectric surfaces to the several basketball courts, sidewalks, and bordering roads. The kinetic energy harvested from the vibrations of these surfaces is enough energy to recharge several hundred drones that will have docking and charging stations on the canopy that hovers above the park. The excess energy can then support local businesses as well as light up the park at night during hours when the area has been deemed unsafe. The canopy exists above the existing trees that shade the park. It takes on a lightweight feel and touches down in the park at determined moments, yet is not meant to dominate the already successful and thriving landscape.

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A.

100’ 60’ SMALLER COMMERCIAL/PERSONAL DRONES 50’ AVG. TREE HT./HT. UNABLE TO HEAR DRONES

A. Lower Manhattan plan showing the proximity of the drone port to Red Hook Container Terminal B. Zoomed out plan of Manhattan showing the proximity of the drone port to local airports

0’

B.

Form Diagram

Form Diagram

Concept Section Collage

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Conceptual Collage

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Existing soccer field with proposed intervention

Nighttime street view showing the piezoelectric ground and illuminated canopy from stored energy

Park from sidewalk view

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Site plan showing existing Sara Roosevelt programs with the added piezoelectric surfaces and the new canopy with drone ports.

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Aerial view from a drone’s perspective

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03 EL SITIO FELIZ Graduate Design Build Project Advisor: Nick Brinen, LIGHTSHED Architecture Parsons the New School for Design Spring/Summer 2016

El Sitio Feliz is an existing community garden in East Harlem, New York. The garden is frequented by locals as well as the neighboring Union Settlement Association which provides community based services and programs for immigrants and low-income residents of East Harlem. The New School partnered with Harlem’s Union Settlement Association and New York City’s Administration for Children Services to redesign El Sitio Feliz. This design build project was researched, planned and constructed by 15 graduate students over the course of the 2016 Spring and Summer Semesters. The Spring semester included schematic design, design development and construction documents, as well as countless site visits and community engagement activities. The Summer Semester was dedicated to implementing and constructing the design on site. The students were tasked with issues like time and budget management, and unforeseen obstacles such as unstable soil which lead to compression grouting. In the end, a 600 square foot steel and cedar canopy with translucent roof panels was constructed for shelter, a poured in place concrete slab and cedar deck was installed beneath the canopy to host performances, and three unique sets of cedar benches were erected throughout the park for rest and spectators. A playscape and ground cover were designed as well. Throughout the process, the students were keen on respecting the existing and beloved landscape of the park and paid thoughtful attention to the needs of the community.

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Previous Canopy Schemes

Concept axon of the new programs added to the site

Site analysis and Schematic Design study models

Group meeting

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Excavating foundations for the East benches

Installing wood blocking and louvers

6" X 6" HOLLOW TUBE STEEL COLUMN STEEL SUPPLIER TO REVIEW AND SPECIFY PLATE SIZE 1X6 CEDAR #2 W/ POLYURETHANE COATING

1'-10"

5 21" REINFORCED CONCRETE SLAB

1"

3" 3" 7"

63 4"

S1 2X4 STUDS O3 38" OSB O3 a 38" OSB C1 1X2 CEDAR DECKING

B1 2x4 BOARD

1'-6"

1'-51 4"

S2 2x4 STUD

5 8" x 7" TRUBOLT ZINC PLATED CARBON STEEL WEDGE ANCHOR 3 4

" PLYWOOD FORMWORK

3"

1'-7"

C5 1x6 CEDAR DECKING

1"

B1 2X4 BOARD

C4 1x6 CEDAR 1'-101 2"

2" x 6" DECKING FRAME JOIST

10"

C2 1X6 CEDAR DECKING

B1 2X4 BOARD

B1 2x4 BOARD O5 38" OSB

1'-2"

B1 2X4 BOARD

S1 2X4 STUD O8 38" OSB C3 1x6 CEDAR

3'-6"

51 2"

4'-6"

4'-0"

#4 REBAR AT 12" O.C.

1'

6"

1'-6"

1'-10"

3"

1'-10"

3"

#3 REBAR AT 8" O.C. J BAR

6"

6"

COMPACTED GRAVEL #3 REBAR

3" CL

3" 2'-6" 3'-6"

Framing for the West benches

Existing site conditions

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Left detail: Platform bench over poured in place concrete slab

Right detail: Column to spread footing

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Completed East benches

Design Development East Bench Render

Completed deck, West benches with raised planters, and steel canopy with wood louvers and polycarbonate for shading

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Design Development Canopy Render

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04 VISITOR CENTER & 9/11 MEMORIAL Undergraduate Comprehensive Building Design Competition Studio First Place Advisor: Mark Lawrence, E/L STUDIO Catholic University of America Fall 2013 The concept of this project was to create a memorial for the lives lost on 9/11 and to act as a functioning visitor’s center for the Department of Homeland Security in Washington DC. By incorporating long ceremonial paths that linked to water, sky and earth, and by displaying artifacts from the three sites from September 11th (New York, Pennsylvania and Washington DC), this building and it’s site act as a link between remembering the past and looking toward the future. Security measures, mechanical and electrical systems, and the existing site were all evaluated during this design process This was a semester long Design Competition with groups of 5 students per team. First place was awarded to this project.

