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AUGUST - SEPTEMBER 2013

VOL 1 - ISSUE 1

EVERYDAY HUMANITARIANS Salvation Army A PHILANTHROPIST Buhle Dlamini

IN HER SPOKEN WORD Lebo Mashile

SPEAKING LIKE AN ACTIVIST NOT VOCALIST Sfiso ‘Atomza’ Buthelezi

“Promoting social cohesion does not require you to do anything new” SANDILE MEMELA Chief Director Social Cohesion


CONTENTS

INSIDE

18

Editors Note

6

In Your SPACe

4

Dlala Safe

8

The Giving Hand

16

People of Statue

21

Agents of Change

24

Show Me Your Nr

26

Inspiration

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CONTENTS

www.spacemagazine.co.za EDITORIAL & PRODUCTION Chief Editor Themba Ndlovu themba@spacemagazine.co.za Editorial Enquiries editorial@spacemagazine.co.za Managing Editor Mabalane Mfundisi mabalane@spacemagazine.co.za Online Operations and Technical Director Danie Meiring danie@spacemagazine.co.za Journalists Anne Zwane, Melissa Moodley, Banyana Mshungu, Princess Guduza Designer Blessing Mabena Contributors Caswelldin Tau, Lebo Mashile, Walter Mthethwa and Palesa Rose Nqambaza

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PUBLISHING Publisher and CEO Themba Ndlovu ndlovut@isolammedia.co.za 0798753630 Advertising Sales adsales@spacemagazine.co.za Subscriptions subs@spacemagazine.co.za Social Activist Club Memberships membership@spacemagazine.co.za For more information contact: SPACe MAGAZINE info@spacemagazine.co.za

EVENTS, PROMOTIONS AND SPECIAL PROJECTS Public Relations Coordinator Morongoe Mokhoeea morongoe@spacemagazine.co.za

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Promotions Coordinator Lerato Phetoane lerato@spacemagazine.co.za SPACe Magazine South Africa,: The SPACe magazine is published by Isolam’ media (Pty) Ltd in partnership with Show Me Your Number and Buying Power cc ISOLAM’ MEDIA (PTY) LTD Email: info@isolammedia.co.za www.isolammedia.co.za SHOW ME YOUR NUMBER info@showmeyournumber.org.za www.showmeyournumber.org.za BUYING POWER info@buyingpower.co.za www.buyingpower.co.za

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Terms and conditions of use/ DISCLAIMER SPACe magazine is a product of Isolam’ Media (Pty) Ltd, No. 15 Ext 1 Block 116 Phase 10 19th Avenue, Alexandra, 2090. The opinion in this magazine do not necessarily represent the views of the publisher. SPACe magazine considers its sources reliable and verifies as much data as possible. However, reporting inaccuracies can occur, consequently readers using this information do so at their own risk. SPACe magazine is supplied with the understanding that the publisher is not rendering a legal or advisory service. Although companies and contributors mentioned herein are believed to be reputable, neither Isolam’ Media (Pty) Ltd, nor any of its employees, sales executives or contributors accept any responsibility whatsoever for such persons’ and companies activities. Isolam’ Media (Pty) Ltd. All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced , stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form without prior written permission of the publisher. Permission is only deemed valid if approval is in writing. SPACe magazine buys all rights to contribution, text, images unless previously agreed in writing.


Your Invlovement

Umuzi Activists Try a New Medium

The 27th of June marked the opening of the Emerging-Arts Activist Exhibition. Umuzi Activists, Evidence, Rudzani, Lawrence, and Tebza, were given the opportunity to showcase their artwork. Courtesy of Umuzi Photo Club www.umuzi.org www.spacemagazine.co.za

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In Your SPACe

A DIFFERENT PERSPECTIVE from Stacey Dlamini We celebrate women annually during this month of August, though it’s something that should be done daily as women are a pillar of strength holding together societies. SPACe caught up with Stacey to get a word of advice and motivation to women. Written By Anne Zwane Q: Who is Stacey Dlamini? A: I’m a wife, a mother, a small business owner. A woman with a strong Christian faith and loves South Africa deeply. I was born and brought up in Canada, but have lived in South Africa for 13 years now. Q: What made you move to South Africa? A: I first came to South Africa for an International Youth Conference and I met a young man. He’s what kept me coming back. But even if he hadn’t been in the picture, I would have still moved here because I’ve always felt a deep affiliation with South Africa. Q: How has living in South Africa been for you? A: I really love this country and it’s such a special place. I’ve had the chance to travel the length and breadth of South Africa and to interact with people from different communities. Though I do find that living here has its challenges. On any given day, you are exposed to really awful news stories that make you fundamentally question the goodness of humankind. And on the same day, you’ll be exposed to people who are warm and kind. We live with good and bad in the same place and time. It’s intense. Q: How did you learn to adjust to the ways of doing things in South Africa?

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A: I love travelling, learning languages and interacting with people from other places so it wasn’t much of a challenge. The one thing that took me a while to adjust to was being aware of personal security which was something I had never had to think about growing up. Q: Have you experienced any sort of xenophobic attack? A: The unfairness of the situation is that as a white, middle-class English-speaking person, I’ve never been stopped on the street and asked whether I have papers. That is the daily experience of my friends from other African countries who don’t “look” South African enough. Q: How does your current occupation at Young and Able contribute to change in South Africa? A: There are very few of us who have the power and resources to make big, sweeping changes that affect many people. But all of us have the power to make small changes that affect many people in our circle of influence. We try to help young people understand and activate their own potential through Leadership Academies, community-based Mentorship programmes and through transforming the leadership teams of school. Working with young people is the best way to impact the future of our country. We also www.spacemagazine.co.za

work with corporate companies through inspirational speaking, and we create learning experiences about topics that we’re passionate about, such as diversity to help people see it as an opportunity, not challenge. Q: What do you think South Africans need to improve collectively? A: We need to fix our education system. So many of our problems as a nation can be addressed by giving children and youth a good educational foundation on which we can build on. We need to look at government schools that are achieving great results and study what they’re doing differently. Also, we need to stop the extreme levels of violence. We have the power to. Q: Word of advice to women. A: Sacrifice whatever you need to sacrifice to get an education. It is something that can never be taken from you and it gives you independence that you need to stand on your own. Then when you find a man you love, you are with him as an equal, not as dependant. Education is our best tool to break the cycle of poverty and dependence.


History and Future

LEADERS OF OUR TIMES Written by Caswelldin Tau

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eing born in the 90’s I have never experienced apartheid or any racial slurs. My pre-teen years I attended a multi-racial school and befriended more white kids than black, not that the black kids were inferior to me but I felt more accepted within the white kids. Having that option wasn’t afforded to the generation that endured apartheid. Communities throughout the world celebrate the man who (along with the support system he had i.e. politicians/ activists/communities) made it all happen, Mr Nelson Rolihlahla Mandela. He devoted his entire life to fighting for freedom and regaining unity amongst all races in South Africa and the world. Growing up in a rural village in the Eastern Cape, moulded him into the president and man he was, a people’s leader. He knew that even though he was deemed as the greatest leader, he was made out of flesh and blood so he too had his fair share of flaws. Being voted into power on the 27th April 1994 under the African National Congress, Mr Mandela has surely left very big shoes that presidents that precede him attempt to fill. His saying resonates truth for me is, “you can only lead them from behind”. I am one of the many fortunate youth to have lived and experienced leadership under four presidents.

Comparing is part of our nature; parents compare their kids so do we. From being lead by a peoples’ president to being lead by an intellectual, it takes some adjustment. Thabo Mbeki was more intellectual, he believed in facts and statistics, being in power for 9 years he had his own ways of politics. He used his 9year

admission he isn’t good with money and yet he was able to guide the country through. He always manages to land in the media whether TV or print media, he’s been bashed by many comedians and sketch artists. He’s been our president from 2007 to date; he is what many call a socialist.

His saying resonates truth for me is, “you can only lead them from behind”. I am one of the many fortunate youth to have lived and experienced leadership under four presidents.

