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UNIT P1a – ENERGY & ELECTRICITY (Revised Summer 2008)

Salesian School, Chertsey

Summer 2008


Notes: 1. This Scheme of Work delivers Unit P1a of the AQA Science A specification. It is intended that it is started in Year 9 as soon as KS3 SATs are completed, and the goal should be to complete as far as the specimen ISA before the end of the year. 2. The scheme assumes access to the Nelson Thornes e-Science material on computer, and access to a digital projector. 3. Students will have access to the Nelson Thornes and Longmans textbooks during lessons only. They will have copies of the Nelson Thornes “GCSE Science A – Revision Guide� at home, from which additional homework tasks may be set. 4. ICT: Lessons 1,2,3,4,5 & 13 require the use of computers and the appropriate sensors and interfaces for datalogging. 5. ICT:

Lessons 19 & 20 require access to the internet or CD-rom based resource material for research purposes.

6. ISA: Time has been included for the completion of an ISA as part of the Centre Assessed Unit, but no specific details are included, as these are provided by AQA. 7. How Science Works: Where aspects of the procedural content (How Science Works) have been integrated into the substantive content, the relevant sections have been indicated in the Homework & Other Notes column. 8. Spiritual, Moral, Ethical, Social Cultural Issues:

Salesian School, Chertsey

Consideration of the effects on the planet of generating electricity, the ever-increasing demand for power and the need for conservation of energy. The Nuclear Power debate

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Summer 2008


AQA GCSE SCIENCE A UNIT P1a – Energy & Electricity 13.1 – How is heat (thermal energy) transferred and what factors affect the rate at which heat is transferred? Teaching time: 7 lessons Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lessons 1 - 2 Students should learn that: a. heat is a form of energy which moves between objects at different temperatures b. there is a relationship between heat and temperature c. there is a link between the rate of heat transfer and the temperature differences involved.

All students should understand that: heat is a form of energy heat flows from hot places to cold Most students should understand that: the rate of heat transfer depends upon temperature difference Some students should understand that:

Target Sheets Laptop computer 1. Beakers/thermometers/ stopclocks. Supplies of hot water (kettles). 2. Computers fitted with interfaces & temperature probes. Beakers Supplies of hot water (kettles).

when different masses of material are used with the same starting temperature, although the rate of temperature drop will differ, the rate of heat loss will be the same.

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Issue Target Sheet Starters: Animation or Quiz (eScience) P1a overview 1. Monitor the cooling manually of equal quantities of hot water at different starting temperatures. Plot and interpret temp/time graphs. 2. Monitor the cooling of different quantities of hot water (from the same starting temperature) using temperature probes and data-loggers. Obtain printouts of graphs and interpret results. [Note: If done accurately, the smaller quantity of water should have a greater temperature drop.]

H&S: Areas of risk: Supplies of near-boiling water will be in use. Use of electrical equipment (computers) in conjunction with water. Key Skills: N1.1 – Interpretation of graphs ICT Opportunity: Data-logging Key vocabulary: heat temperature How Science Works: 10.4/10.5/10.6/10.7

Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 3 Students should learn that: a. conduction is the transfer of heat without movement of the material b. different materials have different conducting properties

All students should understand that: heat can travel through a material by conduction heat insulators are poor conductors metals are good heat conductors, non-metals are poor heat conductors. Most students should understand that: conduction occurs due to vibrations being passed from particle to particle

Metal bar with drawing pins attached Electron model of conduction can be reinforced using textbook if necessary (Milner p.50) 100ml beakers/insulating jackets/thermometers or computers with temperature probes & interfaces Worksheet: Activity Sheet P1a 1.3 Longman Textbook

Some students should understand that: free electrons transfer thermal energy in metallic conductors

Salesian School, Chertsey

Introduction: Brief repeat of KS3 demo of heating at one end a metal rod with drawing pins attached to it by vaseline. Explanation of conduction in metals in terms of behaviour of free electrons Practical: Insulation investigation – 2 identical beakers wrapped with fur. One is soaked with water, the other is dry. The beakers are filled with hot water and the temperature change in each is monitored over a period of approximately 10 minutes. Temp/time graphs to be plotted and interpreted. This activity could be done manually, but computer logging will provide more reliable results.

