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Interviews Antonio Ballatore Indashio

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Yeji Jun | 18 antonio ballatore | 22

michael Benjamin | 36

indashio | 48

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Carlos Cerrillo studied graphic design, with a concentration in photography, at the Universidad del Valle de Mexico in Mexico City. After graduating, he started working as a freelance columnist and photographer for local newspapers. In 2004, he went back to school at the Active School of Photography in Queretaro, specializing in digital photography. In September 2006, his exhibition, “Extirpando Causa II� showed at The Foundry Library in London and received very good reviews. He has also taught photography at Universidad del Valle de Atemajac in Puerto Vallarta.

Carlos Cerrillo

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Gayatri Shantaram

Gayatri Shantaram

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www.gayatrishantaram.com

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Gayatri Shantaram is a fine artist from India, currently living Paris. Gayatri Shantaram is a fine artistinfrom India, Her works have been exhibited at currently living in Paris. Her works have been major galleries shows in India exhibited at majorand galleries and shows in India and Paris, and she has been and Paris, and she has been commissioned by commissioned as businesses such asby thebusinesses Indian Tobacco such Company, the Indian Chennai andTobacco Coimbatore,Company, Komfort Interior Chennai Coimbatore, Komfort Designers,and and Souza Exports. Interior Designers, and Souza Her latest work was for The Marriott Group of Exports. hotels in Pune, India and ‘X-Audit’ in Paris, France. Besides these professional commissioned works, Her latest work was for The Marriott she hasofalso painted individuals all Group hotels in for Pune, Indiafrom and walks of in lifeParis, and from all over the world. ‘X-Audit’ France. Besides Gayatri is also active in art therapy for children these professional commissioned with special needs at painted the CheshireforHome in works, she has also Chennai, India. individuals from all walks of life and from all over the world. Gayatri is also active in art therapy for children with special needs at the Cheshire Home in Chennai, India. Images: Storm at Sea.Coast Le Rouge Cow Patches River

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Mike Felber

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andrew osta

andrewosta.com

Andrew Osta was born in Kiev, Ukraine, in 1982. He immigrated to Canada in 1994, and graduated with honors from the University of Toronto’s Arts and Sciences program. Osta started writing music in 2002 and began drawing and painting in 2005. His turn towards art was a complete surprise to his friends and family. “It happened as a result of a certain emotional breakthrough. I felt an overflowing of emotion that demanded to be expressed, and the only way to express it adequately was through art.” After moving to Peru, where he exhibited along with Pablo Amaringo at the 5th International Amazonian Shamanism Conference, Osta wrote a manuscript which became the book “Shamans and Healers: The Untold Ayahuasca Story” (www.ShamansAndHealers. com). Several songs he wrote were also selected to be recorded for a full - length musical album, Dimension Dream.

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anand pkc

anandarts.net

 Anand is an emerging realistic artist from southern India. At the tender age of 3, he began drawing and was mentored by his mother, an artist. After winning several regional and national art competitions in his teen years, he drifted away from art in adulthood. Now, at 30, Anand is building a career in New York as a professional artist with his own art company “Maharani Arts, Inc.” Anand aims to show the world that his oil paintings can outshine the top ranking contemporary artists and prove realism is alive and well. His first show was Art Expo 2011 in New York City.

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David Fox bleedinginspanish.com

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Yeji Jun yejijun.com

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Yeji Jun was born in South Korea. She received her BFA from Kyonggi University in Seoul, and her MFA from Hunter College in New York. In 2010, she won First Prize in the Viridian Artist International Juried Exhibition, juried by Elisabeth Sussman, curator of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Jun’s work is represented by the Agora Gallery in New York, and Artists Haven Gallery in Florida is exhibiting her work internationally. Jun’s work is an exploration of self. Her painting and installation reveal the artist’s inner thoughts and delve into her imagination to reveal her personal state of mind. Her visualization process connects her subconscious to her consciousness. The elements coming from her subconscious are both spontaneous and deliberate. This visual language allows Jun to share her sarcasm, humor, sadness and fantasy. Viewers can discover, see and enjoy these experiences through her art.