A non – intellectual can be seen as dangerous cause he can only implement ideologies which in turn might backfire, he could sway both ways putting trust in his advisors because he cannot really question or suggest sound policies.

presidency to change and impact our country; he made it possible for middle sectors in the economy and overEvery leader is different and they saw the implementation of BEE. I bring their own style of leadership, prefer to call him ‘the strong silent all presidents have a team of ad- type. visees that fine tune their style and signature. Like how celebrities have a To wrap up there’s our beloved curteam making sure they always look rent president Jacob Zuma, the oppotheir best so do presidents. site of Mr Mbeki. He is not an intellectual or policy expert. By his own

He has been slandered by the nation and our judicial system; question is with the elections so close, should ANC retain power? Is Jacob Zuma going to take our country forward or be slandered by the world once again? Nelson Mandela has left giant gold shoes, will Zuma become more submissive and try by all means to fit in those shoes or will he fill his own? .

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WELCOME ABOARD SPACe and fasten your seat belts we are taking off‌ It gives me so much pleasure to sincerely show my appreciation to all those that made this journey begin with so many possibilities. I would like to pass my gratitude to my fellow colleagues and social activists for believing in me and the craft of ensuring that this magazine becomes alive, and with greatness, attempts to educate our society about building a socially cohesive country. In particular, I thank the Executive Director of Show Me Your Number, Sir. Mabalane Mfundisi, for affording me an opportunity to unleash my skills and talent, that of publishing and running a magazine of this nature; a magazine seeking not to just educate but build the nation and bring every body together, irrespective of age, race, colour, gender, culture, tribe or nation. I applaud him, for he is not just a Director, but indeed a Social Activist at heart and in action, and it is his work and the work we do together with other activists, that inspired the birth of a magazine that promotes and communicates the work people, organizations, government and the corporate, do and contribute in the strive to build a nation that is patriotic of each other no matter what the situations may be. This is a launch issue of the many issues still to come bi-monthly, consisting of this digital flip magazine and a blog. The blog has been structured in a manner that enables all to engage in pertinent matters relating to building our immediate communities and the society at large. As you would notice we have featured our fellow brothers and sisters such as Mr. Sandile Memela in the cover, Mrs. Stacey Dlamini In Your SPACe, just to mention a few, who give us a view point about South Africa. This publication intends to building our country through its compelling content. Welcome ABOARD and look forward to travel this journey with you.

E d i t o r ’s C h o i c e - w w w . s p a c e m a g a z i n e . c o . z a

Be the change you want to see, engage with me and lets work together to build this nation. Send me an email editorial@spacemagazine.co.za Themba Ndlovu Publishing CEO and Chief Editor


Thoughts and Opinions

RECENT VIEWS FROM TWITTER

If we discovered we could hit a tipping point and destroy the climate, killing us all within 20 years, how quick would corrective action be? Ben Landis @thebenlandis1h

Malema is the Simon Cowell of politics. He is just not going to go away. JohrnĂŠ van Huyssteen @Johrne2h

Are you a Social Activist and have something compelling to say? Share your Thoughts and Opinions and lets us know what you think about your country, community and the world you live in. Follow us on twitter: @SPACEMAGAZINESA Like us on Facebook: www.facebook.com/spacemagazinesa Become part of our discussion board on: www.blog.spacemagazine.coza www.spacemagazine.co.za

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“Our belief is that the mandate bestowed on us as the Sport, Arts & Culture Sector needs to be served with energy and innovation, working in partnership with other SANAC sectors, civil society organisations, corporate sector, and government departments�.

Sport, Arts and Culture in Health

Mabalane Mfundisi South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) Sector Leader for Sport, Arts and Culture Sector (SAC) and Executive Director of Show Me Your Number (SMYN), doing it for the promotion Social Cohesion and the prevention of HIV and AIDS in South Africa

By: Thato Mokoena


Dlala Safe

WOMEN

CSF Chairperson Mmapaseka Steve Letsike (Right) and her deputy, Prudence Mabele (Left)

AT THE APEX OF THE LEADERSHIP OF THE NEW SANAC CIVIL SOCIETY STRUCTURE

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he new SANAC governance structure, which was approved at SANAC Plenary in 2012, intensifies the role of Civil Society in the Council. It is imperative that the SANAC Plenary, its various committees, the Provincial and District Councils on AIDS and the Secretariats at national, provincial, district and local levels are reformed in a way that facilitates the work of implementing the new National Strategic Plan (NSP) on HIV and AIDS, TB and STIs in an unfettered way. An audit of all 17 civil society sectors represented in the South African National AIDS Council (SANAC) found a number of weaknesses and disorganisation. To strengthen the civil society sector's participation within SANAC, it was proposed that a Civil Society Forum (CSF) that will act as an advisory body to the sectors be established. The CSF duly came into exist-

ence in 2012 and it aims to facilitate and maximise the participation of NGOs and other civil society networks, including those representing people living with HIV. The Forum will meet four times a year to review progress of civil society participation and to share resources and information. Elections were held to choose the leadership of the CSF. Two women were elected to lead the Forum.

the sector's governance and coordination structure, the primary mandate of each Civil Society sector and its role in the implementation of NSP 2012-2016, sector representation (constituencies, geographical coverage, key areas of work and implementation capacity), sector NSP Implementation plans, monitoring and evaluation framework and reporting structure, amongst others.

The chair is Mmapaseka Steve Letsike and Prudence Mabele is the deputy. Representatives from various SANAC committees were elected for key roles to strengthen the advisory body. Seventeen (17) SANAC civil society sectors are represented at the Civil Society Forum.

"This is an exciting time for the forum. We have an opportunity to engage and to maximise the Civil Society Sector participation in SANAC to contribute to the broader national HIV response. New leadership is in place and it's waiting to work hard. The new NSP provides the country with the best possible framework with which to proceed and it contains the most upto-date policies for addressing HIV, STIs and TB", says CSF chairperson, Steve Letsike.

The Civil Society Forum hosted its first meeting for 2013 this April and discussed issues such as the Civil Society Forum's terms of reference,

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Dlala Safe

Teeing off for a cause

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he SANAC Sports and Arts & Culture (SAC) sector, in partnership with Spot Media Events and Marketing – a private company that is also a member of the SAC sector - are organising a fun-filled weekend to bid farewell to the winter season. The two will usher in Spring with the aptly titled “Durban Spring Break”, whose headline event will be a game of golf. There will also beach sports and a beach party. The event will take place over three days, 30th August - 1st September at the lush, splendid lawns of the Beachwood Country Club in Umhlanga, KwaZulu-Natal. While fun is the motto for the three-day event, at the heart of the activities is a mission to raise funds for the sector’s plan to deal with HIV and AIDS, TB & STIs.

sporting and entertainment events whom we are asking to provide their platforms for direct engagement with the public to take up HIV Counselling & Testing (HCT) services, medical male circumcision (MMC) and condom use”, Mabalane Mfundisi, chairperson of the Sports and Arts & Culture sector, says of the partnership with Spot Media. Golf, the draw-card of the event, will take place on Friday, 30th August. “The event will appeal to the pockets of golfers for funding to champion the cause to reach zero new HIV infections, zero AIDSrelated deaths and zero discrimination”, Mfundisi adds. “In the words of Dr. Michel Sidibe`, the Executive Director of UNAIDS, ‘in pursuit of social justice and human dignity, we must move decisively from slogan to action. Let us unite our efforts to ensure success’. This golf fund-raising event is an embodiment of this dream of Dr. Sedibe`’, he continues.

In line with the objective, the sector will use the event to ensure that, at least, 20% of the attendees and participants take up HIV counseling and testing services. The sector will also distribute 10 000 condoms and promote medical male circumcision during the three days. “We also want to broach a critical conversation on how best to deal with the “Whenever there are people gathered, syndrome of ‘sugar daddies’. Golfers, we must get HIV services to them with- given their economic status, are possible out being intrusive. To win the war ‘sugar daddies’. So, it is important that against HIV, TB and STIs, we must take they come to the party and help us find the services to the people. We must go solutions to this difficult social phenomewhere the people are most comfortable non that is a contributing factor to new and work with them to change their be- HIV infections. There must be no holy haviour. This is how we will win this war cows, we must face the problem headin the most effective and impactful way”, on”, he says. says Mac Biyela, the proprietor and founder of Spot Media and organiser of Ethekwini Municipality mayor, James the Durban Spring Break. Nxumalo, who is also the chairperson of the Ethekwini Municipality Local AIDS Spot Media has been hosting the Durban Council will also participate. After the 18 Spring Break since 2008 and last year the hole golf game, the programme will lead event attracted just over 10 000 people. all guests to an inspiring evening of networking, presentations on the latest sta“This approach is in line with the plan of tistics on HIV and dinner, thus giving evethe sector to ensure that partnerships ryone an opportunity to share their ideas are developed with owners of various and expertise on what is to be done.