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H&S: Areas of risk: Supplies of near-boiling water will be in use. Use of electrical equipment (computers) in conjunction with water. Key Skills: N1.1 – Interpretation of graphs ICT Opportunity: Data-logging Key vocabulary: conduction conductor insulator electrons Possible Homework: Activity Sheet P1a 1.3 How Science Works: 10.4/10.5/10.6/10.7

Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 4 Students should learn that: a. convection occurs when movement within the material itself is possible

All students should understand that: heat travels through fluids by convection Most students should understand that: heated fluids rise Some students should understand that:

100ml beakers & lids Thermometers or computers with temperature probes & interfaces Stopclocks Source of very hot water Card (to fan the beakers)

Introduction: Brief repeat of KS3 demo of forced convection using the smoke box.

H&S: Areas of risk: Supplies of near-boiling water will be in use.

Explanation of convection in metals in terms of behaviour of free particles

Use of electrical equipment (computers) in conjunction with water.

Practical: Comparing the effects of natural & forced convection. (See Practical Sheet P1a 1.4 The beakers are filled with hot water and the temperature change in each is monitored over a period of approximately 10-15 minutes. Temp/time graphs to be plotted and interpreted.

Key Skills: N1.1 – Interpretation of graphs

Longman or Nelson Textbooks Worksheet E2.1f (Sets 3 & 4) E3.1h (Sets 1 & 2) Practical Sheet P1a 1.4

heated fluids rise because they expand and become less dense

This activity could be done manually, but computer logging will provide more reliable results.

Salesian School, Chertsey

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ICT Opportunity: Data-logging Possible Homework: Worksheet E2.1f or E3.1h Key vocabulary: convection particles density How Science Works: 10.4/10.5/10.6/10.7

Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 5 Students should learn that: a. heat energy can be transferred through empty space as radiation b. the rate of emission of radiation from an object depends upon the nature of its surface

All students should understand that:

Laptop computer Black & shiny calorimeter

heat energy can be transferred through empty space as radiation dark matt surfaces emit more radiation than shiny, light-coloured ones

Computer fitted with interface & temperature probes Plastic & copper tubes fitted with thermometers Stopclocks

c. the rate of absorption of radiation by an object depends upon its surface

dark matt surfaces absorb more radiation than shiny, light-coloured ones Some students should understand that:

Milner textbooks Longman Textbooks Worksheet E4.1h (Sets 1 & 2) or E3.1f (Sets 3 & 4) Activity Sheet P1a 1.1

infra-red radiation is transferred by means of wave motion

Introduction: Cooling of 2 “coffee cups” with differing outer surfaces. This could use a black and a shiny can and be set up as a demo to run with a computer logging the temperatures while the student practical takes place. Practical: Solar panel investigation – identical lengths of tubing (painted & unpainted copper & plastic) filled with water and placed under spotlights. Temperature of water monitored to see which would be most efficient for use in a solar panel. The action of the solar panel can be explained using Milner p.16-17, Longman p1a.4, or eScience Animation P1a 1.2 Infra-Red Photography

Salesian School, Chertsey

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H&S: Areas of risk: Use of electrical equipment (spotlights) in conjunction with water. Spotlights will get very hot Key Skills: N1.1 – Interpretation of graphs ICT Opportunity: Data-logging Possible homework: Worksheet E3.1f or E4.1h “Radiation” Activity Sheet P1a 1.1 Key vocabulary: radiation absorb emit infra-red How Science Works: 10.4/10.5/10.6/10.7

Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 6 Students should learn: a. how heat energy can be transferred from buildings b. how to reduce these transfers c. how to evaluate the effectiveness and costeffectiveness of reducing these transfers

All students should understand that: heat is lost from buildings by conduction convection & radiation heat loss ( and therefore heating costs) can be reduced by insulating buildings

Textbooks: Milner, Longman or Nelson Thornes

Brief review of the importance of limiting conduction, convection and radiation in the vacuum flask.