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Interview

Musician. Painter. Restaurateur. Designer. TV personality. It seems like Antonio Ballatore has already done it all. But the star of HGTV's "The Antonio Treatment" is just getting started, and he doesn't plan on staying inside the lines (Chewie agrees).

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EIA: As the son of two artists, how did you evolve an artistic style to create unique and striking designs? AB: It’s funny, because growing up, I never planned on being an artist. I always imagined I’d be playing in a band. But art is what I was surrounded by as a kid. My parents were constantly painting and sculpting, and my father was a director for large department stores, so he was always building things. I was born in Manhattan, and we had a summer house upstate. That summer house had art studios in it for my dad, so I was able to do all this painting and other forms of art, so I was around all this creativity from an early age. But it wasn’t until I had done the music thing and realized that it wasn’t exactly what I wanted to do; being on the road, touring, being broke, etc., that I ran into a friend in New York who got me involved with building sets for David LaChappelle. After that, I dove in head first, and started designing sets.

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EIA: It actually seems like although you were living the “rock star” lifestyle, the artistic and creative side that came from your parents was still calling you. AB: Totally. It’s funny how it all worked out. Even now, after winning Design Star and having my own show (The Antonio Treatment on HGTV) I feel like I’m a ‘creator’ and not necessarily just an interior designer or set designer. I don’t want to be known as a designer that says ‘this pillow goes with that pattern.’ I want to create. I want to inspire people. I’m very into photography, I build cars, I still play music, I write music, so it’s the creativity that I’m attracted to, and not one specific type of activity. I’m not into labels.

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EIA: According to your bio, you “failed art class as a child for coloring outside the lines” and despite this, your parents always encouraged you to think outside the box. AB: My parents were always supportive and encouraged me to be myself. They would tell me to do my own thing and not worry about what other people think. I think my mom was really instrumental in really ingraining that independence in me when I was growing up. She was a little Italian lady who had a lot of heart. She actually went in to the school and got all worked up when they failed me for coloring outside the lines, and that really gave me the confidence to be myself and to do my own thing, regardless of what anyone else thought. And my dad and I are very close. Even now, I’ll call him up and just ask what he thinks of different ideas that I have and he’ll give me his opinion. He still paints and sculpts, and he’s a big inspiration to me. EIA: Obviously, you love music. You mentioned touring with several New York hardcore and punk bands, which ones did you tour with? AB: I toured with Muphy’s Law, then I joined a band called Handsome, which was made up of guys from bands like Helmet, Murphy’s Law and Cro-Mags. After that, I played with the Breeders, but they had some problems, and at that point, I just didn’t want to do it anymore. So I went home and hung out for two months or so, and that’s when I ran into my friend who got me involved with David LaChappelle.

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EIA: You were involved with Z-Bar, a legendary New York location for the hardcore and punk scene. How did you get involved with it? AB: My brother is a restaurant guy, and he was running several restaurants and bars in Manhattan. I would come in to his places and sometimes I’d DJ, sometimes I’d build stuff, and it evolved into something where I’d design and renovate a place and get it looking really cool with a really nice vibe, and then the place would open and it would totally change. It got me thinking that if I had a place of my own, I could continue that vibe with the music, the staff, food, etc. So, there was a place, Z-Bar, near where I was living at the time, and it was in bad shape. But my brother knew the owners and when they heard what I was looking to do, they basically gave me free reign to do whatever I wanted to it. So I went in there, painted everything flat black, and called some friends. I brought in graffiti artists and had them just do their thing. We had a few guys from Marvel comics who used to hang there, and I got them to do some illustrations, so it was a really unique atmosphere. I brought in local bands to play and within six months we had lines around the corner. It became a really successful place. It’s cool, because people still tell me how they remember Z-Bar from way back and what good times they had.