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Dlala Safe about our health. At the rally, men will show their commitment to improving their health outcomes and that of their partners by taking up HIV testing and screening for TB and other ailments. Join the call for safer and healthier communities, and add your voice to the other men as they say in unison:

NOT IN MY NAME NATIONAL MEN’S RALLY

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he SANAC Men’s Sector jointly with Brothers for Life is hosting the National Men’s Rally on the th 24 August 2013 at Johannesburg Stadium from 9am. This rally is the first of its kind and it seeks to mobilise up to 50 000 men from all walks of life to join together in proclaiming their stance against all kinds of violence and their commitment to curbing the spread of violence and diseases in our communities. This intervention forms part of the programme that started with the national dialogue with men hosted by the Deputy President, Hon Kgalema Motlhanthe in April this year. South Africa is experiencing alarming levels of violence, on a daily basis we hear, see and read of the rape and killing of women and children, or the horrific targeting of lesbians and the killing of men. Gender based violence has reached unbearable proportions and it is us men who have to put a stop to it! The rally aims to bring together

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South Africa is experiencing alarming levels of violence, on a daily basis we hear, see and read of the rape and killing of women and children, or the horrific targeting of lesbians and the killing of men.

NO WOMAN SHALL BE RAPED IN NAME! NO WOMAN SHALL BE INFECTED IN MY NAME! NO CHILD SHALL BE KILLED IN MY NAME! NO HOMOPHOBIA IN MY NAME! In addition to the above, the rally seeks to mobilise men across South Africa to take up the challenge of knowing their HIV status, promote health seeking behaviors such as Medical Male Circumcision and create violence free homes and communities. The rally aims to provide a platform to thousands as a show of solidarity to the women of South Africa currently under siege as well as lead by example in the uptake of HIV testing and other services.

prominent and ordinary South African men from all walks of life, from ordinary homes, business, labour, political leadership, sports, and other sectors to unite as one voice in calling for the end to violence against women and children. We urge you to stand up The theme “NOT IN MY NAME” and say “Enough! This cannot seeks to address the fact that a continue, NOT IN MY NAME”. large majority of men do not commit acts of abuse but are however Beyond violence, every man has seen as silent on this issue. It the responsibility and opportunity seeks to get this majority not only to stem the spread of disease in- to speak out against gender based cluding HIV and TB in the commu- violence but to actively demonnity by actively taking up and pro- strate where they stand on the moting good health habits. Only issue as well as the issues of fami30% of men have tested for HIV ly and community health and weland therefore fewer men are on fare by completely rejecting genanti-retro viral treatment, even der inequalities, violence, rape less men are aware of how to perpetuated by some men in our take care of their sexual health communities. and this rally will give us as men the opportunity to learn more www.spacemagazine.co.za


HOW MANY SEX WORKERS IN SOUTH AFRICA? Written By Coceka Nogoduka and Khopotso Bodibe

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ex work is often referred to as the oldest profession. We know that sex workers exist and that they operate in every major city, as well as in rural areas, but until now there has been no indication of how many sex workers there are in the country. A new study of South African sex workers has revealed that South Africa has 153 000 sex workers (figures range between 132 000 and 182 000). The National Sex Worker Population Size Estimation study was conducted in recognition of the fact that sex workers are highly vulnerable to HIV and AIDS. Since sex worker numbers were not known until now, developing robust and evidence informed responses for HIV-prevention pro-

gramming suited to this key population group has been difficult. Information gathered in the study will inform the development of a National Sex Work Strategic Plan, linked to the NSP.

cisions on how to create an enabling environment for the provision and accessibility of HIVprevention services for sex workers. The study was conducted across 12 sites in all nine provinces choSex work is often sen because they ranged from low referred to as the to high population density, have a vibrant female sex work trade, oldest profession and/or a high proportion of immigrants and economic migrants. The estimate includes establishFurthermore, to convince policy ment-based, street-based and makers and funders of the exist- home-based sex workers. ence and magnitude of any public health problem, it is necessary to The study was conducted by the have a reliable estimate of the Sex Worker Education and Advosize of the population at risk. cacy Task-force, with funding and technical support from SANAC. The study marks a new chapter in Full details about the study were South Africa's response to HIV and released at the forthcoming South AIDS, as it will provide govern- African AIDS conference in Durment and other stakeholders with ban, which was held from 18 – 21 data to make evidence-based de- June this year. www.spacemagazine.co.za

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Dlala Safe Dlala Safe

SOCCER

Thiery Henry

IS THE SOLUTION TO END AIDS

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rassroot Soccer (GRS) South Africa's Managing Director, James Donald, and Board Chair, Risana Zitha hosted a breakfast briefing to various stakeholders at Johannesburg Country Club in Auckland Park on Friday, 26th July 2013. At the end of the briefing, all present agreed with GRS that soccer has the power to end AIDS, stop gender based violence and put young people to work. The briefing was attended by amongst others Mrs. Zanele Mbeki, wife of former President Thabo Mbeki, Dr. Fareed Abdullah (SANAC CEO), Mabalane Mfundisi (Executive Director of Show Me Your Number and Chairperson of

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the SANAC Sport, Arts & Culture Sector), Themba Ndlovu (Publishing CEO and Chief Editor SPACe Magazine), Ms. Lebo Ramafoko (Soul City CEO), Prof. Tawana Kupe (Wits University), Prof Tshilidzi Marhwala (University of Johannesburg) and Dr. Robin Petersen from SAFA. Also present were representatives from UNAIDS, the National Prosecution Authority, Nike South Africa, Anglo American.

referrals for testing and treatment. GRS is a highly respected international sport for development NGO that has been active in South Africa since 2006. We serve over 40 000 children a year in SA and we're looking to raise our profile and increase our impact across the country. The work of GRS forms part of the interventions by various organizations in the sport, arts & culture sector that is contributing to the realization of the objectives as set out in Grassroot Soccer is preventing the National Strategic Plan on HIV in Africa by using the world’s HIV, TB and STIs. most popular game to break down barriers, build trust, edu- To learn more about Grassroot cate young people to adopt Soccer, visit their website at healthy behaviors, and provide www.grassrootsoccer.org www.spacemagazine.co.za


News Updates

Our Madiba, 95years young! Written By Melissa Moodley

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he long walk to freedom is a journey each and every South African citizen wears with nobility. To us, as people of this great Nation, the journey continues, deep into the 21st century. Irrevocable and undistinguished by measurement, paying homage to our father of the land, former President Dr. Nelson Mandela, we all annually unite for one day in history to ensure the sentiments and struggles of our forefathers are acknowledged and encourage the same fight for freedom, justice, equality, unity and humanity are alive, strong and remain the responsibility for each and every one of us. July 18th 2013, Mandela Day, marked a remarkable feat for our Tata as he turned a grand 95 years old. Bittersweet sentiments crossed the lips of almost every citizen on Mandela Day this year, in this, the rainbow nation. From posters all over Gandhi Square heralding our great father to signage adorned on the windows of well known banks and corporations throughout town wishing Madiba well on this momentous occasion.

and to symbolize the 67 years that Nelson Mandela served South Africa, fighting for social justice and human rights. Since 2009, the UN also declared July 18th as International Nelson Mandela Day, spreading the initiative of good will across the globe.

Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi and party leaders lent a hand to paint the Sisters missionary in Durban. Gwede Mantashe, the ANC Secretary General also got in on the action planting 66 trees at Thokoza Park in Soweto. Police Minister Nathi Mthethwa was also seen to interact with the public The 67 minute initiative is not to at the Orlando Police Station, reonly spend your 67 minutes on ports the Times newspaper. the day focused on helping your community but rather to continue Mandel day re-directs everyone’s this practice everyday moving for- moral compass to remember who ward to secure equality, justice we are, where we were, what we and human rights in South Africa. were, how far we’ve come, how No matter how small the action or far we have to go and how we gesture, the aim to establish present. change, make a difference for the betterment of society and spread So readers, leaders of tomorrow, the message of hope and action citizens of this great Nation, I urge and ultimately love for one anoth- you to think seriously about your er, regardless of race, gender and 67 minutes and those thereafter heritage. to what you can contribute to encourage the positivity, fight for As the Star newspaper reported, justice and let Mandela’s mission even politician got their hands and goal be reached though our duty for Mandela Day, as presi- hands. dent Zuma launched a low-cost settlement in Danville, Pretoria Let Mandela day serve as a reWest assisting low income black minder that we live with possibiland white families. Helen Zille, ity, we live with opportunities the DA leader, joined forces with abound for our ancestors who MEC for cultural affairs to visit an were not so fortunate, we have after school sport and cultural ac- proven that multi racial societies On Mandela Day, people around tivities centre in Kraaifontein, can exist in harmony, let’s keep the world are asked to volunteer Cape Town. Mandela's fire and truth eternally 67 minutes to charity in honour burning. Do your part NOW! www.spacemagazine.co.za

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Safe TheDlala Giving Hand

The Different Kind of a Giving Hand This NPO believes that young people need to be masters of their own destiny by being active and aims to equip young people with the necessary tools to be able to empower themselves and their communities By Palesa Rose Nqambaza

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outh Moving Up (YMU) is a registered NonProfit Organization. Its existence is inspired by the South African youth, especially from disadvantaged backgrounds. It was founded in 2010 by a 20 year old girl who was facing various challenges as a young woman and realised that there is a need for organisations that can help the youth get through the struggles they face.

and YMU became a result of that. YMU is based in Kagiso (Mogale City) and aims to not only impact the lives of those living in Kagiso but beyond, and it gradually continues to grow. The organization has a team of young people that is dedicated to changing the lives of other young people whichever way possible.

tools needed for the youth to succeed in life. The projects undertaken include mentorship, active citizenship seminars and food security projects among others.

YMU believes that young people, especially those that come from very disadvantages backgrounds, need to be motivated and reminded of their potential, and it is for Because YMU is passionate about this reason the mentorship events the youth, is has undertaken a are constant on the YMU proShe wanted to create a platform number of projects to ensure gram. where young people could change youth development takes place by the lives of other young people, making available the necessary

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Moreover, through active citizenship seminars, the organization aims to restore power back to young people. This NPO believes that young people need to be masters of their own destiny by being active and aims to equip young people with the necessary tools to be able to empower themselves and their communities. Through the food security projects, it teaches peo-

ple (youth in particular) how to grow their own food in small spaces. They believe that by doing so, food insecurity can be alleviated. YMU will also be working with other organisations such as the Centre for the Study of Violence and Reconciliation (CSVR) and Parents Against Drug Abuse (PADA) in various projects that are beneficial to the community.

Moreover, it will also be opening up membership to the public which will give young people that have always wanted to make a difference, but never got the opportunity, a platform where they can impact the lives of others. Their long term goal is to expand throughout South Africa and make their impact felt throughout the entire country.

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Dlala STORY Safe COVER “Social Cohesion has not just become the new buzz word. It has been given this intellectual academic connotation which is intimidating and makes people scared. People shouldn’t remove or distance social cohesion from their day-to-day experiences and practises.” says Memela.

Sandile Memela Chief Director: Social Cohesion RSA: National Department of Arts and Culture

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A SOCIAL COHESION PATRIOT TURNED PUBLIC SERVANT Written By Anne Zwane

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:30 pm in Pretoria, and all these formalities begin to make one wonder if you are dressed appropriately to be confined in this government walls. Not sure how to address him, Sandile Memela, award-winning journalist, cultural critic, author, polemicist, an intellectually provocative writer and Chief Director of Social Cohesion at the national Department of Arts & Culture insists that I call him by his first name as he is not much of a traditionalist. “I would like to think of myself as an urban Zulu animal” he said, smiling so proudly. The term Social Cohesion has become common in South African development debates, featuring in government planning documents, media debates, academic panels and parliamentary hearings. “Social Cohesion has not just become the new buzz word. It has been given this intellectual academic connotation which is intimidating and makes people scared. People shouldn’t remove or distance social cohesion from their day-to-day experiences and practises.” says Memela. “ We (government) define social cohesion as a degree of inclusion or integration which manifests itself in caring for your fellow South African citizens and other people who are here and live here. “ Memela’s job as Chief Director of Social Cohesion is to primarily see to the implementation of the resolutions that were taken at the national social cohesion summit that was held in Kliptown on the 4th and 5th July 2012. He leads, coordinates and oversees the implementation of those resolutions across government, in partnership with civil society organisations. His love and passion for South Africa makes him compatible for his job, “I am a patriotic South African but a critical one. I’ve got the interest of the country and its people in my heart. I’m guided in terms of my actions, attitude and behaviour towards acting in a manner that pro-

jects or portrays very positive good dent remind us that there are still isview of the values and principles of sues that need to be resolved.” this country.” Legacies of colonialism and apartheid Promoting social cohesion does not continue to unequally define and derequire you to do anything new than limit life chances for South Africans what you presumably have been doing. nearly two decades into post-apartheid He says with a firm and inviting smile era which has South Africa ranked as “To be an agent of social cohesion in one of the most unequal ( both socially this country, all you need to do is be and economically) countries in the caring, proud and cultivating a behav- world. He believes this is because of iour and attitude that reveals or con- the dispossession of land and the mofirms that you’re caring and proud. nopolisation of the wealth of the counRefer to the bible of South Africa – that try by entrepreneurs or “so-called is the constitution and if you uphold all business people”. He continues to exthe values, principles and ideals that plain that the institutionalised racist are in the constitution then you are way of life promotes inequality home and dry. It’ll be very easy for you amongst people based on skin colour to be an active citizen who encourages and class. Lack of social cohesion proinclusivity where everyone has got a vides fertile ground for both interpersense of belonging and ownership.” sonal and collective violence which is There are five factors that challenge the seed for self-hate and mutual selfsocial cohesion - economic inequality destruction. Such things plague this (resulting in poverty, crime and unem- country and keep us awake at night. It ployment), spatial division, class (and continues to prevail and define our how we define or identify ourselves), position and status in life. prejudice and discrimination (including racism and xenophobia). “What we lack is a collective political will to solve the problems that confront The primary mandate of the Depart- us as a people. We have resigned ourment of Arts and Culture is to promote selves and rely on other people to do active citizenry where people have a things for us and this must stop” says sense of belonging and ownership de- Memela as he positions his spectacles spite the different implications and in concern. “Everything that happens complexities that come with being a in this country is a direct result of what diverse country. The department pro- we do or don’t do”. motes this inclusivity through its custodianship of the national anthem, na- The dichotomy of ‘black and white’ tional flag and national order and work- seem to be more important in social ing together with other departments. cohesion discussions than xenophobia According to a 2013 January Oxfam which may be viewed as the country’s report,” Extreme wealth and inequality ‘socially explosive fault line’ because undermines societies. It leads to far people think social cohesion is about less social mobility”. Memela agrees the coming together of black and with this statement as he believes white. there is no better way to capture or reflect one of the hindrances to social “We all have to be agents of what we cohesion. “Until we are able to uplift want to see happen. This is a mission the material well-being of the majority critical component of deepening deof the people in this country, it will be mocracy and society cannot leave this difficult for us to have a socially cohesive society because economic ine- to government alone. It is part of our quality is at the heart of inferiority, dis- collective effort”. crimination and confused identities. Incidents such as the Marikana inciwww.spacemagazine.co.za

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Giggles 1) UKUNGABEKEZELANI

Actor and Comedian out of SPACe:

Walter Mthethwa known to me and you as “Nyambose” in the drama series on DSTV Mzansi Magic - ISIBAYA

