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September 2019

To Dance In Russia Local Eats: Wicked Hangry

An Innocent Man’s Daughter

Growing with Gorillas


Features

What do you want to do tonight? I don’t know. What do you want to do? Alison and I can continue this conversation all the way up to “it’s too late to do anything - let’s just watch a show.” Hmmm… the couch is comfortable, and the Golden Age of Television can be seductive – but not this time, couch! I type out a desperate text to Briton and Tonya, a couple we enjoy hanging out with. “You guys want to go to Heard on Hurd?” I pause, fully realizing if I press send there’s no turning back. I pressed send. Our future was now in limbo. We were risking everything. Within the hour, we joined thousands of “Hurders” downtown. Alison and Tonya shopped the mobile boutiques nestled among dozens of food trucks and the stores along Broadway open late for the event. Briton and I enjoyed live music while munching on some tasty Made-in-Oklahoma bratwurst. Things are changing downtown. Lime scooters ready and waiting to take you here and there. The Mule, a popular Plaza District restaurant, is opening a location where The Zu used to be. Across the street, Frenzy Brewing Company is remodeling the historic E.A. Bender building - soon to be Edmond’s first brewery and taproom. Right around the corner, the Railyard will open soon as a mixed-use building concept that will house six eateries. How do you top off an evening of shopping, eating, listening and visiting? For us, we ended up at Unplugged, a gaming lounge near 2nd Street. It was busy with people playing board games - none of which I’m familiar. We find an empty table and enjoy a coffee and conversation. If you haven’t been or haven’t been in a while, there are two more Heard on Hurd events this season, September 21st and October 19th. I will see you there. As I like to tell myself, the couch isn’t going anywhere - it will be there when I get home.

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ASK EDMOND

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THE INNOCENT MAN’S DAUGHTER

Why Edmond? Elizabeth Fritz Clinton overcomes father’s wrongful conviction

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LOCAL EATS: WICKED HANGRY

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GROWING WITH GORILLAS

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Food truck fave opens neighborhood restaurant

Retiring zoo secretary Donna Mobbs reflects on the past 35 years TO DANCE IN RUSSIA

Oklahoma ballerinas train at prestigious program in Russia CULTIVATING COMMUNITY

Co-op brings farmers, artisans and customers together ANGEL HEART BOUTIQUE

Entrepreneurial spirit drives online clothing venture ZONLY BY DESIGN

Local artist creates interactive art

Business 22

ARMSTRONG AUDITORIUM

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DR. MARTHA GARZON

World class center for the performing arts Pediatric dentist nurtures patients and their families

Columns 28

Dave Miller Back40 Design President

LOUISE TUCKER JONES

What Day is Today?

Cover photography by Kate Luber Photography

ADVERTISING l Laura Beam at 405-301-3926 l laura@edmondoutlook.com MAILED MONTHLY TO 50,000 HOMES IN EDMOND/NORTH OKC 80 East 5th Street, Suite 130, Edmond, OK 73034 l 405-341-5599 l edmondoutlook.com l info@edmondoutlook.com September 2019 Volume 15, Number 9

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Edmond Outlook is a publication of Back40 Design, Inc.

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© 2019 Back40 Design, Inc.

PUBLISHER Dave Miller l ADVERTISING MANAGER Laura Beam l GRAPHIC DESIGN Adrian Townsend, Anne Richardson l PRODUCTION Rachel Morse PHOTOGRAPHY Marshall Hawkins www.sundancephotographyokc.com l DISTRIBUTION Edmond Outlook is delivered FREE by direct-mail to 50,000 Edmond & North OKC homes. Articles and advertisements in the Outlook do not necessarily reflect the opinions of the magazine or Back40 Design. Back40 Design does not assume responsibility for statements made by advertisers or editorial contributors. The acceptance of advertising by the Outlook does not constitute endorsement of the products, services or information. We do not knowingly present any product or service that is fraudulent or misleading in nature. The Outlook assumes no responsibility for unsolicited materials.