Possible homeworks: Worksheet E6.1h/E5.1f “Stopping heat losses at home” Activity Sheet P1a 1.5

Review of the methods by which heat is lost from buildings, and how this loss can be reduced. (Milner p.12-13)

Key Skills: N1.1 – Interpretation of data

Laptop computer Worksheets: E5.1f (Sets 3 & 4) E6.1h (Sets 1 & 2) Activity Sheet P1a 1.5

Most students should:

Longman p1a.7

be able to identify where each heat-transfer process is acting

Payback time & Costeffectiveness. Possible plenary material: e-Science “Roll-over” activity P1a 1.5 e-Science “Drag & Drop” activity P1a 1.6

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Key vocabulary: conduction convection radiation cavity wall double glazing insulation How Science Works: 10.8 (Selective presentation of evidence by double-glazing salesmen – emphasis on fuel saving, but avoiding mention of payback time.)

Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 7 – 8 Students should: a. carry out an experiment and obtain reliable data on the effectiveness of a thermal insulator. b. answer questions relating to their data in the form of a ISA.

All students should understand that: The importance of obtaining reliable evidence The significance of the different types of variable involved

Small beakers/Lids Thermometers Stopclocks Insulating material (bubble wrap) & elastic bands Source of hot water ISA worksheets ISA writing frames Graph paper

Lesson 1 Plan & carry out the “Thermal Insulation” practical (Specimen ISA)

H&S: Areas of risk: Supplies of near-boiling water will be in use.

Lesson 2 Answer the ISA written test, then cross-check answers if time allows.

Possible Homework: Summary Sheet P1a 1 How Science Works: 10.4/10.5/10.6/10.7

Most students should: be able to answer questions relating to their own experiment, and to specimen data from a similar context

Salesian School, Chertsey

Note: Data is to be retained in school prior to sitting the written test.

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Summer 2008


13.2 – What is meant by the efficient use of energy? Teaching time: 2 lessons Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Worksheets E18.2f, E19.1f, E19.2f (sets 3 & 4) E18.2f, E19.1h, E19.2h (sets 1 & 2) Activity Sheet P1a 2.1 Homework Sheet P1a 2.4 Summary Sheet P1a 2

e-Science Presentation P1a 2.1 Remind students of energy – arrow (Sankey) diagrams.

Homework & Other Notes

Lessons 9 – 10 Students should learn: a. that when energy is transferred, only some of it is transferred to a useful form, and the rest is wasted b. what happens to the energy wasted during transfers c. how to calculate the efficiency of an energy transfer process

All students should: be able to identify the energy transformations associated with devices be able to identify the useful form(s) of energy produced, and identify the types of energy being wasted be able to draw an energy – arrow (Sankey) diagram to illustrate energy transfers Most students should: know that more efficient devices transfer more energy usefully

A range of energy transfer devices e.g. fan, radio, lamp, heater, hair drier, iron, kettle, hotplate, candle, Bunsen burner, torch, dynamo A selection of balls (e.g. squash, tennis, golf, ping-pong etc)

The wasted energy (usually heat or sound) cannot be reused because it is so spread out Longman P1a.10 Try one or two calculations

metre rules 2. Practical: Using worksheet E19.2f “How efficient is a ball?” students are to determine the efficiencies of a range of balls. More able students could extend this to investigate the effect of changing the drop height

know why it is difficult to reuse the wasted energy be able to successfully apply the equation efficiency = useful energy transferred / total energy supplied to the device Salesian School, Chertsey

1. Practical: Using worksheet E18.2h, “Where does the unwanted energy go?” students are to analyse the transfers occurring in a selection of devices Arrow diagrams can be drawn.