———————————— Umshayeli wetekisi udlala umculo kamaskandi evulele iphimbo lomsakazo phezulu, kwaphawula uIsaac - oyedwa wabagibeli - ngokukhulu ukunengwa " Driver awuvale lomculo awuhambelani neze nathi esikholwa uJesu Krestu" Umshayeli wamkluluza ngeso elibomvu lebhabhalazi. Ngokukhulu ukucasuka wamisa itekisi umshayeli, wavula isivalo sabagibeli wathi kuIsaac," Ngesikhathi sikaJesu ayengekho amatekisi ngakho ke yehla emotweni ulinde imbongolo noma ikameli" ————————————– 2) IMIKHUBA YENSANGO ————————————UMmeli wabhema insango nabangani bakhe yamdaka futhi yamlambisa kakhulu. Behlukana wahamba uMmeli waya ekhaya ukuyokudla ngoba zase zimhwayile. Uma engena edlini wathola umama wakhe ehleli nomunye umama bezixoxela nje. Wethula isigqoko wasibeka eduze namabhodwe okudla osekuphekiwe. Waphaka ipapa, wavula elomshibo waphaka nakulo. Uma sekumele avale ibhodwe lomshibo ngesivalo salo, wathatha isigqoko sakhe wavala ngaso engaboni ukuthi wenza njalo - wathatha isivalo sebhodwe wasifaka ekhwapheni wayohlala phansi wadla. Zidakamizwa ke lezo! ---------------------------------------------------------

HAHAHAHAHAHA … Very Funny! Do you think you have more funnier jokes than what our “Nyambose” has to offer? Email your jokes to editorial@spacemagazine.co.za or post them on our page www.facebook.com/ spacemagazinesa or visit our blog and post a comment on www.blog.spacemagazine.co.za

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People of Statue The benefits of focusing on the youth are two fold; they’re for the companies, institutions, economy and so forth. They’re also for the creation of a new generation of doers that’ll be passed on further.

RISING ABOVE ALL ODDS TO BE A PHILANTROPIST Written By Anne Zwane

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rowing up in a rural village in KwaZulu-Natal and only encountering a library in grade 10, Buhlebethu Dlamini, Founder and Managing Director of Young & Able, has proven that you can be anything you want to be. When asked who Buhle Dlamini is, he answered; “Often I’m described as a professional speaker, entrepreneur and author. But I’m a husband and father before everything else.”Social enterprise has enabled him to impact his community and environment (which is what he loves). Having studied youth development to understand the process of human development and what the key elements of activating human potential are, he believes that everyone is born with a certain talent and potential but it doesn’t necessarily mean that potential is fulfilled.

Dlamini’s interest and love for youth development assures him that the youth of South Africa are able to perform at different platforms given the opportunity because of their creativity and ability.” I believe that the only way we’re going to secure the future is by focusing on our youth because that is the quickest investment you can make because you start to see fruit within a couple of years”, He says confidently. The benefits of focusing on the youth are two fold; they’re for the companies, institutions, economy and so forth. They’re also for the creation of a new generation of doers that’ll be passed on further.

Dlamini’s presentations have been described as entertaining, unforgettable and inspirational because he uses his personal story which enables him to connect to people. He brings “We all have a role to play in acti- an element of humour so that he vating our potential and living up to brings insight with an entertainment our fullest abilities but we need sup- value. port from a young age. We have to acknowledge the two sides of a coin; “Your background plays a huge role as a society we need to provide a in setting you up and with enough platform for young people to activate initiative, determination and committheir potential and the other side, is ment, any individual can defy the that young people need to stop this odds of where they came from beculture of entitlement and expecting cause they have the power to do so”, things to be given to them.” said Dlamini. Travelling the world has

taught him that people are the same because they all have a desire to be heard and be better and count for something. That we need to appreciate the differences of different people . All the success he has achieved is motivation for him to achieve more. It also acts as a scorecard. It’s about progression and understanding the potential to grow. It also enables him to stand in front of people during his presentations as proof and not a contradictor. “In my chosen success, the success is in the impact I make with what I’m doing. I do think that the bank balance is also an important aspect because it is another way I measure my success.” he says, “In order to be successful, firstly define success for yourself because failure to do that, the world will define it for you and you’ll never grasp it. After defining it, set specific goals towards achieving your success. Achieve one goal at a time.” The initiatives and organisations he is involved in encourage South Africans to live their values for good and shape their future because all need to be more involved in determining the future of our country.

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Out and About

Frank Mabaso “AKA” Tribefranko ready for the Decks

Tabz the Musician performing live @ Socialize Café in Joburg

Singer, Nomalungelo from Swaziland performing at Socialize Café in Joburg.

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Hip Hop Crew know as PRETTY Boyz performing @ Socialize

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Lebo Leseilane @ Socialize CafĂŠ in Joburg

Nomalungelo, Clement and Zim @ Socialize CafĂŠ in Joburg

Touch, Wanda, Clement, Mojalefa and Emmanuel

Maryjane Fluff the MC @ Socialize Cafe

Thaso, Chanteh, Siya and Tshego www.spacemagazine.co.za

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Courtesy of Umuzi Photo Club www.umuzi.org

Agent of Change

A New Form of Activism Written by Anne Zwane Issue 1-Vol 1: Aug –Sep 2013

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New Yorker living in South Africa with a passion for media and youth development, David Dini started Umuzi Photo Club. Combining these two passions, Dini started the photo club in 2009 which provided a creative outlet for young people to engage with social issues in a fun and interactive manner. 24

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Courtesy of Umuzi Photo Club www.umuzi.org

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New Yorker living in South Africa with a passion for media and youth development, David Dini started Umuzi Photo Club. Combining these two passions, Dini started the photo club in 2009 which provided a creative outlet for young people to engage with social issues in a fun and interactive manner.

country, too many people are speaking to the youth but not listening to them. Not understanding or engaging with young people on the problems they’re facing. “It was time to buck the trend and make change in dialogue, where young people are built up to speak for themselves on issues facing them”, says Andrew Levy, Managing Director of Umuzi Photo Club. Umuzi focuses on multi-media as a platform to speak to other young people through creative means to tell their stories and get their messages across because they believe creativity is the language of the youth.

The project has since become a household name in youth activism. It is excited to provide a platform for young people to take back their voices in a creative, interactive and productive manner since the youth are battling to have a voice in their communities because of certain circumstances, regardless of the rich Their I Am An Activist has been history of youth activism in South one of their successes to date. Africa. The photographs were captured in black and white because, “it is They started a different youth a very powerful medium in phoempowerment because in our tography as it de-colours the

message and makes it plain to the eye, resulting in strong messages built by beautiful composition”, explains Levy. Through creative activism, they hope to achieve a generation of young people activated by their own will and drive to create a stronger, free and excited youth culture that will be known as the doer generation. They have a number a number of exhibitions throughout the year in different places around the world and their most exciting initiative that’s coming up is their photography academy. It is a one-year course that looks to build skills and provide on the job experience. For more information, you can email Umuzi at info@umuzi.org or check out their website www.umuzi.org

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Show Me Your Number The Africa Day Sport Festival was the culmination of the City of Joburg’s Africa Day celebrations organized by Show Me Your Number working with the City of Joburg’s Departments of Community Development and the Department of Social Development through the Migration Unit.

May 2013. Given the lead role of the Department of Community Development on issues of social cohesion within the City’s Growth and Development Strategy, the Sport and Recreation department played a leading role whilst the Migration Unit of the Department of Social Development (which houses the JMAP) would provide strategic support in terms of content and participation of the schools.

AFRICA DAY SPORT FESTIVAL

Well done to the winners! The stage is yours, the moment is your own to cherish and Africa is smiling proudly at your achievements”, these were the words of Ms. Dudu Maseko, the Executive Director of the City of Joburg’s Department of Community Development. She was addressing the learners from Liberty College from Alexandra and Kelekitso High School from Meadowlands.

union of people, and not merely a union of governments” said His Excellency John D. Mahama, President of Ghana during his address during the celebration of the Africa Day in May 2013 to the Pan Africa Parliament based in Midrand, South Africa. The words are a reflection and an embodiment of why we do the things we keep doing to celebrate Africa and being African. The Africa History Week and the Africa Sports Day Festival are steps in the path to realise the vision as espoused by the Ghanaian President.