AB: Without sounding too cliche’, I feel like without taking a risk, there’s no reward. I love taking risks, whether I fail or succeed, I’m not afraid. When I do fail, it makes me come back stronger and inspires me to keep pushing. And when I succeed, it’s really cool. It’s kid of weird, because people either love me or hate me, and the people that do love me aren’t necessarily in love with everything I do, but they’re inspired by some of my work, and that’s what it’s all about. That’s what makes it all worth it. EIA: What is still on your bucket list? AB: I’ve always been a risk-taker, so a bucket list isn’t really my thing. I’ve experienced so much, and I kind of go wherever life takes me.

EIA: Where do you get a lot of your inspiration from? Is it from the streets of NY, your background, or is it a more complex synthesis of a bunch of elements? AB: I’m inspired by everything around me. Past experience, family, friends, or just walking down the street. I recently moved to downtown LA, and a few months ago I was feeling really uninspired. I took Chewie (Antonio’s dog) on a long walk. We just walked the streets for hours, going nowhere in particular, and when we got home and had all these new ideas. I tend to collect a lot of thoughts and images in my head and they kind of pop EIA: According to your website, you operate under the out a weird times. mantra “go big or go home.” Are there any other mottos or mantras you as an artist live by?

favorites: Artists? Francis Bacon, Picasso. I love the thought behind Jackson Pollack, how everyone gave him shit because they said his artwork looked like spaghetti, and how he changed the game, so to speak. Reading about him, I really appreciate the things he went through for being different, and now he’s considered one of the masters. It’s inspiring to me. When I read some of the critical things that people write about me, knowing what he went through, I know that just comes with the territory of being an artist. Not that I’m comparing myself to him in any way, but just knowing that he went through all of that stuff and kept on going is inspiring to me! EIAMAGAZINE.COM

Movie? The Jerk

Book? “Hotel LaChappelle” by David LaChappelle. I’m really proud of being a part of that whole scene.

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Band? Oh man, there are so many different ones, I don’t think I can choose just one. I love so many different types of music. Metal, rock, reggae, funk, soul. I love collecting vinyl. growing up, it was kiss, and they still inspire me. When I was a kid, I had all the Kiss dolls, and I would build little stages and sets for them.

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EIA: How have things (both personally and artistically) changed since you started giving people The Antonio Treatment? AB: Well, it’s a little strange. I’ll be walking through Home Depot and people will come up to me and say “hey, I love the show!” and most of the time I’m wondering if I know them, because I forget I have a TV show. So in that way, it’s kind of weird. But what’s really awesome is when people will contact me and tell me that my work inspired them. People will send me pictures of stuff they built, stuff they created, and that’s killer. That makes everything worth it. It’s the ultimate payoff. EIA: Can you please tell us more about your LA studio, Studio 413, and "The Ingredient Group"? AB: Studio 413 is my loft where I live and work. We started it as a full time design studio, but with the Antonio Treatment, happening it’s kind of taken over the space. The Ingredient Group is me partnered with Chef Sammy D, who I like to call the ‘food version’ of me. He’s a Brooklyn guy, so we’re from similar backgrounds. He’ll take traditional dishes and create a crazy twist on it.

EIA: Will that be filmed? AB: We’re trying to work out the details. I don’t know if it’s going to be Antonio Treatment or an online thing or maybe a special. I’m not sure yet. I think it would really show the true, fullest potential of the thing. Especially in Vegas, where everything is larger than life to begin with, I think these two projects are going to be really over the top and special. It’s definitely going to be documented. EIA: Your dog, Chewie, is a big part of your life, as well as the show. How is he doing? AB: Chewie’s doing great. We get a lot of Chewie paintings and Chewie art work sent to us. It’s pretty cool. He loves the fans, and I think the fame is going to his head a little bit, but he’s still all about love and cuddling. I’m thinking about getting a little sister for him to play with, so that’s something that might be happening soon. EIA: Are there any other projects on the horizon that you want to talk about? AB: I’m really excited about the downtown LA Art Walk. It’s a once a month thing, and something like 40,000 people converge on downtown LA. They basically take over all these empty spaces and turn them into galleries. I just met with people from the Art Walk, and they offered me a great opportunity to do whatever kind of shows I want to do. I’m really happy to be here and really stoked at where my life is heading.

