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Be sure to watch this year’s first episode of Cub Now News, airing right after LC Current to preview print stories and see footage featuring the football team and the marching band.

Visit our online edition of the Cub Reporter for videos, photos and exclusive stories and interviews that you won’t see in print.

Cub Reporter Lawrence Central High School

7300 E. 56th St.

Volume 62

Indianapolis, Indiana

Issue 1

September 24, 2010

School gives senior warm welcome

water and swam over to him,” Sbarbaro said. Sean Monahan, the other student It was just another typical day at who helped, jumped into the water as Culver Military Academy for senior well and pulled Berry out into the PWC, Jackson Berry. He got up around 6:45 then got a ski boat to take him to shore a.m., ate breakfast at 7:15 with drill right where there was an ambulance waiting. afterwards, and then started classes. He Berry was unconscious and in a severe began his classes with band and then had state. He was airlifted Personal Watercraft to South Bend Safety. Memorial Hospital. He didn’t know I thought it would be a reOnce he was stable it would be his last ally cool way to show him enough there, Berry day at Culver. It was around how much support he has. was airlifted again to Methodist Hospital 9:30 a.m. when Berry Kaitlin Opat in Indianapolis. took a sharp turn “We were on his jet ski and Senior expecting Jackson crashed into Ryan to call to give us Arnett, another student at Culver. Arnett’s wave runner his final rank, so naturally I thought it hit the top of Berry’s, whipped him was Jackson,” said Diane Berry, Berry’s around and then knocked him in the mother, about the phone call she received following the accident. “When water unconscious. “I guess you can say I was shocked,” I picked up the phone I immediately said Gina Sbarbaro, one of the Culver knew it wasn’t Jackson.” Berry’s parents received the students who helped Berry and Arnett information on the morning of July 26. after the accident. “It was the typical call: ‘Mrs. Berry, “I just went through the motions, did the sign for help and dove into the Jackson has been in an accident,’” Berry’s

DeyaHernandez deyahernandezcub@gmail.com

news

New Indiana immunization laws are forcing students to be up-to-date on certain vaccinations. Read more about the new codes on page 6.

In uniform, senior Jackson Berry marches in a parade as the Battalion Commander at Culver Academy. On the right, friends visit Berry during his stay at Methodist Hospital.

mother said. Berry suffered severe traumatic brain injury (bleeding and bruising to the brain), a clavicle fracture, bilateral collapsed lungs, femur chip fracture, and cuts to his face and legs. During his hospitalization, he was in Methodist’s Pediatric (Peds) Intensive Care Unit for 10 days. During that time his breathing was supported by a mechanical ventilator, his brain pressures were monitored with a probe in his skull, he had chest tubes to re-inflate his lungs and he was medicated for pain and sedation.

features a&e

Wacky broadway show starring a singing and Private vs. public schools: Which dancing Hitler, The Producers comes to Indianapolis. Read the one is better? The age-old dereview and check out pictures on bate is discussed on pages 12 page 16. and 13.

His external injuries are resolved but recovery from his traumatic brain injury will take about a year to fully heal. After his stay in intensive care, Berry was transferred to the Pediatric Rehab Unit where he stayed for one month. During that time he had to relearn everything: eating, drinking, walking, talking, and manners. His rehab days consisted of two sessions each of physical therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, and school. Many of Berry’s friends visited him during his stay at Methodist. And senior -See Berry on page 6

sports

The boys’ cross country team is ranked No. 8 in the state, and the girls’ No. 11. Read about the the teams’ successes on page 21.


2news

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Amused about hopping around the fieldhouse in a trash bag, junior Angelica Twigg races toward her cheering teammates at the end of the finishline.

In the first event, seniors Michelle Austin, Nicholas Selke, Andre Davis and Robert Dunn get help from freshman Davon Lane as they struggle to overpower the five juniors at the other end of the rope. Cub photos/Sam Mueller

Battle

of the Classes

SamMueller sammuellercub@gmail.com

Keeping his eye on the egg, senior Nicholas Selke moves toward the finish line while balancing the egg on the spoon, helping secure the trophy for the senior class.

During dizzy bat, junior Angelica Twigg spins in 10 circles around the bat before stumbling off to try and beat the other teams to the finish.

Senior Andre Davis moves as quickly as he can to the other side of the gym while trying not to lose his accessories, in a race to shoot free throws.

The seniors took victory over the junior and freshman/sophomore teams and claimed the trophy as theirs in the recent Battle of the Classes Fewer than 20 students arrived in the fieldhouse out of about 70 who had signed up to participate in the Sept. 16 event. Those there expressed discouragement about the lack of enthusiasm. SAC adviser Effie Keys expressed concern. “This is going to be one bad event,” she said. But money and effort had already

been spent organizing the games, so the group continued. The events consisted of a variety of games from physically straining activities like tug-of-war to a simple egg toss. One of the participants in the egg toss, sophomore Keith Bigbee, wound up being unlucky and had egg on his pants before it was all over. “It was crazy, but it was funny,” Bigbee said. Once the events began, students and adults appeared to have a good time even with the lack of participants. The mood changed for the better. “Now I’m having a blast. It was worth it,” Keys said.


news 3

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Senior honored by performing arts center

Senior Amy Kleiman awakes from her slumber in “A Midsummer Night’s Midterm.” Little did she know that her lover, Lysander, had been enchanted by a mischievous fairy.

JoeMount

joemountcub@gmail.com

Senior Ashley Welcher is on a poster promoting the new Palladium performing arts center in Carmel. It also promotes performing arts as a whole, including those here. Welcher, who plays the oboe, was chosen by band directors Matt James and Randy Greenwell to represent LC in the Palladium’s honor program. Posters of Senior Ashley “They want- Welcher promote not only ed someone Carmel’s new Palladium who would but also performing arts as r e p r e s e n t a whole. them very well, and we thought of her,” James said. To increase advertising for the opening of the Palladium on Jan. 29, anonymous sponsors have teamed up with the 360 Role Models Group to honor selected students from all over the state to promote participation in the performing arts. These students attended a two-hour photo shoot over the summer, and their pictures were put on 300 posters, business cards, and life-size Fatheads to be featured in their communities. Students had to have a minimum 3.3 GPA, demonstrate leadership abilities, and be involved in the arts. “She would be a good representative because she’s involved in so many things as a performer,” Greenwell said. In addition to being on the posters, Welcher will receive season tickets to all of the Palladium’s events. “Opening night, I’ll be there,” Welcher said.

Bringing in some country flavor, senior Maddy Jordan plays Dana Jo, an aspiring singer in “Roomers.”Cub photos/Jack Leibovitz

A tense moment plays out with private investigator Gilley, played by senior Argelia Cruz, and the eccentric Sheila, played by freshman Mariella Sellars.

Rookies raise the bar KevinKryah

kevinkryahcub@gmail.com A group of outcasts struggling to survive and stay hopeful. An apartment full of eccentrics and their varied schemes. Four students frantically studying for a test over “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” These situations were the basis for this year’s Rookie Show. The production marked the point when the students ceased being rookies and started to become the future actors of LC. The Rookie Show is an annual production of three shows performed by students who have never been in a theatrical production here. Each show is directed by a Thespian officer, or someone who has worked more than 100 hours in the theater. This year the directors were seniors Amy Kleiman, Joe Mount and Kaitlin Opat. More than 50 novice actors auditioned for the plays. Rehearsals started

on Sept. 3 and met six more times for evident that nearly everyone had done two hours each during the two weeks their best to prepare — they moved before the show was performed. beyond rookie status and became fullDuring these rehearsals, the rookies fledged actors. learned stage skills such as voice projecThere lies one of the greatest motion, blocking and tives for the Rookie emoting. They also Show ­— it helps drahad the important ma teacher Kathleen tasks of memorizing “There is a lot of great Horrigan find canditheir parts. dates for future protalent coming up.” Memorization is ductions. vital in a show, but “I see people in a Kathleen Horrigan it is a difficult skill different light when drama teacher to master, as some of I get to see them the students learned. perform,” Horrigan “It’s really hard to memorize mono- said. “Things I look for are the ability logues, especially with Shakespearean to memorize, characterize, and dedicawording,” sophomore Alex Wickham tion.” said. After this year’s Rookie Show, HorThe directors of the shows were rigan said she is optimistic about the fupleased by how much work the cast put ture. “There is a lot of great talent comin. ing up,” she said. “My cast (was) far ahead of where I Some of these fresh faces will be thought they could possibly (have been) seen again, this time in the upcoming at (that) point,” Kleiman said. Fall Play, “Ring Round the Moon.” By the time the curtains rose, it was The play runs Nov. 11-13.


4news Students look at U.S. founding SamanthaStrong samanthastrongcub@gmail.com In Drew Horvath’s U.S. government law class, every day is Constitution Day. The students pick the document apart, perform debates, and examine each section. Last Friday the class prepared for an upcoming Federalist and Anti-Federalist debate. The students applied the work of America’s founding fathers, such as James Madison, to political situations in America today. Although the students were preparing for upcoming projects, they were also celebrating a significant day in American history. Few students knew that Sept. 17

is the anniversary of the day when 39 of America’s founding fathers signed the Constitution in 1787. It’s known as “Constitution Day and Citizenship Day.” As of 2005, federal law requires all federally funded schools to observe Constitution Day by teaching their student body about the Constitution on that particular day. Schools do not have to follow a certain curriculum as long as they observe the day annually. Rather than celebrate the day as a school, LC breaks up the celebration among the social studies classes. “Pretty much each social studies teacher does something in recognition,” said Bob Hasty, social studies department chairman.

Celebration connects Spanish students CamilleMilton camillemiltoncub@gmail.com Fireworks booming in the sky, clowns entertaining young children, and traditional music blaring from speakers everywhere. These are all memories of senior Mizraim Obed Gonzalez when he experienced the celebration of Mexico’s Independence Day while living in Mexico City 11 years ago. “There were clowns, fireworks, traditional music and food. It was crazy,” he said. Gonzalez was able to share his experiences this year as the AP and Nativespeaking Spanish classes came together to celebrate Mexico’s Independence Day on Sept. 17. The event included traditional food, music, art, sports and a piñata. Mexico’s day of independence was Sept. 16, where 200 years ago the Mexican people revolted against the Spanish government in their country and took back control of their land. The national

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

holiday is celebrated with a military parade and a declaration from the president of Mexico proclaiming independence and remembrance of the night of the country’s victory over the Spanish. “This celebration was especially appropriate because many students have a heritage link to Mexico,” Spanish teacher Jamise Kafoure said. The event gave students like Gonzalez a chance to share history and their experiences. Gonzalez was especially influenced by the traditional music playing at the celebration, and he was able to share this music with both classes during presentations about the culture of Mexico. The cultural influences in Mexico City inspired him to create his own band, Sentinela, and he shared his influences with the other Spanish students. The event allowed the AP Spanish students and Native-speaking Spanish students to be exposed to different cultures. The celebration was a way for both classes to learn more about Mexico’s Independence Day.