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H&S: Areas of risk: Hazards associated with the use of mains electricity. Many of the electrical devices will get very hot. Possible homework(s) Activity Sheet P1a 2.1 Worksheet E19.1h “Efficiency” Homework Sheet P1a 2.4 Summary Sheet P1a 2 Key Skills: N1.2 – Calculations Key vocabulary: efficiency useful energy wasted energy Sankey diagram How Science Works: 10.5/10.6/10.7

Summer 2008


Mid-Topic Test Teaching time: 1 lesson Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 11 Students should: a. Assess their own understanding of the topics covered in the unit so far by completing a mid-topic test, and then analysing their results in order to plan their own revision programme

All students should: complete a test of the type to be faced at the end of the unit.

Test paper Markscheme

Test (to be peer-marked)

Analysis grid

Part of this unit may have been taught at the end of year 9. If this is the case, this test will prove a useful reminder of some of the topics covered then.

Most students should: analyse their results to determine which areas need further revision

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


13.3 – Why are electrical appliances so useful? Teaching time: 4 lessons Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 12 Students should learn that: a. energy is transferred when anything is done b. electrical energy can be transferred into a wide variety of other forms c. everyday equipment is designed to carry out specific energy transfers

All students should: understand that electrical appliances transfer electricity into other forms of energy Most students should:

A range of electrical devices. e.g. fan, radio, lamp, heater, hair drier, iron, tv, kettle, hotplate etc Milner textbooks Worksheet E8.1h Activity Sheet P1a 3.1

be able to identify the energy transformations associated with particular devices

Energy transfer circus: Students to identify energy changes in a variety of electrical devices and construct energy flow diagrams

H&S: Areas of risk: Many of the electrical devices will get very hot Possible homework: Worksheet E8.1h “Energy Transfers” Key vocabulary: conservation of energy

Exercises from textbook: Milner p.18-19

be able to give examples of equipment that can achieve particular energy transfers

Salesian School, Chertsey

Introduction: Activity Sheet P1a 3.1 Brainstorm “Why do we need electricity? What do we use it for?

Conservation of Energy. Consider problems caused by a lack of electricity for common devices.

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 13 Students should learn:

All students should:

a. that the electrical energy transferred depends on the power rating of a device and the time for which it is used

know that electrical appliances of different power ratings transfer energy at different rates know that the energy transferred depends on the duration of use of the device

Immersion heaters lab packs thermometers beakers

Introduction: Discussion – Do all electrical appliances use the same amount of energy?

H&S: Areas of risk: Use of electrical equipment in conjunction with water.

Laptop computer

Demo: Use light sensors to show that different lamps transfer different amounts of electricity to light energy

Although the water should not be allowed to get too hot, the heaters themselves could be hot

Computer fitted with interface and light sensor(s) At least 2 lamps of different power ratings

. Most students should: know that the energy transferred can be calculated as the product of time and power rating

Worksheet E10.1f Activity Sheet p1a 3.2 Nelson Thornes Textbooks

Practical: Use low voltage immersion heaters, of different ratings, set at same voltages to heat equal volumes of water. Monitor temperature rise. Discussion: It should be emphasised that the duration of use must be considered if the total energy transfer is to be calculated.

be able to successfully apply the equation energy transfer (j) = power (w) x time (s)

energy = power x time Calculations: Nelson P1a 3.3

Possible homeworks: Worksheet E10.1f “Electrical energy and power” Activity Sheet p1a 3.2 Key Skills: N1.2 – Calculations ICT Opportunity: Data-logging Key vocabulary: power rating Joule kilojoule Watt kilowatt

e-Science Drag & Drop P1a 3.2 (Unit Matching)

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 14 Students should learn: a. that energy from the mains supply is measured in units of kilowatt-hours b. how to perform power calculations for mains appliances

All students should: understand that the energy transferred by a device depends on both the power rating and the duration of use

Power monitors Stopclocks A range of electrical appliances e.g. heaters, hair drier, iron, kettles, hotplate etc. (These should have quite high power ratings)