LOCALLOOK

Ask Edmond

Why Edmond? Why do people move to Edmond? Why do they stay? Here’s what a few happy Edmondites shared with Outlook:

Alison Hyde

Kayla Stump

Pablo Gonzalez

We relocated from Florida to Edmond due to a military move. We chose this area because of the highly rated schools (we have 3 kids, so this was important!). As we continue to explore the area, we are so glad we have made this our new home. Along with a lower cost of living, there are many outdoor activities, cultural events, and great places to eat! Our neighborhood is amazing and friendly, filled with walking trails and parks, perfect for our kids and dog.

I chose to come to Edmond as a student because UCO had the “what’s up factor.” That meant that I literally could not walk from one side of campus to the other without someone stopping me just to say, “what’s up?” Being from a small town, I loved that this city brought a ton of options for entertainment (and food) without compromising on the community.

I grew up in Hawaii, but moved to Oregon to wrestle in college. While I was at school, my parents and siblings relocated to Oklahoma because my dad got stationed at Tinker Air Force Base. When my parents relocated, they chose to move to Edmond because of the schools, safe community and cost of living. I stopped wrestling my sophomore year and moved to Edmond to be closer to my family.

Moved here --2018

Moved here --2012

Our favorite places so far are Red Rock Canyon, the Neighborhood Jam, the local YMCA and library. Our favorite new thing to do was join the American Elite Mixed Martial Arts gym to try Jiu Jitsu as a whole family, we highly recommend it! We like to spend weekends as a family at the Science Center, farmers market, and Zoo. I cannot wait to see what more Edmond has to offer, I know we haven’t even scratched the surface yet!

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Now, as an adult and a fullblown, tax-paying, Edmond resident, I continue to treasure the community that Edmond provides. The city is great about diligently bringing in fun and exciting new options for students, young couples and families, while also creating a safe space for all of us to grow together. I moved here for school, but I stay here because Edmond effortlessly became my new home. It has everything I could ever need and some things I didn’t even know I needed. I can’t imagine living anywhere else.

Moved here --2015

When I moved, I wasn’t thrilled to be living in a land-locked flat state, but I’ve grown to love Edmond and its welcoming community. Even though it doesn’t have a beach or mountains, there’s always something to do. With the growth of Downtown Edmond, I never have to go far to have a good time. I love that I don’t have to drive to Oklahoma City to enjoy great local food and entertainment.


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FEATURELOOK

The Innocent Man’s Daughter By Lea Terry

Dennis Fritz’s story caught the attention of millions of people last year thanks to the Netflix documentary “The Innocent Man.” Twenty years ago, Fritz and his friend Ron Williamson were convicted in Pontotoc County for the 1982 rape and murder of 21-year-old Debra Sue Carter, but in 1999 both were exonerated with the help of The Innocence Project and new analysis of the DNA evidence used to convict them. For Fritz’s daughter Elizabeth Fritz Clinton, the wrongful conviction left her dealing with the loss of her only parent and the inability to fully understand the situation or know how to reach out for help. “The stigma that’s attached to someone being incarcerated, and also the brutality of the crime that he was convicted for, that’s not something you want to openly share with others,” Clinton said. Clinton’s mother had been murdered by a neighbor several years earlier, and after her father was convicted she lived with her grandmother. Her father went to prison as she entered middle school, leaving her without a parent during what she described as crucial developmental years. She also didn’t see him for 12 years because he didn’t want her to visit the prison. During that time, she found herself living two separate lives as she struggled to act like a normal teenager while also dealing with profound loss, fear and confusion. She recently began telling her story, most recently at Ripples of Hope, a benefit breakfast for the nonprofit organization Calm Waters, which provides free services to children and families dealing with divorce, grief and other types of loss. “I internalize things quite a bit, so being able to just speak about it openly and honestly was really refreshing for me,” Clinton said. Her family attended the event, and she said finally hearing her perspective helped them understand how the situation affected her. She said things might have been different if the support services available today had been an option back then, and she also hopes that other children dealing with loss will be better equipped to seek support. Though she was nervous about speaking publicly, Clinton said she was surprised at how easily her story flowed as she finally faced the audience. She’ll share her story again in October at Wrongful Conviction Day, a fundraising event hosted by the Oklahoma Innocence Project at the Oklahoma City University School of Law. Fritz’s story came to national attention after best-selling novelist John Grisham’s 2006 book “The Innocent Man,” followed by the Netflix series. The conviction of both men depended largely on questionable witness testimony, including from the man now convicted of Carter’s death. The prosecution also relied on DNA analysis that has since been disproven and that used now-controversial methods such as hair analysis. For Clinton, this showcases the importance of looking beyond first impressions and instead asking questions and seeking to understand someone’s situation before making assumptions. She also stressed the importance of not blindly accepting someone else’s word. “Just because something has been said by someone you may consider to be in a superior position, it may not be the truth,” Clinton said. Clinton hopes that the attention surrounding her father’s case will encourage people not to make snap judgments. “What’s put in front of you may not always be what reality is,” Clinton said. For more information: www.okinnocence.com