The Africa Day Sport Festival was the culmination of the City of Joburg’s Africa Day celebrations organized by Show Me Your Number working with the City of Joburg’s Departments of Community Development and the The content for Africa History Week Department of Social Development were organised as part of the City of through the Migration Unit. Joburg’s Migration Unit Africa Day activities and these included poetry “Now is the time for the Pan African and debate by the learners from the Parliament to solidify the energy of different schools in Johannesburg. solidarity and hope that is sweeping across the continent. The African Un- The finals for poetry and debate took ion must hasten its evolution into a place at Soweto Theatre on the 24th

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For the Africa Day Sport Festival, football was identified as the key component for the day. Show Me Your Number was given the role to lead, working closely with Africa Diaspora Corps and supported closely by the Migration Unit and the Sport and Recreation Unit of the City of Joburg. Other member NGO’s of the Johannesburg Migration Advisory Panel were mandated to support and help mobilise their constituency for the day of the event. This mobilization was poor, but the spirit of the football players from the 8 schools was not going to be dampened by the small crowds on the Africa Day. “To make the City of Joburg a world class African city means two things. These are getting dirty and doing work that others shy away from, and secondly promoting collaboration between the City and the migrant communities. Sport, arts and culture are central for the City of Joburg to get closer to the migrant communities and their South African counter-parts” said Wandile Zwane, Executive Head of the City’s Department of Social Development.


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Show Me Your Number

LOVE JOZI

AT TSHIRELETSO GENERATION PRIMARY SCHOOL

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ince 1 March 2013, Show Me Your Number has been running an after school sport programme at the Tsireletso Primary School where we have been working with 150 kids between the ages of 7 – 11 years. These activities take place weekly on Tuesday, Wednesday & Thursday from 14h00 – 15h30. At Show Me Your Number we have named this project NANANA TAKE ME HOME PROJECT. When he was a young boy, Johannesburg Executive Mayor Parks Tau was a learner at Tshireletso Primary School, and this is more reasons why the learners form this school to do well despite some of the psychosocial challenges that they experience daily. Greatness emerges out of adversity at times. Show Me Your Number engaged with the school as part of its responsibilities towards the implementation of the City of Joburg’s Mayoral Spousal Office commitment in 2012 to offer sport at this school and add more schools in 2014. The school through the Principal ensured that the 150 kids are recruited to participate in the project. Each selected learners was provided with an indemnity form to take to their parents to fill in the form and sign the form, also providing their contact details. We have the file with the forms of each kid, and each time the learner does not attend, the parent is

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communicated with the alert and lifeskills and motivation. them and find out why the learner When you are between the ages did not attend. of seven and eleven years, all you want to do after school is play. The programme has been imple- But this programme has brought mented since March 2013, and to another element of play with a date we have mainly experienced meaning” says Mrs. Pilisiwe Twala success whilst there were chal- -Tau, the founder and Chairperlenges here and there. The suc- son of the City of Joburg Mayoral cesses far outweigh the challeng- Spousal Office. es such that indicating these challenges is insignificant. Show Me To expand more on the lifeskills, Your Number has deployed three the coaches share with the kids coaches Lerato Phetoane, Fikile key lifeskills and positive message Sithole and Sibongile Khumalo based on the core work of Show (each working with 50 kids) to im- Me Your Number which is using plement the activities. The coach- HIV and social cohesion message es are Show Me Your Number to instill lifeskills and leadership Ambassadors and they were well amongst the kids. Kids being kids known women soccer players dur- means the coaches have to negoing the early days of Banyana Ban- tiate the naughtyness of some of yana and Basetsana as they repre- the kids, but in the main, these sented the country in these teams kids area happy, committed and whilst they were playing for So- enjoyable bunch to work with. weto Ladies FC. According to the school Principal, The Show Me Your Number Mrs Ghardy Mokgethi she says of coaches are assisted by the youth this project “Most of our learners volunteer coaches who are from are enjoying themselves and this the community of Meadowlands makes our learners enjoy school. who have a long history with Our mission is to make learners Tshireletso Primary School. To have interest in learning and empower the coaches on delivery Show Me Your Number is helping of the after school sport pro- us realise our mission. We are gramme, the coaches have been very grateful for this partnership” through intensive training provid- The programme will run until 29th ed by Nike, Sport for Social of Nov 2013. In November 2013 Change Network, University of during the United Nations ChilJohannesburg and Sport for All. dren’s Day, we will arrange a funrun/ walk and sport jamboree for This training has greatly assisted the learners from Tshireletso Prithe coaches in implementation of mary School and other schools in the activities that include ath- Meadowlands. letics, football, small sided games www.spacemagazine.co.za


BRUCE RAMOKADI IS ATTRACTING MEN TO UNDERGO MEDICAL MALE CIRCUMCISION

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n 1995, Bruce was a 20 year old full of energy, very speedy and he was banging goals for Orlando Pirates. Bruce Ramokadi signed for Orlando Pirates in 1993 when he was just 18-years-old. He won his first league medal with the club a year later with Pirates lifting the NSL title. He retired from professional football prematurely at the tender age of 28 due to a niggling knee injury in 2003. Bruce played in the 1995 CAF Champions Cup final where Orlando Pirates beat Asec Mimosa of Ivory Coast to become the first Southern hemisphere club to do so. Bruce scored the winning goal against Algeria’s JS Kabylie to help Pirates lift the CAF African Super Cup in 1996. Bruce is very decorated and whilst at Orlando Pirates he won the following medals: NSL (1994), CAF Champions Cup (1995), CAF African Super Cup (1996), Bob Save Super Bowl and BP Top 8 (both in 1996), Telkom Charity Cup (1993,

1995, 1997, 1999). He is also a Silver medalist for Coca-Cola Cup (1995) and the Bob Save Super Bowl (1998).

dure. In his own words, Bruce says “To be an agent of positive change, one must be ready to lead from the front. That is why I circumcised and now I speak with Since he retired, Bruce has been authority when I tell other men to involved with football at level of join me”. youth coaching and in the recent years his focus has been on play- Bruce is the public face of Show ing an Ambassadorial role for Me Your Number’s Medical Male Show Me Your Number. In 2006, Circumcision campaign titled Bruce was the first Ambassador of “Bruce Ramokadi Circumcision Show Me Your Number, when he Dialogues. He is also an active single handedly addressed the member of Sport Heroes Walk youth of Bekkersdal in Wes- Against AIDS (that is led by Cyntonaria Local Municipality about thia Tshaka) where he represents HIV prevention. At the time, it football players. Heroes are was not fashionable to speak made, and Bruce is part of those about circumcision and HIV pre- heroes who use their hero status vention. to ensure that football remains relevant to the fans by playing a In 2012, Bruce Ramokadi formed role in social cohesion and nation part of the Show Me Your Num- building. In many weeks and ber Ambassadors who were months to come, Bruce will be trained to mobilize men to take engaging with men to encourage up medical circumcision as part of them to consider undergoing HIV HIV prevention. So moved was Counselling and Testing, medical Bruce that he decided that before circumcision and at all times to he can recruit anyone, he should use condoms. be the first to undergo the procewww.spacemagazine.co.za

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Activist of the Month

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olling his tobacco with an apparatus I have not seen prior to this, Sfiso ‘Atomza’ Buthelezi schooled me on being a black man in South Africa through his eyes and knowledge. “The tobacco incites conversations because people confuse my rolling of tobacco with marijuana which gives me a chance to educate people on marijuana and its history,” he explains, “Everything I am started when I realised I was different from everyone else in my circle. I then actively tried to be different in everything I do. I enjoy rolling and smoking it.” Raised in the east of Johannesburg by a single mother, Buthelezi’s perspective was influenced by the way his mom brought him up. Buthelezi is a musician and a writer who writes about different things and people and sometimes people aren’t happy about what he writes. “I take my Black Africaness seriously and of late, I have become less apologetic about how I feel about things.

