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Games and Making by Kristina Thoennes I am fascinated by the interplay of games, stories, and making – the amazing Venn diagram of fans and gamers and readers and makers. When Harry Potter was my obsession, I saw so many expressions of creativity born from the love readers had for the stories: incredible costumes, music, artwork, and more. Readers were celebrating, recreating, getting inside the world of Harry Potter. Reading the books wasn’t enough. We had to bring it into the “real” world. As a knitter, I see projects based on every kind of fandom: books, games, movies, etc., represented in scarves and blankets and toys and bags. A search for Harry Potter amongst the patterns on the yarn-work site Ravelry has over 500 results, Doctor Who over 470, Game of Thrones and Minecraft over 100 each. Why do people make and share these projects? To celebrate what we love, to identify with our favorites, to connect with other fans. To bring these stories and games and ideas into the “real” world. Pokémon Go is one of my current obsessions. (Over 1000 Ravelry projects come up for Pokémon!) So when I was considering a project for our regional Yard Art Day, I decided to make a Pokémon. Knitting wouldn’t work here – too hard to make something big enough to be seen in the yard. I had collected a bunch of plastic bottles and coffee cans that would make a good structure for papier-mâché. The various evolutions of Eevee are some of my favorite Pokémon, so I decided to make the electric type, Jolteon.

I used duct tape to attach seltzer bottle legs and ears to a coffee can body and head. 82 PAGE

A berry container made a good snout. Cutting cardboard into sharp triangles gave me the sparking fur in the back and around the head. And seltzer bottles cut in half created the larger mane.

VEJ Summer 2018  

In the Summer 2018 issue, the Virtural Education Journal asks the question, "What If... virtual experiences can level the playing field by b...

VEJ Summer 2018  

In the Summer 2018 issue, the Virtural Education Journal asks the question, "What If... virtual experiences can level the playing field by b...