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FOODLOOK FEATURELOOK

Local Eats: Wicked Hangry

By Laura Beam

Food truck fave opens neighborhood restaurant Wicked Hangry. The name alone makes you laugh because you know you’ve been there--that moment when you were so hungry that your attitude got more out-of-control than your appetite. When you’re that hungry, there’s nothing better than food made exactly how you want it, on the spot. At Wicked Hangry Handcrafted Burgers, owners Heather Brehm and fiancé Adam Rogers embrace that concept with a menu of burgers, hot dogs, grilled cheese and wraps, built to your taste with made-from-scratch sauces and unlimited fresh toppings.

good you could eat it with a spoon. It’s especially tasty as a dipping sauce with their fried cauliflower or fried pickles. “We make our own sauces and batters, and use a clear, gluten-free frying oil so everything is light,” Heather says. “We hand mix our hamburger meat several times each day with our own special seasoning blend and shop for and prepare our own veggies each morning too,” she adds. Other unique topping combos ready to be piled on burgers, sliders, wraps, fries, grilled cheese or black bean patties are the Screamer with grilled jalapenos and habaneros, cheddar cheese and Wicked Sauce; the Pickynic with french onion dip, ruffles and house fried pickles or the LannaLouWow with grilled canadian bacon and pineapple plus mango salsa. There is a combo for every food mood you have.

Burger Backstory With eight children between the two of them and backgrounds in the oil field and energy management, Heather and Adam are no strangers to the needs of busy families. As Edmond locals, they’ve shared their passion for kicked-up comfort food since 2015, “starting with Even Keto, low-carb, gluten-free and vegan diners will nothing but a food truck and a prayer,” Heather recalls. find something to satisfy on Wicked Hangry’s menu, with Owners Heather Brehm and fiancé Adam Rogers Earlier this year, when looking to buy some equipment options like avocado slices, boiled eggs, black bean patties from the former restaurant at 33rd and Boulevard, they and salads. So don’t get hangry, get happy! ended up taking the space itself instead. Now opened for Stop by 3325 S. Boulevard #175, at the corner of 33rd & Boulevard three months, they can connect with their ‘fellow hangries’ on a new level, in Edmond or visit www.wickedhangry.com for details or food truck and share their love of community through food. Their unique brand of fun bookings. and personality shows in everything from their crafty menu item names and cheery decor, to their spacious bar and plans for Live PD watch parties. Wicked Combos A straightforward menu allows you to select your entree and choose your own toppings. One of the most popular selections is the signature Wicked topping combo which includes cheddar cheese, bacon, avocado, fried onion strings and Wicked Sauce--a slightly smoky, tangy chipotle aioli that’s so 12

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Laura Beam is a writer and advertising manager with 25 years in radio, newspaper and magazines. Connect with her on LinkedIn or Facebook.


SEASONAL, MODERN CUISINE IN AN UPSCALE ENVIRONMENT.

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FEATURELOOK

By Amy Dee Stephens

Growing with Gorillas As a child, Donna Mobbs remembers leaning over the rails of the zoo’s lion exhibit and watching her shoe fall in. It was rescued by a keeper, and then she knew she would work at the zoo someday. Donna was right.