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Ground and First Floor Plans

Southeast view of building and steel artifact

ARTIFACT 1 STEEL FROM THE TWIN TOWERS ARTIFACT 2 STONE FROM THE PENTAGON

Walkway towards entrance

Cafe entrance and exit to exterior

Walkway towards exterior Artifact 3 monument

Ramp towards courtyard

ARTIFACT 3 DIRT FROM THE PENNSYLVANIA PLANE CRASH

Concept sketches

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Exploded Wall Section

Floor and mechanical systems 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

antique grade reclaimed wood 1/2” gypsum board 2 1/2” metal studs 2 1/2” metal channels 7/8” hat channels exterior wall construction pilkington toughened fins w/ connec tion hardware 8. pilkington planar system curtain wall 9. 1/2” glass-mat sheathing 10. GFRC panel support system 11. GFRC panel system

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1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10.

concrete subfloor 4” board insulation pex radiant heating tubing 3” topping slab toughened fins w/ 902 igu connections planar system curtain wall concrete columns reclaimed wood - grade varies supply/return ducts & diffusers hss 2x2x1/2 tube support system

11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

capilary cooling tubes sprinkler pipes w/ recessed sprinkler heads concrete roof w/ integral concrete beams 2x8 wood blocking sloped board insulation w/ 1/4”=1’ slope steel plate imbedded into concrete ceiling steel angles imbedded into gfrc fascia gfrc fascia w/ drip edge and flashing control joint (topping and floor slab joists to align)

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Southeast view of building and steel artifact

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05 SEMESTER ABROAD, ROME, ITALY Advisor: Eric Jenkins Catholic University of America Spring 2012

Each place visited I created a composition within my sketchbook. I would draw an elevation or plan, an axon of the space, and a detail. This method taught me how to analyze an entire space in a limited amount of time. Italian cities visited included Rome, Florence, Venice, Vincenza, Verona, Naples, Giulianova, Siena, Bologna and San Vito d’Altivole. Cities visited outside of Italy included Prague, Ljubljana, Berlin, Barcelona, Amsterdam and Bourdeaux.

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Castelvecchio, Verona, Italy

Villa Guilia, Rome, Italy

Old Town, Ljubljana, Slovenia

Villa Guilia Spatial Diagram & Details

Church of the Santissimo Redentore, Venezia, Italy Spatial Diagram

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Villa Rotunda, Vicenza, Italy

Sagrestia Vecchia, Florence, Italy Spatial Diagram

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06 RESIDENTIAL

House Example B

Firm: Virtuoso Architecture Location: Spring Lake, NJ Date: 2015-2017

My job includes full 3d models and construction documents produced via Revit which consists of 3d renderings, floor plans, electrical plans, framing plans, wall sections, building sections and details.

framing plans, codes, elevations, sections, wall sections, details, floor plans, electric plans,

The following projects include two residential custom homes in which my role was to build the 3d Revit models and complete the Construction Document Sets.

Revit Model

House Example A

Front Elevation

Revit Model

Building Section

Rear Elevation

Front Elevation

First Floor Plan

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Second Floor Plan

Roof Plan

First Floor Plan

Second Floor Framing Plan

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07 EDUCATIONAL Firm: Bernardon Location: West Chester, PA Date: 2015

The following project is a Science lab addition to a high school. My role in this project included site visits, surveying, client meetings and coordination, and being responsible for certain sections of the Construction Document Set.

West Elevation

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Wall Sections

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08 LANDSCAPE & PLAZA DESIGN Firm: Bernardon Location: West Chester, PA Date: 2015

This project is in an urban setting located in a suburban town of Philadelphia. The concept for this new development project was to create a dynamic plaza and gathering space, while still fitting into a historic setting. My role in this project included modeling the commercial building in SketchUp and designing the plaza. The design process of this project consisted of analyzing ways to allow the plaza to act as a multi functioning space for community gatherings and general public activities. The site slopes from the street down to the building so ways to bring the pedestrians from the sidewalk to the building and vice versa were studied. Elongated steps, which could be used for sitting, and a ceremonial ramp, which allows for the pedestrians to experience the curvature of the center circles were planned. In addition, the center circles have water fountains that are inlaid into the ground. These fountains, as well low plant coverings, helped to bring a more lively and fresh feel to this underdeveloped urban corner.

Plaza view from the third floor

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View from ground floor exterior space

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09 CORPORATE Firm: Bernardon Location: Philadelphia, PA Date: 2013

Based in an industrial area on the outskirts of Philadelphia, the concept of this building was to create a statement design for a company’s headquarters. Most of the building is glass allowing for viewsheds from the interior to the surrounding river and Amtrak train tracks, while rustic materials were incorporated to represent the site’s industrial history. A parking garage is located on ground level and the building is elevated due to flood plains. My role in this project was co-designing in the Schematic Design phase.

Southwest View

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Northwest View

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10 MATERIAL EXPERIMENTATIONS Graduate Material Technology Class Parsons the New School for Design Spring 2016

BIOPLASTIC EXPERIMENTATION

This is an image of a bioplastic and algae mixture. This mixture was used to create an air and water filtration product that converts carbon dioxide and water pollution into clean water, oxygen and biomass.

CHARCOAL EXPERIMENTATION

This image shows one product out of a series of experiments to test the strength of bioplastic to potentially be used within a built environment.

After researching the properties of charcoal, I experimented with creating a fire resistant natural paint with charcoal as the base ingredient. Through fire resistance tests I concluded that the paint resisted fire when there was the most amount of charcoal in the mixture. This product could be used as a base substance for building paint applications or within a flyash mixture.

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