Sophomore Marcus Berry digs deep as he performs the second movement, Oblivion, on his bass clarinet. Cub photo/Jack Leibovitz

Season ‘marches’ on DeyaHernandez deyahernandezcub@gmail.com The Spirit of Central Marching Band and Guard will be at both Greenfield and Hamilton Southeastern on Saturday as part of the new competition season. The band has been practicing since summer break. They started in June to prepare for the Fourth of July parade and after that they worked on music for the show. “I think that summer practices went pretty well,” senior John Kroetz said. The schedule consisted of practices starting at 2 p.m. and ending at 9 p.m. with water and lunch breaks. During band camp, which was the first week of August, the practices consisted of music, marching and dance. “We were pretty good at staying on our feet. We pushed a lot of hot, un-

comfortable rehearsals,” Kroetz said. The Spirit of Central Marching Band and Guard hosted their annual Spirit of Central Marching Band Invitational on Sept. 11. Although LC competed in an exhibition category, they were still scored on their performance. “We all love our show and believe in it,” senior and drum major Cal Lennon said. The show is called Evolucíon (Evolution). It consists of all South American music. It has a total of four songs all written by Astor Piazzola. The songs that are being performed are Baroque Samba, Oblivion, Aconcaqua and Liebertango. Their goal this year is to excel and push the band to perform in the highest quality performance. “There’s a lot of seniors this year and a lot of leadership. We’ve been through a lot so I feel like we’ll succeed,” Lennon said.


Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Five are Merit semifinalists we only had one.” The National Merit Scholsarayoungcub@gmail.com arship Corporation (NMSC) Five seniors have been is a non-profit organization. named semifinalists in the 2011 Scholarships are given with its own funds and National Merit by about 450 scholarship business orgaprogram. They These kids really denizations and are Thomas serve it ... they don’t college instituFreije, Alexander Harty, take the easy way out. tions. NMSC’s Cameron RodSuzanne Oakes goal is to honor the nation’s gers, Bryan Rust and Jef- Guidance Counselor s c h o l a s t i c champions and frey Turner. encourage the “I can’t remember the last time we had pursuit of academic excellence. semifinalthis many,” guidance counselor Scholarship Suzanne Oakes said. “Last year ists are chosen based on PSAT

SaraYoung

scores and compare across the board with all high school seniors in the United States. There are about 16,000 semifinalists in the entire country. They represent fewer than one percent of U.S. high school seniors. The semifinalists have an opportunity to compete for 8,400 National Merit scholarships that are worth more than $36 million, available next spring. “These kids deserve it. They’ve read a lot, excel in school, challenge themselves with challenging classes and don’t take the easy way out. That’s why

they’re semi-finalists,” Oakes said, “I’m really excited and surprised. My parents were really proud of me for being a semifinalist,” Freije said, These five seniors are to continue an application process that includes essays as well as their scholastic records in order to qualify for the chance to become National Merit scholarship finalists, earning the Merit Scholar title. Juniors are reminded that the PSAT, to be given here Oct. 13, is the first step toward winning a National Merit scholarship.

New policies include new incentives

ZachGriffin

zachgriffincub@gmail.com The new members of the administration have brought new policies to students ­— with rewards as well as punishments for student behavior. Among the rewards are coins which teachers may give to students for a variety of reasons, basically because students have been spotted doing the right thing. The coins, worth 50 cents each, can be used to purchase specific items, some of which have been donated by the Indianapolis Colts and other organizations. Among the items are not only lanyards and T-shirts but also big-ticket items that include an X-box 360. Incentive items may be purchased only with incentive coins. But the coins may be combined with U.S. currency to purchase almost any item in the bookstore. “I wish I could earn coins,” said bookstore manager Twana Messer. “I want one of those Colts T-shirts.” Messer said she believes the incentive program is great. “Students need to know that the more coins they earn and save, the greater the incentive

item can be.” thing,” said principal Kevin The administration also has Brown. “But if you come to plans to reward students who me and ask to eat off campus have decent GPAs and no ma- lunch, and I see that you have jors with a privilege pass. This been written up for refusing to pass will allow students to have wear your ID, that doesn’t look special privileges designated good for you.” by the administration such as Banas said, “The thing that leaving G4 and M8 classes five I have noticed the most when minutes early. coming to LC was that not only “This will be nice for those was the school asking a lot from students who drive,” dean the students, but the students Ryan Banas were asking said. a lot from the Also, stuschool. I think dents with no I wish I could earn that is a great majors, a high coins. I want one of relationship to GPA and pahave so that those Colts T-shirts. rental consent both sides are Twana Messer really getting may be able to eat lunch Bookstore Manager something out off campus. of LC. That is Banas did what we are not specify a trying to reinspecific GPA for the off-campus force.” lunch perk, but he did empha- One of the most controversize that it would need to be sial policy changes of the new pretty high because of liabil- school year is the repeal of last ity reasons. Off-campus lunch year’s electronic policy. Last would be one of the perks of the year’s policy allowed iPods and privilege card. other music devices to be used Banas is also ironing out a during study halls and lunch plan to have a student privilege periods. Cell phones were not board to help the administra- allowed last year. tion decide on ways to reward But, according to Brown, good student behavior. up to 60 percent of the school “We want to have LC be was abusing the policy last a nice, fun environment for year. That is why he said he those who chose to do the right needed to repeal the policy

when he took over as principal. Brown did add, however, that if the student body continues to progress, the administration would consider implementing a less strict electronics policy in the future. But now, no electronics are allowed at all from 7:30 a.m. to 2:45 p.m. There is also a much stricter punishment for having a cell phone out. Students who have phones on during the school day risk having them confiscated and having to serve a detention before the phone is returned. Those students will also be assessed a point on the new 6-point disciplinary/attendance system. For every violation, there is an assigned point value. If a student accumulates 6 or more points, he may be recommended for expulsion. “This system gives the staff a better picture and the student a better picture of their particular situation,” Brown said. “Students need to see ‘hey, I’m getting close.’” The administration is also enforcing the student ID policy. There are punishments for students who do not wear their IDs on a lanyard. There may also be rewards for students who do wear their IDs faithfully.

news 5 important dates

Sept. 25: Immunization clinic, 9 a.m.- noon, Lawrence North Sept. 25: District marching band competition Sept. 27: School board meeting, 7 p.m., ESC Sept. 29-30: Bowling team try-outs, 3-5 p.m., Woodland Bowl Oct. 6: Graduation cap/gown/an- nouncement info sessions Oct. 8: Powder Puff game, 7 p.m., football field Oct. 9: SAT, 8 a.m., Student Life Center Oct. 12: Fall concert, 7 p.m., audi- torium Oct. 13: Senior breakfast, 7:30 a.m., Studio Theatre Oct. 13: PSAT, 7:30-10:45 a.m., LC Oct. 13: Early release, 2 p.m. Oct. 13: Fall concert, 7 p.m., audi- torium Oct. 13-14: Yearbook photo retakes Oct. 14: Cap and gown orders due Oct. 16: Regional marching band competition Oct. 21-22: Fall break; no school Oct. 23: ACT, 8 a.m. Oct. 23: Semi-state marching band competition

parent info College visits grow

In the past, college representatives were able to meet with students in the Commons during the lunch block. Now they also may visit with small groups of students in a designated classroom during non-lunch blocks. The schedule for college visits here is posted in the Guidance Center. Students who wish to speak with representatives during lunchtime may do so without signing up in advance. For other blocks, students are to sign up with assistant Laura Schroeder in the Guidance Center no later than the day before the visit. A pass will be sent to the student’s class; the student may be dismissed from class at the teacher’s discretion.

Cub of the Issue After each issue of the Cub Reporter has gone to press, the editors honor the staff member who went above and beyond expectations. This issue’s Cub of the Issue is Alex Kryah.


6news

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Township cracks down on school immunization laws

MeredithVarie

meredithvariecub@gmail.com Recent outbreaks of whooping cough and chicken pox throughout the state of Indiana, along with a new law focused on immunizations, are forc‑ ing school districts to react. Lawrence Township is no exception. Four confirmed cases of whooping cough have been reported in Lawrence ‑ at Amy Beverland, Forest Glen and Mary Castle elementary schools. No cases of chicken pox have been confirmed. A new Indiana state law requires additional immunizations for students, but many have not complied. “Approximately 46 percent of Law‑ rence Township students have not yet proved they are up-to-date on their im‑

munizations,” said Joanie Emhardt, dis‑ trict coordinator of health and nursing services. Because of the outbreaks of pertussis (whooping cough) and varicella (chick‑ en pox), being up-to-date on immuniza‑ tions has become even more important. “Statewide, there have been 222 re‑ ported cases of chicken pox and 368 re‑ ported cases of whooping cough since January 2010,” said state health commis‑ sioner Dr. Gregory N. Larkin. There were 392 cases of whooping cough in all of 2009. “The best way to prevent whooping cough and chicken pox is to be vaccinat‑ ed,” Larkin said. Indiana code requires school age children to receive immunization against meningitis, chicken pox and whooping cough, and to furnish proof

Get Vaccinated Now When: Sept. 25 9 a.m to noon Where: Lawrence North High School Cost: Free to their schools. “We will ask that families provide an up-to-date immunization record or a written statement from the student’s health care provider expressing the reason the student is behind sched‑ ule,” Emhardt said. The Marion County Health De‑ partment is offering a free vaccination clinic at Lawrence North High School 9 a.m. to noon on Saturday.