Donna also participated in horned lizard research, bottle-fed lion cubs, and got over her fear of snakes. When the Make-A-Wish Foundation asked for special animal encounters at the zoo for terminal individuals, Donna served as liaison. “The animals always knew they were with someone who was In 1984, she saw a newspaper ad for the zoo director’s secretary. “I dying and needed gentle treatment. Without prompting or cues, I watched a instantaneously knew that was my job--but I didn’t get an interview. I called dolphin come out of the water, roll over, and allow a woman to stroke her and and said, ‘You don’t understand, you’ve hired the wrong person—that’s the have a private conversation,” Donna said. “We had a three-year-old that loved job I’m supposed to have.’ I was adamant,” Donna said. Scarlet the parrot. During his last 24 hours, the keepers “I didn’t know that took Scarlet to visit him. He became conscious long “Lo and behold, that person didn’t last, and I was hired.” enough to remember the commands to get her to bark and Now, Donna is nearing the end of her 35-year career as the gorillas had a sense meow. The family was so touched. Scarlet was invited zoo’s executive assistant, working under five different zoo of humor, or that to the funeral, and instead of her usual squawking, she directors. She’s seen the zoo undergo dramatic changes. whispered the whole time.” they would prank “We were a small zoo in serious financial trouble until the sales tax passed. I’ve watched us grow into this beautiful is awed by the intelligence of Elok the orangutan. each other or giggle Donna facility. Now, we are on track to be at the level of San “Years ago, the keepers trained Elok to gather his blankets when tickled.” Diego.” to be washed. I recently watched the keeper say, ‘You left one in the corner,’ and he walked over to get it. She said, Unsurprisingly, Donna has encountered animals in close, personal ways—but ‘You are sitting on one,’ and he looked beneath himself, picked it up, and it’s the gorillas that have stolen her heart. “In 1999, I helped hand-raise twin handed it to her. He understood every word! I’m amazed by the things our baby gorillas. It was the most amazing year of my life with those precious staff accomplish. It’s not glamorous and they’re not going to get rich, but they babies. I didn’t know that gorillas had a sense of humor, or that they would are saving the planet one animal at a time.” prank each other or giggle when tickled.” Facing her last days as a zoo employee is unfathomable to Donna. She hopes “The twins’ father, Tatu, was my best friend. He got me through tough times, to come back as gorilla-area volunteer, because she can’t imagine life without particularly the death of my parents. I would visit him on lunch break, and he them. “I don’t even know who I am without the zoo. I drive in the gate and would come to the glass and listen to my troubles. I know he recognized me. hear lions roaring and African wild dogs howling every day. I don’t know We had a bond. He made the most beautiful vocalizations--musical sounds, how I’m going to drive out that last time. It’s been a beautiful place to work, not just grunts. When he grew elderly and began to decline, the vets even let and I believe I’ve had a tiny part in helping save the planet. Even if I’m not me observe his medical procedures. It was heartbreaking to lose Tatu.” there physically, part of me will always be there. I’ve been blessed by a job where even on tough days, I could go see gorillas.”

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FEATURELOOK

(Left to right) Mikenna Seale, Mia Ray, Lillian Savage, Adelya Gosmanoxa and Lauren Heard

To Dance in Russia By Lea Terry

For three weeks this summer, students from Edmond’s Academy of Ballet and Theatre Arts trained at one of the most prestigious ballet training programs in the world, as the first Oklahoma residents to be accepted into the Ballet Heritage Summer Intensive program in St. Petersburg, Russia. The program teaches the Vaganova Method, which was developed in Russia and incorporates elements of Russian, French and Italian ballet. “The Vaganova academy is the mothership of classical ballet,” said Lisa Webb, director of Ballet and Theatre Arts. For Webb, the trip was the fulfillment of a childhood wish. “To sit at the feet of these master teachers from the Vaganova Academy was humbling and awe-inspiring,” Webb said. The students trained from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. six days a week, while Webb observed classes and participated in teacher training. Each class had one teacher speaking Russian and several others working as interpreters for the many participants from around the world. “You really had to train your ear in order to be able to hear your language,” Webb said. Webb described the program as an intense experience that not only helped strengthen the girls’ dancing ability, but also their emotional and physical resolve. “Not just dancing but doing strength building for that many hours a day, having to dig into their own desire and motivation,” Webb said. “It’s on them to be in class, to be attentive, to try every correction and then do it again in the next class.” Webb’s student Lillian Savage said the experience taught her to not get discouraged. “You go to an intensive, and there are so many people there who are better than you, and you have to learn not to let it get you down, you just have to learn how to be inspired by them,” Savage said. She also cited 18