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RACHel Fagiano

rachelfagiano.com ďżź

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CHRIstina Rodriguez

wix.com/drkgrphks/christina

Born in New York, Christina Rodriguez is a graphic designer by trade and an artist at heart. In addition, to being a full time student at The Art Institute of New York City, she currently runs her own venture, ‘Drk Grphc Arts.’ She likes to draw, paint, admire photography, and write poetry.

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scott Mallory, Jr. iscottm.com

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Franz Salazar

wix.com/ezark40/artfz

“Since the mid 90's, my approach to art has evolved. This evolution is evident in all my work. I'm a strong believer that there is a way to communicate by being expressive and feel as if I'm able to do this with my pieces. As an artist, I put so much passion into my work, which means my pieces are a part of me as well.” “I find art very therapeutic, it relaxes me.” www.artofthespheres.com

Looking Through Patient Eyes

jaja Dario artofthe spheres.com

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Cuyler Smith

cuylersmith.com Cuyler Smith was born and raised in Texas, where his passion for art began at an early age. Inspired by film and animation, Cuyler moved to southern California where he earned his BFA in animation from Laguna College of Art and Design and his MFA in Illustration from California State University-Fullerton. He currently resides in Irvine, California with his beautiful wife Sharon and their dog Bella. Cuyler continues to enhance and adapt his passion and technique as a visual communicator while being an art instructor and freelance illustrator.

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Patricia Abramovich abramovichpatricia.com

Patricia views art as “the freedom to create with no boundaries, to express the diversity of color from which the human soul is composed.” Spreading color across a canvas is a means of meditation that enables her to connect with her inner self. Her hands move with rhythm using the painter’s knife to mix the colors directly on the blank canvas, letting her soul do the conducting. When working in water color aquarelle, Patricia allows the colors to merge with the water in whatever direction they choose, allowing the painting to proceed in the direction it is meant to go. “I feel when the artwork is ready and reaching a balance between the colors. I usually have no preconceived idea and am always curious to see the final results of my painting.”

Heather Pinheiro painted her first portrait during her junior year of high school. Shortly after, she sold her first commissioned painting, she was accepted to Pratt Institute in New York. Heather finished her education at Rutgers University,graduating with a degree in graphic design.

Heather Pinheiro heatherpinheiro.com

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I am drawn to p h oto g r a p h i n g contemporary urban spaces that are absent of people and have minimal evidence of human involvement. I refer to these spaces as being void, not empty. The void seduces my sensibilities and is a pathway for my psychological release.

Ginny Mangrum

I photograph ideas and select the type of photography applications that best describe the project’s focus by using film or digital. Scale is also a consideration, and large prints will be used when it benefits the message I want to express. The use of color versus black and white is a powerful decision when considering emotions such as nostalgia, whereas color can stimulate senses in another way that can arouse a more inviting and !exciting side. Sometimes color is the main character, and the message shifts.

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stacey views art as a unique way to observe the world. Art has always been an undeniable part of her. Stacey’s passion for art pulses through her! veins. Art is a window in which to see the world, both the beauty and the ugliness. To her, art is everywhere and art is everything. ! Stacey has been fortunate to have been given the gift of creativity, and it inspires her every day. Her vision allows her to see the magnificence surrounding us and gives her the ability to share that vision with others. Through her art, she aims to show people the true emotion in seemingly ordinary things which they may have overlooked, and to open their minds to a realm they have never experienced before.