Injured senior welcomed back with open arms Continued from page 1 Kaitlyn Opat came up with the idea to make T-shirts for when Berry would come back to school. “I thought it would be a really cool way to show him how much support he has and that lots of people were glad he was back and doing so well,” she said. Berry was able to return home, for the first time since June 26, on Sept. 3. He returned to school Sept. 7. “The only things that kept me sane while I was in the hospital were my cell phone, laptop and the two TVs,” he said. Berry continues to progress with daily improvement in walking, talking, eating and manners. He has a tendency to be impulsive, frustrated and bored, especially when he is tired. He will need to re-learn math, and he takes more time with all activities at school. For awhile he will need assistance navigating between classes, which necessitates his friends’ help. He is also not allowed to drive until he is cleared by his physicians and the written and driving test again. Most importantly, he has to make sure that he never hits is head again. “All I have to say is that I’m so, so glad that he is doing well,” Sbarabaro said. Berry’s family formed a website for updates on his accident. It was a way for family members and friends to know what was going on. The website contains blogs in which people can write messages to Jackson and pictures of when he was in the hospital and at Culver. The website is www.caringbridge. com/visit/jacksonberry.


opinions7

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Cub Reporter Staff 2010-2011 Print Editor Alli King Online Editor Greg Price Broadcast Producers Deya Hernandez Brad Oppenhein News Editor Samantha Strong Opinions Editor Kayla Taylor Features Editor Katie McDowell Arts & Entertainment Editors Kevin Kryah Joe Mount Sports Editors Alex Kryah Hailey Newkirk Webmaster Tony Wheeler Photographers Jack Leibovitz Sam Mueller Reporters Nata Amores Reed Dillon David Dunn Brooke Fernandez Zach Griffin Sarah Heiny Torre Kennedy Melissa Macneur Camille Milton Nick Petr Kayla Taylor Meridith Varie Sara Young Advisers Elizabeth Granger Samantha Zilai Lawrence Central High School 7300 E. 56th St. Indianapolis, IN 46226 (317) 964-7400 The Cub Reporter is published 11 times a year by the students on the newspaper staff. Letters to the editor are welcome, but limited to 200 words. The author’s name will be printed with the letter. Letters should not contain obscene or libelous language.

Staff policy 2010-2011

The mission of the staff of the Lawrence Central High School student newspaper, the Cub Reporter, includes the following: informing readers in an unbiased fashion of the happenings and issues in the school community; providing an opportunity for each student to have a voice; educating readers using responsibility, accuracy, sincerity and integrity; and encouraging positive change. The Cub Reporter serves as a public forum through which its readers can express concern and gain insight into local, national and international issues as they relate to the Lawrence Central community. It provides coverage of Lawrence Central and its community, including events, situations and school policies. The Cub Reporter is governed by the same basic rights and responsibilities as the professional press. High school journalists have the right guaranteed in the First Amendment to free expression as interpreted by rulings such as Hazelwood and Tinker. The Cub Reporter staff realizes this freedom comes with responsibility. Published items must not contain libel or obscenity, invade the privacy of individuals, ignore good taste or violate laws pertaining to its publication. With the right to freedom of expression comes an obligation to the highest standards of the journalistic profession. These include responsibility, accuracy,

sincerity, integrity, impartiality, quality, we recognize that they are fair play, balance, decency and tact. engaged in an educational venture Good taste should be exercised in and as such, room for trial and all content. error must be allowed. The publication shall be free The three venues of the of profanity, vulgarity and words Cub Reporter — print, online which have acquired undesirable and broadcast — are headed by meanings, as judged by generally individual editors in chief who accepted standards of the commu- makes decisions about the content, nity; shall contain no statements after taking into consideration other derisive to any staff members’ suggestions. All race, religion or national origin; The Cub Reporter is issues will be shall show no governed by the same basic discussed with disrespect for the adviser. law enforce- rights and responsibilities as T h e ment or the the professional press. Cub Reporter generally acaccepts and cepted ethics of encourages the community; public input shall not advothrough the cate illegal acts of any kind. form of letters to the editor. The To maintain integrity, it shall letters should voice opinions or not become involved in, or take concerns to the Cub Reporter’s sides with, rivalries or jealousies audience. Letters including libelous within the school community. or obscene materials will not be It shall provide equal printed. opportunity for both sides of an Like all materials printed in issue to present its case. the publication, letters reflecting No person or organization is to criticism should criticize issues, be permitted to use the publication not individuals. No letter will to his own ends, be that an editor, be printed without positive staff member, adviser, teacher, identification. administrator or someone outside The editors in chief reserve the school. the right to edit the comments for It is understood that the Cub grammatical errors and for length Reporter is designed primarily if they exceed the allotted 200-word to serve as a training ground for space as long as it does not alter the students interested in learning the meaning of the comments. Letters techniques of sound journalism. It must be signed and will be printed is a class for which students earn with the author’s name. credit. All requests for anonymity While staff members are will be denied.The Cub Reporter expected to strive for professional may consider guest columns or

articles. However, it reserves the right to deny printing any article. The Cub Reporter receives a portion of its funding through the student activity fee, which each student pays at the beginning of each semester. Other funds are generated through the sale of ads. The Cub Reporter may accept ads from any source, except those which promote an idea contrary to Lawrence Central’s discipline code or community standards. Ads which may provoke controversy will be discussed by the editors in chief, adviser and business manager. If a student’s name or picture is used as an endorsement in an advertisement, a release form must be signed by both the student and his legal guardian before publication of the endorsement. Paid political advertisements will be accepted with the name of the payee clearly indicated in the advertisements. Additional funds are generated by staff fundraisers, which follow administration guidelines. An error in any edition will elicit a statement of correction or clarification in the following edition if deemed appropriate or feasible according to space limitations and other factors. The Cub Reporter is a member of the Indiana High School Press Association (IHSPA), the National Scholastic Press Association (NSPA), the Columbia Scholastic Press Association (CSPA) and Quill & Scroll.

drive to school or be diagnosed with senioritis, we do know the layout of LC pretty well and which lunch line is the fastest. We also can finally look down upon the “fresh meat” and marvel at the fact that, well, that’s no longer us. But if we aren’t “fresh meat,” or the leaders of the school, then what are we? Are we categorized as underclassmen, which would be entirely unacceptable not to mention a little insulting, or are we upperclassmen, just a little lacking in the privileges? Sophomore year is this awkward point in high school

when we just don’t know. We don’t know if we should cower down when in the presence of seniors, or if we should stick our noses up when among freshmen; I honestly prefer the latter. But, really, this is a serious issue that needs to be addressed; who knows how this affects our academic performance, not to mention our social growth. We sophomores need some guidance; we need to know, if we aren’t underclassmen, or upperclassmen, then what are we? Middleclassmen? I’d rather not.

Class of 2013: Identity Crisis On the run

By Samantha Strong

The Class of 2013 has a problem. Yes, all 704 of us are in the midst of a troubling situation – a crisis if you will: an identity crisis. While many may argue that they know fully well who they are, pointing out the fact that as they walked

through those Hall of Fame doors on that muggy August morning they even had their student IDs to prove it. They knew their name, their schedule, hopefully the general vicinity of where their classes were, and, of course, that it was a gray day. And yes, I know that we are supposedly “searching for who we really are” at this age but there is one thing that no sophomore really knows regarding their identity. Are we upperclassmen or underclassmen? While sophomores don’t enjoy the perks of being able to


8opinions

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

THE

Is the 6-point system fair or flawed? ZachGriffin zachgriffincub@gmail.com We are teenagers. It is in our nature to resist new authority and break rules. So naturally, when a new principal comes in and changes all of the rules and makes the policies stricter, we aren’t going to want to listen. But how bad, really, are these new rules? Are we as people really that fashion-obsessed that a 2-by-3-inch card and a lanyard are going to cramp our style? It’s not like it makes us look alien. In fact, most jobs in this country require an ID be worn. Whether you are a doctor or a Wal-Mart sales representative, you need to wear an ID badge, so why can’t we do it here at LC? It is a proven safety measure. So just wear it. It won’t kill you. The no iPod rule really stinks, I’ll give you that, but then again people shouldn’t be using them in the middle of class when the teacher is talking. Plus, people have them turned up so loud that every single person in the class can hear them. I really don’t want to listen to Dr. Dre during pre-calc.

Cell phones were outlawed before this new administration. That rule was broken then and will continue to be broken as it has been in the past. A detention isn’t going to stop people from texting. It may frustrate a few people, but it won’t stop them. At least not initially. I am a huge believer in the 6-point system. It will keep the hooligans out of the building and it will let students and teachers know where students are as far as discipline goes. It does have its flaws (like the 3-point penalty for playing cards), but it is a step in the right direction.

MelissaMacneur melissamacneurcub@gmail.com The infamous 6-point system is here. What once was 25 points in previous years is now just 6, making it easier for LC’s students to be get a disciplinary record. Although the system intends to weed out the bad from the good, it might very well be proving us all wrong. Looking at the point system, it’s obvious that it’s lacking in aspects. Point values are not

equally distributed. Playing cards, otherwise known as “gambling,” is an automatic 3 points. It makes no difference whether it’s Kemps, Solitaire or Spoons. A student caught cutting class on a first offense receives half a point. A student caught cutting on the second offense receives half a point. If students leave for lunch off grounds on both the first and second offenses a whole point will be earned. There are no classes being conducted during a lunch block. Therefore there is nothing for a student to miss. When students cut class they are losing important opportunities for lessons, tests, and homework assignments. Why is it, then, that a student receives more points leaving grounds for lunch than cutting an actual academic class? In this case, cutting class might just be twice as nice. In all seriousness, if the administration thinks the new point system will remove all troublemakers, they may be surprised when straight “A” students are expelled for playing Go Fish and using a cell phone.

THE BURNING QUESTION: Do you support the revised system? “I don’t. Just because my phone gets taken away doesn’t mean I should get expelled.”

“It’s stupid. The priorities are wrong. Why is cutting class less points than getting your phone taken away? At least I’m actually there.”

“It’s fair because it gives students chances to do the right thing, and if they don’t then they start getting disciplined.”

Alieah McCrackin, 10

Erica Carlson, 12

Sean Gassen, 11


S

opinions 9

Cub Reporter

September 24, 2010

peak Your Mind: Bear 6-Point System

it all

“I’m a terrible person and I think it’s funny.” -Beatrice Rowlands, 11 “Get off my lawn!” -Katherine Powell, 10 “Brocolli make me frown.” -Trinity Brown, 9 “A double rainbow!” -Sofia Dollinger, 12

Paige Weisel

freshman

Hailey Link

sophomore

Nick Baird

junior

Aren Anderson

senior

Do you think the new point system will benefit the school?

Yes, because most people, when they get in trouble and there’s no point system, they keep getting in trouble.

I don’t really care about the point system because I don’t get in trouble.

I think in the long run the point system could benefit the school.

In a way, yes.

Do you think certain offenses should be worth more or fewer points than they are now? Yes, cutting class should be worth more points than having your cell phone. If you have your phone, you still went to class.

Yes, it is ridiculous that you can cut and only get half a point, but if you have your phone it’s a full point. It’s stupid.

Yeah, I do think some things should be worth more or less points. I don’t understand why gambling is worth more points or taken more seriously than fighting or having a weapon.