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the teachers’ patience and understanding, and said the experience helped her strengthen her technique, something crucial when auditioning for ballet schools and companies. For fellow student Adelya Gosmanava, the variety of instruction helped hone her technical and artistic skills and made her a stronger dancer. The group studied everything from modern and character styles of ballet, as well as taking an acting class. “I got the opportunity to improve my technique in ballet a lot, because the teachers there were so particular about everything,” Gosmanava said. Gosmanava had been to other ballet intensives, but Ballet Heritage stood out not only for its variety of instruction, but also the teachers’ depth of knowledge, all of which she feels helped strengthen her technique and better prepare her if she decides to pursue dance professionally. While the program was a demanding experience, Webb and her students also had the chance to see historical and artistic sights around St. Petersburg, and she hopes that the exposure to other ways of life will stick with her students for years to come. “I was touched when several of the girls said they didn’t want to leave,” Webb said. “They wanted to see their parents, but I think they also realized the world is so much bigger, and there are so many ancient structures and works of art in Europe. I hope it ignited in them a wanderlust to explore and to not be afraid of a new situation. To learn more go to: abtaonline.squarespace.com


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FEATURELOOK By Amy Dee Stephens

Cultivating Community

A new Farmer’s Market has popped up in north Edmond—and its success is staggering! The reasons? It is open daily, is mostly indoors, and is truly local. Chris and Jennifer Webster initially started their own farm, Providence Farm, out of a recognition that healthy, organic food leads to better health and energy. They sold their produce at Farmer’s Markets and even started their own farm stand in their front yard at Waterloo & Western. “Other farmer friends joined us, and our customer base grew to the point that, to be honest, I didn’t feel like I had privacy at home,” Jennifer said. “We knew it was time to look for a brick and mortar location. We never in a million years dreamed it would happen so quickly.” They wanted to try a new slant on the traditional Farmer’s Market, and the opportunity presented itself in early spring when the Websters noticed the hardware store on the corner at Waterloo and Coltrane was going out of business. As a prime location off I-35, Chris and Jennifer knew it would be a great location, with a building that provided a climate-controlled option. Based on customer comments, they also knew that daily store hours would help busy families who found it inconvenient to shop on Saturday mornings. The hardware store owner was ready to retire and sell, at a hefty 2.5 milliondollar price tag. Chris convinced him that there was a need for a new kind of Farmer’s Market; a hub where the local community could come together daily, at a site that had room for events and classes, and with providers who used no pesticides. “Amazingly, he agreed to lease it to us!” Jennifer said. The Websters got the keys on March 31st, had a soft opening on April 6, and held their grand opening for the Conscious Community Co-Op on May 4th. Although they started with 12 vendors, they now have over 80. “The customers enjoy interacting with the farmer, potter, quilter, leathersmith, or soap maker that they are buying from. We are also educating the community about buying local, because our customers are paying the bills for these farmers and artisans who are sometimes hanging on by a thread. It’s a struggle to produce food in a climate where we get six weeks of rain and then a month of drought,” Jennifer said. Although the Websters are just a few months into their new venture and working 80 hours a week to get it off the ground, Jennifer is excited about the upcoming season. “In the fall we’ll focus on pumpkins, apple cider, and soup-making classes. This winter, our focus will switch to holiday gifts, such as baked goods, self-care products and art.” Already, people from other towns are consulting with the Websters about their concept. Jennifer attributes their success to the cooperative spirit and community-mindedness of the business. The vendors commit to helping each other, but also to donating food for events that provide free food to needy neighbors. “We think this is the start of something that can go much bigger and spread over America. Honestly, it’s been a ‘loaves and fishes’ story. We had hardly anything to sell that first weekend, but we made a nice profit. It’s so rewarding to see the farmers when we cut checks each week. Some would have no other opportunity to sell their stuff. We didn’t know this co-op thing was going to fall in our lap, but it’s been beautiful to watch the community love and support its local suppliers.” To learn more, visit Conscious Community Co-Op on Facebook.

