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Virtual Education

JOURNAL

Learning Moral Philosophy and Ethics Through the Study of Video Games By Sherry Jones

As a philosophy and game studies college instructor, I have been using the medium of video games to teach philosophical theories and concepts, some of which students may find too difficult to comprehend by only reading the primary texts written by the great philosophers such as Aristotle, Kant, Wittgenstein, de Beauvoir, Arendt, and Nussbaum.

Figure 1.1 - Immanuel Kant

My primary goals for teaching philosophy are to instill in students a passion for contemplating on the nature of existence and a love for the evolution of human thought. To facilitate students’ learning process and to bridge students’ knowledge gaps in philosophy, I have used multimodal mediums such as pictures, cartoons, podcasts, documentaries, and movies to reinforce my lessons. Although the mediums, designed with visual and auditory semiotics systems, have enhanced students’ understanding beyond the linguistics-only-based texts, the mediums lack a level of sensory-motor interactivity that can help students to further engage with the lessons at hand. Today, I have found video games to be one of the most effective mediums, if not the most effective medium, for encouraging students to engage with hypothetical scenarios that can serve as philosophical thought experiments. Beginning in 2018, the Ethics and Games Series for the Metagame Book Club is created to demonstrate that teaching rigorous philosophy and humanities lessons through the use of video games is possible and desired by students.

Figure 1.2 - Metagame Book Club PAGE 103

VEJ Summer 2018  

In the Summer 2018 issue, the Virtural Education Journal asks the question, "What If... virtual experiences can level the playing field by b...

VEJ Summer 2018  

In the Summer 2018 issue, the Virtural Education Journal asks the question, "What If... virtual experiences can level the playing field by b...