Yeah, it’s stupid that skipping class is half a point and being caught with your phone is one.

Are 6 points too drastic of a change compared to the 25 points students were allowed in previous years? Yes.

If I did care, I think 6 points is fine. I don’t think it’s too much or too little. It’s a good number.

Six points is too drastic of a change, but it would be nice to get rid of the hoodlums/troublemakers.

I didn’t even know we had a system in previous years.

How many points do you think a student should reach before expulsion? Zero.

Six points is a good number of points before expulsion.

10-12 points.

Probably 10.

“Insanity is fun.” -Steven Gasaway, 11 “My body is tired from all the space travel I do in my lucid dreams.” -Adam Turner, 10 “Sweets are gonna rock this year!” -Christine Gorell,12 “You never know what you got, till it’s gone.” -Lauren Sebring, 10 “Music is the ultimate expression of feelings.” -Kris Coleman, 12 “I love Cherry Coke, it’s delicious.” -Wyatt Lich, 9 “Doritos don’t give you first degree burn.” -Jesus Bazan, 9 “I can’t wait for fall! Scarves and sweaters are the best.” -Lane Creech, 11 “Grenade free foundation!” -Alston Gholor, 9


Cub Reporter

The

September 24, 2010

sharpest

features 10

in the shed tool it conveniently fits in your pocket allowing you to bring it anywhere. That way you can always have a number of tools at hand without adding any DavidDunn extra weight. daviddunncub@gmail.com “I have a dictionary (app) and it’s a lot easier to carry Earlier this year the around,” sophomore Dean invention of the stethoscope Gardener said. “It’s a lot more app for the iPhone caught the accessible, too, because you can attention of doctors, nurses always have it with you.” and physicians from around the globe. Now with more than In some cases the iPhone app is easier to use than the 500 people downloading this actual item it replicates. For app a day, it appears that this instance, the stethoscope app invention might replace the actually displays the patient’s actual stethoscope. There are heart rate. This is preferable to also a number of other iPhone the original stethoscope which apps that have the potential to only amplifies replace many the sound of of the tools we the heart beat. use every day. ...The real calendar is “The Many just a bulky booklet of calendar items have (app]) is more already been bound paper. efficient and replicated by Ryan Gandy organized,” even some of the less recent Senior senior Ryan Gandy said. cell phones. “You can have Clocks, it at the push calendars, of a button whereas the real calculators, cameras, calendar is just a bulky booklet stopwatches, timers: All are of bound paper.” included on standard cell Compared to its material phones. Then there’s the iPhone which can function as a counterparts, the apps available in the Apple store are tuner, metronome, dictionary, also very cheap. The average thesaurus, tape measure, level cost of an iPhone app is about bar, stethoscope, flashlight, $1.99 as opposed to the cost and even speedometer. As of a dictionary which is about impressive as this is, why would someone go through the $11.99. “The metronome (app) was trouble of buying these apps if they already own products that like 99 cents instead of $10,” Gardener said. do the same thing? The most appealing feature But just as every rose has its thorn, the apps for about the iPhone is that it the iPhone have multiple offers so many functions yet

iPhone apps could potentially replace tools in use today

Cub graphic/ David Dunn

New Tool Apps

Bar Code Scanner 99 cents Alarm Clock Pro 99 cents iHandy Flashlight 99 cents Ruler 2 99 cents limitations. “You have to have internet connection and be in certain places for some apps to work,” Gardener said. For the apps that don’t require internet access, the biggest problem is accuracy. The tape measure function is a good example of why most tools haven’t yet been replaced. Instead of actually displaying the measure markings, this app calculates an approximation that’s usually 2 percent off the mark. With its accelerometer, it finds the speed it was moved at as well as the time span for which it was moved. However, its accelerometer tends to have trouble if the speed is inconsistent allowing room for inaccuracy. There are a few other apps like this that have a high level of uncertainty. Given the pace of technology, it’s only a matter of time before such errors are corrected and more tool-like apps are created, increasing the possibility of replacing the actual products they replicate.


features11

Off & Running

Cub Reporter

September 24, 2010

Runners discuss the pros and cons of running marathons barefoot

field podiatrist Dr. Brian Elliott said he believes it depends on the runner. Some runners need the extra stability and support of basic running shoes while others are strong enough to withstand the repeated pounding with the miniSamanthaStrong mal support of Vibram FiveFingers or samanthastrongcub@gmail.com no support with bare feet. “I would not encourage Vibrams or SaraHeiny barefoot running for the casual runsaraheinycub@gmail.com ner, but for a competitive runner, when used correctly, these running styles can show great improvement in balance Every time freshman Mikayla and strength,” Dr. Elliott said. Burrell sees her dad head out for a run Dr. Elliott also said Vibrams help barefoot, she can’t help but laugh at the muscles in the feet and alleviate him. pressure. He said he believes that many “I make fun of him every time he runners transition to barefoot running walks out the door with no shoes on. I too quickly, which is think it’s ridicuwhere he sees most lous,” Mikayla injuries. However, said. Going completely barefoot the majority of these Mikayla’s dad, Alan Burrell, a feels wonderful with all the injuries are not severe. Runscience teacher nerve endings in your feet. ning with at Belzer Middle School, has been Alan Burrell Vibrams generrunning for more Science Teacher ally than 10 years. leads to Mr. Burrell’s first blisters barefoot race was while running barefoot is the Indiana University Mini-Marathon known to cause minor on March 5, 2010. sprains and strains. “Going completely barefoot feels wonderful with all the nerve endings in Between running barefoot, using your feet,” Mr. Burrell said. Vibrams He ran two half-marathons, 13.1 and wearmiles each, barefoot. ing run Vibram FiveFingers mimic running ning barefoot while providing protection from the dangers of the road, such as rough gravel or broken glass. Vibram FiveFingers are available worldwide and cost between $75 and $200. The shoe is growing in popularity even here. Freshman Will Gordon said he wears his Vibrams on easy runs. “I like my Vibrams; I get more out of my stride, it’s more fun, and you can feel the terrain,” he said. Gordon said that he would not consider running barefoot because of the dangers of the debris on the ground. While running barefoot may seem like the natural thing to do, Green-

shoes Dr. Elliott has seen the most injuries with barefoot runners. Not all runners see the benefit of running barefoot. Robert Meier, a social studies teacher here, has run 20 marathons, all with running shoes. He said he believes running barefoot is extremely unsafe. “If you’re running on concrete or blacktop, you are going to end up tearing up your feet one way or another,” he said. Meier said he thinks running with Vibrams is a good way to avoid these dangers, but he prefers running shoes himself. The discov-

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ery of Vibram FiveFingers has put a new outlook on competitive running. Many runners are making the switch from constrictive laces to feeling the freedom between their toes. Some runners turn to the book Born to Run, by Christopher McDougall, for advice on making this transition. Although the change can provide many benefits, runners still need to take it slow. Mr. Burrell advises to take it in small steps. “I started with Vibram FiveFingers and walked around for an hour or two, then ran them for a mile, and then two miles,” Mr. Burrell said. He plans to continue running barefoot for the rest of his life, despite his daughter’s taunting. “I don’t think he’ll ever wear shoes,” Mikayla said. “He doesn’t listen to me.”


12

features

The

price is right? mick has three children who all attend St. Pius X Catholic School. Not only can students have many classes to choose from in both Lawrence Township high schools, but they also have the opportunity to exKatieMcDowell perience McKenzie Career Center which offers medical, culinary, engineering and katiemcdowellcub@gmail.com other types of career interest courses. It’s the private schools that have the As a freshman, senior Eva Flick atupper-hand in student-to-teacher ratio, tended Cathedral High School but she though. Lawrence Township has about has completed her last three high school 16 students for every teacher whereas years here. Park Tudor, a local private school, boasts Tuition to attend Cathedral for the a nine-to-one ratio. But Flick has found 2010-2011 school year is around $10,800. that this has not Tuition to attend LC: zero. affected her ability Public or private schools? That is the ques- As a Christian I appreciate to learn. “The teachers tion. The age-old argubeing able to take a are just as inment over which type Christian view on things. volved and really of education is right for to help you students comes down to Elliott Baker want learn,” she said. a number of characterSenior Oftentimes, istics such as class size, it isn’t just the diversity, price, test scores educational aspect and opportunities. Many that attracts students and families to students and staff here have had the opprivate schools. “As a Christian I appreciportunity to experience both sides and ate being able to take a Christian view on feel that both types of schools have their things,” senior Elliott Baker said. advantages and disadvantages. Baker spent his first three years of “Academically, I believe that public high school at Heritage Christian School. schools offer students greater opportuniReligion was also a factor for the McCorties to learn a wider range of subject conmick family. “By sending my children to tent than at a private school,” business Catholic grade school, I am fulfilling my teacher John McCormick said. McCor-

Teachers and students explore the differences of private and public schools

responsibility to my children, my family “Significantly more cultures and culand my church,” said McCormick. tural norms are presented to the public The religious influences in some school student than to a private school private schools also help impact betstudent,” McCormick said. ter behavior in the school. McCormick Lawrence Township has a diverse believes that in public schools there are population with 59 percent of its students more discipline issues due to diversity. of ethnic background and this number is Despite this, almost everyone believes growing. Local Brebeuf Jesuit has only that diversity is 18 percent non-Caucasian a good thing. students. The public schools teacher Academically, diversity “I think (a lot of diversity) must be more creative in causes teachers to have a is a positive different type of teaching for students. It lesson delivery. style. gives people a “The public school John McCormick teacher must be more crechance to expeBusiness Teacher ative in lesson delivery,” rience the views of others,” McCormick said. Baker said. Flick has also found that The lack of funding in private teachers in public schools teach differschools doesn’t allow the wide selection ently then those in private schools. “From of groups and clubs. In general, private my experience, teachers in the public school funding comes solely from tuition school setting often are older, have more and if it is affiliated with a church, then experience in their field and are overall the parish as well. Government fundmore knowledgeable,” she said. ing in public schools allows for variety As it stands now, McCormick will of opportunities in schools because the be sending his sons to LC due to the students do not have to pay. strength of the educators here. Many clubs and groups for students “The biggest determining factor in to join here may not be available at priour decision was the quality and profesvate schools like Club L.I.G.H.T., a club sionalism of our faculty,” he said. “The supporting all types of sexual orientamen and women that will be educating tions, or the Latinos Club for students of my boys are high quality people and topLatin ethnicity. notch educators.”