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BIZLOOK

Armstrong Auditorium By Maria Veres

Picture yourself in a luxurious concert hall, enjoying a performance by a world famous artist. No, you aren’t in New York, Dallas, or even Oklahoma City. This cultural jewel is on the outskirts of Edmond, miles from the nearest traffic light. Welcome to Armstrong Auditorium, Trip Advisor’s number one Edmond destination. A Five-Star Experience The moment you walk in, you know you’re experiencing something special. The auditorium is an elegant, intimate space, seating over eight hundred. Acoustics are among the best in the world. It has the beautiful styling of a top-rated concert hall, including Austrian crystal chandeliers and custom Appalachian cherry paneling.

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Performers receive the same pampering that patrons do. The staff gets to know the artists, prepares favorite recipes from their homelands, and strives to make them feel welcome. “That shows onstage,” says Shane Granger, Director of Marketing and Public Relations. “They want to give back. Put a superior hall together with performers and patrons who have been elevated, and there’s something about that that takes it to the next level.” Honoring the Armstrong Legacy Armstrong’s parent organization is the Philadelphia Church of God. Established in 1989 in Edmond, the church continues the work of Herbert W. Armstrong, founder of the former Worldwide Church of God. The Philadelphia Church of God began with just twelve people and eighty dollars. Now it has a presence all over the world. “We’ve been able to rebuild from the ruins after Mr. Armstrong died,” says Shane. A dedication to cultural excellence was an integral part of the Worldwide Church of God. The Armstrong Performing Arts Series continues that tradition. “Our mission is to champion Oklahoma as a world class center for the arts,” says Shane.

Armstrong Auditorium

New Season Begins This Month Armstrong’s twenty-first season begins Sep. 12 with the Four Italian Tenors. Highlights will include Mexico’s Ballet Folklorico, the Siberian State Symphony Orchestra, and the vocal ensemble Chanticleer. The series attracts audiences from across the state. Many patrons are regular subscribers, but Shane also looks forward to welcoming newcomers. “Come to Armstrong,” he says. “It’s an experience you won’t forget.” Visit Armstrong at Bryant and Waterloo or www.armstrongauditorium.org.


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BIZLOOK

Dr. Martha Garzon By Maria Veres

Going to the dentist can be scary for little ones. But Dr. Martha Garzon works hard to make sure patients leave her office smiling. A Welcoming Place Young patients can enjoy video games while they wait or snuggle with a stuffed animal in the dentist’s chair. “It helps a lot because it relaxes the patient,” says Dr. Garzon. “And that relaxes parents as well.” At Dr. Garzon’s office children receive lots of TLC. She and her team accommodate children’s needs by avoiding things that are challenging to them and by using toys, weighted blankets, eye masks, and earplugs, etc. to help make their appointment more pleasant. Dr. Garzon and her staff welcome children with health concerns and sensory, behavioral, social, psychological, intellectual, and learning challenges.

A Natural Career Choice Dr. Garzon’s early life prepared her well for her career. Growing up in Colombia, she had many cousins and friends who her mother welcomed into their home. “She instilled in me a love for children,” says Dr. Garzon. Among those neighbors was a boy with Downs Syndrome. Dr. Garzon enjoyed his company and has been drawn to special needs children ever since. “A lot of people were afraid of going to the dentist,” she recalls. “I was blessed with a good dentist and a good orthodontist.” A dental school instructor also nourished Dr. Garzon’s love for pediatric dentistry. At Home in Edmond Dr. Garzon has practiced in Edmond for nineteen years. With their choice of several suburbs, she and her husband were most drawn to Edmond. “We like Edmond because it has trees and has nice neighborhoods with convenient access to amenities and highways.” she says. She also appreciates the welcoming community here. “I grew up in a big city,” she recalls. “Here people recognize you and they remember you.”