Most students should: c. how to calculate costs for the use of mains appliances

be able to successfully apply the equations energy transfer (kWh) = power (kW) x time (h)

Worksheet E11.1f Activity Sheet P1a 3.3 Homework Sheet P1a 3.3 Textbooks Milner Longman

Introduction: Discussion – recap on the need to know both power rating and time of use in order to be able to find energy transfer. Practical: Use power monitors with a range of electrical devices to determine power ratings. Use power monitors to determine energy transferred in a fixed period of time for a range of electrical appliances. Calculations of energy used and costs. [See Milner p.22 for examples] Longman p1a.11

cost of electricity used = number of units x unit cost

H&S: Areas of risk: Hazards associated with the use of mains electricity. Many of the electrical devices will get very hot. Possible Homework: Worksheet E11.1h “Buying Electricity” Activity Sheet P1a 3.3 Homework Sheet P1a 3.3 Key Skills: N1.2 – Calculations Key vocabulary: kilowatt kilowatt-hour unit How Science Works: 10.5/10.7

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Using a pair of coaxial induction coils, demonstrate that a pulse of current in the primary coil will induce a pulse in the secondary.

H&S: Areas of risk: Care must be taken if any attempt is made to demonstrate the action of step-up transformers. Mains electricity must not be used as the input, as dangerously high output voltages could result.

Lesson 15 – Transformers & The National Grid All students should understand: Students should learn: a. that a voltage or current can be induced in a coil by switching on or off a nearby electromagnet b. which factors control the size of the induced voltage or current c.

the importance of transformers in transmission of electricity

the construction of a transformer that transformers can be used to change the voltage of an a.c. supply

Induction coils Battery Light spot galvanometer Transmission line demo (See Technician Note) Video F18 or G7 Worksheet F19.1h (sets 1 & 2) F19.1f (sets 3 & 4)

Most students should: understand that electricity is transmitted through the National Grid at high voltages to reduce energy losses

Activity Sheet P1a 3.4 Summary Sheet p1a 3 Nelson Thornes Textbook

understand that the higher the voltage, the lower the current needed to transmit energy at the same rate

Salesian School, Chertsey

Emphasise that it is the change which is inducing the output pulse. Explain that transformers can raise or lower voltage of an a.c. supply. Demonstration of model transmission line to show the improved efficiency of transmission of electricity at higher voltages.

Key Vocabulary: primary coil secondary coil step-up transformer step-down transformer National Grid Possible homework: Activity Sheet P1a 3.4 Summary Sheet p1a 3

The second half of “Generation of Electricity 2� on tapes F18 or G7 illustrate the action of transformers quite clearly. (Showing the whole of this programme is not recommended as it is very dated in appearance.) Nelson Thornes P1a 3.4

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Summer 2008


Lesson 15 - Technician Note

Model For Demonstration of Power Transmission A demonstration model of power transmission lines can be set up as shown below. This represents two transmission lines (outward and return in each case). The base can be a piece of hardboard or chipboard, slightly more than 1m long, and about 10 cm wide. Four small terminal posts can be mounted at each end as shown. The lines should be made of 28 swg eureka wire. They should be stretched sufficiently that they will not sag and come into contact with one another. The centre section of each wire should be coated by rubbing with coloured candle wax. Suitable transformers may be made using a ‘c-core’ and coils (e.g. one with 240 turns, one with 2400 turns). Two identical transformers will be needed. The power supply should be 2.5V a.c. Use 2.5V bulbs.

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


13.4 – How should we generate the electricity we need? Teaching time: 6 lessons Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 16 Students should learn: a. that we rely on electricity to maintain many aspects of our everyday life b. electricity can be generated by the interaction of electrical conductors and magnetic fields. c. how power stations convert the energy in fossil fuels or nuclear fuels into electricity

All students should:

Laptop computer

know that electricity provides us with heat/light/ entertainment/health care/ transport as well as being an integral part of the requirements of many jobs

Worksheet SAG ET1.2

electricity is a secondary energy source, and is generated by the movement of electrical conductors and magnetic fields.