“The men and women that will be educating my boys are high quality people and top-notch educators.” -John McCormick, buiness teacher

Cub graphic/ Katie McDowell

September 24, 2010 Cub Reporter 120

13

Percent of Grade 10 Passing ISTEP Math

100 100 80 80 60 60

S

40 40 20 20 00

Lawrence Lawrence Central Central Private

Carmel Carmel

Heritage Heritage Christian Christian

ParkPark Tudor Tudor

Public

Sizing Up Tuition Park Tudor

$16,980

Indiana University

$9,028*

Heritage Christian

$9,130

Purdue University

$9,070*

Brebeuf Jesuit

$12,950

Ball State University $7,508*

Bishop Chatard

$7,875

Lawrence Central

Cathedral

$10,806

$0

*Price for an Indiana resident.

Information collected from official school websites

Diversity in Our Township

1.5% 11%

White Black Hispanic Multiracial Asian

41%


12

features

The

price is right? mick has three children who all attend St. Pius X Catholic School. Not only can students have many classes to choose from in both Lawrence Township high schools, but they also have the opportunity to exKatieMcDowell perience McKenzie Career Center which offers medical, culinary, engineering and katiemcdowellcub@gmail.com other types of career interest courses. It’s the private schools that have the As a freshman, senior Eva Flick atupper-hand in student-to-teacher ratio, tended Cathedral High School but she though. Lawrence Township has about has completed her last three high school 16 students for every teacher whereas years here. Park Tudor, a local private school, boasts Tuition to attend Cathedral for the a nine-to-one ratio. But Flick has found 2010-2011 school year is around $10,800. that this has not Tuition to attend LC: zero. affected her ability Public or private schools? That is the ques- As a Christian I appreciate to learn. “The teachers tion. The age-old argubeing able to take a are just as inment over which type Christian view on things. volved and really of education is right for to help you students comes down to Elliott Baker want learn,” she said. a number of characterSenior Oftentimes, istics such as class size, it isn’t just the diversity, price, test scores educational aspect and opportunities. Many that attracts students and families to students and staff here have had the opprivate schools. “As a Christian I appreciportunity to experience both sides and ate being able to take a Christian view on feel that both types of schools have their things,” senior Elliott Baker said. advantages and disadvantages. Baker spent his first three years of “Academically, I believe that public high school at Heritage Christian School. schools offer students greater opportuniReligion was also a factor for the McCorties to learn a wider range of subject conmick family. “By sending my children to tent than at a private school,” business Catholic grade school, I am fulfilling my teacher John McCormick said. McCor-

Teachers and students explore the differences of private and public schools

responsibility to my children, my family “Significantly more cultures and culand my church,” said McCormick. tural norms are presented to the public The religious influences in some school student than to a private school private schools also help impact betstudent,” McCormick said. ter behavior in the school. McCormick Lawrence Township has a diverse believes that in public schools there are population with 59 percent of its students more discipline issues due to diversity. of ethnic background and this number is Despite this, almost everyone believes growing. Local Brebeuf Jesuit has only that diversity is 18 percent non-Caucasian a good thing. students. The public schools teacher Academically, diversity “I think (a lot of diversity) must be more creative in causes teachers to have a is a positive different type of teaching for students. It lesson delivery. style. gives people a “The public school John McCormick teacher must be more crechance to expeBusiness Teacher ative in lesson delivery,” rience the views of others,” McCormick said. Baker said. Flick has also found that The lack of funding in private teachers in public schools teach differschools doesn’t allow the wide selection ently then those in private schools. “From of groups and clubs. In general, private my experience, teachers in the public school funding comes solely from tuition school setting often are older, have more and if it is affiliated with a church, then experience in their field and are overall the parish as well. Government fundmore knowledgeable,” she said. ing in public schools allows for variety As it stands now, McCormick will of opportunities in schools because the be sending his sons to LC due to the students do not have to pay. strength of the educators here. Many clubs and groups for students “The biggest determining factor in to join here may not be available at priour decision was the quality and profesvate schools like Club L.I.G.H.T., a club sionalism of our faculty,” he said. “The supporting all types of sexual orientamen and women that will be educating tions, or the Latinos Club for students of my boys are high quality people and topLatin ethnicity. notch educators.”

“The men and women that will be educating my boys are high quality people and top-notch educators.” -John McCormick, buiness teacher

Cub graphic/ Katie McDowell

September 24, 2010 Cub Reporter 120

13

Percent of Grade 10 Passing ISTEP Math

100 100 80 80 60 60

S

40 40 20 20 00

Lawrence Lawrence Central Central Private

Carmel Carmel

Heritage Heritage Christian Christian

ParkPark Tudor Tudor

Public

Sizing Up Tuition Park Tudor

$16,980

Indiana University

$9,028*

Heritage Christian

$9,130

Purdue University

$9,070*

Brebeuf Jesuit

$12,950

Ball State University $7,508*

Bishop Chatard

$7,875

Lawrence Central

Cathedral

$10,806

$0

*Price for an Indiana resident.

Information collected from official school websites

Diversity in Our Township

1.5% 11%

White Black Hispanic Multiracial Asian

41%


14 features

Sleep tight

Students find difficulty getting suggested amount of sleep TorreKennedy torrekennedy@gmail.com

Junior Brenna Wilson was wide awake. She was in her third block class, watching the teacher’s Power Point, taking notes and beginning her homework. She hadn’t been like that in her first block class. There she struggled to keep her eyes open and her focus on the class work. It was just too early in the morning for her to function. Wilson said she typically gets just four or five hours of

Cub photo/ Sam Mueller

sleep on a school night. “Sleeping less does not bother me much; I think my body might have become accustomed to little resting,” she said. “I believe that a lot of teenagers do not receive the proper amount of sleep, but I also do not see too much wrong with it,” she added. Statistics do not agree with her assessment. They point to teens’ need to get eight or nine hours of sleep each night. The reality is that few teens do, so Wilson is not alone in the

fight to stay awake during the school day. Sophomore Michael Riddle also has a problem staying awake. Riddle said he doesn’t have a real issue with sleeping in class in the morning; however, toward the end of the day he starts to get a little

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010 drowsy. some rest. First block and third He said he normally gets block, government and inteabout four hours of sleep on a grated chemistry and physics, school night because he wakes are the two classes that Taylor up to answer seems to fall text messages. asleep in Freshthe most. “I I believe that a lot man Trysten don’t seem of teenagers do not Fugate’s alarm to get into goes off at 5:45 receive the proper too much a.m., but he trouble with amount of sleep... has discovfalling asleep Brenna Wilson in class but I ered a way to stay awake in cut down Junior can the morning. on it,” she “Eat breaksaid. fast,” he said, With two “and the tiredness seems to go jobs right after school and a away.” puppy, things are difficult. If Playing sports and coming she quits a job, it means less home to do homework is one money coming in. reason. Fugate said he nor“On days I do not work mally gets about eight hours of I am stuck studying,” Taylor sleep on a school night. said. Senior Sharde Taylor in She usually gets off work contrast sleeps only eight to at 10:30 p.m. and then goes nine hours between two days. home to her puppy. In the morning she hits the “Sometimes I feel like an snooze button so it will leave old woman,” she said. “I feel her 30 more minutes to get like I am 30 years old.”


features15

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Better Many believe starting school later would benefit students in the classroom

BrookeFernandez brookefernandezcub@gmail.com

Earth space science teacher Amanda Cole looked out over her class and saw several heads that were down. Again. She said there’s a growing trend of her students being sleep deprived. “Seven out of 30 students in my first block Earth Space science class sleep,” Cole said. Those sleepy students are a big reason why Cole would like to start school later. “They’re good kids, but they’re just too tired,” she said.

late than

never

Media specialist Nocha Flick agreed. She said she likes the idea of starting high school later in the morning because teenagers’ biological make-up is different than that of elementary age students. “We are not meeting students where they are at their best,” Flick said. “Research indicates that learning happens later in the day for teenagers.” According to the National Sleep Foundation, students in grades 6-12 are not getting enough sleep, and that lack of sleep gets worse as they get older. The NSF also said that teenagers need from eight-anda-half hours to nine-and-a-half hours of sleep every night. Principal Kevin Brown also agreed that starting school later could be beneficial because students would get more rest.

Cub art/ Aaron Vaughn

Neurologist Adam Frisch, a sleep medicine specialist at St.Vincent’s, said that a teenager should get at least eight hours of sleep a night but may require as much as 10 hours of sleep a night. Fisch also said teenagers should stay away from any large meals, especially carbohydrates, before going to sleep because they can cause hunger overnight. Students’ opinions about the school starting time differ depending on what they do after school ends. “The time school starts should stay the same because we would get out really late and then your day is gone,” senior Brittney Barfield said. However, sophomore Stewart Hvidston said he would like school to start at 8:30 a.m. instead of 7:30. “People normally don’t do well in school because they’re tried and can’t concentrate,” he said.


16a&e

A Crossdressing HITLER?

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Roger De Bris gives Hitler a new personality when he takes the stage.

The crowned Roger De Bris (Trevor Fanning) flirts shamelessly with Leo Bloom (Jason Gloye) when Bloom arrives at his apartment.