Dr. Garzon and her staff

She is committed to working with Edmond parents as well as children. “I am very prevention oriented,” she says. “I like to teach families about how to keep their smiles healthy at home to avoid them from coming to get them fixed.” Dr. Garzon is accepting new patients from infants through age eighteen. “It’s so rewarding when you work with children who are afraid and see them becoming more comfortable,” she says. “No matter what challenges they have, we want them to have a dental home.” Visit Dr. Garzon at 870 South Kelly or www.marthagarzondmd.com.

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FEATURELOOK

By Lea Terry

Angel Heart Boutique Edmond resident Schayene Silva has always had an entrepreneurial spirit. Growing up in Brazil, she came from a family in which her parents and grandparents ran their own businesses, and her favorite childhood game was playing store. “I was always selling something: Barbie dolls, Barbie clothes that I would make, candy, those little popsicle things that you make in the summer,” Silva said. So it seemed like a natural progression to eventually leave her full-time job at an oil company to embark on her own entrepreneurial adventure. Today, along with husband Felipe Resende, she runs Angel Heart Boutique, an online plus size clothing store.

“When you see that you’re bringing so much more doing something else on the side, you kind of lose interest in your job,” Silva said. “It took me three months to actually leave my job, but I was already feeling like I was going to leave.” Silva came to the United States at age 18 after her mother married her stepfather. While she describes the move as culture shock, she said the experience helped her grow up and fueled her entrepreneurial drive. Her husband Felipe came to the U.S. at age 12, and they met in Oklahoma

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“My parents were always present in my life,” Silva said. This freedom was one of the main reasons Silva and her husband wanted to have their own business. “We really just wanted to stay home with our dogs,” Silva said.

Angel Heart Boutique ranked #461 on this year’s Inc. 5000 Most Successful Companies in America list.

The couple started the boutique as a side business in 2015, originally reselling products on eBay. The business grew quickly, and Silva knew this was something she wanted to pursue full-time. Her husband said if she could make the equivalent of her full-time salary for three months, she could quit to devote her time to their company. They originally ran the company from their apartment, but have since moved into a warehouse in Edmond.

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as adults. Back in Brazil, she had frequent exposure to her family’s entrepreneurial pursuits, often visiting her father at work. In fact, her parents’ business was on the same block as their home, and Silva said in her family, running a business wasn’t something that required choosing work over family, but rather was a way to merge the two.

The couple take their dogs to work with them, and also have the freedom to travel for around three months out of the year. Another perk, Silva said, is knowing you have the flexibility to meet your financial goals. This does require considerable hard work, especially in the first three years, Silva said, but for her it was worth it. “I’m never tired of it, I’ll work as many hours as I need to and I’ll be happy doing it,” she said.

Resende eventually quit his job at a tech company to run the boutique alongside Silva, and she said working together is another major benefit. Silva said their personalities work well together, and they never get tired of working so closely together. They’re also careful not to micromanage each other. Each oversees different areas of the business, with Silva handling tasks like purchasing items and marketing, and Felipe taking on duties like accounting, payroll and shipping. “We never argue over business. Plus, you have somebody to talk to,” Silva said. For more information about Angel Heart Boutique, visit www.angelheartboutique.com.


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ALOOKBACK decided to let my son, Jay, sleep in a bit, being as we had no plans for the day. You would think something would kick in and say, “Didn’t we do Saturday yesterday?” But no, it didn’t. Not until I went to Jay’s room when he woke up and saw all the signs that he was planning on going to church. He even had on his Sunday socks. (Yes, he truly does have Sunday socks.)

What Day is Today? By Louise Tucker Jones

Recently, I forgot what day it was. No, I don’t mean the day of the month. I actually forgot that it was Sunday. I thought it was Saturday—again. So I

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I told him that church was “tomorrow,” not today. This was Saturday, not Sunday. He looked at me like I had lost my senses, and indeed I had but just didn’t know it. But something didn’t feel right so I looked on my phone. Oh my gosh! It really was Sunday! I glanced at the time. We had 40 minutes to get ready—both of us, and Jay hadn’t even had breakfast. I quickly went into overdrive and we actually made it to church on time, but my thoughts troubled me. What if this was one of those things that the doctor would say, “Well, Louise, not knowing what day it is can definitely be a sign of dementia.” I had already told him about losing my cordless home phone then finding it in my

makeup drawer. Should I tell him about forgetting words? How I would be talking to a friend and suddenly forget the word I needed and she would supply it. I did the same for her. We thought it was normal for our age, but now I questioned. And should I tell my oldest son? Would he want to have a conversation about a place for me to spend my last days in the throes of dementia? Thankfully, he did not. He thought the incident was funny and felt “stress” was the culprit. But he did gift me with an Amazon Alexa, saying, “Mom, you can ask her anything—even what day it is.”