Horseshoe magnet/ loops of insulated wire/ light-spot galvo

know that the energy from the fuel is used to heat water, producing steam which turns turbines and that these drive the generators which produce the electricity

Activity Sheet P1a 4.1 (Sets 1 & 2) Worksheet E14.1f (Sets 3 & 4)

Demo dynamo Induction coils/light-spot galvo/ bar magnet

Steam Generator/turbine (with safety screen)

Introduction: Brainstorm uses of electricity Group work: Discussion activity based on worksheet SAG ET1.2 “Who else needs a supply?”. This asks pupils to prioritise electricity users. Each groups then elects a spokesperson to present their decision. Discussion of methods of producing electricity on a large scale. Demos of electromagnetic induction and model steam generator with turbine e-Science Video clip P1a 4.1

Most students should:

H&S: Areas of risk: Steam generator – use of safety screen essential Possible homework: Activity Sheet P1a 4.1 Worksheet E14.1f Key Skills: C1.1 – Discussion Key vocabulary: electromagnetic induction magnetic field dynamo fossil fuel nuclear fuel uranium plutonium turbine generator

Plenary e-Science Drag & Drop P1a 4.1

be able to describe the energy transformations which take place within the power station Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 17 Students should learn: a. that fuels are a source of stored energy b. how energy can be extracted from fuels b. the advantages and disadvantages of each type of fuel

All students should: know that energy is extracted from fossil fuels by burning them know that many fuels produce air pollution or other waste when they burn

Samples of coal, wood, crude oil, paraffin, meths. Crucibles, tin lids, tripod stands, bunsen burners Safety goggles Worksheet SAG ET4.1

Introduction: Discussion – Is there an ideal fuel? Practical: Fuel tests (as Salters Science) Worksheet SAG ET4.1 ”Is there an ideal fuel?” Samples of a range of fuels are burnt and their properties observed.

know that some fuels are in shorter supply than others Most students should:

H&S: Areas of risk: Igniting fuels – extreme care required Long hair must be tied back Safety goggles must be worn Room must be well ventilated Key vocabulary: fuel renewable non-renewable nuclear

Some discussion of the use of nuclear fuels could take place during plenary, otherwise it could be done during a later lesson.

know that cost can be a significant factor when comparing fuels

Plenary Is there an ideal fuel? What makes an ideal fuel?

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 18 Students should learn: a. that only a small proportion of the energy in a fuel is converted into electricity in a power station

All students should:

Video “Energy & Efficiency”

know how energy is being wasted at each stage of the generation process

Access to VCR & TV

know that the pollution from power stations contributes to environmental problems

Worksheet E14.1h

b. what form the wasted energy takes, and where the it goes c. that electricity can be generated from nuclear fuel which also has associated environmental risks

know that the waste products from a nuclear power station will be hazardous far into the future

Salesian School, Chertsey

Laptop computer

Nelson Thornes Textbook

Introduction: Recap. Sankey diagram showing energy transfers in a power station. Where does the wasted energy go, and how much of it is there? Video: “Energy & Efficiency”

Key vocabulary: carbon dioxide sulphur dioxide acid rain global warming uranium plutonium How Science Works: 10.8/10.9

Nuclear Power station. Is nuclear power safe? e-Science Presentation P1a 4.4 Nelson Thornes P1a 4.4

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lessons 19 – 20 Students should learn: a. the basic principles of extracting energy from renewable sources b. some of the advantages and disadvantages of each source

All students should: know the main forms of renewable energy the basic principles of how energy can be obtained from the main types of renewable energy source

Access to internet Laptop computer Worksheets E15.1h & E16.1h (sets 1 & 2) E15.1f & E16.1f (sets 3 & 4) Textbooks: Nelson Thornes/Longman

the advantages of replacing fossil fuels with renewable sources Most students should know the disadvantages associated with the main renewable energy sources

Introduction: Discussion – Is there a better (cleaner) way of obtaining energy than from fossil fuels? The following activity is intended to occupy 2 lessons: Students can use the internet to research renewable sources, and prepare a report on the main features of each. [If the internet is not available, textbooks and videos are available which could provide an alternative source of information.] 1. Wind & Water Intro. e-Science Animation P1a 4.2 Nelson Thornes P1a 4.2 Longman P1a.15/16

have an awareness of the limited impact that renewable sources have on current demand for energy.