‘The Producers’ offensively funny JoeMount

joemountcub@gmail.com Trevor Fanning’s short synopsis of his lead character: “I play Roger De Bris. He’s considered to be the worst director…He’s gayer than a two-dollar bill.” Fanning’s highly “colorful” joke is a perfect reflection of the show he’s in: “The Producers.” The entire show is a tongue-in-cheek guilty pleasure with humor bordering on the offensive, and characters mocking the stereotypes they play. No race, culture, or sexuality is safe in “The Producers.” You can’t help but laugh with this show. Think “Robin Hood: Men in Tights” meets “South Park.” Fanning is definitely a show stealer in his outstanding performance as the very gay Roger De Bris. Performing such

songs as “Keep it Gay” and “Springtime for Hitler,” he keeps the audience rolling in their seats. “It’s (all) very offensive, but in a good-humored sort of way,” said Fanning. The plot: Max Bialystock teams up with Leo Bloom to put together the worst Broadway flop in history after Bloom discovers they can make more money with a flop than with a hit. They find the worst script, a praise to Adolf Hitler written by the Neo-Nazi Franz Liebkind, hire the worst cast they can find, and recruit Roger De Bris to direct. But DeBris has some ideas of his own when he rewrites the script after having a “stoke...of genius!” with Hitler winning the war and an entire chorus number, complete with a Nazi-themed fashion show and tap dancing storm troopers. But when the lead breaks his leg

Info to Know: Footlite: 1847 N. Alabama St. Box Office: (317) 926-6630 Ticket Prices: Adults $17 Students $15 Seniors $15 Sept. 24-25: 8 p.m. Sept. 26: 2:30 p.m. Oct. 1-2: 8 p.m. Oct. 3: 8 p.m. moments before the curtains rise, De Bris decides to go on as Hitler. Adolf has a never-before-seen side to him: going from an iron-fisted dictator to a fabulous Fuhrer in the time it takes to say “break a leg.��� Instead of being the flop it was supposed to be, De Bris’ performance makes critics believe the show is the best satire of the decade. After spending some time in jail, the duo produces

Ulla (Jessica Biernacki) “dances” during her “audition” with Leo Bloom (Jason Gloye) and Max Bialystock (Kevin D. Smith). Courtesy photos/Zach Rosing

musical hits with the inmates and eventually gets a pardon from the governor which allows them to return to Broadway. The show is made for mature audiences. Covering everything from Nazis to nymphos, “The Producers” is a must-see for anyone who enjoys the highly offensive, incredibly inappropriate and outrageously hilarious.


a&e17

Cub Reporter

♫ Pump up the Volume ♫

September 24, 2010

Artist: M.I.A. Album: Maya Genre: Electronica/Dance

M.I.A. is a British artist who has been creating provocative music since 2005. M.I.A.’s third album Maya creates its own niche in the music industry with a mixture of original sounds and meaningful lyrics. In Maya, M.I.A. (Maya Arulpragasam) criticizes the political world with lines like, “Obama needs to love

Similar Artists: MGMT, Gorilliaz, Santigold, Escala

Artisit: The Pretty Reckless Album: Light Me Up Genre: Rock

Fronting the band as the leather clad, crucifix wearing, tough rocker chic singer, Taylor Momsen proves she’s far more than the portrayal of a privileged Upper East Side starlet. Although Momsen has been criticized for her risqué image and controversial interviews, her band delivers. Momsen’s newest album, Light Me

Similar Artists: Flyleaf, Paramore, Pink, Vertigo

Artist: Eminem Album: Recovery Genre: Rap

Eminem released his seventh album this summer called Recovery. This expressive album was definitely not lacking controversy. Recovery serves as a sequel to the album Relapse. This album is more emotional than Relapse, having the listeners get better connected to Eminem. Audiences will feel as if they have entered Eminem’s old life, filled with abuse and

Similar Artists: B.o.B, T.I., Drake, Asher Roth

up Chen... throwing bombs down to Mecca,” from “Lovealot,” all while maintaining her techno punk sound. This album features a wide variety of topics, from love and technology to genocide. Not only does Arulpragasam supply futuristic funky music, but she also wants the listener to be aware of tragedies in the world. The lyrics for this album give people who normally would not be seen in the public eye a chance to have their story shared with the entire world. Arulpragasam expresses human tragedy with the use of alarms and explosions as a backdrop in songs like “Born Free.” In Maya particularly, Arulpragasam shows her political influences, which have led to a career. This music can be aggressive, although throughout Maya there is still an upbeat feel. The mix of fast beats along with harsh lyrics and the sound of destruction create a truly unique sound.

Up, delivers pure grunge rock with a dash of blues and soulful lyrical ballads. Momsen’s raw voice snarls with the moody guitar strumming and dark bass. According to critics, the album itself is definitely an emulation of early Courtney Love, The Runaways and grunge elements from bands like Garbage. Momsen shows fellow fans that a powerful female voice in rock is possible. The lyrics can range from all the rock essentials with hints at religion and politics. With Momsen’s intense angst-ridden voice, and her fellow band members thrashing along, it’s hard to forget the softer titles like “You” and “Nothing Left to Lose.” All in all, Momsen’s strong vocals and haunting lyrics leave behind sugary pop themes and take on controversial elements in our society. Her rough vocals and bluesinspired tracks create a symphony of modern rock ‘n’ roll.

poverty. Listeners can expect every Eminem album to involve some sort of controversy going on in the world. Recovery was no exception. The song “Love the Way You Lie” featuring Rihanna caused the most problems, with a music video showing how bad a domestically violent relationship can be. Rihanna was the best artist to be featured in this song since she just got out of an abusive relationship herself. “Cinderella Man” is a rock/rap track about being an underdog. This fits Eminem’s personal struggle to make it big in life, and to prove his doubters wrong. Eminem came through again with his Recovery album not talking about usual rap topics like getting girls, or “making bank.” His unique style of rap is what has gotten him famous, and why he will continue to be popular.

Rating: 1--2--♫--4--5

Rating: 1--2--3--♫--5

Rating: 1--2--3--♫--5

Camille Milton

Nata Amores

Song suggestion: Xxxo

Song Suggestion: Goin’ Down

Song Suggestion: Cinderella Man Reed Dillon

Artist: Jewel Album: Sweet and Wild Genre: Country

Jewel’s most recent album, Sweet and Wild, features a pop-twang feeling mixed with heartaches, love and satisfaction. Right from the very first song, “No Good in Goodbye,” you instantly feel the emotion in her voice. Her ninth studio album has turned out to be an exceptional venture in the

Similar Artists: Norah Jones, Sarah McLachlin, Shawn Colvin, Loreena Mckennitt country industry. This album shows a different side of her. It’s a more “loosen up” album that expresses her love and her romance in a different way. “Ten” is a great example of her new sound. It shows that no matter what happens things will work out. Sometimes it is best to just take a breather, just think about the situation. Even though you sometimes want to leave, you may realize that it is just another bump in the road that you will get through. Jewel not only talks about the great part of the relationship but shows that not every relationship is prefect even though it looks that way. It’s a great mix of Carrie Underwood with a smidge of Kellie Pickler. She has accomplished a different sound to her music and will continue to be successful in the country genre.

Rating: 1--2--3--♫--5

Song Suggestion: I Love You Forever

Deya Hernandez


18 a&e

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

GIRL VS. FOOD KatieMcDowell

katiemcdowellcub@gmail.com

Union Jack Pub 924 Broad Ripple Ave. Indianapolis, IN 46220 (317) 257-4343

I’ve already started to feel the symptoms of senioritis. I sometimes daydream about my summer vacation to Europe, specifically London, which made me crave some English pub food. So Alli, our friend Natalie and I ventured to Union Jack Pub located in Broad Ripple. This local pub provides an authentic, English feel to the otherwise hip, downtown location of the Village. Union Jack makes a great sports bar to watch European sports not typically shown in other local restaurants like English Premier League Soccer or even rugby. We decided to start off with an appetizer of mozzarella sticks to hold us over until our main meal. Although classic fish and chips comes to mind at an English pub, pizza is Union Jack’s claim to fame. The pub offers deepdish, stuffed crust, New York, and regular styles of pizza.

Natalie decided on the awardwinning pepperoni deep-dish. I went for a classic pub selection of a steak sandwich with mushrooms, caramelized onions and melted cheese. Alli chose the Cuban sandwich with pulled pork, ham, pickles, cheese and brown mustard paired with the salt and pepper kettle chips. Even though the wait for the pizza to slowly bake can be around 40 minutes, it’s worth it. The cheese and pepperoni melted atop the thick crust had Alli and me begging Natalie for a bite. My steak was cooked just how I asked — medium — and Alli’s side of kettle chips was not just the typical bag of Lay’s, but was seasoned with pepper and was perfect with her Cuban sandwich. Overall Union Jack is a fun, casual environment for those who want a good pizza or maybe just to want to watch some soccer. Or should I say football?

Cinemaniac

Last Exorcism receives mixed feelings KevinKryah

kevinkryahcub@gmail.com Horror movies are generally not known for quality. But “The Last Exorcism” brings some new ideas to the table and you could do much worse than this movie. The film, shot in documentary style, starts off with an interesting premise: Cotton Marcus, a disillusioned preacher, and a documentary crew set out to a secluded town in Louisiana to perform a fake exorcism to prove that exorcism is just that —fake — and that demonic possession is all fictional. Marcus leads the crew, and by extension the audience, through the clever nuances of how he stages the “exorcism.” The first 30 minutes are actually interesting and original, and if the movie had continued this way, then it could have been a compelling study

on both faithlessness and overzealous ignorance. Unfortunately, after the first “exorcism” is performed, we see that the girl who was supposedly “possessed,” Nell, may actually be possessed. The subsequent hour gives us plenty of jump scares that, while effective, don’t really connect with the inventive first act of the film. The shaky-cam mock-doc approach stays authentic, but the very nature of that style makes capturing the action in a clear manner nearly impossible. It isn’t bad, but you can’t help but wish the writers had tried a little harder. However, the shift from first act to second pales in comparison to the last 10 minutes. I’m not going to spoil it, but the movie becomes so ludicrous that the entire movie is almost ruined by the ending. Other than that, “The Last Exorcism” is well worth your time.

source/www.fandango.com Genre: Horror Rating: PG-13 Director: Daniel Stamm Length: 99 minutes Fun Fact: Lead actress Ashely Bell did all body contortions with no stunt double or special effects.


a&e19

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Puttin’ on the

Ritz

TroyGiles troygilescub@gmail.com You’ve all seen her. Whether it was at a party, on Facebook pictures, or here at school, there’s always that girl who “forgot” to put on her bra or “accidently” bought the jeans that were one size too small. Well, listen up, ladies — I’m here to tell you how to fix that problem because you’re grossing out everyone around you. If your problem is in the shirt or dress department, here are some tips. Make sure before you buy an article of clothing that it fits well. No matter how cute it is, it will not be flattering if it does not fit. Another important tip is to check the label of the dress or top you’re buying. Make sure it’s the right size but also make yourself aware of the fabric it’s made of. Sometimes the label gives instructions on how to wash so shrinking or other deteriorating effects

Everyone’s

a Critic KevinKryah kevinkryahcub@gmail.com I don’t care if it’s summer blockbuster season, I don’t care if it’s just a stupid action movie, and I don’t care if it’s a cheesy Tyler Perry comedy—a movie must, and I stress must, have at least a half decent script to be good. No exceptions. I’m sure some of you are going “duh!” right about now, but I guarantee that almost all of you reading this have seen far more stupid movies (90 percent of anything starring Adam Sandler, 100 percent of anything with 3-D wedged into the title) than good, well-written movies. This is not an attack on your taste — many movies in mainstream theaters are poorly written, commercially-minded piles of garbage. Not all, but many. How do I know this? It’s certainly

Too much for comfort

don’t occur. If it doesn’t, you can always So if you live in your jeans, this research the fabric online and find out. is the season for you. Denim is really Oh, and girls, wearing see-through popular right now in a lot of different shirts with visible undergarments, styles, so instead of having a denim matching or not, is creating a trend that faux pas, schedule a shopping trip to is really tacky. H&M or Target for fashionable and in It’s also vitally important to know style selections of denim wear. your correct size. Do your peers a While we’re still in our last bit of tremendous favor and find out if you’re warm weather, wearing your crew unsure. You can go to Victoria’s Secret necks and layering your tanks can be for sizing tips a cute and effective way and JCPenney. to cover up. However, com for a size I’m here to tell you how Forever 21 and other calculator and to fix that problem stores have already begun video tutorial. stocking sweaters for because you’re grossing the chilly weather ahead There are ways to dress out everyone around you. so start looking around. well and still Making a trip to the mall look great. to buy proper yet cute Stores such clothing will be well worth as Forever it. And don’t forget: If you 21, H&M, Old Navy and many others haven’t been someone who washes have great options for covering up and clothes to their fabrics accordingly, start looking classy. now and you’ll find that your clothes If you’re struggling with the zipper will stay healthy a lot longer!.I speak for of your jeans or the waist is cutting the good of the people when I tell you into your skin, there’s a problem, and ladies that by simply covering up or I highly suggest you attend to fixing it wearing well- fitted clothing, a happier rather than settling with it. community is just around the corner.