ABOUT THE AUTHOR Louise Tucker Jones is an award-winning author, inspirational speaker & founder of Wives With Heavenly Husbands, a support group for widows. LouiseTJ@cox.net or LouiseTuckerJones.com.


FEATURELOOK

Zonly by Design By Amy Dee Stephens The “Bicycle Buffalo” is coming to town! It’s Edmond’s newest art sculpture, slated for installation at the bicycle trailhead near Integris Hospital along I-35. This interactive art piece was envisioned by local artist, Zonly Looman, who sketched the idea two years ago. “I was brainstorming ideas to make sculptures out of recycled materials. One was a buffalo made of bicycle tires. Two years later, my dad, Robert Looman, learned that the Edmond Visual Arts Commission was looking for an interactive art piece to put along the bicycle trail. He said, ‘I think my son has the perfect piece.” The committee approved Looman’s kinetic design, with its spinning wheels and arrowhead-shaped base. Although it is Zonly’s first sculpture, the 25-year-old already has an art studio in downtown Edmond, called Studio Z. It’s where Zonly paints, builds, tattoos, and writes music. His largest painting is a series of brightly-colored buffalo murals on the alley walls of 100 N. Broadway. Lately, Zonly has become sought after as a “live painter” in Oklahoma’s nonprofit world. He attends fundraising events, paints on-site, and then his work is auctioned off for impressive amounts, ranging in the thousands! “I’ve seen bidding wars amongst family members,” said Zonly’s father. “When Zonly paints, he feels the vibe of what’s going on around him, and it inspires him.” Zonly doesn’t think he has developed his signature style yet, but he often uses neon colors, which he calls “abstract pop expressionism.” He is 30

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heavily influenced by his Kumeyaay and Chumash heritage, two Native American tribes from along the Pacific coast. The American buffalo figures prominently in his work, especially his charity pieces. “The buffalo represents abundance, peace, and new life to come. It’s also a warning to keep up with your prayer life and to give thanks. I call it the ‘buffalo blessing,’ and it’s the message I share when I talk to groups,” Zonly said. Zonly visits schools to talk about his life as an artist. He encourages children to express their feelings through art, where there is no right or wrong. His conviction stems from an art professor who told Zonly that his colors and shadings were wrong. “I came home and blacked out a beautiful tiger canvas I’d painted. It took me awhile to bounce back from that and realize that artists can’t be put in a box with rules.” Although Zonly experimented with art as a young child, it was during high school at Deer Creek that Zonly started drawing customized artwork on white canvas shoes for his friends. “I drew cartoon characters, graffiti names, whatever they wanted. I probably did 100 pairs of shoes that year.” He also got a tattoo kit, and his cousin said, “Hey man, you can practice on me.” What surprised Zonly was that he felt completely natural holding the tattoo machine, and eventually did a full tattooing apprenticeship. His mentor said that painting would boost his tattoo skills. “He was right,” Zonly said. “One night when I was 21-years-old, I picked up a brush and painted a Native American chief, green with a pink background. I loved it, and I haven’t stopped painting since.” Zonly’s father is very proud of his son’s success. “I’m very proud of how he’s relating to kids and he’s giving back to the community. That’s a lot for a 25-year-old, but he works hard, and he’s very talented.” “I hope that someday, my art is in museums across the world, because I want as many people to see it as possible. That’s not just a goal—I believe it will happen.” Visit www.zonlylooman.com for further information.


80 East 5th St., Ste. 130 Edmond, OK 73034

Profile for Outlook Magazine

Edmond Outlook - September 2019  

Edmond Outlook - September 2019  

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