Possible homeworks: Worksheets E15.1h “Renewable Energy Sources” /E16.1h “Wind, wave & solar power” Key Skills: IT1.1 – Online, or CD-ROM data search Key vocabulary: solar wind wave biomass tidal geothermal hydroelectric power

2.Sun & Earth Video – Electricity for the Future Nelson Thornes P1a 4.3

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 21 Students should learn: a. that there are environmental issues associated with all forms of electricity generation

All students should know that: pollution from fossil fuel power stations contributes to global warming and acid rain waste products from a nuclear power station will be hazardous far into the future

Activity Sheet P1a 4.4(i) Activity Sheet P1a 4.4(i) Homework Sheet P1a 4.4 Renewable energy Video Textbooks: Milner Nelson Thornes or Longmans

Show video on generation of energy from renewable sources

Possible Homework: Homework Sheet P1a 4.4

Activity Sheet P1a 4.4(i) Activity Sheet P1a 4.4(i) (Use textbooks)

How Science Works: 10.8/10.9

e-Science Drag & Drop P1a 4.4

renewable energy generation has an environmental impact Most students should: be able to explain why carbon dioxide emissions contribute to global warming and sulphur dioxide emissions contribute to acid rain be able to identify some of the disadvantages associated with the main forms of renewable energy

Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008


Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Activity Sheet P1a 4.5 Worksheet E17.1h (sets 1 & 2)/ E17.1f (sets 3 & 4) Summary Sheet P1a 4

This lesson provides an opportunity to review everything that has been learned about the energy sources available for generation of electricity.

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 22 Students should learn:

All students should:

a. that reliable energy sources can produce electricity at any time

know that fossil fuel power stations can produce electricity at any time

b. that some forms of power station can react more quickly to demand than others

know that sources such as wind, wave and solar energy are dependent upon weather

c. that some energy sources will depend upon prevailing conditions

know some of the factors which affect the output of other renewable sources

Textbooks: Milner Nelson Thornes or Longman

A choice of possible activities exist: a. Milner p.46-47 & p.52-53 b. Activity Sheet P1a 4.5 c. Worksheet E17.1h ”Which one should we use?”

know that pumped storage systems can provide a store of energy to meet sudden surges in demand

Key Skills: C1.1 – Participation in discussions C1.2 – Read & obtain information C2.1b – Give a short talk How Science Works: 10.8

In either case, this could be done with students working in small groups, with each group then giving a brief presentation to the class

be able to compare and contrast a variety of sources

Salesian School, Chertsey

These

Possible homework: Summary Sheet P1a 4

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Summer 2008


13.4 – Exam Practice Teaching time: 3 lessons Learning Objectives

Differentiated Learning Outcomes

Resources

Activities

Homework & Other Notes

Lesson 23 – 25 Students should: a. Assess their own understanding of the topics covered in the unit so far by completing a mid-topic test, and then analysing their results in order to plan their own revision programme

All students should: complete a series of past papers.

Test papers Answer grids Markscheme

Tests (to be peer-marked)

Homework: Revision

Most students should: analyse their results to determine which areas need further revision

According to time available, there may be time to complete a P1a ISA. Three lessons should be allowed for this; one for planning and drawing up a results table, one for performing the practical and plotting a graph, and one for completing the written ISA exam. (These need not necessarily be consecutive lessons, as absentees should be given time to catch up with the rest of the class.) Salesian School, Chertsey

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Summer 2008

P1a Energy & Electricity  

Energy and Electricity SoW

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