A Script? What’s that? not because I torture myself by actually watching these pointless exercises in incompetent filmmaking. No, generally, you can tell from the trailer of a movie how much thought went into the script. For instance, any trailer trying to jam its brief running time full of zingers is a very bad sign (Vampires Suck, Grown Ups, et al). Just go to the theater and put some scrutiny into the trailers — it’s very easy to sort the garbage from the potentially good. “But why?” one may venture. “Why would movie studios release movies with bad scripts?” The answer is saddening: People will go see sloppily-written garbage as long the trailer appeals to one’s basest instincts—”A giant robot

fighting another giant robot with a flaming sword? Awesome!” You may protest, but this truly is the state of American culture right now and it is saddening. So saddening, in fact, that I try to rationalize it; I like to think that movie trailers induce audiences into a sort of primitive mob mentality where dirty jokes and mindless action have endless appeal. But my attampts to justify it are pointless; as long as paying people will line up to see a spectacle every weekend, why should movie studios (business) care about such frivolous things as a script? I’ll tell you why: because I’m a film geek with a bone to pick with bad movies, and I just so happen to have a column to attack them with. Ready or not, Hollywood, here I come.

As long as paying people will line up to see a spectacle every weekend, why should movie studios care about such frivolous things as a script?

What’s Hot in Indy

Concerts • Sept. 30: Mike Posner @ Murat Egyptian Room at Old National Centre (formerly Murat Centre) • Oct. 2: Eric Johnson, Andy McKee & Peppino D-Agostino @ Clowes Memorial Hall • Oct. 3: 30 Seconds to Mars @ Murat Egyptian Room at Old National Centre (formerly Murat Centre) • Oct. 7: Goo Goo Dolls @ Murat Theatre at Old National Centre

Books • Sept. 7th: The Grand DesignStephen Hawking • Sept. 27: Don’t Blink- James Patterson, Howard Roughan • Sept. 28: Fall of Giants- Ken Follett • Oct. 5: Thirst No. 3: The Eternal Dawn- Christopher Pike

Movies • Sept. 24: Legend of the Guardians: The Owls of Ga’Hoole, Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps • Oct. 1: The Social Network, Casino Jack • Oct. 8: Life as We Know It, Secretariat

CD’s • Sept. 27: Manic Street Preachers- Postcards From A Young Man • Sept. 28: Kenny Chesney – Hemingway’s Whiskey, T.I. – King Uncaged • Oct. 5: David Archuleta – The Other Side of Down, Toby Keith – Bullets in the Gun


20a&e

Et Cetera

By The Numbers

12 Number of letters in the Hawaiian alphabet 20 Miles an elephant can swim in a day

number of phone calls a person 1,140 Average makes each year of water the average person 150 Gallons uses per day

7

Speed in mph at which a rain drop falls

of steps an average American 18,000 Number walks each day

10

1

Number of calories burned by licking a stamp

57

Number of teeth a mosquito has

Pound of coffee beans a coffee tree produces in a year U.S. 61,000 Number of pizzerias in the Source/snapplefacts.com

Favorite Song

September 24, 2010

Would You Rather... Stay inside for a week?

OR

Go a week without electricity?

Be lost in a dark cave?

OR

Be lost in a foreign country?

Be in a waiting room Skip out on a party with nothing to do OR because you’re so busy? for three hours? In a severe storm, be Be stuck in traffic on trapped at the top OR the longest suspension of the tallest Ferris bridge? Wheel? Earn a low income helping the needy?

OR

Receive a high salary from a job where you have to rip people off?

OR

Be trapped in a crowded elevator?

Be stuck on a very high ski lift?

What’s LC’s...

Current Book

Cub Reporter

Current Ringtone

Favorite T.V. Show

Campus Vampire Weekend Callie Reuland (12)

Galapagos Kurt Vonnegut

London Bridge Fergie Cameron Lumpkin (9)

Voyager Diana Gabaldon Charli McGuirk (11)

Love The Way You Lie Eminem (Feat. Rihanna) Victoria Steele (9)

Trueblood Brook Ayers (12)

Feeling This Blink-182 Ike Welhausen (10)

Twilight Stephenie Meyer Alexia Johnson (9)

Tik Tok Ke$ha Angela Hetrick (12)

Degrassi Aleya Beckwith (11)

Haven’t Met You Yet Michael Buble Alex Karnes (11)

Cameron Sabotin (12)

The Last Song Nicholas Sparks Kathrine Powell (11)

Itty Bitty Piggy Niki Minaj Ally Beiswanger (11)

Little Secrets Passion Pit Nicole Havens (10)

Law & Order Chelsa Lee (12)

Jersey Shore Tricia Moffat (10)


sports 21

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Cross country teams start strong ReedDillon reeddilloncub@gmail. Both the boys and girls cross country teams have gotten off to successful starts, with high hopes for a great season finish. At each of the first four races the men have finished in the top four and the girls have finished in the top six. Thanks to these finishes, the men are currently ranked eighth in the state while the women have been ranked as high as 11. These finishes for the men have been despite the tough competition they have faced. On Sept. 11 the boys finished in second place at the Eagle Classic meet, behind only top ranked Columbus North. At the Flash Rock Invitational on Sept. 18, the men finished in fourth, ahead of Franklin Central by 25 points. Sophomore Matt Dorsey finished in eighth, being the top finisher for the boys. “Our senior leadership is outstanding this year, which is one of the key differences in elevating our program to being

At the Brebeuf Invitational, sophomore Kollette Koehler outruns her Carmel High School opponents. Cub Photo/ Sam Mueller

elite,” coach Mike Holman said. The girls started out really strong, but at the past few meets

have not finished as high as they would like, due to injuries. “We are struggling right

now because of injuries to some of our runners, but once we recover, we’ll be back on track,”

sophomore Macey Roach said. For the girls, the Eagle Classic meet was successful with their coming in sixth, despite injuries to two of the varsity runners. The girls finished in fifth at the Flash Rock Invitational, with Roach winning the meet. “Although we’re doing well, we still need to close the time gaps between our No. 2 and 7 runners,” Roach said. Last year the girls had a very good start to the season, but in the end realized they peaked too early. To prevent a repeat, Roach said, “Both boys and girls are using a different training regiment than last year so that we do our best in the later meets, and not burn out towards the end.” Although right now the girls are struggling with injuries, Holman’s goals for both teams remain high. “The No. 1 goal this year is to be the best that we can be. If we do that, then the girls have a great chance to make it to state, and the guys have a great chance to get on the podium at state,” Holman said.

Team looks ‘to show off talent when it counts’ JoeMount joemountcub@gmail.com The season got off to a rough start for the boy’s tennis team, but members look to sectionals with confidence. As the team struggled to win their matches, they were facing a common theme: lack of focus. Despite being made up of mostly upperclassmen, the team has had a hard time coming out on top. “We’re close all the time…we’re in almost every match,” said coach Tim Taylor. Both the team members and coach agree that they’re losing matches they should win. “We’re failing to reach our full potential,” senior Trevor Kirsh said. “We have had a difficult time reaching our goals.”

The coach has been focusing on the mental aspect of the game. “They probably have the highest GPA in sports. We have the academics on our team; that’s why we go after the mind,” Taylor said. As the season progresses, Taylor said he feels the boys just aren’t focused on what they need to do, and team member senior Michael Poetz agreed. “We have been blowing too many opportunities,” Poetz said. After losing their first two matches, the Bears were able to rally back for their games against Lawrence North and Pike. But they continued to trade wins for losses throughout the season and now stand 5-6 right before they head into sectionals. Their last match against Carmel was a difficult one across the board. Seniors

Nick Daily and Tom Freije both lost their matches, and only sophomore Alex Larsh was able to scrape together a win for LC resulting in a score of Carmel 3, LC 2. But, however grim a beginning this team has had, both the coach and the team have high hopes for sectionals on Sept. 30. “With all that said and done, we’re going to win sectionals,” Taylor said. LC has been known for having a rough season and then pulling things together at sectionals. The boys have said they’re confident that they’ll be able to take their sectional, and the coach shares that enthusiasm. “They’re a talented group. The guys can’t wait to show off their talent when it really counts,” Taylor said.

Sophomore Toby Marvel returns the ball in a match against Franklin Central. Cub Photo/ Sam Mueller


22sports Kicking off season right

NickPetr nickpetrcub@gmail.com

The football team will try to continue their success tonight at Bloomington South after a strong 4321 win against a formidable Columbus North team last week. The Bears dominated the Columbus game from the start, jumping out to an early 17-0 lead, and didn’t look back, putting up 26 more points in the second half. A major part of the win was a result of the Bears not turning the ball over. “We took care of the ball a lot better in the (Columbus North) game, and as a result we were able to play much better.” coach Jayson West said. LC was coming off a tough 14-37 loss to Pike where the Bears turned the ball over four times, which eventually took them out of the game. As a result of no turnovers, the Bears played great against Columbus. Senior Tre Roberson once again led the offense by managing the football game perfectly with 107 yards passing and 180 yards rushing. It was also a joint effort from three different running backs to combine for 200 yards rushing to help Roberson. The rest of LC’s backfield helped, too, by adding 200 yards of rushing. “All three units played well,” West said. “We had a lot more energy and focused on our game instead of worrying about what they did.” The Bears have been playing strong all season. They started with a 19-6 win against rival Lawrence North and followed with a 42-19 blowout of North Central. After the loss at Pike, the Bears took out Columbus North 43-21. The Bears will now face a weak Bloomington South team which is just 1-4 and is coming off a 23-0 loss to Southport. Bloomington South doesn’t have a go-to guy and struggles defending, so the Bears just need to play solid defensively and keep putting up points. “We just have to keep on keepin’ on and focus on the little things and we’ll be fine,” West said.