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michael Benjamin

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Michael Benjamin grew up in Pennsylvania, the youngest of six children. His parents instilled in him a spirit of acceptance, love for all people, hope, and enjoyment of life. His method of expressing this spirit is art. Later he received mentoring from a wonderful art teacher, Michael was accepted to Pratt in 1992. There, he experienced what he describes as ‘artistic heaven’. After leaving Pratt due to financial reasons, he attended Cooper Union, but found the competition amongst the students to be disillusioning. After 2 years, Michael took a leave of absence and came away with a deep respect and admiration for the handful of students who did not succumb to the politics and artistic banter. Michael later worked at the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art, installing the 25-year retrospective of Sol LeWitt’s work. There, he rediscovered his love for painting. He rediscovered his works from his Pratt days, and picked up where he had left off many years ago. The magic of art had come back to him, and he’ll never let it get away again.

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emichaelbenjamin.com

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ART 101 NEVER, UNDER ANY CIRCUMSTANCES, BELIEVE ANYONE WHO TELLS YOU THAT YOU CAN’T SUCCEED AS AN ARTIST. THIS IS YOUR GIFT. NO ONE CAN TAKE THAT AWAY FROM YOU. THIS IS YOUR SPIRIT, SOUL AND MIND. IT WILL NEVER GUIDE YOU WRONG.

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emmanuel Laflamme

quartertofour.net

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Ya La’Ford New York

Ya La’Ford’s pieces are symbolic of a lifelong fascination with ancient tribal languages. An exploration of life, survival and existence, La’Ford’s art reflects an intimate window to humanity and history shared with the present day. She attempts to quiet the mind in her pieces, allowing the viewers solitude, and to direct their thoughts toward what nourishes the body, mind and spirit. Her work touches those who observe it in a way that it becomes somewhat of an escape, providing a touchstone to return to when needed.

Images: In Trinity, La Genesi Del 10,! Percorsodiamore

rachel Pozivenec

Ya La’Ford

pozivenec.tumblr.com

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rachel rolseth Everything+Is+Art+++++|+Issue++W++

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Eladia Alvarado eladiaalvarado.com

Eladia was born in Peru in 1969 and immigrated to the NYC area in 1973. She completed her artistic training at the School of Visual Arts in 1992. Working primarily in oils and in abstract form, Eladia’s paintings are vivid in color and hold up to three layers of paint to add depth and translucency. She does not adhere to current art trends, but prefers to be true to her own artistic expression from within. Her influences are everywhere in NYC, with its rich multi-cultural and diverse population and constant activity.

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ndashio has come a long way from his humble beginnings. From hand-sewing his own clothes on his mother’s kitchen floor to the runways of New York City’s Fashion Week, Indashio has conquered all. Find out what’s next for this internationally acclaimed fashion designer.

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What/Where does your drive come from to create? I have a very artistic family. My aunt and cousin are artists. I started getting into fashion and art in high school and it was just an outlet for me to express myself. I did a lot of painting and designing. It was like therapy to me. I was drawn to it as a form of self expression and an outlet.

Did you design your own clothes in high school? I started making clothes in high school for my sister and it just sort of snowballed into doing clothes for friends too.

Were your designs back then as bold as they are now? They were. I used to dress up my sister Sierra, she was my fist muse. I would dress her in the craziest outfits and she’d wear them to school. Everyone would make fun of her, but I would dress her as outrageously as possible. It was like every day was a music video for me.

Thinking back, how great does it feel that people used to make fun of your designs and now everyone goes crazy for them? It feels so good. I remember a few years back, when I did a few MTV cameos and was just starting to get a little notoriety, I had people asking me to make them clothes. These were the same people who would talk shit about my designs back in the day, and now they were begging me to create for them. Success is really the best revenge!

Was there a specific time where you realized that this is what you wanted to do? I was a senior in high school, and I had been designing for about a year. About that time, I just knew I needed to go to New York and become a fashion designer. I had a really hard time in high school. I was always getting into trouble, always rebelling, and I felt that if I could get through that, I could get through anything.