Sfiso ‘Atomza’ Buthelezi Writer and Vocalist from The Muffinz

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For the longest time we have been controlled by fear and at some point I succumbed to being silenced. I advocate my truth and speak my truth because I believe it’s true and that’s the reason why I share it” said Buthelezi who graduated in Communications. He felt that he would have a bigger impact through music than sitting in a little cubicle pushing paper work because he can reach a lot more people through music which is the love of his life.


AN ADVOCACY OF TRUTH Written By Anne Zwane “Activism is direct and confrontational tackling of grievances, doing something about an issue that one deems unfair. I’m not really an activist. I just exercise my freedom because when you educate yourself, especially with the law, you start to realise that people in possession of power (whether political, economical or religious) often abuse their subordinates because they (subordinates) are usually unaware of their rights.” Buthelezi informs me.

ple who take interest in history as a blueprint of how they’re supposed to live. Buthelezi’s concern is that people don’t know what BCM is therefore associate it with

“History is to me what

food is to humans. It’s the basis of who we are. History encompasses many things. It is education and knowledge and allows us to learn from other people’s experiences.

“History is to me what food is to humans. It’s the basis of who we are. History encompasses many things. It is education and knowledge and allows us to learn from other people’s experiences. being ‘deep’ or Rastafarian or having nappy/natural hair and it is not We need to understand that about that. there’s a history attached to everything that we know and why Black Consciousness in a nutshell we’re having this conversation in is about understanding your place English is because of that history”. as a black person and being self Philosophies of Steve Biko and the dependent. “It advocates the use Black Consciousness Movement of our language to prevent the (BCM) are adopted by black peo- African way of life from ending.”

Buthelezi assures me. Many young people are not getting into politics and this has become an issue of discussion and different conclusions have been made. “We’re creatures of habit and as a political as your mind may be, your social status may not allow you to be. Youngsters are afraid of sacrifice. Who is willing to quit their job and pursue the stream of bettering South Africa? Also, the assumption is that politics are boring but young people don’t take a second to think about who will run the country when these old people die. Politics is a game of lives and for the longest time the lives of black people have been taken for granted and we see that in Sharpville and Marikana”. “I carry my blackness everywhere and people shouldn’t be offended by it”.

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EVENTS

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UBUNTU CALABASH STORY OF HOPE AND MUSIC EXTRAVAGANZA HELD AS PART OF THE MANDELA MONTH CELEBRATIONS AT SOWETO THEATRE ON THE 18 & 19 JULY 2013. ORGANIZED BY SHOW ME YOUR NUMBER AND IMPLEMENTED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE FOLLIWING PARTIES: Lerato “ka yise” Letsoso Hlangabeza Mhlongo Afrika Awake Afrika Diaspora Forum UNHCR THE FOLLOWING ORGANIZATIONS GAVE TREMENDOUS SUPPORT IN ENSURING THE PROJECT AND CELEBRATIONS WERE IN ORDER: City of Joburg: Dep. Of Community Development City of Joburg: Dep. Of Social Development The Mayoral Spousal Office

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Commemorating Womens Month

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Courtesy of Umuzi Photo Club www.umuzi.org www.spacemagazine.co.za

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Community

Photo by: Mpho Mogaki

Everyday Humanitarians Salvation Army By Banyana Mshungu

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orld Humanitarian day is a time to celebrate those who face obstacles in an attempt to help others. This day is a day that broadens the help that is paid to many. As we draw closer to this annual celebration of 19 August, I visited Salvation Army at Carl Sithole Centre in Klipspruit Soweto to find out about their contributions to humanity. Walking into Carl Sithole Centre in and not knowing what to expect out, I was met by a Mr Tero Saajoranta, the administrator of Klipspruit's Salvation Army. Throughout the interview I felt a sense of warmth and comfort coming from Saajoranto, which shed some light as to why he is the best person for the job.

ganisation which was founded by William Booth in 1865. It now provides services to more than 120 countries through 175 languages. Booth began the organisation through the philosophy of "Heart to God, Hand to Man". According to the website, "Salvation Army under God cannot be fully understood without facing up to the addressing issues of communities." This organisation commits itself to helping people in need and it maintains its growth by preaching the word of God in everything that is done in the organisation, globally.

The Carl Sithole centre has an impressive coordination and is methodically organised. With world Salvation Army is a Christian or- humanitarian day approaching,

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Saajoranto explained what the day means to Salvation Army," Everyday is humanitarian day here at Salvation Army because we incorporate the values and principles that are emphasized annually during the celebration of this day. We pride ourselves with the work we do and how many people we’ve helped through our organisation." “There are 90 orphans that live at the centre, with some having lived here their whole lives, this place has become their home”, says Saajoranta. “There are also 60 children who attend the in house nursery though some are not residents at the centre which also applies to the other 300 children that attend the primary school that is also located inside the premises of the centre”.


With this many children to take care of on a daily basis I continued to ask him what daily challenges they come across as staff. "This is a big centre, and because it has been in existence for this long some of the homes are not in the best conditions. Therefore we are faced with broken pipes, leaks and many other inconveniences, which need maintenance daily." This all needs money, which is sometimes money they do not have. A plan to expand some of the homes in the centre was brought to my attention. The homes are divided according to gender and age of the children, as the children grow older they're then moved to the relevant homes. Saajoranta explained the need and demand for larger accommodation but because of the shortage of space and insufficient funding, these demands are met with decline. Furthermore, plans to renovate have also been left stagnant due to lack of resources. One house been recently renovated by funding that they had received. There other homes are still in

place but need some work because the buildings were built many years ago. He emphasized the need for funding or building

Salvation Army is a Christian organisation which was founded by William Booth in 1865. It now provides services to more than 120 countries through 175 languages. Booth began the organisation through the philosophy of "Heart to God, Hand to Man". According to the website, "Salvation Army under God cannot be fully understood without facing up to the addressing issues of communities."

materials to make these renovations possible so that they can rest easy about the safety of the children who are accommodated there. The centre does allow volunteers for those who want to assist the centre in anyway but procedures need to be followed before they can accept a person as a volunteer. These procedures ensure that they do not accept people who might bring harm to the children or the organisation at large. Saajoranta and his wife gave up their life in Finland to come and serve people in South African communities so one can never question their commitment towards helping people who are in need. "This is what the Lord has called me to do, I could not see myself doing anything else", he assured me. A tour around the extremely neat and organised centre took me by surprise because the playing field of the children was clean, and given the nature of children, one would expect it to be littered. Seeing the faces of very happy and content toddlers was the most fulfilling part of the day because they brought joy to the day. This was overall a good experience and we at Space Magazine can only wish the best for Carl Sithole centre and Salvation Army as a whole. To continue doing what they do for the less fortunate, to reach greater heights and for many more blessings. For donations, please contact Carl Sithole Centre Tel: (011) 527 1109/25 Email: carlsitadmin@lantic.net or visit the Salvation Army Website www.salvationarmy.org.za

Photo by: Mpho Mogaki www.spacemagazine.co.za

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Community

Social Cohesion is the glue for broken communities

By Banyana Mshungu

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ocial Cohesion is the fundamental concept that unites people in achieving a common goal in a community, to work together towards bringing about humanity in ways that involve meeting basic needs. These basic needs could include safety, food, shelter etc. It is important that people understand and practise social cohesion in their communities, to ensure a better society and South Africa. According to For Food, nearly 40% of families in South Africa live in extreme poverty which stems other issues that occur in South African communities.

viduals of the particular community to come together and find ways in which the challenges are stabilised and resolved. If a community does not join hands to tackle the issues in and around their communities, these issues will accumulate until they're attended to. Communities such as Zandspruit which is located in Johannesburg are always working towards bettering the conditions of their community after incidents that have caused division within the community. Cleaning services are placed to ensure that the community maintains a clean environment. There is also a community centre, which is open for the locals to come and learn skills, which results in job creation. A health centre is also in place for health related needs by the residence to prevent certain illnesses from becoming a problem in the community.