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Volleyball works to improve record The girls were able to add two wins to their record, against Scecina and melissamacneurcub@gmail.com Pike, at the invite last Saturday.  LC beat The Lady Bears volleyball team Scecina in the first game 25-18, and the second game 25-21.  placed fifth out of The Bears also eight teams in the defeated Pike in Sept. 18 Warren We really worked together three games 25-18, Invitational.  21-25, and 26-24.  At a current and proved to ourselves Sophomore record of 5-16, the and outside hitter team is working at not that we can win against only improving their strong teams and come out Katherine Powell said she feels record but also their on top. confident about overall plays on the Katherine Powell her teams wins court. Sophomore and has hopes that “By the end they will carry on of the season we’d to future games. like to improve our “We really worked together, and quickness in our middles, our defense, and our serve-receive,” coach Krystal proved to ourselves that we can win against strong teams and come out on Stallings said.

MelissaMacneur

top,” said Powell. Last week the team played against Cathedral and lost in three games, resulting in scores of 16-25, 9-25 and 1725. “We played a lot better against Cathedral then I had thought we would,” Powell said. Throughout the night senior Shay Redd got eight digs and Katherine Powell had 10 for the Bears. The team will face off against the Noblesville Millers next at 6:30 p.m. Monday at home. The girls say they plan to stay optimistic about the rest of the season. “I have seen so much growth in our team this season and I am very optimistic about our upcoming matches, including the match against the Noblesville High School,” senior Morgan Black said.

Injuries hurting soccer girls KaylaTaylor kaylataylorcub@gmail.com

The Lady Bears are finding themselves struggling with an array of injuries this season that could hold the team back from improving their losing record.  LC lost to the Franklin Central Flashes in their senior night game Sept. 20. The night ended with a score of 1-0. The Lady Bears also lost to Noblesville last Saturday 5-1. Junior Tory Herrmann scored LC’s only goal against the Millers. Despite a significant number of injuries, the team rallied around each other and beat Southport on Sept. 15. Senior Natalie Sidebottom and juniors Maggie Ullrich and Herrmann had two goals each. “We have a lot of injuries this season, but hopefully we can get through it,” Herrmann said. Juniors Alexa Frischman, Rachel Taylor and Kelsey Thornton, sophomore

Megan Siemers and freshman Avery Bowman are all on the injured list. Injuries range from torn ACLs to concussions. “I think psychologically, it’s had a huge effect on us,” coach Chris Harmon said. And he added, “We have to work that much harder and we have to be that much better. Where we were good, we have to be great.” The girls were defeated in their Sept. 1 game against Pike 4-0. They had a brighter spot on their record with a 3-1 win against the Castle Knights on Aug. 28. Herrmann scored two goals, and senior Danielle Baker scored one. “It’s sad that it’s all coming to an end,” senior defender Kylie Culley said. “I’m going to really miss the bonds that I’ve formed with my teammates.” The team hopes to finish off strong against New Palestine at 11 a.m. Saturday. The Marion County tournament begins at 5 p.m. Sept. 27 at Park Tudor.

Playing the ball downfield, junior Tory Herrmann tries to manufacture a goal for the Bears. Cub Photo/Jack Leibovitz


sports 23

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

Soccer boys off to shaky start

did,” sophomore Jonathan Specker said. On the game leading into that alexkryahcub@gmail.com treacherous weekend, the Bears played The Bears will try to improve their against Perry Meridian. Senior Gonzalo 1-8-2 record against Brebeuf on Saturday. Castillo scored the tying goal in the last So far, the two ties have come against two minutes of the game. Mount Vernon and Perry Meridian, and “I knew we had to score to at least the win came against cross-town rival get a tie, and scoring that goal felt Lawrence North. amazing,” Castillo said. The losses were delivered by New In their first three games, LC lost to Palestine, Cathedral, Pike, Westfield, New Palestine 6-2 and lost to Cathedral Carmel, Columbus North and Southport. 3-0. The Bears are coming off a loss The lone win came against crossto Southport 4-3. The Bears got off to town rival Lawrence North 3-2, with two a quick start but goals courtesy squandered the lead. of senior Shane On Sept. 14 they Ruggles. lost to Bloomington I knew we had to score to “It feels good South 3-0. In the two at least get a tie, and scorto beat these previous games, guys. We had they tied Mount ing that goal felt amazing. a lot of missed Vernon 0-0 and then and Gonzallo Castillo opportunities were defeated by we are going to Columbus North 2-0. Senior have to work on Prior to that that,” coach Joe defeat, the Bears had Weber said. played the hardest part of their schedule The Bears season opener did not go as they came up against three top-11 as well. On Aug. 17, the Bears got dealt a ranked teams in three consecutive days. big loss to New Palestine, 6-2. It started with a close loss to Pike, 2-1, on The Bears have recently been Sept. 2. plagued by injuries as well. Senior Ryan “We played great today,” said Amerman and Specker have been hurt, sophomore Petr Sliva following the which has affected the play of their game. defense in a negative way. “If we played like this every game, “We have a lot of work to do,” Weber we’d have a much better record.” said. The next two days did not go as well The Bears game against Brebuef will as the Bears lost 5-0 to No. 11 Westfield be their last regular season game. It’s at and lost 4-0 to No. 6 Carmel. home at 11:30 a.m. Saturday. “After the Pike game, I thought we The sectional tournament begins would have some better results than we Oct. 7 at Heritage Christian.

AlexKryah

Outrunning the opposing defenders to the ball, junior Daniel Hennessey gets ready to kick the ball downfield to an open forward. Cub Photo/Sam Mueller

Golf team sees all new varsity players

ZachGriffin

zachgriffincub@gmail.com

This year, an entirely new group of girl golfers hit the course. All five graduating members were replaced with five new players, four of which are underclassmen. They are sophomores Breanna Petruccianni and Maddie Morton and juniors Abby Hollis and Audrey Meyer. “The girls are new to varsity golf. We are learning all parts of the game. We are trying to be better golfers every time

we tee it up,” coach Andy Renie said. The season had some key wins and some disappointing losses. The girls had a rough time at sectionals on Sept. 18, which ended their season. They placed sixth out of nine teams and were 114 strokes off the first place finish of Bishop Chatard. Petruccianni came in with the team’s low score with a 94 through 18 holes. Hollis also came in below 100 with a score of 99. Meyer posted a 107. Team captain senior Tashara Herndon had a 103 and Morton a 117. The team scored a

combined 403. Pendleton Heights beat LC on Aug. 31 in a close match with a score of 206 to 211. LC did bounce back with a 205 to 212 win over New Palestine two days later. The team also beat LN 219 to 223. This is the ninth straight year that LC has beaten LN. The victory was short-lived, however, as Park Tudor took first place in the three-way match with a score of 181. A day later, LC posted its best score of the year with a 197. Meyer made her

first birdie of the year on the fourth hole par 3. Pike came in second with a 201, and Speedway followed up with a 266. LC hit a low in a four-way match with LC, Ritter, Lapel and Knightstown. Lapel took the victory with a score of 188, while LC turned in a disappointing 212. However, Renie said he is still optimistic about the future. “The girls have improved how they play golf,” he said. “We look forward to practicing more and getting better in the off-season.”


24 sports

Cub Reporter September 24, 2010

senior

Brad Korn

Years on Varsity: Four

Position: No. 1 Singles and Doubles “I like the Best Part about camaraderie. LC tennis: It’s just fun. ” “When we won Favorite Sectionals moment with LC my freshman tennis: year.”

SCOREBOARD Football 8/20-LC: 19, Lawrence North: 6 8/27-LC: 42, North Central: 19 9/3-LC: 41, Perry Meridian: 0 9/10- LC: 14, Pike: 37 9/17-LC vs Columbus North 9/24-LC vs Bloomington South

Girls Volleyball 9/14-LC vs Southport Lost: 24-26, 13-25, 16-25 9/15-LC vs Cathedral Lost: 16-25, 9-25, 17-25 9/16- LC vs North Central Lost: 14-25, 17-25, 19-25 9/18- LC: 2-2 at Warren Central Invitational

Boys Tennis 8/17-LC: 2, Cathedral: 3 8/24-LC: 0, Brebeuf: 5 8/26-LC: 2, Perry Meridian: 3 8/30-LC: 3, Lawrence North: 2 8//31-LC: 4, Pike: 1 9/2-LC: 1, Columbus North: 4 9/7-LC: 1, Bloomington South: 4 9/8- LC: 3, New Palestine: 2 9/14-LC: 3, Franklin Central: 2 9/16-LC: 1; Bloomington North: 4

Girls Golf 8/31-LC: 211, Pendleton Heights: 206 9/2-LC: 205, New Palestine: 212 9/7-LC: 483 at County 9/8-LC: 227, Cathedral: 184 9/13-LC: 466 at Conference Indiana 9/16-LC: 182, Secina: 195 9/18-LC: 403 at Sectionals

Boys Soccer

Boys XC

8/19-LC: 3, Lawrence North, 2 8/24-LC: 0, Cathedral: 3 8/31-LC: 1, Perry Meridian: 1 9/2-LC: 1, Pike: 2 9/3-LC: 0, Westfleild: 5 9/4-LC: 0, Carmel: 4 9/9-LC: 0, Columbus North: 2 9/11-LC: 0, Mount Vernon: 0 9/14-LC: 0, Bloomington South: 3 9/16-LC: 3, Southport: 4

8/21-LC: 3rd at Brebeuf Invitational 8/28-LC: 3rd at Noblesville Hokum Karem 9/11-LC: 2nd at Brown County 9/18-LC: 4th at Flash Rock Invite 9/21- LCCC Invitational

Girls Soccer 8/19-LC:0, Lawrence North: 1 8/23-LC:1, Ben Davis: 2 8/25-LC: 0, Cathedral: 4 8/28-LC3: 3, Castle: 1 9/1-LC: 0, Pike: 4 9/13-LC: 1, Bloomington South: 3 9/15-LC: 8, Southport: 1 9/18-LC: 1, Noblesville: 5

Girls XC 8/21-LC: 4th at Brebeuf Invitaional 8/28-LC: 5th at Noblesville Hokum Karem 9/11-LC: 6th at Brown County 9/18-LC: 5th at Flash Rock Invite 9/21- LCCC Invitational


Issue Sept. 24