And right after high school you moved to Florida? I moved to Florida, and I would sit on the floor with my mom and I would sew clothes. Around this time, I would call MTV and BET every day, and they’re like ‘Who are you and why are you calling every day?’ Then, one day I got a call from BET that one of their hosts was wearing one of my tops. I just jumped for joy.

Did things really take off after that? After the BET thing, I did my first fashion show in Miami. It was sponsored by Candies and Maybelline.

That must have been an amazing experience. It was. They set up this huge tent on Ocean Dr. right across from the Versace mansion, Russell Simmons, Sean John, they all showed there. For me to share a stage with those designers, it was like all my hard work was paying off.

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After the Miami show was when you moved to New York? About two months after the Miami show, I came to New York for the first time by myself. I did a show in a little art gallery in the meatpacking district. The show had all sorts of designers, artists and sculptors. At that show, I met a guy who said he was interested in representing me for New York Fashion Week. That show got me into Women’s Wear Daily, and that was huge for my career.

From that time to now, what’s changed about your designs and the way you express yourself? I’ve grown tremendously. I went from being a small town boy to an international fashion icon. My style gets bigger and bigger every year. To have people all over the world support me and recognize me for my talents is like a dream come true. I feel really blessed. To dress a client and have them look at themselves in the mirror like they never have before, that feels so good. What does the name “Indashio” mean? I made up the name, so I figure I can make up the definition. Indashio means ‘living the dream.’

You have a lot of things on the horizon, tell us about some of the projects you’re working on. I’m going to be putting out a men’s line for Fashion Week this season. Women’s fashion has always been my forte, so I really wanted to try something new.

There’s talk of this collection being available in stores, is that true? Yes! This collection will be available all over the country at Nordstrom, as well as at indashio.com. I’m really excited to have an affordable collection that can be mass marketed and available to everyone.

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How about film and television? I just finished taping a show for Lifetime that will air in January. It’s called “24Hour Catwalk” and it’s hosted by Alexa Chung. Basically, I will be creating a collection in 24 hours. You get to see all the drama that goes into trying to do this in such a short amount of time. It’s going to be some epic television, let me tell you!

Do you have a specific motto or mantra that you live by? My motto is ‘do anything, don’t give a shit.’ There are no rules in fashion, there is no wrong or right. It’s about self-expression.

How important do you think art is in fashion design? Art and fashion design go hand in hand. I consider myself an artist before a designer. I feel like I’m an entertainer and a performer. Fashion is just wearable art.

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Favorites... Book? The Secret Music? Hip Hop has been a huge part of my life. I love all types of music, though. I love Fiona Apple, Madonna, Michael Jackson, Prince, Lady Gaga. I love so many different types.

Where does your inspiration come from? Inspiration is everywhere. People, places, things, music, movies. I can find inspiration in anything.

Is there anyone you haven’t worked with yet that you look forward to working with? I would love to work with Lady Gaga. I love her, and I love her message. She’s somebody who is herself, and I love her work. You’re involved with a lot of charity work. What draws you to particular charities such as the Make-A- Wish Foundation? I try to work with charities that I can relate to. I feel like I’m living my dream, and if I can help someone else live theirs, even for a day, it’s my obligation as a human to do it. With the Make-A-Wish Foundation, I’m able to do that. I’m also active with ‘Entertainers For Education’ in New York, which encourages kids to stay in school. Because I had such a tough time in high school, I can relate.

What advice would you give to an up and coming designer or artist? Just do it. Just don’t stop. You can accomplish anything if you don’t quit and don’t give up.

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indashio.com swapmgmt.com Manager: Anel Photos courtesy from indashio.com EIAMAGAZINE.COM

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bryan Willis Thompson bryanWillisThompsondesign.carbonmade.com

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EIA Magazine | Issue 2  

Exclusive Interviews with Antonio Ballatore and Indashio.

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