The challenge to tackle these issues is always something many communities avoid. It is with great importance that people start building supportive relationships to ensure unity is built with their fellow residents, in an attempt to tackle issues in the community and working towards resolving these issues. The community of Zandspruit is Communities face challenges dai- set to building their own futures ly which constantly require indi- through social cohesion. They

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dedicate themselves to meeting their community needs in whichever way they can. Many communities can learn from this community so they can implement the same ethics to their own communities, to assist in building unity in the country. Furthermore, if more people realised that certain problems cannot be resolved by the government only but need resolving from the people who reside in the area, eventually people will start taking responsibility for their needs as a community. When people work together there is always better progress as compared to when an individual tries to achieve something on their own without any assistance from anyone, especially when it comes to something that will benefit the masses. So people must begin accepting their situations and have the courage to approach these situations as a community for better living conditions, education, crime and economical status of the people, Be the change you want to see.


News Updates

BRINGING THE PAST TO THE PRESENT

the iconic Market Theatre revamp With it’s flourishing reputation, deeply engaging plays and performances to date, we no doubt to see Market Theatre and it’s new look as brighter and beneficial, reaching even more people whilst harnessing and growing the future for South African art.

A

distinct heritage building that is home to Jozi’s Market Theatre has been undergoing major renovations over the last four months. Founded in 1976 the iconic theatre in the hometown district of Newtown, Johannesburg has been pivotal in raising awareness about social injustices and issues that still affect South Africans, challenging post-apartheid perceptions and enabling its audiences to think deeper about silenced realities. Known to worldwide audiences as the “Theatre of the Struggle”.

Written by Melissa Moodley

portrayal of cultural, social and political struggles for freedom in South Africa. Holding true to the old stage adage ‘the show must go on’; the Market Theatre has not closed it doors during renovations and patrons have been able to still enjoy and witness the beauty and magic of the stage performances as they once had, with little or no disruption.

Officially opening it’s doors in August, to the newly designed 450 seat theatre will give it’s exiting patronage and first time spectators something to talk about. An old world feel in a Shelving twenty one international new world context, the theatre will awards and over three hundred resemble that of the renowned South African theatre awards is proof Globe Theatre in London. of the Market Theatre’s successful and ground breaking notoriety that As denoted on the theatre’s website, encompasses the artistry and unique the main mission of the Market Thea-

tre Foundation is to “create an authentic South African cultural experience which is committed to providing the highest level of artistic excellence in all aspects of the performing and visual arts in which the education and development of a diverse community of artists, audiences and technicians is assured.” With it’s flourishing reputation, deeply engaging plays and performances to date, we no doubt to see Market Theatre and it’s new look as brighter and beneficial, reaching even more people whilst harnessing and growing the future for South African art. For information on the upcoming shows at Market Theatre, please visit www.martkettheatre.co.za or call on 011- 832-1641.

ENTER FOR FREE AND WIN www.blog.spacemagazine.co.za


Community

The power of the youth 2014 Elections Politics in South Africa have been described as a "joke" by many because of the constant quarrels that have evoked from political figures, including descriptions of a corrupt political system. By Banyana Mshungu

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he 2014 Elections are slowly approaching us and it seems now that the focus is more on the youth's votes with President Zuma urging the youth to vote in his speech at the Young Communist's Leagues (YCL) national council, which was in Galashewe near Kimberley in Northern Cape. It was said that Zuma stated that, the story of twenty years of democracy needs to be told in order to defend the hard fought freedom which has improved the lives of hundreds of South Africans. "The youth has a greater responsibility to society than engage in turf wars", said Zuma.

and therefore it is up to them shape their own future in ways that they would like it to be, with guidance from those who have shaped the present we are currently living in. Much of the masses of the youth are not trying to engage in politics because of the many incidences that have occurred. In addition, the youth sometimes underestimate the power of their vote and how much of a difference that one vote could make and so they choose to not vote.

New political parties have been created such as the EFF by Julius Malema (Who is the former ANCYL president) and Agang by Mamphela Ramphela. As any othIt is known that the youth of to- er party, these too bring promisday is the future of tomorrow es of change to the country. Poli-

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tics in South Africa have been described as a "joke" by many because of the constant quarrels that have evoked from political figures, including descriptions of a corrupt political system. With these connotations it is only understandable that many citizens would want change including better figures and a better system. Zuma went on to say "There is need for intervention and we support that." With the ANC having been the ruling party of postapartheid South Africa, loyal supporters of the party will continue to remain loyal to the ANC. While some loyalties are in question and some no longer in existence, this will by far be an unpredictable election.


Essays and Poems

Womanchild The poet, performer, actress, presenter and producer

Lebogang Mashile

At 11, she stood on the Which no longer had precipice room for a woman

A predator’s wet dream

With dolls floating between her ears

And men whose stares grab

Without weapons, her body was an invitation

And new worlds expanding below her waist

When no one is looking At 17, she was sold to the highest bidder Below water, her body was a volcano Her ringed finger a prize For a husband three At 15, she stood untimes her size armed before infantries Without warning, her Who deemed her ter- body was a trophy rain to be clean

Without wings, her body was a prison At 13, the ocean fell A bottomless tide ferried her to Daddy’s lap

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Dlala Safe Inspiration

TRY YOURSELF By Banyana Mshungu

A

s a child I was always protected from harm by my parents, shielding me from all the ugliness of the world. As I grew older, I became more acquainted with the things that they tried protecting me from. I started seeing and applying connotations to things such as tears, seeing that tears are caused by an overwhelming feeling known as pain but never fully understanding what caused the pain at the time. How they never warned me about this amazingly challenging process of growing up. They also never warned me about the trouble in the world; the pain, suffering and cutting experiences that i would inevitably encounter with as I grew older. I began to notice people so dear to me weep and soak themselves in the deepest rivers of sorrow. Hearing more songs from Shirley Brown, Brook Banton and Nina Simone .I wondered why 42

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they were becoming the daily bread, until I came across heartbreak. That one thing my folk merely prepared me for. Yes, the kind of heartbreak that robs you of your sleep. That occupies every part of your being and stands between you and your sanity. Never ceases knocking on your door and leaves your spirit in tatters.

Learning that being weak is sometimes okay, that weakness is the first sign of strength and you just need to locate it and recreate yourself into something more powerful than what you were before. Also, learning that pain comes and goes and we are never fully prepared for the damage it will cause to our souls but we are evolving beings and it never stops unI was always told, " talking til we stop learning from our about it makes it better ", lessons. they never understood that nothing makes it better. That Now, you go do what you sometimes pain heals itself have to do to meet your and no amount of poetry or wounds half way, find spaces jazz compilations could make that make you tingle inside. it easier. My ears were raised Spaces that spark some light by Brook Banton's Lie To Me, into the darkest parts of you, Shirley Browns It Ain’t No that cleanse your scars and Fun and they only just start- that poison the hurt. Rid ed making sense a while ago, yourself of thoughts of unwhen I was introduced to the worthiness, distaste and uglicoldest echo, the hollow of a ness. Make peace with yourbody that I've lived in my self, find yourself and most whole life and even with this importantly forgive yourself. emptiness I had to fill myself All in an attempt to diminishup again, one heart ache at a ing the pain . time. Elevation always www.spacemagazine.co.za


Book and CD Reviews

THE NEXT SUPER MEN (CD) *Finding a CD sleeve with song lyrics on it always gets me excited, that’s how I felt when I got The Muffinz album “Have You Heard?” it took me a day to learn most of the lyrics so I sang along. Their song arrangement and composition is awe-inspiring; could I say addictive even. Each song has its own meaning and message, the one that never gets old for me is “The Next Super Man” and “Soldiers” (Fight for Peace) written by Sfiso “Atoms” Buthelezi and arranged by The Muffinz. This is one album you shouldn’t skip tracks on; you’d be doing yourself an injustice. This is definitely a new school of Jazz

REVENGE WEARS PRADA: The Devil Returns, by Lauren Weinberger This is the sequel from the first bestseller of The Devil Wears Prada and it promises more drama and entertainment. In this second instalment Andy seems to be doing well as a fashion editor for a magazine, and she is engaged to be married. Her runways days still gives her sleepless nights which she likes more than her dreadful boss Miranda Priestly. Can she handle Miranda this time around? www.spacemagazine.co.za

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